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Ethiopia Criminalizes VoIP Services

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the clamping-down-on-0s-and-1s dept.

Censorship 255

An anonymous reader writes "The Ethiopian government has passed legislation criminalizing the use of VoIP services like Skype and Google Talk. Anyone using these services within the country now faces up to 15 years in prison. 'Ethiopian authorities argue that they imposed these bans because of "national security concerns" and to protect the state's telecommunications monopoly. The country only has one ISP, the state-owned Ethio Telecom, and has been filtering its citizen's Internet access for quite some time now to suppress opposition blogs and other news outlets. ... Reporters Without Borders also reports that Ethio Telecom installed a system to block access to the Tor network, which allows users to surf the Web anonymously. The organization notes that the ISP must be using relatively sophisticated Deep Packet Inspection to filter out this traffic.'"

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255 comments

Devolution (5, Insightful)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335087)

You're looking at it. Great Britain, USA, Ethiopia, China, Saudi Arabia... are there *any* countries where an internet connection can be had with complete freedom of access and no censorship?

Re:Devolution (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335113)

There is no such thing devolution, only evolution in a direction you don't like.

Re:Devolution (1)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335139)

Thank you for the proper english correction.

Re:Devolution (4, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335319)

Thank you for the proper English correction.

FTFY

Re:Devolution (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336143)

Fuck that fag Yeah!

Re:Devolution (4, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335289)

Are we not men?

Re:Devolution (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336331)

We are devo.

Re:Devolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335347)

Way to define devolution.

Re:Devolution (1)

Concerned Onlooker (473481) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335731)

It's in my dictionary:

The process of declining from a higher level to a lower level of effective power or vitality or essential quality. Syn. degeneration.

Re:Devolution (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336045)

It's in my dictionary:

The process of declining from a higher level to a lower level of effective power or vitality or essential quality. Syn. degeneration.

See this is why I come on here and post "nigger" and other racial jokes, troll about politics or operating systems, ask anybody who mentions an intelligent woman if that woman is fat, and just generally fuck around. It's the only way to have fun around here anymore.

Do you know why? Do you know why that is?

Because you motherfuckers will get into crazy-ass passionate fights over stupid shit like whether "devolution" is a word.

For. Fuck's. Sake. You. Motherfuckers. You know exactly what the guy meant. He might not have said it just the way you like. Hell for that matter he might be wearing a tie that clashes with his shirt. SO FUCKING WHAT?!

I know programming takesa this kind of precision and attention to detail. Now then, take a big big bite of your Ass Burger. Tastes good? Alright! Now I'm going to explain what your poor negligent daddy should have told you long ago, you anal-retentive Asspie fucks: you need to figure out that not EVERYTHING in life is exactly the same as programming. Specifically, when you form entire threads about the use of ONE WORD in a casual, informal discussion, you're Doing It Wrong(tm).

I won't throw in the bullshit about Mama and her basement because it's old as hell and I'm not so smug as to think you can't get an apartment somewhere. As a gentleman, I will ask when the last time was that you had a beautiful woman in your arms who wanted to stay there a while. Perspective, man.

Re:Devolution (2)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336079)

I take it you never watched the Super Mario Bros movie

Re:Devolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336093)

There is no such thing devolution, only evolution in a direction you don't like.

Obviously you have never seen Australian Parliamentary Question Time..

Re:Devolution (2, Insightful)

Gotung (571984) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335153)

There was never a time or a place where what you describe existed.

Re:Devolution (0)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335247)

Yeah, even before the US government decided that they need to help the xxAA groups with copyright enforcement, you'd be in a load of crap for posting kiddie porn.

Re:Devolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335341)

There was never a time or a place where what you describe existed.

Oh, come on, give the guy a break. Those authentic vintage rose-tinted glasses he bought at the swap meet were expensive, so he's got to get his money's worth out of them.

Re:Devolution (5, Insightful)

Catbeller (118204) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335499)

Bull. You are revising living memory. Of course it existed. It existed fifteen years ago, everywhere. The tech to listen in on all calls did not exist, nor was it legal. It was absolutely, constitutionally ILLEGAL to spy on citizens in the USA. We talked on the phone and messaged each other in the happy knowledge that it took a court order or Scientology operatives to obtain phone conversations or internet activity. Such things are possible today because our citizens are technologically and politcally illiterate and have absolutely no cultural memory past ALF reruns. The US is stupiding itself to death. OF COURSE WE HAD PRIVACY!! You gave it up!

Re:Devolution (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335649)

Bullshit. The tech to listen on phone calls has existed as long as phones have existed, and if you think the didn't listen in on calls, constitutionally or otherwise, I have a bridge to sell you.

i really hate to break it to you (3, Insightful)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335835)

but if you have a thought, and you put it on a wire that leads to a public network, you have just given up your right to privacy

not legally, but logically

even if the government was passionate about not snooping on the network in its borders, what of corporations? what of rogue government operatives? what of technically proficient and strangely motivated individuals?

it's a NETWORK, not a closed box in your garage

if you want something private, don't put it on a public network. once it gets out there, it is beyond your control. and you are the person who put it out there. so don't put it out there if it is important for you to keep private

this has nothing to do with legality. it has to do with a common sense understanding of the nature of the subject matter you are dealing with: a wide open public network. there is no such thing as privacy on that

Re:Devolution (4, Insightful)

Tharsman (1364603) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336015)

Bull. You are revising living memory. Of course it existed. It existed fifteen years ago, everywhere. The tech to listen in on all calls did not exist, nor was it legal. It was absolutely, constitutionally ILLEGAL to spy on citizens in the USA. We talked on the phone and messaged each other in the happy knowledge that it took a court order or Scientology operatives to obtain phone conversations or internet activity. Such things are possible today because our citizens are technologically and politcally illiterate and have absolutely no cultural memory past ALF reruns. The US is stupiding itself to death. OF COURSE WE HAD PRIVACY!! You gave it up!

There has been technology to wiretap calls for as long as there have been telephones. All you needed was access to the telephone company. Heck in the extreme early days, before phones were able to dial, a cop may simply sit by the operator and listen in.

There was a middle ground where it took a bit more legwork to get the wiretapping done, but there was no point where it became impossible if desired.

Yes, you “need” the court order, but that order can be granted in secret and is granted if no other ways to prove you are guilty of the investigated "serious" crime is available. If you are innocent, that usually means they will wiretap you because they wont find anything else to tie you up to the crime.

Over the decades warrants have been given to investigate even people just vaguely related to the real target of an investigation, as they may shed light on the target himself.

This is nothing new, and these computer monitoring is being implemented by many countries that simply don’t want to lose their ability to keep monitoring everything at will.

Re:Devolution (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336051)

Ultimately this is about this sentence:

"to protect the state's telecommunications monopoly." Government are monopolies and the politicians or bureaucrats therein desire to keep that monopoly. Whether it's a monopoly over power or money (or both). The U.S. government doesn't allow any other company to deliver letter mail. Why? Because it's protecting its monopoly. Another example is Comcast which, in many cities or counties, has been given a monopoly by their favorite friend: the government. Nobody else may laydown lines to supply CATV.

There are MANY laws on the books that are about, in essence, the government protecting its or somebody else's monopoly and limiting individuals' freedom of choice. Like forcing us to buy hospital insurance, which precludes other solutions (paying cash directly, forming a health coop, becoming best friends with a doctor, or just simply deciding to trust God, Fate, Whatever).

WTF? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335267)

You're looking at it. Great Britain, USA, Ethiopia, China, Saudi Arabia... are there *any* countries where an internet connection can be had with complete freedom of access and no censorship?

What the F are you yammering on about, you nob? It is completely common to have a completely free(from a libertarian perspective) and uncensored internet connection from a plethora of ISP in the United States and the United Kingdom. Genuine issues abound in many countries, including Ethiopia and the risk of the erosion of freedoms in many other places does exist. But, you hyperbolic patent falsifications erode people's willingness to take these matters seriously. In the long run, you are doing far more harm than good.

Please feel free to STFU!

Re:WTF? (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335703)

doesn't exist, sorry.

Considering NSA taps on the backbone for the gov't "Free" is a strawman.

What they are focusing on is "is it monitored?" and the answer is: yes. If the ISP doesn't that has no bearings on gov't decisions. Does that mean anything will come of it? Probably not.

Re:WTF? (0)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335783)

Fapping to Dystopia is a morbid but popular pastime and reflex among many people.

It's no substitute for thinking, and is like apocalyptic religious superstition in that respect.

"Please feel free to STFU!"

Indeed.

Re:WTF? (4, Interesting)

flyingsquid (813711) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336083)

What the F are you yammering on about, you nob? It is completely common to have a completely free(from a libertarian perspective) and uncensored internet connection from a plethora of ISP in the United States and the United Kingdom. Genuine issues abound in many countries, including Ethiopia and the risk of the erosion of freedoms in many other places does exist. But, you hyperbolic patent falsifications erode people's willingness to take these matters seriously. In the long run, you are doing far more harm than good.

Please feel free to STFU!

Seconded. There are real issues, but saying "OMG teh USA is just like China!" is really not helpful. The situation is a lot more complex than that. The United States has actually done a pretty amazing job promoting free speech on some fronts- the U.S. government invented the internet after all, and private U.S. companies such as Google, Twitter, and Facebook have provided the means for people to engage in free speech. The article mentions Ethiopia trying to block Tor... well, the Tor anonymity network was actually developed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory.

At the same time, you have to ask where all of the technology to censor the internet is coming from in the first place. China doesn't really need any help, but for countries like Syria, Iran, and Ethiopia to monitor the internet, they need outside help. The answer is that this help comes from the west- there are companies in Silicon Valley and in Europe that are willing to sell the equipment and software needed to hack into, store, and analyze the communications of their citizens. They make a profit, and they don't ask too many questions about whether this technology might lead to the arrest and torture of dissidents.

The article mentions that Ethiopia is using Deep Packet Inspection to filter out the internet and block Tor. The question becomes, who's providing them with this technology? If we want to make a difference that's how we could do it- figure out where this technology is coming from and then apply pressure to the company selling this technology. If the companies selling this technology are held up to public scrutiny and faced with the prospect of boycotts and negative press, a lot of them will back off.

Re:WTF? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336213)

Not true, internet in the UK blocks pirate bay and other websites that the government doesn't like. Such as child porn and the like.

If we should even have such a completely free internet is a whole other kettle of fish.

Re:Devolution (3, Insightful)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335321)

Youre lumping vastly different situations into one bucket, throwing up your hands, and despairing.

US, UK, etc have their own censorship and "entering the 21st century" issues, but lumping them together with Ethopia and China is a pretty big stretch.

The fact that we have outlets like the Onion, Jon Stewart, and all the talking heads (Beck, OReilley, whoever else) which build their reputation on skewering powerful political figures shows you just how different we are.

If youre asking if there are any countries where the internet is completely unrestrained and there is no enforcement of any laws whatsoever, no, there arent, and thats not a bad thing (ask any of the GPL folks). Likewise, if youre asking if there are any countries whose laws are perfect and are never abused, sorry, we dont have a utopia yet.

It seems to me that the least helpful thing that can be done (other than pretending everything is peachy) is to act like everything is as bad as it could be and that things are hopeless. More helpful perhaps would be to discuss WHERE the US, UK, etc fail, but comparing them to Ethopia is ridiculous.

Re:Devolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335639)

Go read manufacturing consent and realize that John Stewart (for example) is the way they bound the argument.

Re:Devolution (2)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335905)

go read the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and reference the section on Criteria for Paranoid Schizophrenia

Re:Devolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336203)

Right, because there is no such thing as manufactured consent? You are a moron.

Re:Devolution (4, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336301)

Don't worry man, I'm just an advance Internet Forum Consent Engineer (tm), my assignment is Slashdot Task Force 45D, subsection truth bearer neutralization.

We are aware of the few geniuses such as yourself who have independently stumbled upon the real truth the Bilderberg Agenda (tm) has so desperately worked to keep secret, and we will not let you ruin our plans.

So I must continuously mock you so as to keep the others properly propagandized and placated.

Re:Devolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336227)

Harsh, but sadly, an accurate assessment.

Re:Devolution (4, Funny)

flyingsquid (813711) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335787)

I felt that your post on internet censorship makes a refreshingly reasonable, coherent, and well-informed argument, without resorting to ridiculous exaggerations or references to 1984 and the Nazis. It suggests a nuanced worldview that goes beyond simple black-and-white thinking about complicated issues.

Please hand in your Slashdot ID.

Re:Devolution (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335891)

don't worry, we'll censor the comment, and all will be normal again

Re:Devolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335911)

[i]If youre asking if there are any countries where the internet is completely unrestrained and there is no enforcement of any laws whatsoever, no, there arent[/i]

Incorrect. I live in a country where our politicians barely know how to use email properly, and we only have one cable broadband internet provider, who can barely keep all the channels on.

The internet is a free vast open place for us...for now at least.

Re:Devolution (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335921)

thank you

you said better than what i said in a sister comment

Re:Devolution (1)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335941)

GPL is needed because of Copyright laws .... an artificial monopoly

Without copyright and patents the GPL would not be necessary .... the GPL is there for something already free and open, to keep it free and open ...

The USA and UK are not perfect (by a long way) but are reasonably free ... unlike Ethiopia with most definitely is not ....

But there are freer counties, so they are definitely not the best examples of a fairly free and open system

Re:Devolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336105)

I hate it when people are reasonable.

Re:Devolution (4, Interesting)

Krneki (1192201) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335531)

Slovenia

Albeit we had 2 censorship incident done via DNS blocking.

They didn't last very long, were unconstitutional and easily circumvented by replacing the DNS server address and no one was ever persecuted by circumventing the protection.

To this date, not a single charge or court order has been issued for private usage of the internet for whatever reason. The only incidents were regarding "hate speech" and rightfully so.

Re:Devolution (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335975)

and rightfully so.

Sorry, but if Slovenia's hate speech laws are anything like every other European countries I've seen (I'm most familiar with Germany and the UK, both of whom I would accuse of legislating thought crime) they're far more restrictive than in say, the USA. Just because you agree with it doesn't make it not censorship.

Re:Devolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335993)

>

Hate speech? What, did somebody suggest that the holocaust never happened?

ah yes, the tired typical false equivalency (1, Informative)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335553)

every city in the world has a police force. in some cities the police force is corrupt and inefficient. in other cities, there's still corruption, but policing is efficient and they do their best to root out the corruption

but because you can find corruption in any police force, let's go after the very idea of police itself as unnecessary and essentially wrong

or: because they found one corrupt cop out of a mostly good police force in city X, no one in city X can criticize the completely corrupt police in city Y

do you understand the failure in logic here?

good, now you understand your own failure

the usa finds some internet usage objectionable and looks for it

ethiopia finds some internet usage objectionable and looks for it

WHAT do they find objectionable?

kiddie porn? or political expression?

criticize based on THAT, not the fact that governments, all of them, look at the packets on their networks, and always will, and oftentimes, for good reasons

if this concept bothers you, you have a problem with the reality of the world you live in

Re:ah yes, the tired typical false equivalency (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335971)

WHAT do they find objectionable?

kiddie porn? or political expression?

Everyone finds kiddie porn objectionable. The problem is that somehow, every single time a nation's blocklist is leaked, it turns out to have political expression on it. It's trivial to confirm whether or not the leaker is manipulating the list before releasing it to make it look bad (can you get to this site? No? Then it must really be blocked!).

Sure, somewhere out there there may actually be a black swan. I'm not holding my breath and hoping for it.

Re:ah yes, the tired typical false equivalency (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336207)

i call bullshit

show me the simple political expression that the USA is blocking

Re:Devolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335555)

What? No obligatory Sandvine reference? I figure that those buggers would be into it....

Great market for their shit.

is this the first case.... (1)

ganjadude (952775) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335099)

of TOR being blocked on an ISP level??

Re:is this the first case.... (2, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335359)

no

Re:is this the first case.... (5, Funny)

YodasEvilTwin (2014446) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335463)

Mod parent up. His useful explanation is overshadowed only by the in-depth article he linked to.

Re:is this the first case.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336295)

I admit it, I didn't read the linked to article. I just read the summary.

Re:is this the first case.... (1)

detritus. (46421) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335595)

Not at all. The solution to this is OBFSProxy which rides the protocol on other application layer protocols. The Tor project always has tricks up their sleeves.

No, and... (4, Informative)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336141)

Not only is this not the first case, but it is a problem that the Tor developers have been addressing for some time. There are two techniques that are known to be used to block Tor:
  1. Blocking all entry nodes; China, for example, does this. Bridge nodes mitigate this problem, but a determined government like the Chinese government can compile a list of all bridge nodes, and block those too.
  2. Distinguishing Tor from an HTTPS connection; this is a more technically advanced method that is favored by governments that lack the resources to compile lists of bridges. Since Tor has a unique pattern of TLS connections, it can be identified and blocked by a national firewall; fixing this problem is an ongoing effort (the goal is to make Tor look like Firefox).

Criminalize VOIP (1)

asmiller1950 (625539) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335141)

There are a lot of former Vonage customers that would agree with this approach.

Africa (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335157)

Africa is becoming the new teaparty mecca.

Re:Africa (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335339)

Im not aware of the Tea Party being a fan of big government.

Oh wait youre just trolling, carry on.

National Security (5, Funny)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335187)

National Security is a threat to National Security. Anyone who uses National Security as an excuse should be locked up to protect National Security.

Re:National Security (0)

bartosek (250249) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335259)

My kingdom for a mod point

Re:National Security (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335279)

Of course, by your own argument, you should be locked up immediately!

Re:National Security (2)

ZeroSumHappiness (1710320) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335391)

Hey, if it makes it so that people can't willy-nilly invoke National Security as a defense I think that's a price worth paying.

Re:National Security (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335443)

MATT DAMON!!

Re:National Security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335687)

Mods missed the Good Will Hunting reference. Try to be less obscure next time.

Re:National Security (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335515)

"National security" is a threat to national security. Anyone who uses "national security" as an excuse should be locked up by guards hired from National Security [guardstogo.com] to protect national security.

Re:National Security (1)

Githaron (2462596) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336317)

Ah! Infinite recursion!

Deep Packet Inspection? Wrong. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335191)

"The organization notes that the ISP must be using relatively sophisticated Deep Packet Inspection to filter out this traffic."

There is zero reason people *need* to use DPI to block Tor Traffic. You simply run compatible Tor connectivity software (i.e. The Tor Client) and create a list of those users who can accept communications with you--compare the nodes on that list with nodes that are within your networks; done.

Not so simple (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336193)

Sure, if you get lucky and the users within your network happen to connect to your entry node. Except that there are hundreds of thousands of Tor nodes in the world and they are not all in Ethiopia.

The standard ways to block Tor are:
  1. Block publicly listed entries, which is why bridge nodes exist.
  2. Block TLS connections that match the Tor fingerprint, which the Tor developers are constantly working to thwart i.e. by making Tor look more like Firefox. This is the DPI approach mentioned in TFA.

Re:Deep Packet Inspection? Wrong. (1)

EmperorArthur (1113223) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336237)

It's not that easy.

https://www.torproject.org/about/overview.html.en [torproject.org]

Tor clients are just that. Clients. They connect to servers that forward encrypted traffic to an outbound proxy server.

There are ways to try and catch Tor users. They could run there own forwarding servers, and look for connections to them from inside the country. They couldn't decrypt the data, but they could at least see who was using the software. They could also monitor traffic going to the database that keeps track of all the servers. Another way would be to run an exit node, and hope that the tor user sends personal identifiable data over an unencrypted connection. All of this is without touching DPI.

There are mitigation option available. Blacklisting IP blocks from the server database is an easy one to implement, but it can quickly turn into a game of whack-a-mole. When a user first runs the Tor software it asks if tor is blocked in your country. If you say yes then it won't connect to the central database. There are other ways to get a list of good servers to connect to. It's more of a hassle, but it's one less attack vector.

So, no they do not have to run DPI to detect at least a portion of Tor users. They also probably don't need to run DPI to see if someone is even trying to use Skype or VoIp. However, most countries want good spying capabilities and that requires at least some DPI. If they can afford it then it is often well worth the cost to just use DPI for everything.

Now who will complain about evil carriers in US? (2, Interesting)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335205)

Now who will complain about evil carriers in US after you will get a perspective of what they do in Ethiopia? :-)

Jokes aside, Islam (Ethiopia has 3 times more Muslims than in 100% Muslim Somalia) prohibits prying and spying on civilians, so any snooping, any PATRIOT act, any FISA laws would be impossible under Islamic government.

They might prohibit certain services altogether to prevent spread of lewdness, but they won't spy on you.

A man peeped through a hole in the door of Allah's Apostle's house , and at that time, Allah's Apostle had a Midri (an iron comb or bar) with which he was rubbing his head. So when Allah's Apostle saw him, he said (to him), "If I had been sure that you were looking at me (through the door), I would have poked your eye with this (sharp iron bar)." Allah's Apostle added, "The asking for permission to enter has been enjoined so that one may not look unlawfully (at what there is in the house without the permission of its people)."

Re:Now who will complain about evil carriers in US (2, Insightful)

Pieroxy (222434) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335273)

They might prohibit certain services altogether to prevent spread of lewdness, but they won't spy on you.

Wanna bet? If it suits their interest, they will. There is no doubt about it.

Re:Now who will complain about evil carriers in US (4, Insightful)

ZeroSumHappiness (1710320) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335455)

Exactly, just like a Christian government will provide for those who cannot provide for themselves a Muslim government would never spy on anyone.

Re:Now who will complain about evil carriers in US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335453)

The worst part of this, is that you'd probably only need data plans on your phones, except for emergency calls. They have the BW for it, but now they are establishing their data capped plans so that VoIP providers cannot compete with the wireless carriers.

In my country phone companies bankrupt a couple of network providers because they offered voice plans on top of their data plans. They sue them, made them take those services out, of course, breaking enterprise contracts.

Who's going to stop their greed and lack of innovation?

Re:Now who will complain about evil carriers in US (5, Informative)

dcollins (135727) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335475)

Wikipedia > Internet censorship by country > Pervasive censorship (the highest level) in Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, UAE, and of course, Iran.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_censorship_by_country [wikipedia.org]

Re:Now who will complain about evil carriers in US (1)

JAlexoi (1085785) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335693)

It also says that killing an innocent person is a horrible sin, but since you can redefine innocence any time you wish....

Re:Now who will complain about evil carriers in US (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335805)

"They might prohibit certain services altogether to prevent spread of lewdness, but they won't spy on you."

Or say they won't...

Re:Now who will complain about evil carriers in US (1)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335833)

Jokes aside, Islam (Ethiopia has 3 times more Muslims than in 100% Muslim Somalia) prohibits prying and spying on civilians

In theory, so does the US Constitution.

Re:Now who will complain about evil carriers in US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336033)

Jokes aside, Islam (Ethiopia has 3 times more Muslims than in 100% Muslim Somalia) prohibits prying and spying on civilians, so any snooping, any PATRIOT act, any FISA laws would be impossible under Islamic government.

Just because Ethiopia is a neighbour of Somalia doesn't make it (or its goverment) islamic.

While there are a lot of issues in "the west", comparing a single-ISP, policing government to a greedy ISP is unfair to all the millions under the first's rule. Do you know that the goverment has blocked blogspot (somehow the most popular blogging platform for ethiopians)? Now that it has posted this, /. could be next, you never know.

Leaving that as it is, what is the west's role in building/strengthening of all these police states? As long as they are promised a fight against extremism/terrorism, the americans didn't mind when the government killed hundreds of peaceful demonstrators [washingtonpost.com] , let alone blocking skype. I don't suppose skype and co. would care either since there is not that big a market for them, but how would they deal (or pretend to deal) with this?

Re:Now who will complain about evil carriers in US (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40336097)

[[[ Islam (Ethiopia has 3 times more Muslims than in 100% Muslim Somalia) prohibits prying and spying on civilians, so any snooping, any PATRIOT act, any FISA laws would be impossible under Islamic government. ]]]

BULL SHIT. Another clueless islam apologist. What about the Saudi's demanding that Blackberry give them their encryption keys so they could SPY on their citizens?

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-08-07/rim-saudi-arabia-reach-deal-on-blackberry-ap-says.html

Religion and government (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40336291)

Politicians talk a big game when it comes to religion, but practical matters of government almost always leave religion in second place, at least at the national level. You see it here in America, with Christian politicians talking about how faithful they are, then turning around and decrying any attempt to end the death penalty (as if they are without sin). Do you really think Muslim politicians are better than Christian politicians?

It is easy to reinterpret or ignore religious traditions when they get in the way of conducting government business.

how about the tourist? (1)

fredan (54788) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335237)

are they also under this law?

Re:how about the tourist? (1)

YodasEvilTwin (2014446) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335505)

Why would the exclude foreign heathens from their laws? In the hopes that a journalist's exposé would provoke the US into bombing the crap out of them? No :P

Using sophisticated Deep Packet Inspection (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335263)

"The organization notes that the ISP must be using relatively sophisticated Deep Packet Inspection to filter out this traffic"

Almost certainly provided by a US or European country.

What are they afraid of? (3, Insightful)

Skapare (16644) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335377)

What are they afraid of? They are the government. Oh wait ...

Waste of money (3, Interesting)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335379)

Imagine the number of starving people they could feed, or development projects they could fund, with the money they channel into running computers to control the citizenry...

Looking through the wrong window (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335591)

It's not a waste if you're in the business of government, where you leverage other people's money for your own beneift.

What happens to truly disruptive tech (2)

Catbeller (118204) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335395)

Who is providing the software and hardware for the deep filtering? Who are the scum? It's like peddling POS tablets for pedophile brothels. Who the hell is providing police state software to imprison the population?

And this is what happens when you really make a tool to end-run police states, such as the US or the UK. They make it illegal and imprison you. Ask Assange.

Re:What happens to truly disruptive tech (3, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335593)

Well, Sandvine is the big name in DPI tech, though there are others. Googling 'Lawful Intercept capability' brings up a fair list of vendors, pretty much everybody who sells networking gear, along with a few specialists.

Empirically speaking, there would appear to be a lot of competent techies who are either actively authoritarian or very good at the yuppie Nuremberg defense; because this stuff doesn't build itself, and it doesn't get built by throwing jackbooted morons at the problem...

"DPI" is standard on networking gear. (2)

Aero77 (1242364) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335739)

Most organizations use DPI to block specific protocols from entering or leaving their network. This technology is not the black market malware you think it is. Like any tool, it can be used for good or evil.

A preventive measure (4, Funny)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335461)

so the prince can't contact people to get his money out.

Obviously (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335493)

...they don't have phones. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNX09JmpIGU [youtube.com]

UN (2)

fluffythedestroyer (2586259) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335517)

Since Ethiopia is part of the UN, don't they have something to say about this ?

Re:UN (1)

raydobbs (99133) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335661)

Ethiopia is probably on the Human Rights Council of the UN, which means they are the poster children of ethical governance. You know, the seat the United States -used- to occupy that has been open for countries like Myamar, Sudan, and other wretched rat-holes to be elected in.

Response (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335523)

If regulatory reform becomes difficult in a country, sometimes the leader gets assassinated.

backwards (1, Funny)

pak9rabid (1011935) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335581)

holy FUCK what a backwards country.

In other news out of Ethiopia: (2)

kheldan (1460303) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335605)

..famine issues within the country, overall standard and quality of living issues, along with all forms of violent crime and corruption have, apparently, been solved by the Ethiopian government because they now have time to worry about what the fuck is going on with Facebook.</sarcasm>


*facepalm*

Re:In other news out of Ethiopia: (3, Funny)

BSAtHome (455370) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335953)

They indeed solved the problem. They have other countries take care of the humanitarian help and provide the "starving children" images so that we all give money.

It is called outsourcing.

[sarcasm tag blew up; could not be contained in a tag]

Switzerland Network Testing Tool (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335713)

Switzerland Network Testing Tool

"Is your ISP interfering with your BitTorrent connections? Cutting off your VOIP calls? Undermining the principles of network neutrality? In order to answer those questions, concerned Internet users need tools to test their Internet connections and gather evidence about ISP interference practices. After all, if it weren't for the testing efforts of Rob Topolski, the Associated Press, and EFF, Comcast would still be stone-walling about their now-infamous BitTorrent blocking efforts.

Developed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Switzerland is an open source software tool for testing the integrity of data communications over networks, ISPs and firewalls. It will spot IP packets which are forged or modified between clients, inform you, and give you copies of the modified packets."

- https://www.eff.org/pages/switzerland-network-testing-tool [eff.org]

EFF "Switzerland" packet monitor tool looks for ISP meddling

- http://arstechnica.com/uncategorized/2008/08/eff-switzerland-packet-monitor-tool-looks-for-isp-meddling/ [arstechnica.com]

Abandon Hope All Ye Who Enter Here (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335735)

Here's a plan: make your relatively poor country as inhospitable to outside investors as possible, let it spiral into despair until the people either revolt/civil war or relocate to Marklar, but, hey, *you're* still in charge.

Somebody try transmitting a treatise on game theory through their firewalls - maybe it'll end up in a report on somebody's desk. Oh, and knock the evil assholes out who implemented this firewall.

all governments are evil in various degrees (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335801)

some are just more obvious than others

and who sold them these tools of censorship (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40335883)

and oppression? LOL WE DID..

simple solution? (1)

ekimminau (775300) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335925)

Satellite Internet? I guess Im being too simple...

I guess proper punishment is out the window (4, Funny)

cvtan (752695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40335939)

So stealing 1 song worth $1 is worth $155000 in damages and making a phone call over Skype is worth 15 years in prison. Maybe I'll sell drugs or kill people instead; this other stuff is just too dangerous!
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