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Valve Unveils Steam For Schools, Portal In the Classroom

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the lollipop-chainsaw-is-home-ec-and-shop dept.

Education 83

tekgoblin writes "Well this is pretty awesome, Valve has made an entrance into the education sector. They plan to release a new version of Steam for education uses in schools. Valve will call this service Steam for Schools, an education version of the Steam client that allows administrators to limit what its users can access. The idea of Steam for Schools is to use the platform as a teaching aid. Valve has already put together a number of educational lesson plans for using Portal 2 and its level editor to teach math and physics."

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83 comments

Thank you for participating. (5, Funny)

DWMorse (1816016) | more than 2 years ago | (#40400627)

We would like to thank your parents for all signing the Test Subject Waiver. Please assemble in the gymnasium for your mandatory uniform assignment, before boarding the Aperture Science Facility Field Trip Bus.

Re:Thank you for participating. (5, Funny)

masteva (996554) | more than 2 years ago | (#40400675)

Cake will be provided at the end of the trip.

Re:Thank you for participating. (0)

zill (1690130) | more than 2 years ago | (#40400761)

The cake is a lie.

Re:Thank you for participating. (1)

newcastlejon (1483695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401567)

The cake is a lie.

Spoilers! Shame on you.

Re:Thank you for participating. (0)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#40403685)

Old meme is old.

Re:Thank you for participating. (1)

crafty.munchkin (1220528) | more than 2 years ago | (#40406975)

True, yet the most relevant it's EVER been on /.

Re:Thank you for participating. (1)

milgram (104453) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401403)

What about Kool-aid?

Re:Thank you for participating. (1)

RaceProUK (1137575) | more than 2 years ago | (#40409775)

That comes with 2tblsp rhubarb, on fire.

Re:Thank you for participating. (4, Funny)

i kan reed (749298) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401187)

Bus.

I think you mean multi-pupil relocation device

Re:Thank you for participating. (0)

DWMorse (1816016) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401429)

Multi-pupil relocation vehicle - device just doesn't carry the proper ring to it. But I think that was my favorite Slashdot comment to write thus far.

Re:Thank you for participating. (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401869)

"Multi-pupil relocation module" - how's that?

Re:Thank you for participating. (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 2 years ago | (#40410863)

Multi-diminutive-young-person-locomotive-transport chariot.

chariots!

Re:Thank you for participating. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40407265)

You mean '1500-megawatt superconducting multi-pupil relocation device'.

Portal? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40400633)

Wouldn't a better game for kids be a shooter, where you have to quick knife the correct answer to gain points? Also FIRST

Re:Portal? (4, Funny)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 2 years ago | (#40400677)

Given your unfortunate second sentence (albeit one lacking punctuation), I see that you'd be one of the ones lying on the ground having been "quick knifed" by a faster student.

Re:Portal? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40400909)

In Florida, any is an improvement for a child's math and science education.

wow... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40400789)

...even public schools got Steam before Linux.

Re:wow... (1)

BronsCon (927697) | more than 2 years ago | (#40400993)

Did the schools get Steam before they got Linux, or did they get Steam before Lunix did?

Re:wow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40401045)

What's a "Lunix"?

Re:wow... (5, Funny)

durrr (1316311) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401325)

" BSD, Lunix, Debian and Mandrake are all versions of an illegal hacker operation system, invented by a Soviet computer hacker named Linyos Torovoltos, before the Russians lost the Cold War. It is based on a program called "xenix", which was written by Microsoft for the US government. These programs are used by hackers to break into other people's computer systems to steal credit card numbers. They may also be used to break into people's stereos to steal their music, using the "mp3" program. Torovoltos is a notorious hacker, responsible for writing many hacker programs, such as "telnet", which is used by hackers to connect to machines on the internet without using a telephone. "

It's like terrorism and communism combined into one package of evil.

Re:wow... (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401665)

May a curse be upon you if my boss ever sees that. I suspect he already believes it.

Re:wow... (1)

byornski (1022169) | more than 2 years ago | (#40406979)

Welcome to the internet circa 1998?

Re:wow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40409685)

I see your comedic Overton window and raise you by:

Linux Thorvoltos was hung for treason by mind-controlled penguins.

Re:wow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40411595)

" BSD, Lunix, Debian and Mandrake are all versions of an illegal hacker operation system, invented by a Soviet computer hacker named Linyos Torovoltos, before the Russians lost the Cold War. It is based on a program called "xenix", which was written by Microsoft for the US government. These programs are used by hackers to break into other people's computer systems to steal credit card numbers. They may also be used to break into people's stereos to steal their music, using the "mp3" program. Torovoltos is a notorious hacker, responsible for writing many hacker programs, such as "telnet", which is used by hackers to connect to machines on the internet without using a telephone. "

It's like terrorism and communism combined into one package of evil.

Lol Adequacy.org. Brings back some crazy memories

Re:wow... (1)

Airballp (1077091) | more than 2 years ago | (#40404331)

Yes.

Portal (0)

Terracotta122 (2653543) | more than 2 years ago | (#40400821)

...and remember kids, the cake is a lie. Why not introduce the kids to a real life video game called the playground? Don't get me wrong, this is sweet, but everyone is bitching about their kids being fat, and not getting the nutrition that they need. This should teach kids video games and computers are great, but also teach they should also go outside and hang out with real friends, not Facebook and Twitter...

Re:Portal (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40400895)

Uh wtf does Facebook and Twitter have to do with video games. You're making a false dichotomy here by implying kids currently either play video games or physically play on the playground, take your bullsh1t somewhere else.

Re:Portal (0)

Terracotta122 (2653543) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401273)

You sir, are dense. I'm saying kid's shouldn't be looking at a screen all day. Take your "bullsh1t" elsewhere.

Re:Portal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40401359)

Well who the f said kids look at screens all day now? Because most don't. pls go

Re:Portal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40401435)

You're clearly a child and are looking at the screen right now...proof!

Re:Portal (2)

crafty.munchkin (1220528) | more than 2 years ago | (#40407003)

If that's the case, why are laptops mandatory at my daughter's high-school?

Re:Portal (2)

Translation Error (1176675) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401411)

Why not introduce the kids to a real life video game called the playground? Don't get me wrong, this is sweet, but everyone is bitching about their kids being fat, and not getting the nutrition that they need.

Who says they aren't doing both? Just because it's not mentioned in an article about Valve doesn't mean it isn't happening.

Re:Portal (1)

Eponymous Hero (2090636) | more than 2 years ago | (#40402321)

ok, so kinect then

Very smart (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40400893)

Get students used to steam at school and then they'll come home and play games on steam. "But Mom, I'm STUDYING!"

Re:Very smart (1)

Johann Lau (1040920) | more than 2 years ago | (#40403697)

In other news, students can't think. Oh my oh my, why would that be? Even though we have games that are about spatial reasoning and physics and therefore "all about science"???

The pie, you fucking ate it -- that's all the physics there is. This is like Microsoft generously giving away their stuff to schools. Fuck that, kick them in the nuts.

Portal in the classroom? (1)

AC-x (735297) | more than 2 years ago | (#40400903)

Portal in the classroom? Now that's one education game that doesn't disappoint at every turn!

You have died of Thermal Discouragement Beam.

Re:Portal in the classroom? (1)

Canazza (1428553) | more than 2 years ago | (#40410907)

It is dark.
You are likely to be eaten by your companion cube.

For games? Or Educational content? (2)

geekd (14774) | more than 2 years ago | (#40400937)

The linked article is lean on details. Is this for "educational" games? Or regular games? Or for educational software that is not games?

I totally do not get what a teacher would use Steam int he classroom for. Anyone have any ideas? I've been out of school for a long time, so maybe I'm just missing something.

Re:For games? Or Educational content? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40401225)

There are lots of games that can be adapted to teaching something. Portal can help illustrate physics concepts, Universe Sandbox can illustrate astrophysics concepts, Civilization can help illustrate (more or less) how world events can shape history, SpaceChem can show how chemistry works... kind of. Even games like Dungeon Defenders can teach teamwork, cooperation, and collaboration. There are probably others, but, really, it's all how you apply them to what you're going to teach anyway.

Re:For games? Or Educational content? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40401661)

Everything is educational if you are open to learning from it.

Re:For games? Or Educational content? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40403747)

I like Spacechem. But chemistry is just a backdrop for the logic puzzles. It is however great for basic computer science.

Re:For games? Or Educational content? (1)

Guspaz (556486) | more than 2 years ago | (#40403819)

Portal's level editor can be used to implement binary logic, so that has some educational value. I saw somebody implement a 4-bit adder using lasers and moving platforms, and I managed to do one using just lasers and receptors, so there's a lot of flexibility there. My stuff was pretty messy and compact, but I'm pretty sure you could do it up in a more illustrative manner.

Re:For games? Or Educational content? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40402011)

I totally do not get what a teacher would use Steam int he classroom for. Anyone have any ideas?

SpaceChem!!

Re:For games? Or Educational content? (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | more than 2 years ago | (#40402277)

This is just a way for Valve to expand their market. This is not a benevolent action of a benevolent company. It's little different than when Apple was giving cheap Apple IIs to elementary schools that ended up being unused. Valve wants to be the sole power in the digital software distribution for games by being only slightly less evil than the competition. Being in the schools is just another way to let their fan army claim that they're the good guys.

Re:For games? Or Educational content? (1)

Zantetsuken (935350) | more than 2 years ago | (#40402501)

It doesn't have to be just games that it distributes.

Even the normal Steam client lets you view embedded video, or download video as its own "store" item. Also, since a game is just another type of program, you could deliver other applications as well, such as the training simulators used in MCSE books, custom testing programs that some classes insist on using, editor applications such as Notepad++, GIMP, etc.

I think the biggest benefit of this would be giving the teachers a trusted software repository where they can tell their students to just go download it through the SteamEDU client, and not have to worry about them going to an impostor site and getting a school computer infected with malware (because obviously nobody knows how to ask for a rebuild of that system from the school's IT dept).

Re:For games? Or Educational content? (2)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 2 years ago | (#40403009)

I think the biggest benefit of this would be giving the teachers a trusted software repository where they can tell their students to just go download it through the SteamEDU client, and not have to worry about them going to an impostor site and getting a school computer infected with malware (because obviously nobody knows how to ask for a rebuild of that system from the school's IT dept).

Actually, I see it as one better - if you need software for a particular class, it can be distributed and licensed properly via Steam. If the alternative is to run it on the lab computers, it makes sense to have this as a way for people to do the work using the software at home using a personal install. It beats distribution via CD (and often pesky license key hassles). All the student has to do is launch Steam, select the program and download and install.

That, I think is the biggest benefit. Especially since it's targeted at the highschool group.

Re:For games? Or Educational content? (1)

filthpickle (1199927) | more than 2 years ago | (#40404729)

"Hey kids, there is a computer for each of you in the room. There's a router and some network cable too. Some of the computers won't come on, some won't be able to get on the network. The sound won't work on some. If you can get every one working you can play games for X minutes Y times week."

I am sure there are developed strictly for education applications that can be put in the mix.....but I learned so much about computers being in pretty much that situation (not in a classroom, and once we got everyone's computers working and on the network we just played games until we collapsed)

Wow (0)

BluPhenix316 (2656403) | more than 2 years ago | (#40400971)

When I went to scholl we were lucky if we had text books that didn't fall apart, now they have video games that teach logic? Yet, most of the time I keep seeing articles about how our schools are failing...........

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40403631)

When I went to scholl we were lucky if we had text books that didn't fall apart, now they have video games that teach logic? Yet, most of the time I keep seeing articles about how our schools are failing...........

Yup, mostly spelling apparently.. ;-p

No subjject (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40401155)

This is the best goddammit fucking game . Sone a bitch. I love how thay keep everything themed with the portal theme. Their viral marketing. All that shit. I'm playing through both of them again tonight.

Unless the school uses Linux of course (0)

jopet (538074) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401369)

Because Valve has still not managed to release Steam for Linux.
With that attitude they should not be allowed into schools.

Re:Unless the school uses Linux of course (1)

notjustchalk (1743368) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401627)

Oh come on, seriously? The vast majority of schools are still using some flavor of Windows. I am as gung-ho about Linux as your average /. reader, but even I can see the benefits of this coming out now rather than waiting for the Linux port (which I am waiting eagerly for). Beyond just that, most large school boards run locked down MS desktops which are centrally managed - you think that's going to change anytime soon?

Re:Unless the school uses Linux of course (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40401767)

Umm.... you know how many public schools use Linux in the US? Roughly none of them. They are all on either Windows or Macs.

Why on earth would Steam on Linux be any sort of factor?

Re:Unless the school uses Linux of course (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40402549)

Because some moron thinks linux is important?

Re:Unless the school uses Linux of course (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40401953)

Steam works great under wine, and all of Valve's games work. I can play portal, portal 2 or HL2 no problem.

Re:Unless the school uses Linux of course (1)

flimflammer (956759) | more than 2 years ago | (#40404897)

Yeah! I mean nearly all child-facing machines in schools run Linux, so what would even be the point!?

Right?

Right?

Oh.

I knew I knew her from somewhere... (2, Informative)

LordStormes (1749242) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401447)

I've always been convinced that my high school chemistry teacher was real personality used to create GLaDOS.

I'm making a note here: HUGE SUCCESS (4, Funny)

wramsdel (463149) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401481)

"Ms. GlaDOS, I need to go to the bathroom!"
"Certainly, Chell, it's out the door and right down that chute."

As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (5, Informative)

notjustchalk (1743368) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401599)

Here's the actual site that Valve has published regarding this particular effort:
http://www.teachwithportals.com/ [teachwithportals.com]

A few things not quite clear in TFA:
1) These are not retail versions of Steam nor Portal 2:
1a) As mentioned, it is a locked down version of Steam called Steam for Schools. Only one application is available right now:
1b) A modified version of Portal called Portal 2 Puzzle Maker which takes most of the concepts in the game but makes it more interactable (i.e. here's a room, here's a pallette of tools, here's what you need to figure out or do...) - a game design tool more than a game.
2) For the teachers among us (me included), they've already collected a number of lesson plans for both Physics and Math curriculums. They're both tending to higher grades (ie 9-12) right now (e.g. parabaloid motion, harmonic oscillation, gravity, spatial geometry/volumes, etc) which makes sense, however, I've only taken a cursory glance as I'm supposed to be marking exams right now... (oops). They're also accepting lesson plans, etc.
3) It looks like they're aiming to extend lessons into the Chemistry, Game Design, Language Arts, and more categories - color me excited as I'm a Chem teacher!

It's unfortunate I'm only finding out about this right now as it's pretty close to the end of the school year, but I supposed the summer is a good time to play with it and figure out how to integrate it into the classroom. For those who are already getting steamed re: "they should be buying textbooks, etc", I have to say that computing resources are already in schools and to a large part being wasted on Facebook and flash games for the most part - this is just another tool to enrich courses and make the curriculum come alive. Oh, and for those that would rather us teachers "take our students outside to learn about physics", I challenge you to a) take more than 5 kids outside and try to keep a lesson run coherently with all the sundry distractions and b) try to do it in the middle of winter.

Kudos to Valve for willing to venture into this territory! Now, let's just get that Linux port finished already okay...? :)

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (1)

notjustchalk (1743368) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401873)

Forgot to mention - it's FREE!

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (1)

sociocapitalist (2471722) | more than 2 years ago | (#40402279)

"...I challenge you to a) take more than 5 kids outside and try to keep a lesson run coherently with all the sundry distractions and b) try to do it in the middle of winter."

Snowball fight trajectories must be useful for something....

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (1)

rcuhljr (1132713) | more than 2 years ago | (#40402561)

Glad to see this coming to fruition, The head of this project from Valve was at the future of education panel at PAX east this year and it was quite an interesting presentation. It was pretty annoying that it got shunted into a slightly shorter time slot, this is an incredibly interesting subject area.

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (1)

AKabral (1056068) | more than 2 years ago | (#40403897)

I hope they include SpaceChem - it's a fantastic puzzle game that many people have thought to liken to teaching chemistry, industrial manufacturing and programming.

SpaceChem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40406515)

ABSOLUTELY. There is nothing better than SpaceChem for getting the brain in gear for programming. I believe it's already offered to schools at a discount? The learning curve is pretty much perfect and once you complete a level there is the bonus challenge of optimising your layout in different ways (speed, or minimal symbols). If I had time to spare, I would use it completing the last level.

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (0)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 2 years ago | (#40404397)

As a parent and one-time student, I have to wonder about your completely evading the issue of monetization. This is yet another attempt by tech firms to further monetize the education of students. I seriously doubt this will be free.

I hear near-constant complaints from teachers and their unions that they are not paid enough (and I agree), but c'mon, try and save us a buck, will ya? Getting a 3rd party-middleman involved in the distribution of lesson plans is just ridiculous. They are not claiming to produce the lesson plans, just distribute them. The Portal 2 example is just that--an example of lesson plans they want submitted. Are you telling me that it is really that hard to share such things as technology stands?

If you're having trouble keeping the attention of your students--as a chemistry teacher--you're not doing it right. I once had a teacher walk into the classroom, plug in an electric hotplate letting it get red-hot, then place a metal GAS CAN on it. Trust me--he had the full attention of the entire class. After the can got very hot, he put the lid back on it, turned off the hotplate and we got to watch as it was slowly crushed by the ambient atmospheric pressure to a quarter of it's original size. Simple, yet very effective lesson that capitalized on theatrics--the teacher didn't say a word until after the demonstration, nor did he have to.

And here is what bothers me the most...
"Valve will call this service Steam for Schools, an education version of the Steam client that allows administrators to limit what its users can access."

Since when is LIMITING access to information beneficial to learning?

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (1)

flimflammer (956759) | more than 2 years ago | (#40405009)

And here is what bothers me the most...
"Valve will call this service Steam for Schools, an education version of the Steam client that allows administrators to limit what its users can access."

Since when is LIMITING access to information beneficial to learning?

That is what bothers you the most? You put out this long winded post about how evil it all is, and the fact that Steam for Schools lets the individual school administrators specifically whitelist which applications they want to let their students install/use is what bothers you the most?

Really?

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 2 years ago | (#40406517)

"You put out this long winded post about how evil it all is..."

Long-winded? Really? That post took me all of two minutes to type and post to Slashdot. How long did it take you to read it?

And, yes. I do think that limiting what data is available through these course plans is a step backwards, and no, I wasn't talking about games. I was talking about non-teachers (or even simply biased ones) creating courses that our kids would then be subject to. This opens up all sorts of special-interest issues. Imagine the Catholic Church submitting courses/course-plans through this. Who is to say that they would do so openly and not under some false pretense? Simply leaving OUT information is often just as bad as information that is flatout wrong. There are reasons to have a "Board of Education" in place for school districts--they keep out commercial interests that seek to further their own profit-motivated agendas. I am very skeptical when I see a commercial interest getting involved with education. Just take a look at our nations most prestigious educational institutions--they are more IP farms then anything else these days.

(I apologize in advance for the wall of text)

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40405029)

I think it means limit in terms of games. There are alot of free games on steam, the kids shouldn't be able to go willy nilly downloading whatever they want during a lesson.

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40404401)

This kind of thing sounded really great when Microsoft was getting into it too; free and low-cost computers, copies of Microsoft software, funding for entire vo-tech schools. It's good to be excited about something, especially where education is concerned, just don't lose sight of the fact that Valve *is* a corporation, and there *is* something in this for them.

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (1)

humanrev (2606607) | more than 2 years ago | (#40406121)

Now, let's just get that Linux port finished already okay

It's absolutely amazing how many people want to bring a DRM platform to Linux. I know Steam is very popular but it also encourages people to give the keys to access your games with a 3rd-party, and not keep the control with yourself. If something happens to your account/Valve, you're fucked. We should be encouraging places like non-DRM sellers like GOG to have Linux games officially available, as well as encourage things like the Humble Bundles when available. This infatuation with Steam will simply push acceptance of "permanent rental" with the younger generation.

Note: I'm not a freetard - I dislike Richard Stallman, but I don't like where the lack of control over the things we buy is going. That fuckhead at Phoronix is OBSESSED with Steam for Linux - as if it will fix everything for Linux on the desktop.

Re:As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40409351)

As a teacher, I say Kudos to Valve!

As somebody who highly values education and intelligence, I am ONCE AGAIN, saddened by your comments. It makes me depressed that people like you are allowed to "teach".

And from the article poster:

Well this is pretty awesome ... an education version of the Steam client that allows administrators to limit what its users can access.

This is pathetic. If people will praise corporatism and Digital "Rights" Management as being "awesome", then this just shows how completely stupid and ignorant people in America are.

I guess this down-grading of education and the exultation of banality in education started when the television networks started providing "free" Cable In The Classroom. Pathetic. Of course I expect to be modded down by you Sheeple that have taken over Slashdot.

Have fun!

does Steam work under firewalls that most schools (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401719)

does Steam work under firewalls and lock down software that most schools use?

Re:does Steam work under firewalls that most schoo (1)

notjustchalk (1743368) | more than 2 years ago | (#40401861)

YMMV, but as an IT-admin turned teacher, I can tell you in my neck-o-the-woods, the lockdowns are simple AD policies for Windows and a rather crummy 3rd party AV/FW combo. So, it's really just as easy as getting central admin to whitelist a few more executables and IP addresses (which may not even be necessary as I'm fairly sure this is not going to be an "always online" type Steam app). This won't be a problem IT-wise, but without a strong IT person onsite it may become a "convenience" issue (ie. central admin may not want to deal with support).

Re:does Steam work under firewalls that most schoo (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#40402415)

well at other schools they did not use AD policies they used stuff like deep freeze and useing that may trigger some kind of drm issues.

Other places used used 3rd party lock down software that also made app show odd errors do to stuff being locked down to much.

As the summary, as usual, sucks and lack details (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40401819)

More details and suggested lesson plans can be found at http://www.teachwithportals.com/

Portal Guns For High Schoolers? (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 2 years ago | (#40402869)

Ok, whose bright idea was it to give Portal Guns to the high school kids? The captain of the football team sent one of the chess club members to the hospital by "portal-ing" him down a flight of stairs. In retaliation, the chess club portaled the captain of the football team into an infinite loop. He's been like this for 12 hours straight as we try to figure a way to get him out of it.

Re:Portal Guns For High Schoolers? (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | more than 2 years ago | (#40403769)

lol I'd mod you funny but I already posted in here.
In real life, that'd be a serious conundrum.. if you nudge someone just a little off center, they'd be likely to dislocate their shoulder or break a leg as it hit the edge of the portal at high velocity.. or worse.
The other thing I've wondered about, what if you could move the portals once they were created? What would happen if you stuck someone in one of these infinite loops, then gradually brought the two portals closer together until they were an inch apart? I imagine you'd wind up with some serious bloody hamburger as body parts were forced to overlap and inhabit the same space simultaneously.

Re:Portal Guns For High Schoolers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40404665)

An interesting concept, tele-fragging yourself...

Re:Portal Guns For High Schoolers? (1)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 2 years ago | (#40408213)

In real life, that'd be a serious conundrum.. if you nudge someone just a little off center, they'd be likely to dislocate their shoulder or break a leg as it hit the edge of the portal at high velocity.. or worse.

It's true, it's a very dangerous situation. these guys [youtube.com] seem to have figured out a solution, however.

What would happen if you stuck someone in one of these infinite loops, then gradually brought the two portals closer together until they were an inch apart? I imagine you'd wind up with some serious bloody hamburger as body parts were forced to overlap and inhabit the same space simultaneously.

I think they would be crushed against themselves... yuck :^P

Re:Portal Guns For High Schoolers? (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 2 years ago | (#40413241)

I was actually thinking of just that video when I posted my comment. Imagine that in the hands of a high schooler. Like the kind of kids who bullied that bus monitor. *shudders*

I hope this is in my local public school soon (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | more than 2 years ago | (#40403699)

My kid had a tough time with school this year, he's in fourth grade and sometimes it seems they're trying to teach those kids trig already. He hated school this year with a passion. However, he's a huge fan of portal, so if they used the game to help teach, it should probably make school more interesting and fun.
Well.. either that, or just ruin Portal for him.

Finally (1)

Hsien-Ko (1090623) | more than 2 years ago | (#40404179)

Wild Science Arcade can be deleted!

More non-Free software in schools is a disservice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40405467)

"Why would a school want to dishonor its duty by bringing nonfree software to the classroom? The source code and the methods of free software are part of human knowledge. The mission of every school is to disseminate human knowledge. Proprietary software is not part of human knowledge. It's secret, restricted knowledge, which schools are not allowed to disseminate."

  - Richard Stallman

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