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400 comments

Smart move (4, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40375119)

Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa is a friend of Venezuela and Cuba--and NO FRIEND of the U.S.

Re:Smart move (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375181)

RUN FORREST, RUN!!

Dumb reading (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375213)

Assange is scheduled to be extradited to Sweden for a violent crime. This has nothing to do with the USA, or WikiLeaks.

Re:Dumb reading (0)

eugene6 (2627513) | about 2 years ago | (#40375275)

I'm sure the USA won't snatch him for additional crimes they think he has committed against the USA once he has traveled to Sweden for prosecution of these "violent crimes."

Re:Dumb reading (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375405)

Stop beating your meat to your masochistic prison torture fantasies. Wikileaks mismanged itself into death, while Assange had burned bridges with everyone. He'll spend a couple years in a nice comfy swedish reformatory dormitory and everyone will forget about him except his groupies.

Re:Dumb reading (1)

cod3r_ (2031620) | about 2 years ago | (#40375651)

apparently they are saying he's in trouble for not using a condom. Which is a strange charge altogether.. Which leads people to believe that it does in fact have everything to do with the USA and wikileaks. Though I'd imagine if we really wanted him we'd have just gone in and got him the way the US does things.

Re:Dumb reading (0, Troll)

FhnuZoag (875558) | about 2 years ago | (#40375933)

He is not *in trouble for not using a condom*. He is in trouble for obtaining a sex act that the other partner did not consent to, and initiating a sex act whilst the partner is asleep. He's in trouble for RAPE. RAPE. RAPE. Stop spreading ridiculous lies.

Re:Dumb reading (5, Interesting)

Ironhandx (1762146) | about 2 years ago | (#40376121)

Way to drink the kool-aid. That or you are astro turfing.

He's not even being charged by the women involved anymore. The women suddenly wanted to charge him AFTER they were approached by a swedish prosecutor. They later attempted to drop the charges, were told they couldn't, eventually succeeded in dropping the charges, only to have the charges somehow re-instituted by a swedish prosecutor with known high up US ties under pressure from the swedish government.

This is all as reported by the SWEDISH Press. Stop fucking astro-turfing to attempt to cover this shit up. This is the most blatant abuse of power by the US over its allies I've ever seen.

Re:Dumb reading (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40376213)

You sound like a tin foil hat wearing nut.
Whats next, global warming is a scam? 911 was a inside job?

Re:Dumb reading (3, Funny)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40376147)

>>>He is in trouble for obtaining a sex act that the other partner did not consent to

Som she claims. Several days later. AFTER she found-out the Assange was two-timing her. If you believe this woman you're really gullible, and I have a 6 GHZ laptop you might be interested in.

Re:Dumb reading (3, Insightful)

just_a_monkey (1004343) | about 2 years ago | (#40376191)

But I wonder if the next time someone in Sweden (but, for the sake of argument, someone who hasn't angered our rulers as Assange has) has sex with a sleeping partner and skips the country, there will again be a European arrest order and a worldwide Interpol hunt?

Re:Dumb reading (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40376237)

He is in trouble for obtaining a sex act that the other partner did not consent to...

So if you consent to only fuck millionares and then you find out I'm broke, I'm a rapist?

...initiating a sex act whilst the partner is asleep.

The other person woke up and said RAPE. RAPE. RAPE.

Right? No? Oh... odd...

Re:Smart move (5, Informative)

ianare (1132971) | about 2 years ago | (#40375231)

Ecuador's foreign minister had offered assylum in 2010 but president Rafael Correa later dismised it. It's possible they have succombed to US pressure already, or they could be worried he has something they don't want released.

Should be an interesting turn of events either way. I do hope he finds refuge somewhere, to continue the good fight.

[Stupid] move (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40375505)

It makes him look guilty of the "not wearing a condom" charge. He should just go face the trial, especially since there's no way they can prove he's guilty (it's just her word vs. his).

Re:[Stupid] move (4, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40375547)

the "not wearing a condom" charge

Are you really naive enough to believe that's what ANY of this is about?

I mean, seriously?

Re:[Stupid] move (4, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40375821)

>>>Are you really naive enough to believe that's what ANY of this is about?

I guess I am. Prove to me that something more nefarious is going on with this Sweden Condom Non-wearing case?

Re:[Stupid] move (-1, Offtopic)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40376151)

Prove to me that something more nefarious is going on

Sure, Missourian. I'll have Leon Panetta and the Swedish prosecutor stop by your house tonight to brief you on the whole setup.

Re:[Stupid] move (2)

DRJlaw (946416) | about 2 years ago | (#40375879)

the "not wearing a condom" charge

Are you really naive enough to believe that's what ANY of this is about?

I mean, seriously?

Well, now it's about flushing $320000 of bail down the judicial drain. Not to mention the additional criminal charge (Bail Act offense, or whatever is applicable in the United Kingdom in this instance -- not my area of law).

Re:[Stupid] move (5, Interesting)

clifyt (11768) | about 2 years ago | (#40376029)

Yes, some of us are really that naive.

Sweden is very liberal about the protection of women and what should constitute sexual abuse. He was a big name, and he broke the law to the point he used his influence to do things that would get other men arrested too. And then instead of answering the charges, he fled the country. Over something that might get him $1000 in fines and told not to come back to the country.

In most countries, what he did would be considered douchebaggery of the highest proportions. In Sweden, they find it criminal...even if it is pretty much a slap on the wrist. When a big name does it, they need to make an example...and the example is he pays a fine much smaller than he has wasted in lawyers so far and goes home. He could have taken care of this months ago, but he wanted to stay in the public eye and pretend that he was oppressed. I wish I could fuck one woman, convince her to drop me off at another woman's home. Fuck her without a condom after telling her I was wearing one, and then go back to the first and pull my condom off halfway through and brag about it...while having half the world look at me as if I'm a political prisoner for doing so...and probably fuck another dozen women in the process.

Gotta hand it to him...he knows how to play others. Are you so naive to think that a man so skilled at manipulation isn't manipulating you?

(BTW I think the US would LOVE to have him in custody, but we all know that he committed no crimes in the US. Treason is not a crime if you aren't a citizen...regardless of what Republicans would like to have you believe)

Re:[Stupid] move (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | about 2 years ago | (#40376221)

If it is all that, ask for that fine, and prohibit him from going back into the country. Why do Sweden need to force him back into the country to face the penalty of being prohibited to get back in the country?

Re:[Stupid] move (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375575)

What trial? He hasn't even been charged yet, they only want him for some form of questioning that they are unable to do by phone, video conference, or written deposition and that couldn't be performed by them coming to Assange.

I forget what it is called, but I think it rhymes with "extraditing to the USA"

Re:[Stupid] move (0, Troll)

Adriax (746043) | about 2 years ago | (#40375579)

The first thing a swedish official would tell him the moment his plane lands would be: "Sorry about that, charges have been dropped, but those CIA agents over in that other plane are going to have a word with you. Goodbye."

Re:[Stupid] move (3, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40375991)

>>>" those CIA agents over in that other plane are going to have a word with you. Goodbye."

Why do you think that will happen? I'd like some citations, not some random Alex Jones-style conspriacist rambling. Kay-kay? Thanks.

Re:[Stupid] move (5, Informative)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#40375617)

What makes you think he'd ever face trial if he ended up in Sweden? Sweden has illegally rendered [egyptindependent.com] political refugees to the US to be tortured in the past. What makes you think they wouldn't do the same to Assange?

Re:Smart move (2, Insightful)

FhnuZoag (875558) | about 2 years ago | (#40375865)

Reminder:

"In April 2011, Ecuador expelled the U.S. ambassador after a leaked diplomatic cable was shown accusing president Correa of knowingly ignoring police corruption. In retaliation, the Ecuadorian ambassador Luis Gallegos was expelled from the United States.[1]"

Assange should find a good audience amongst Correa's corrupt and human rights abusing buddies. Assange continues to discard his principles - if he still has any remaining.

Assange should... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375183)

... be careful what he wishes for.

how is he going to leave the UK? (2)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#40375189)

the cops can't touch the embassy or their cars but once he steps out in the airport he is fair game

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375221)

unless they get a car carrier

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (2)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40375235)

I'm pretty sure they could sneak him out if they really wanted to. With diplomatic immunity, can the police even stop one of their cars?

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (2)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40375317)

Would they even need to sneak him out? I am not really sure how asylum works; if Ecuador says, "Yes, Assange has asylum here," would the UK government have to allow them to move Assange to an airplane and fly him out of the country?

Bearing in mind that the UK is not China, and would hopefully behave in a more civilized manner.

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (3, Informative)

maccodemonkey (1438585) | about 2 years ago | (#40375433)

Would they even need to sneak him out? I am not really sure how asylum works; if Ecuador says, "Yes, Assange has asylum here," would the UK government have to allow them to move Assange to an airplane and fly him out of the country?

Nope.

The Ecuadorians have diplomatic immunity, not Assange. Assange doesn't suddenly gain immunity by proxy.

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375559)

Put him in a bag labeled "diplomatic mail"

verification:luggage

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40375563)

Which only adds to my confusion over this application. Why apply from the UK, if he would first have to escape the British police and get to Ecuador?

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40375615)

Well, nevermind, apparently I missed part of the summary. Looks like he found a way into the Ecuadorian embassy, so I guess the question is, how will he find his way out of the UK from there?

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (1)

maccodemonkey (1438585) | about 2 years ago | (#40375927)

Well, nevermind, apparently I missed part of the summary. Looks like he found a way into the Ecuadorian embassy, so I guess the question is, how will he find his way out of the UK from there?

In theory, he doesn't have to. Why does he have to leave the Ecuadorian embassy?

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40375959)

Well, I suppose he could continue to do his work from there, assuming they have a reliable Internet connection etc. Not sure if he really wants to spend the rest of his life in the Ecuadorian embassy though -- it is a step up from house arrest in a mansion, but not exactly "freedom."

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375325)

Based on my undergraduate degree in Law and Order, and a master's in CSI, I can confidently state that the interior of an embassy car holds the same legal status as the embassy itself. The police can stop the car and speak with the driver, but they have no authority to inspect its interior.

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (1)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | about 2 years ago | (#40375365)

Of course they can stop the car.

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40375429)

I am pretty sure asylum protections are extended to embassies and diplomats' cars. Even if they knew Assange was in the car, the best they could (legally) do is follow the car and hope that he steps out to pee.

That is assuming that they would even give Ecuador a hard time about moving Assange out of their country, which I am not even sure they would do.

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (0)

Dunbal (464142) | about 2 years ago | (#40376031)

Diplomatic immunity is not what it used to be. I am sure the UK is perfectly willing to risk a diplomatic "incident" with Ecuador in order to roll over some more for the US. After all when you're in so far, what does a little further matter?

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375259)

diplomatic car to the diplomatic business jet. how do you think diplomatic bags are moved without being opened ?

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (3, Interesting)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40375279)

I am not entirely sure what the UK government would do if Ecuador granted asylum in this case. It would certainly be harmful to diplomatic relations if the UK refused to honor the asylum i.e. refused to allow Assange to enter the Ecuadorian embassy or travel to Ecuador. Maybe the UK government is willing to pay that prive to send Assange to Sweden; I am not sure what is worth more, Assange being questioned by Swedish police or diplomatic relations with Ecuador. I suspect the latter; the UK has little to lose from sending Assange to Ecuador, and if the Swedes and Ecuadorians have a diplomatic fallout over it, the UK can at least stay in the clear.

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375291)

When he gets political asylum, he can leave UK.

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375391)

Helicopter ride out of the UK, change flight plans once out of the UK and divert to different airport, then take a waiting airplane to a North African country, and take a series of flights that avoid layovers in Europe and North America.

Re:how is he going to leave the UK? (0)

devitto (230479) | about 2 years ago | (#40375937)

...so he'll stay on Ecudorian soil, the embassy, until he's so annoying for the UK government that the risk of him embaressingly staying (still doing his Russia Today programmes and other interviews), or embaressingly 'sneaking out' and disappearing, is worse than the promise Ecudor to allow him to leave for the Ecudor mainland.

He's been interned in his home in the UK for 18 months, so being interned some more isn't really a problem, is it ? All the while the case in Sweden looses credibility, and his extradition to Sweden looks more and more shakey.

Funny.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375251)

How many countries have denied him asylum so far?

I have mixed feelings about this... (-1, Troll)

Lisias (447563) | about 2 years ago | (#40375261)

If by one side I hope Assange gets it (as, in fact, he is being unlawfully persecuted by US government), on the other side it will be a big shame for everybody else that just a half baked democracy on a third-world country (hey, I live on one of these, I know what I'm talking) has the guts to stand up against tiranny.

Re:I have mixed feelings about this... (1)

rastilin (752802) | about 2 years ago | (#40375303)

That sounds like two positives. Everybody else should be judged fairly on their actions, and if their actions are bad, they should be ashamed.

Re:I have mixed feelings about this... (3, Funny)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#40375461)

a half baked democracy on a third-world country (hey, I live on one of these, I know what I'm talking)

Greetings fellow USA resident

Re:I have mixed feelings about this... (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | about 2 years ago | (#40376295)

Oh, no.

You are moving fast, and the direction is correct. But you are still far, far away from a third world country.

All this trouble. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375283)

Is he really that afraid that he won't get a fair trial - in Sweden?!?

Is there something about the Swedish judicial system that I don't know about? Is it a kangaroo court or something?

What is Assange afraid of?

Re:All this trouble. (5, Informative)

El Lobo (994537) | about 2 years ago | (#40375353)

Well, it's not the first time the swedish government bows before their master: http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/default.aspx?pageid=438&n=egyptian-deported-from-sweden-by-cia-freed-2011-08-11 [hurriyetdailynews.com]

Re:All this trouble. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375625)

You're really giving the one existing example, while 9/11 was still in everyone (recent) memories (this happened in December 2001), and that they were denied asylum and deported (this is the messy part, the why it was denied - based on security claims - and how it was all too fast)?!?!? But even so Sweden tried to assure that they wouldn't be tortured or be subject to inhumane treatment (ok, now Sweden authorities were just silly and ingenuous). Yes, Assange case really compares to the fear that the claim of "terrorism" instilled on people and governments in the following months of 9/11.... seriously...

Re:All this trouble. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375967)

" Yes, Assange case really compares to the fear that the claim of "terrorism" instilled on people and governments in the following months of 9/11.... seriously..."

Yes, yes it does, in the minds of certain US officials. And those are the only minds that count in this case.

Or, to put it another way: just because Assange is acting paranoid, doesn't mean they're not really after him.

Re:All this trouble. (5, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40375387)

Is he really that afraid that he won't get a fair trial - in Sweden?!?

No, he's not *afraid* of it. He *knows* it. This whole thing was such an obvious setup from the get-go that I'm surprised the CIA had the balls to even try it. Shit, even Dominique Strauss-Kahn was less obvious than this mess.

Re:All this trouble. (2)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#40375507)

Honestly, I'm surprised that they haven't just assassinated him.

Re:All this trouble. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375595)

Drone strikes are not yet carried out on UK soil. Stay tuned!

Re:All this trouble. (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 2 years ago | (#40376115)

Maybe in Ecuador soon. Possibly not, Assange is too high profile and not as easy to smear with the "terrorist" paintbrush. Wait until the CIA manages to convince some children to say that he fondled them and then just maybe.

Re:All this trouble. (4, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40375643)

The CIA has apparently gotten away from that (especially with public figures). Public discrediting works just as effectively, doesn't leave behind a martyr, and isn't as obvious. So if some asshole is criticizing the value of the U.S. dollar [guardian.co.uk] , you don't send up a guy with a gun to his room, you send up a maid shaking her ass. Much cleaner that any bullet to the head, and just as effective.

Re:All this trouble. (0, Troll)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | about 2 years ago | (#40375723)

No, he's not *afraid* of it. He *knows* it. This whole thing was such an obvious setup from the get-go that I'm surprised the CIA had the balls to even try it. Shit, even Dominique Strauss-Kahn was less obvious than this mess.

Excuse me, Sir, but your tinfoil hat has slipped a bit to the side. You probably want to get it more firmly back on your head again.

Re:All this trouble. (2, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40375999)

Excuse me, Sir, but your tinfoil hat has slipped a bit to the side.

There is somewhat of a difference between someone who thinks that aliens at Area 51 are teaming with the CIA to steal his urine--and someone who thinks that the CIA takes covert action against foreign nationals who threaten the security of U.S. confidential information.

Re:All this trouble. (5, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40375395)

Is he really that afraid that he won't get a fair trial - in Sweden?!?

The charges were dropped, then mysteriously the investigation was reopened. If you had sent copies of the secrets of the world's most powerful government to everyone else, would you not be a little nervous about unusual criminal proceedings?

Re:All this trouble. (0)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | about 2 years ago | (#40375701)

If you had sent copies of the secrets of the world's most powerful government to everyone else, would you not be a little nervous about unusual criminal proceedings?

No, because I wouldn't have sent copies of the secrets of the world's most powerful government to everyone else in the first place.

Re:All this trouble. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40376059)

That is because you are a coward.

Re:All this trouble. (1)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | about 2 years ago | (#40375415)

Don't you know this is all a global conspiracy against him? This is all a plot by the US Government, The Reptilians and probably the Rothschilds and Bilderberg Group trying to kill him.

Re:All this trouble. (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40375471)

Don't flatter yourself, this is hardly some super-elaborate global conspiracy. Setting a dude up with sex is one of the oldest intelligence ploys in the book (the Germans even used it on JFK). And getting a country like Sweden to bow like a lapdog to you when you're the U.S. is hardly a challenge.

Re:All this trouble. (2)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | about 2 years ago | (#40375599)

He's already long since burned all his bridges. They would have ceased caring by this point if it was all nothing but phoney charges. Outside of the loon fringe cheerleaders, no one even still cares about what this guy says.

Re:All this trouble. (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40375787)

Whether he's still active or not, getting him and punishing him is still important to the U.S. because it sends a clear message to anyone thinking of doing something like Wikileaks in the future. "Reveal our secrets, and we WILL get you."

Re:All this trouble. (1)

HarrySquatter (1698416) | about 2 years ago | (#40375867)

Why? He's already been globally discredited and made countless enemies of past associates and allies. The US or Sweden gain nothing by continuing to try to push phoney charges since he already as been punished and the message has been sent. Last time I checked no one else has taken his place so it seems the message has rang clear.

Re:All this trouble. (3, Informative)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40375883)

They would have ceased caring by this point if it was all nothing but phoney charges

The Swedes did drop the charges, for lack of evidence. Someone cared enough to reopen the investigation and try to force Assange to go back to Sweden.

I do not think it is a stretch to suggest that the US government had something to do with that.

Re:All this trouble. (1)

gatfirls (1315141) | about 2 years ago | (#40375567)

Conspiracy or not it is pretty odd to what length the Swedish authorities have gone to in this (if everything is as described) very tenuous rape allegation. They better extradite him soon or they'll have to do a Bin Laden style extraction.

Re:All this trouble. (3, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40375667)

Yeah, it's crazy to think something is wrong with a criminal investigation against a controversial person being closed for lack of evidence, then suddenly reopened. Clearly, anyone who thinks that the secretive intelligence agency of the country whose secrets were published by Assange would have anything to do with this situation is a crazy conspiracy theorist...

Re:All this trouble. (-1, Flamebait)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | about 2 years ago | (#40375669)

Don't you know this is all a global conspiracy against him? This is all a plot by the US Government, The Reptilians and probably the Rothschilds and Bilderberg Group trying to kill him.

Don't forget The Illuminati.

Re:All this trouble. (2)

runeghost (2509522) | about 2 years ago | (#40375587)

The reason I have seen given for Assange to fear extradition to Sweden is that apparently it would be much easier to extradite him from from Sweden to the United States. In other words, it's not Sweden that he's afraid of, but that the Swedes will hand him over to the Americans with a wink and a nod.

Re:All this trouble. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375755)

This comes up time and time again, but there's no legal theory to support it. Think about it, easier than FROM THE UK? The place that extradited someone for copyright infringement?

Re:All this trouble. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40376045)

No - that is just meaningless speculation.

If he was extradicted to Sweden, then a further extradiction would instead need permission from both Sweden and the UK (see the principle of speciality). Also, The UK is a country with closer ties to the US than Sweden is.

Re:All this trouble. (1)

devitto (230479) | about 2 years ago | (#40376003)

He's not been CHARGED with anything - the cops just want to question him.

Ooops, but then Sweden, out of nowhere, gets a extradition order from the US. Not being charged in Sweden means local charges don't prevent him from leaving, so what do you know, Jules, welcome to GITMO.

Re:All this trouble. (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 2 years ago | (#40376085)

What is Assange afraid of?

You, and people like you, who have already judged him guilty.

Perfect choice of country for assylum (0)

arcite (661011) | about 2 years ago | (#40375409)

- copious amounts of hot women

- cheap booze

- virgin beaches

- non extradion county :)

Re:Perfect choice of country for assylum (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375453)

It's an all you can rape buffet.

Not likely (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375443)

Ecuador may grant his asylum temporarily in order to gain political bargaining power with the UK, there is no way he will be a permanent resident. I think the walls are closing in for Assange.

This is so sad... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375519)

He is truly this paranoid? Can someone get this man to a psychiatrist? He is only wanted for questioning. Sweden wont extradite him to USA. If you believe that you have been sucked in to the conspiracy nuts world.

This is so far from reality

Re:This is so sad... (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | about 2 years ago | (#40375645)

He is truly this paranoid? Can someone get this man to a psychiatrist? He is only wanted for questioning. Sweden wont extradite him to USA. If you believe that you have been sucked in to the conspiracy nuts world.

This is so far from reality

No doubt about that. He has been ranting for months that the USA will secretly extradite him from Sweden (as if Sweden has already okayed this -- yeah right), ship him off to Guantanamo Bay (like Harold & Kumar, no doubt), and execute him shortly thereafter. Does that actually sound realistic to anybody with at least half a brain living in this USA? Hell, Obama would probably have a reception for him at the White House instead.

Re:This is so sad... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40376253)

Obviously they wouldn't extradite him in the rape case since that is a Swedish affair, but if the US states that he is wanted in the US for something, how can you know that Sweden wouldn't let them have him? That prisoners given to the US may be tortured is well known enough that you've got American politicians publicly defending the legality of the torture that is publicly admitted to be taking place (waterboarding), so yes Assange may be tortured if he is extradited to the US. Sweden may extradite people suspected of doing something to the US, and the US is publicly stating that they do torture some prisoners (they just prefer to call it waterboarding instead of torture). There is not even an attempt to hide these facts, there is no conspiracy, so what's the unbelievable part?

Put Him In Jail Now! (-1, Troll)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | about 2 years ago | (#40375557)

This is why Assange should have been in jail from the beginning, and not staying in a country mansion. What fools he has just made of the UK legal system.

Re:Put Him In Jail Now! (0)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40375707)

Yeah, because people should be put in jail despite no criminal charges being filed against them.

Re:Put Him In Jail Now! (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375791)

This is why Assange should have been in jail from the beginning, and not staying in a country mansion. What fools he has just made of the UK legal system.

The terrorist should've been eliminated by a drone strike long time ago, while he was still raping the innocent victims. USA agility doubleplusbad on the issue.

Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40375713)

No less than the admittedly fictional Marshall Matt Dillon once observed that even an innocent man will run from the law. I'd say seeking asylum in the US would be a smarter move than this, though.

Idiot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40376009)

Im seriously sick of hearing about this idiot.

Why Ecuador? (1)

Daetrin (576516) | about 2 years ago | (#40376053)

Seems a bit random, i don't know of anything that special about Ecuador, well except... oh wait, he's going to wait for a space elevator to be built there so he can escape to space!

hints that they may grant it (1)

peter303 (12292) | about 2 years ago | (#40376261)

You just cant go around asking everybody if they'll grant you asylum. Word might get out with this violating his curent house arrest.

Re:Why Ecuador? (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40376273)

i don't know of anything that special about Ecuador

Ecuador is one of the very few countries in the world (along with Venezuela, Cuba, Iran, and North Korea) that doesn't kneel before the U.S.

Hey, if I rape someone can I get a free trip too? (0)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 years ago | (#40376243)

Despite his being concerned over other maters, the fact is that the ONLY reason he's being brought back to Sweden is to answer sexual assault charges.

These are complaints from women who used to work with him, not some random people pulled out of a hat. Do they deserve no justice at all if something happened? Do they deserve no chance of a trial for someone they felt attacked them?

There are larger forces at play, sure, but it doesn't mean he should get a free pass on this matter.

Once those are cleared up, then he can seek asylum to avoid possible espionage charges.

Poor Wannabe James Bond (1)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | about 2 years ago | (#40376291)

He's going to find out martinis and baccarat in Monte Carlo are not the same as beer and cockfights in Quito.......

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