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AutoCAD Worm Medre.A Stealing Designs, Blueprints

Unknown Lamer posted more than 2 years ago | from the will-emacs-be-next? dept.

Security 139

Trailrunner7 writes, quoting Threat Post: "Security researchers have come across a worm that is meant specifically to steal blueprints, design documents and other files created with the AutoCAD software. The worm, known as ACAD/Medre.A, is spreading through infected AutoCAD templates and is sending tens of thousands of stolen documents to email addresses in China. However, experts say that the worm's infection rates are dropping at this point and it doesn't seem to be part of a targeted attack campaign. ... [They] discovered that not only was the worm highly customized and well-constructed, it seemed to be targeting mostly machines in Peru for some reason. ... They found that ACAD/Medre.A was written in AutoLISP, a specialized version of the LISP scripting language that's used in AutoCAD."

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Worship zombie or bitch to bartender? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447039)

Which do you do to explain to soothe your butthurt ego?

I vote we call it Bawney Fwank (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447045)

Because it's written in LISP.

Re:I vote we call it Bawney Fwank (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40449369)

And it loves Communist China.

also Autodesk software needs local admin to run ri (4, Interesting)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447059)

also most Autodesk software needs local admin to run right or at least the older ver of it did.

Re:also Autodesk software needs local admin to run (1)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447521)

Well my copy of 2012 does, otherwise it won't work at all. I don't know if 2013 does. Maybe someone who's company has sprung for the new version can chime in. Nothing like "gaping ass wide security hole" to make your day is there? Err never mind...that could probably lead to a 13 year old joke.

Re:also Autodesk software needs local admin to run (2)

jeffasselin (566598) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447539)

I'm going to ball CS, I install Autocad for many of my customer's users, and I haven't needed to give them admin privileges since version 2007 I think.

Re:also Autodesk software needs local admin to run (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447667)

Run it in a VM, using a fresh VM image before each use.

Or does AutoCAD have some horrible DRM system that would get in the way of that approach?

auto cad needs a better then video card (4, Informative)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447795)

auto cad needs a better then video card what most vm have. Also can use a lot of cpu power.

Re:auto cad needs a better then video card (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447803)

Sure, although with IOMMUs being widely deployed on PCs and hardware being more virtualization-friendly these days, it should not be long before running AutoCAD in a VM is not so annoying.

Re:auto cad needs a better then video card (2)

GigaplexNZ (1233886) | more than 2 years ago | (#40449521)

Except Intel doesn't support VT-d on their flagship K series chips... you need the lower end chips to get it. Intels product differentiation makes little to no sense, and their inconsistent support for VT-x caused a hell of a lot of problems with XP mode on Windows 7 when it was released.

Re:auto cad needs a better then video card (2)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448521)

That entirely depends on what you do with it, it doesn't "need it" unless it is for a very large project (for CPU) and you want it to look very nice on the screen with 3D rendering. For simple parts drawings a 286 with co-processer was tolerable back in the day so any modern desktop system has the grunt for a large portion of CAD work. AutoDesk are infamously slow with development - is the thing multi-threaded yet or is it as if we are we still stuck in 1992 when other CAD was multi-threaded but AutoCAD wasn't?

Re:auto cad needs a better then video card (2)

Inda (580031) | more than 2 years ago | (#40450577)

We designed cars in 1992 on Spark stations. Multi-surfaced wireframe models, in those days.

It may have taken a second or two to redraw shaded views, but CPU speeds were never a real issue.

The biggest problems back then were network problems. "Network going down!" was a common scream around the body design shop and everyone rushed to save their work.

Solid modelling was done on the same Spark stations in 1999. Once again, no real problems with the hardware.

I miss Solaris. As a young man, I couldn't believe we were using Win3.1 in the back office, whilst using Solaris for all the important work. The difference between the two was huge.

Re:also Autodesk software needs local admin to run (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447799)

Option 2 for the win

Re:also Autodesk software needs local admin to run (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448471)

It used to. I still have a dongle for the way overpriced student version that was still crippled in other ways.

Re:also Autodesk software needs local admin to run (1)

WCVanHorne (897068) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447881)

Well for us 2012 does not seem to need admin to run; although you need to run as admin once to do the performance optimization/video card thing.

Re:also Autodesk software needs local admin to run (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447751)

Revit doesn't. At least 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 haven't.

can we stop calling it stealing (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447123)

It's just sharing. Information wants to be free! Remember?

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447267)

It's just sharing. Information wants to be free! Remember?

On slashdot, information wants to be free and there's no such thing as intellectual property when it's the RIAA or MPAA. When it's someone we like, then the group think is very, very different. Suddenly, artificial scarcity is fine, it's wrong to copy someone else's creation against their will.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447573)

wow.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447917)

OK, don't feed the trolls, but here goes anyway:

There's a bit of a difference: The AutoCAD drawings being stolen were (presumably) never meant to be released to the public. It could very well be theft, as in theft of trade-secret or such. Piracy never enters into it, as it's not a publicly-sold copyrighted work.

You generally don't walk up to a engineering firm and ask to browse their drawings catalog and then offer to buy one. If you somehow did manage to buy a drawing, and if said drawing were copyrighted, and you then turned around and started selling copies of that drawing to others, then that would be piracy (and not theft).

Theft of corporate secrets is indeed theft, since the original owners no longer have the secrets. The "secrecy" part of it is forever gone, even if the drawings remain. The economic loss is easily much, much greater than the corresponding loss due to piracy, namely of one potential sale of a copyrighted work that's otherwise generally available.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40448357)

Bull... I'm sure many OS's were "never meant to be released to the public" and that the "economic loss" could easily add up -- what's wrong with that? If anything, I'd want the blueprints to my car released because, you know, if I find a problem in it, I could just fix it myself. OR if you know, they stopped selling my car, I could keep it running... *lolz* Because of this, I encourage more such viruses

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (1)

znrt (2424692) | more than 2 years ago | (#40449145)

if said drawing were copyrighted, and you then turned around and started selling copies of that drawing to others, then that would be piracy (and not theft).

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
"Piracy is an act of robbery or criminal violence at sea. "

the RIAA or MPAA have not only coluded your civil rights already, they aren't only a serious threat for your freedom of speech, they have already hijacked your language, thus effectively manipulating and screwing your thinking. sad.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40450393)

if said drawing were copyrighted, and you then turned around and started selling copies of that drawing to others, then that would be piracy (and not theft).

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: "Piracy is an act of robbery or criminal violence at sea. "

the RIAA or MPAA have not only coluded your civil rights already, they aren't only a serious threat for your freedom of speech, they have already hijacked your language, thus effectively manipulating and screwing your thinking. sad.

ok, that is very selective copying from Wikipedia, and it doesn't help our cause to become the fud side. Not only do Wikipedia have a list [wikipedia.org] of what piracy also may refer to, including copyright infringement. But also tells you that the use of "piracy" in context of copyright infringement dates back to 1603 [wikipedia.org] (a bit before RIAA/MPAA could "hijack the language") and has been a common term for this since, including in the 1886 Berne Convention [wikipedia.org] .

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448121)

Trade Secrets are *not* copyrighted. Copyright law applies in some cases because the lawyers didn't know where else to put it, but copyright applies to published works, and Trade Secrets are not published works. There's a difference, but those looking to support their pet causes without regard to reality refuse to ever see it.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (4, Insightful)

jaymemaurice (2024752) | more than 2 years ago | (#40449265)

The correct description of this is industrial espionage.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40448419)

RIAA doesn't make music and MPAA doesn't make movies, the question is, why is it their "property"?

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40448575)

Because the artists signed their rights away to the labels represented by the *AA

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (2)

Bodero (136806) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448643)

On slashdot, information wants to be free and there's no such thing as intellectual property when it's the RIAA or MPAA.

Correct. There isn't a better example than the The Oatmeal saga.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (2)

tsm_sf (545316) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448903)

So... you're saying we prefer a scrappy entrepreneur over a bloated group of coked up media whores.

And we're supposed to feel bad about it. Do I have that right? We're supposed to feel bad?

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40449259)

14 years ago when I was in high school I used to think Slashdot was a cool place full of intelligent people.

Now that I'm wiser and more worldly I realize that this site is home to one of internet tech's worst communities. The hypocrisy, double-standards, and fanboyism all but make the site worthless. Furthermore, it has pretty much ruined Linux for me. I absolutely cannot take Linux seriously when it's biggest backers are so thoroughly full of it.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (1)

DarkOx (621550) | more than 2 years ago | (#40450239)

Because there is difference between independently duplicating published material and converting someone else's property for your use, getting their computer to publish materials to you in this case.

I and I expect many other Slashdot readers would argue the harm here is the using of a computer that does not belong to you to do something you have not been given permission to do. I also think exposing trade secrets and duplication copyrighted works need to be thought about differently. In the case of copyright infringement you are looking at stuff that has been make publicly available by the author; with trade secrets its a question of confidentiality and privacy.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40450305)

Oh, so those pesky CAD writers first collected some 80%-95% unoriginal material, changed it a bit, then paid radios and TV to broadcast it, and when you started to like it and wanted to show it to your friend they claimed you should have bought their 10 pieces collection and sue you for lost sale?

Because that's what *AA do, in case you lived in a different universe. Go download a car.

Ah, but which information? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447305)

...And the information that wants to be free the most is who wrote it, why, and where they live.

Then some angry engineers with metal meter-sticks and such want to share some kinesthetic/tactile information with the perpetrator. At length. (Precisely measured.)

Re:Ah, but which information? (1)

arcsimm (1084173) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448437)

T-squares, my friend, T-squares. Preferably the ones with the cast-aluminum heads --- they can be very persuasive.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (4, Funny)

NEDHead (1651195) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447447)

The CADS. Have they no honour? (spelt this way 'cuz it looks better)

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (4, Funny)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447631)

The Chinese are just sampling these designs to decide whether or not to buy.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (4, Interesting)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447817)

there might be some truth [washingtontimes.com] to that:

Last month, for example, the Peruvian Defense Ministry canceled a $114 million contract with a consortium that included U.S. defense manufacturer Northrop Grumman after a Chinese company convinced officials the project did not meet technical specifications.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40448867)

China's gonna get you! China's gonna get you! What you gonna do when China's gonna get you? [youtube.com]
derp derp derp, derpa doom dum dum derp derp derp derp derpa doom dum dum

derp derp derp, derpa doom dum dum derp derp derp derp derpa doom dum dum
derp derp derp, derpa doom dum dum derp derp derp derp derpa doom dum dum

hurrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447689)

The supposition from information wants to be free is that it is easy to copy and transmit. That is exactly what is happening. The owner of the information is having trouble controlling its distribution.

Re:can we stop calling it stealing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40448833)

Let's start calling it 'chinking'.

Success! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447137)

My company uses the comparitively archaic Microstation! Victory at last!

LISP is so great (4, Funny)

Alan Shutko (5101) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447161)

That it's finally expanded into the virus industry!

Re:LISP is so great (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447229)

No... it has just become self aware, and is doing this on its own for reasons we cannot possibly comprehend.

Re:LISP is so great (2)

djl4570 (801529) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447315)

Will Lisp build itself into the devices it steals.

Re:LISP is so great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447359)

Was that a question.

Re:LISP is so great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447395)

Was that a question!

Re:LISP is so great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447457)

This is a question?

Re:LISP is so great (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447969)

P!

Re:LISP is so great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40448337)

Thtop it! You're embarathing me!

It is jsut so that they can re-create Peru (2)

Master Moose (1243274) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447187)

Why else would they take their designs?

It makes cloning villages much eaier if you have the blue-prints.

I bet these guys http://idle.slashdot.org/story/12/06/22/0022251/china-pirates-austrian-village [slashdot.org] would have loved the blue-prints before they started

Re:It is jsut so that they can re-create Peru (2)

slashmydots (2189826) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447899)

I dunno about that. When I think Peru, I think advanced engineering in architecture and mechanics :-P And flutes. It's probably primarily used for flute design actually lol.

Re:It is jsut so that they can re-create Peru (1)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 2 years ago | (#40450321)

More likely that it is a fishing expedition and they really are after engineering documentation and technical drawings of a more secret kind. Building plans might have some useful bits to copy nut are likely to attract the kind of skills to create the worm. This could very well be just the first version. M$ windows and the applications running on top of it seem to have become the vector for wide ranging worms, viruses and trojans released by government espionage agencies running Linux ie they are safe screw everyone else. In wide ranging global fishing expeditions just to see what they can get, with no regard for unintended consequences. US lead the way into what is likely to cause M$ a lot of security based fiscal harm.

been known a while (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447191)

It's been known for many years that China is engaging in wide-scale corporate cyber-espionage. Anyone who got caught by this deserves what they got.

I'm sorry I no longer have the link handy, but Chinese nationals caught performing in-person corporate espionage in various countries have admitted straight out that such espionage is a top priority of the government there. It funds stays abroad and you are expected to "bring something back" to China when you return. That's not to say they all do it - lots of them are honest and intentionally return worthless data or otherwise subvert the intent. But also, lots do it too, and it's really easy any more now that we have multi-gigabyte micro-SD cards. Combined with the cyber-espionage, China is finding shortcuts to go from an agrarian society just a generation ago, to competing with the best technology from the west and Japan. That might not be a bad thing, either - increases their standard of living for instance and helps with the problems they had formerly with widespread starvation.

Anyway point is this should not be a surprise to ANY western company.

Easy to track down (4, Funny)

microbee (682094) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447231)

Just arrest all LISP programmers and beat them up until they talk. There aren't many anyways.

Re:Easy to track down (5, Interesting)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447541)

If you count all the custom versions of LISP out there used for scripting inside other applications I think you'd be rather surprised just how many LISP programmers there are. Half of them probably don't even know what they're writing in is based on LISP.

Re:Easy to track down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40448191)

And thome of us even talk with a lithp.

Re:Easy to track down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40450069)

Inthenthitive clod!

Re:Easy to track down (2)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447591)

There aren't many anyways

Clojure is becoming pretty popular these days, and there are plenty of not-so-trendy places where you see Scheme and Common Lisp being used. Also, do not forget that a certain widely used text editor is mostly written in Lisp, and that there are plenty of developers working on that editor.

Oh, yeah, and AutoCAD macros, but I am not sure how many people are writing those...

Re:Easy to track down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447813)

Microsoft Office is written in LISP? That EXPLAINS SO MUCH!

Re:Easy to track down (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448603)

Oh, yeah, and AutoCAD macros, but I am not sure how many people are writing those

It used to be a major selling point of AutoCAD and why I hated using the light version where repetive tasks couldn't be automated (I even imported data from spreadsheets and did decent graphs in CAD instead of the shit line graphs in MS Excel at the time). Then I just got used to not doing macros, and moved on to use other CAD that was not as shitty as AutoCAD LT. Now python has some DXF functions so you can do things to exported drawings as batch jobs or generate drawings from data without touching CAD at all.

Re:Easy to track down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40448683)

Hey, leave those poor people with speech impediments alone!

Re:Easy to track down (2)

Cow Jones (615566) | more than 2 years ago | (#40450315)

Just arrest all LISP programmers and beat them up until they Smalltalk.

Nth posto (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447287)

We are the slashdot trolls, my (just made, surprise butt fuck) friend.
And we keep on trollin' till the end.

We post goatse [goatse.ru] links.
Natalie portman and hot grits.

No time for lusers (Linux users),
Because FreeGayOS (FreeBSD) rules!

Nth+1 posto (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447333)

We are the slashdot trolls, my (just made, surprise butt fuck) friend.
And we keep on trollin' till the end.

We post goatse [goatse.ru] links.
Natalie portman and hot grits.

No time for lusers (Linux users),
Because FreeGayOS (FreeBSD) rules!

Free Tibet! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447365)

I think the best thing to do would be to flood those addresses with AutoCAD blue-prints of the Tibetan flag.

Uh oh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447367)

You see, we were using AutoCAd to design this Moon based "LASER" called the Allen Parson's Project.

This "LASER" and its subsequent installation was designed on AutoCad. I can't really state what I - er, - We were going to do with this "LASER" . All I can say it that the Chinese now have it.

I'd also like to report that a whole tankful of Sharked - with let;s say "devices" - strapped to their head have gone missing.

That is all,

S. Evil; MS (I haven't gotten my doctorate yet,) Bwahahahahahahhahahahah! AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAHHAHAH@! AHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAH!

pfft (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447399)

Thanks for last week's news, Shitdot. Timely as ever.

China (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447411)

I'm SHOCKED that Chinese email addresses seem to be involved. SHOCKED... and we will continue to do business with these lying cheating bastards who are waging economic warfare with the US until we send our last dollar there.

Re:China (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448051)

I'm SHOCKED that Chinese email addresses seem to be involved. SHOCKED... and we will continue to do business with these lying cheating bastards who are waging economic warfare with the US until we send our last dollar there.

um this is a attack on puru no the US. you can calm down now besides haven't you ever heard of hosted servers, they can be leased anywhere in the world and china would be a great place to put get one because they aren't likely to sell you out without large amounts of money being involved

NOT CHINA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447429)

BUT AMERICA!!! (AS ALWAYS...)

CAN YOU SPELL SINO-KOMMIES KIDDIES ?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447439)

I thought so !!

this would be a good time to send flawed data (5, Funny)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447479)

use the email addresses to send flawed data to china so they end up trying to build impossible things like what is found in Escher's drawings

The Coming Poiuyt Gap. (3, Funny)

bmo (77928) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447775)

But then they will be building the impossible while we only build the possible. They will have assumed that we have working Poiuyts and attempt to build them themselves, not knowing that they don't work. The biggest problem in not getting something done is assuming it can't be done. The Chinese will assume it can be done, and do it.

We will then be having generals and captains of industry bemoaning the Poiuyt Gap, which must be closed and we will spend trillions building Poiuyts.

--
BMO - What, me worry?

Re:The Coming Poiuyt Gap. (-1, Troll)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447931)

I"m more interested in chinese poontang gaps, myself.

Re:The Coming Poiuyt Gap. (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448211)

When expressing mildly off-topic and possibly off-color love for Chinese poontang on Slashdot, there's a little checkbox for you right next to the words 'Post as Anonymous Coward'. You must have missed it.

Re:The Coming Poiuyt Gap. (2)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448483)

nope

Re:The Coming Poiuyt Gap. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40448497)

Well it's a damn shame you didn't get modded insightful.

The Law of Unexpected consequences (4, Interesting)

Artifakt (700173) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447529)

A brand new install of Autocad costs $3,995 and up. It produces files that have a distinctive extension, making them easy to identify and to tell from other types of documents without even having to examine internal code. Any file produced by a legal autocad install was made by somebody who paid serious money to be able to do so. Ergo, if someone can harvest a thousand Autocad files at random, a high proportion of them will be of valuable, useful stuff.

        Fighting warez sites distributing Autocad means, if the company is successful, a higher percentage of the documents made with it will be the valuable stuff. At 4K a legitimate copy, actually stopping a high percentage of 'pirates' means increasing the danger to your own legitimate users.

          If going through 10,000 autocad documents means finding, say, a dozen new patent filings and diagrams, two trade secret process designs for million dollar product lines, a few archetectural blueprint packages, and such, it becomes worth a government paying a programming team to write the software and putting three or four fulltime engineers and a few technicians on just evaluating those documents for the 'good' ones. If there were a thousand bootleg copies of the software for every legitimate one, that government might not bother to go through 10 million documents for about the same haul, as most of the bootleg copies won't be producing anything worth that much.

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (5, Informative)

trout007 (975317) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447589)

AutoCAD isn't used by too many serious mechanical engineers anymore. We have moved to parametric CAD like Solid Works, Pro/E, CATIA, ect. Structural Engineers use programs like STAAD that have tools for compiling with structural steel standards. I do know some people that still use AutoCAD for schematic work.

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (1)

mbkennel (97636) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447745)

ah, that makes it so much more espionage proof.

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (4, Insightful)

WCVanHorne (897068) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447911)

Well in manufacturing you may be correct but in construction AutoDesk is still a top dog.

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40449007)

I'm in the construction field (architecture more specifically), and we left AutoCAD years ago for more advanced BIM software. And I'm in a part of the country that is somewhat behind our industry curve.

AutoCad is far from top dog. Compared to tools like Revit, it is just a dog. I'll never go back.

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (4, Informative)

GigaplexNZ (1233886) | more than 2 years ago | (#40449597)

Well in manufacturing you may be correct but in construction AutoDesk is still a top dog.

AutoCad is far from top dog. Compared to tools like Revit, it is just a dog. I'll never go back.

Revit is made by Autodesk.

architects (4, Insightful)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#40447913)

what the chinese will mostly get is many, many house floorplans, elevations and relfected ceiling plans

Re:architects (1)

physicsphairy (720718) | more than 2 years ago | (#40449025)

The Chinese do do a lot of copycat architecture [nationalgeographic.com] , model cities after other famous locations, etc. It is strangely plausible that this could actually be some kind of art heist. . . .

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40448599)

True, but if they meant any Autodesk software Autodesk Inventor is very common (much more than CATIA, I believe).

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40447653)

Any file produced by a legal autocad install was made by somebody who paid serious money to be able to do so.

I paid around 100 quid for a student edition, so not necessarily (although at the time that was serious money to me). Of course, when I upgraded Windows six months later, the damn dongle didn't work any more, so I resorted to a cracked copy that just happened to be two versions higher and didn't plaster "Education version - not for production use" all over everything...

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448273)

That, and AutoCAD where I worked last where there was an official install (with the retail price you mention, many pirate), you'd have ended up with useless GIS data that's kept in AutoCAD because ESRI costs more, and every GIS document generated was public knowledge and available from the city. It was mostly telephone pole locations for a telecom.

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (1)

joe_frisch (1366229) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448341)

I'm a bit surprised that it is worth it though. The vast majority of autocad drawings are really boring - building layouts, miscellaneous machine parts etc. It would be very labor intensive to go through zillions of stolen drawings to try to figure out which ones were actually valuable.

OTOH, this could be a sort of demonstration run. Once they find out how to quietly steal drawings, they might be able to modify the code to look for specific drawings from specific companies or government sites. They might be helped here by government agencies who have a uniform drawing numbering and description system.

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (1)

flyingsquid (813711) | more than 2 years ago | (#40449305)

If there were a thousand bootleg copies of the software for every legitimate one, that government might not bother to go through 10 million documents for about the same haul, as most of the bootleg copies won't be producing anything worth that much.

Wait, so the problem is that the Chinese are stealing people's blueprints, and your "solution" is to have people steal software? That's got to be the most twisted defense of piracy I've ever seen. I mean, if it's morally acceptable to take a piece of software that retails for $4000 without paying for it, then isn't it also morally acceptable for the Chinese to steal those blueprints? If it's okay to steal software, movies, and music because "information wants to be free" then its okay for the Chinese to, say, swipe the design for an American manufactured wind turbine because "information wants to be free". The whole argument that it's not really theft when you download an MP3 because you're not depriving them of an actual object would also apply to the manufacturer. The Chinese didn't actually take anything from them, all they did was rip off the design. It seems to me that either the creator has the right to control the distribution of the intellectual property or they don't.

Re:The Law of Unexpected consequences (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#40450439)

Wait, so the problem is that the Chinese are stealing people's blueprints, and your "solution" is to have people steal software? That's got to be the most twisted defense of piracy I've ever seen. I mean, if it's morally acceptable to take a piece of software that retails for $4000 without paying for it, then isn't it also morally acceptable for the Chinese to steal those blueprints?

Actually, the first action is unlikely to significantly reduce Autodesk's revenues, however, the second action plus Chinese companies selling cheaper knock-offs of your stuff can put your engineering company out of business. So if you're pragmatic, yes, the GP is on to something here.

Worm targets Windows machines .. (1)

dgharmon (2564621) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448013)

"Security researchers have come across a worm that is meant specifically to steal .. files created with the AutoCAD software. The worm, known as ACAD/Medre.A, is spreading through infected AutoCAD templates .. ACAD/Medre.A was written in AutoLISP, a specialized version of the LISP scripting language that's used in AutoCAD".

Does this 'worm` run on any other system except Microsoft Windows?

Re:Worm targets Windows machines .. (1)

GigaplexNZ (1233886) | more than 2 years ago | (#40449619)

It probably runs on OS X too since AutoCAD runs there.

Oh people, please make bogus AutoCAD plans! (1)

aisnota (98420) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448041)

If you are infected with this, please please make bogus plans for exotic weapons, marital aides and artistic expressions.

Please salt those wounds!

Ahem (1)

drdrgivemethenews (1525877) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448113)

LISP is not a scripting language.

-------

My other car is a cdr.

Re:Ahem (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448713)

AutoLISP is from memory. It got a very shitty reputation because on the early implementations in AutoCAD (some of which I had the misfortune of using), the parser was very sensitive to whitespace and had a few other little quirks. That meant that sometimes a script wouldn't run until you deleted a line and retyped in the the same human readable text - so debugging was very time consuming. I attempted to write a 3D drawing to G-code converter in it as part of a Univerisity CAD subject in 1988 (feed in drawings, then output code a CNC milling machine can use), but back then the "standard" was model specific so it was really far beyond the scope of one person in one semester for anything other than rigged demos (the input drawings done in a very specific way).

Blueprints? (4, Funny)

BobandMax (95054) | more than 2 years ago | (#40448399)

If it can steal blueprints, that is one sophisticated piece of software. It would have to fold them, stuff and seal envelopes, calculate and affix postage and deposit them in the outgoing mail. Wow!

Re:Blueprints? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40449759)

In general, blueprints are better rolled and shipped in tubes. If you're going to write a virus that can stuff an envelope, you might as well do it properly and not damage the loot.

Original research on ACAD/Medre.A at ESET's web si (5, Informative)

Aryeh Goretsky (129230) | more than 2 years ago | (#40449173)

Hello,

Somewhat surprised to see that the original research on the worm by ESET has not been mentioned yet on Slashdot. For all those who are interested, here it is:

From speaking with some of the ESET folks involved in the above, it seems there may be additional details forthcoming.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Chinese mailboxes neq China (1)

Katatsumuri (1137173) | more than 2 years ago | (#40449539)

Maybe it's just some local corporate espionage using Chinese mailboxes to cover their tracks.
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