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New Mineral Found In Meteorite

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the please-don't-call-it-unobtianium dept.

Space 85

Virtucon writes "The new mineral was found embedded in the Allende meteorite, which fell to Earth in 1969. Since 2007, geologist Chi Ma of Caltech has been probing the meteorite with a scanning electron microscope, discovering nine new materials including panguite. 'Panguite’s primordial nature means that it was actually around before the Earth and other planets formed, meaning it can help scientists learn more about the conditions in the cloud of gas and dust that gave rise to our solar system.'"

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85 comments

So did he develop super powers? (5, Funny)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 2 years ago | (#40462521)

I guess The Panguin is already taken.

Re:So did he develop super powers? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40462561)

The Panguin... half man... half penguin... half pan-handler!

Re:So did he develop super powers? (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 2 years ago | (#40463669)

half man... half penguin... half pan-handler!

Three halves? Wait a minute... which one are you - Tom or Ray?

Re:So did he develop super powers? (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about 2 years ago | (#40464835)

I worked with a lot of people that are 3 halves. I'm not far off. Now, do I go to the gym or have Ribs for lunch Hmm?

Re:So did he develop super powers? (2)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#40467181)

The Panguin... half man... half penguin

Already here... don't pacemakers run Linux?

I saw this in the firehose and RTFA (yeah, I know, so sue me). It led me to look up the new mineral on wikipedia (not much there) and the Chinese God that it was named after. Interstingly, the Chinese genesis legend is incredibly similar to the Judeo-Christian/Muslim Genesis.

Odd how so many ancient religions world-wide from completely different and isolated parts of the world can be so similar. The Chinese legand even has counterparts in many native American religions.

I was just a little let down by the "new mineral" though, it's very similar and related to other minerals fairly common on earth. It's a form of titanium oxide, which is used in pigments and has been for a long time.

Re:So did he develop super powers? (1)

Mr. Slippery (47854) | about 2 years ago | (#40470337)

Odd how so many ancient religions world-wide from completely different and isolated parts of the world can be so similar.

The world wassn't so "isolated" in the old days as we usually think. Buddha statues in China and Japan were came about via the ancient Greek practice of making statues of deities. There's some evidence that the Chinese visited the Americas before Columbus. Ideas get around.

Re:So did he develop super powers? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40462935)

No, but he rides his horse ever more proudly as he watches the flowers fly by.

Element Zero (2)

Deathnerd (1734374) | about 2 years ago | (#40462523)

Totally read this hoping we'd finally discovered Element Zero [wikia.com] . *sigh* Another time, perhaps.

Elerium 115 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40463067)

I was personally hoping they found Elerium 115 ;)
Maybe then we could explore the galaxy.

Re:Elerium 115 (4, Funny)

Cryacin (657549) | about 2 years ago | (#40463137)

The Elerium 115 is right there on the shelf between the unobtainium and the pure weapons grade balonium.

Re:Elerium 115 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40464049)

Haha. I was afraid that might be the case.

Re:Elerium 115 (1)

Rollgunner (630808) | about 2 years ago | (#40467677)

You still use Balonium? If you want to maximize your nucleonic blasts, you need to refine it into Phoni-Balonium

Re:Element Zero (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40468455)

Element ZeroZero was discovered a long time ago... no wait...

The 2 questions on our minds... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40462551)

1) Can we eat it? (and will it give us super powers)
2) Will it blend?

Re:The 2 questions on our minds... (4, Funny)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 2 years ago | (#40462635)

If Prometheus taught us anything, ingesting extraterrestrial materials leads to worms coming out of our eyes.

Re:The 2 questions on our minds... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40462755)

If Prometheus taught us anything, ingesting extraterrestrial materials leads to worms coming out of our eyes.

It gets much much worse than that my friend.

Sometimes it leads to NIGGERS!

Worms out your eyes would definitely suck but it wouldn't destroy civilization.

Re:The 2 questions on our minds... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40462811)

Hey! You know the rules. Only one question per post.

Panguite (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40462555)

So, much like the year of linux on the desktop, it's fleeting and goes down in flames?

Re:Panguite (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#40462719)

So, much like the year of linux on the desktop, it's fleeting and goes down in flames?

maybe... but, like linux, I hear is also hard to melt down.

Bot! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40462655)

Pretty sure the article was auto-generated by a buzzwordifier:

Panguite (IMA 2010-057), (Ti4+,Sc,Al,Mg,Zr,Ca)1.8O3, is a new titania, occurring as fine-grained crystals with Ti-rich davisite in an ultra-refractory inclusion within an amoeboid olivine inclusion from the Allende CV3 carbonaceous chondrite.

Doesn't mainstream PC tech use the least abusive field-related babble when compared to medicine and legalese?

Re:Bot! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40462691)

Weird, here I thought is was a competitive Starcraft tourney play-by-play.

Andromeda Strain (3, Informative)

rossdee (243626) | about 2 years ago | (#40463209)

"Panguite (IMA 2010-057), (Ti4+,Sc,Al,Mg,Zr,Ca)1.8O3, is a new titania, occurring as fine-grained crystals with Ti-rich davisite in an ultra-refractory inclusion within an amoeboid olivine inclusion from the Allende CV3 carbonaceous chondrite."

amoeboid?

Uh-oh
Better call in Dr Jeremy Stone and the Wildfire team

Re:Andromeda Strain (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40465999)

It's a mineralogical texture (shape). It just means that the shape of the edges of the mineral grain is quite wiggly, with deep embayments and projections, kind of like the shape of the pseudopods of an amoeba. The short way to describe it would be "blobby" or "shaped like an amoeba". So, the new mineral is found as an amoeba-shaped inclusion within an (also) amoeboid-shaped olivine mineral grain. The olivine grains were already well-known from this meteorite. For example, see this paper [uchicago.edu] [PDF] from 1976, although the pictures in the scan are very poor.

Re:Bot! (4, Insightful)

Ruie (30480) | about 2 years ago | (#40463387)

Pretty sure the article was auto-generated by a buzzwordifier:

Panguite (IMA 2010-057), (Ti4+,Sc,Al,Mg,Zr,Ca)1.8O3, is a new titania, occurring as fine-grained crystals with Ti-rich davisite in an ultra-refractory inclusion within an amoeboid olivine inclusion from the Allende CV3 carbonaceous chondrite.

Doesn't mainstream PC tech use the least abusive field-related babble when compared to medicine and legalese?

For once we have a line of scientific discussion and you are complaining ?

Re:Bot! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40464301)

And soon it will be that whomever control the panguite controls the world.... get ready for a new spacerace.

Re:Bot! - not (1)

sensei moreh (868829) | about 2 years ago | (#40465499)

No buzzwordifiers were used to create that statement. It's actually quite straight-forward and descriptive. What surprises me is that new minerals are still being discovered in the Allende meteroite, given how much its been studied over the last 40+ years.

Re:Bot! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40469575)

Is it ironic that you misidentify the passage as a buzzword, but call it such because you mindlessly reproduce sentences you've seen others create?

Just because you don't understand the technical words doesn't mean they are being used incorrectly.

Re:Bot! (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#40470247)

Pretty sure the article was auto-generated by a buzzwordifier

I see you've never read a real research paper. You're likely to see the word "enumerate" fifteen times in a single paragraph without once seeing the word "count".

It looks more to me like he cut and pasted from the paper.

Panguite’s primordial nature (2)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#40462683)

'Panguite’s primordial nature means that it was actually around before the Earth and other planets formed, meaning it can help scientists learn more about the conditions in the cloud of gas and dust that gave rise to our solar system.'

How can one be sure a meteorite that fell on Earth in 1969 is representative for the "gas cloud and dust that gave rise to our solar system"? I mean, can't the meteorite be originated in other start systems?

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (4, Informative)

meglon (1001833) | about 2 years ago | (#40462911)

Certainly they could, however, given the distance to the closest star system from us, the travel times, the odds of hitting something as small as our planet with something even smaller from that distance, plus given the uncertainties of what actually lies between those systems and how that medium would interact with anything traveling through it, and even the unknown variable of what it would take to eject such an item from the originating system in the first place (not all systems are the same)... one would be far safer to go with the simplest answer, instead of opting for the answer that is so incredibly remotely possible.

Just saying.... the simplest answer is usually the right one.

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about 2 years ago | (#40463123)

billions of years ago the clusters would have been closer per BBT, its still possible that sometime all those years ago rocks had more of a chance of galaxy skipping no? having said that K.I.S.S. for sure

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (2)

meglon (1001833) | about 2 years ago | (#40463707)

Well, i was generalizing on the previous post, and it was in reference to other star systems.

Aside from the obvious unknowables at the moment, the interactions of the interstellar medium, interactions in transition from and into the systems themselves as well as the energy needed to eject the item from the system (which is also part of the transition out), we can do some basic math to calculate travel time, if we make a few basic assumptions.

The entry speed of a meteorite into our atmosphere is ~11-25km/sec. Using a high average of 20km.sec, and placing that as the average travel speed of the object (huge assumption), an object traveling 4x10 16th meters (no clue how to do expo here, so bear with me) which would be the rounded current distance to Alpha Centauri (give or take a couple inches i'm sure), would take over 2 trillion years to bridge the space in between (~150 times the age of the universe). Given that Alpha Centauri is getting closer to us, that distance (and travel time) would have been greater in the past.

Now, you may have meant other systems, but you typed "galaxy skipping." Alpha Centauri is ~4.3 ly distant, the nearest galaxy is Canis Major Dwarf at ~25000 ly distance, assuming you want to include the Milky Way's satellite galaxies as such. That's going to add at least a couple more minutes to travel time.

It all comes down to speed. There's certainly much more energetic objects out there than 20km/sec, and certainly a lot of ways to get something going much faster than that.

Now, it's certainly possible that this object did originate inside our systems disc, it could have been some random trash floating in interstellar space that our system simply ran over and accumulated. That one will take us going out there and getting samples to see what's there though, and that's going to be a 50 year project at best... which is actually a pretty good idea for one, but that's my opinion. So while the odds are pretty dang small that it came from a system that currently exists, it may have came from a system that used to exist and happened to be in the path of our system which means that something could have been much closer to us billions of years ago (or even before the forming of our system) and simply be a bunch of rubble that we're passing through now.

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (1)

hankwang (413283) | about 2 years ago | (#40463903)

"current distance to Alpha Centauri (give or take a couple inches i'm sure), would take over 2 trillion years to bridge the space in between"

You made an error in your calculation. Since 20 km/s is 1/15000 of the speed of light, it would take 15000*4=60000 years to travel 4 light years, which is quite a bit less than your number.

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (1)

meglon (1001833) | about 2 years ago | (#40472377)

Thanks. Once i remember where i did my calcs i'll try to figure out how i screwed that one up so much. I'm pretty sure it's when i multiplied it by 8.5% a couple times too many. I'm too light a weight for alcohol anymore.

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40463943)

IANAA

But isn't the escape velocity from the sun is something like 600km/s? So something falling from infinity/very far away towards the sun would be moving quite a bit faster than 20km/s for most of the distance?

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (3, Informative)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 2 years ago | (#40467969)

we can do some basic math to calculate travel time, if we make a few basic assumptions.

The entry speed of a meteorite into our atmosphere is ~11-25km/sec. Using a high average of 20km.sec, and placing that as the average travel speed of the object (huge assumption)

We can do some better calculations from those same numbers also.

For instance, 11km/s relative to Earth is below solar escape speed, so a rock moving that fast did NOT come from outside the solar system (barring some really interesting interactions with multiple planets on entry to the Solar System - and we can't assume that condition existed for most (or even many) of the meteors arriving at the low end of meteor speeds).

On the other hand, 25 km/s relative to Earth could be moving greater than solar escape speed, if it were moving more or less in the same direction Earth is at impact - if it's basically chasing Earth, then it's moving at about 31 km/s in excess of solar escape speed.

On the other hand, if it's coming in at a larger angle relative to Earth's motion, then it may still be moving at less than solar escape speed. Coming in perpendicular to Earth's orbital motion, for instance, leaves it moving about 4 km/s BELOW solar escape speed.

Which leave you with (assuming arbitrary of meteor orbits) less than half of all meteors coming in at the high-end of the speed range are interstellar, with an even small fraction of the slower ones being interstellar objects.

Which leaves you with most of them being local, with no regards to travel time.

Note, by the way, that travel time is pretty much irrelevant to the likelihood a rock came from around another star.

Note also that your travel time estimates are off by a several orders of magnitude. You have the approximate distance in meters to Alphacent correct, but you then divide that by a speed in km/s (giving you an error of 3 orders of magnitude), then you compound that error by assuming that the result of that first division was time in YEARS instead of SECONDS (giving you an error of another seven orders of magnitude).

The correct answer, by the by, for your numbers, is about 63000 years.

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (1)

meglon (1001833) | about 2 years ago | (#40472351)

Yeh, you and Hankwang corrected me on that one, and thanks for laying out where i went wrong. My mistake was such a big one i'll have to take time to find my calcs and go over it... once my hangover goes away (which feels like might be a couple weekends hence - advil just ain't slowing it down any).

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#40463155)

Just saying.... the simplest answer is usually the right one.

The the annoying thing about sayings - one can found others, equally plausible/witty, pointing towards the contrary
Like: "There is always a well-known solution to every human problem--neat, plausible, and wrong."

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (1)

meglon (1001833) | about 2 years ago | (#40463777)

Yes, quotes can be made to say just about anything by someone that want's a quote to be interpreted a certain way. However, i'm not entirely alone in the basic sentiment of my post: http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/scientific-experiments/occams-razor.htm [howstuffworks.com]

I would also suggest that our planet accreating matter wouldn't really fit into the meaning of "human problem" in Mr Mencken's quote, who wrote about the affairs of actual living humans, not the falling of meteorites from the sky.

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (2)

guruevi (827432) | about 2 years ago | (#40463385)

Most of the stuff in our solar system, stays in our solar system - you know gravity and such. Most of the stuff in other solar systems likewise stays in their respective solar systems. I don't think there are any known objects that traverse(d) multiple solar systems. Sure, in the beginning (at the birth of our solar system, when the sun was in a cluster of stars) the matter could've all been close enough to each other to share some other solar systems' rocks but at this point in time (astronomically) the stuff in our solar system stays in our solar system.

Re:Panguite’s primordial nature (1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 2 years ago | (#40468037)

but at this point in time (astronomically) the stuff in our solar system stays in our solar system.

Note that a comet falling in from the edge of the system can, if it passes near enough to Jupiter (but not too near) leave the vicinity of Jupiter moving at more than solar escape speed.

In which case, it would not stay in our solar system.

12 posts in (5, Funny)

Ukab the Great (87152) | about 2 years ago | (#40462845)

And no adamantium references. They just don't make basement virgins like they used to.

Re:12 posts in (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40462921)

In defense of my basement virginity, have you ever tried typing adamantium with one hand?

Re:12 posts in (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40469831)

You must stop this piracy at once !

Re:12 posts in (1)

jeko (179919) | about 2 years ago | (#40469733)

Worse yet, no kryptonite references at all. Sigh. No one studies the classics any more...

Zantetsuken (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40462897)

No comments about turning it into a sword that can cut anything and everything?

I am immensely saddened this day.

And they know this how? (0)

ArcadeNut (85398) | about 2 years ago | (#40462983)

'Panguite’s primordial nature means that it was actually around before the Earth and other planets formed,

So how exactly did they come to this "Scientific" conclusion?

Re:And they know this how? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40463161)

From the Wikipedia (I'd never taint my honor by RTFA):

"Panguite is in a class of refractory minerals that formed under the high temperatures and extremely varied pressures present in the early solar system, up to 4.5 billion years ago. This makes panguite one of the oldest minerals in the solar system. Zirconium is a key element in determining conditions prior to and during the solar system’s formation."

I'm no chemist, but from that it seems they know when it was formed because of the temperature/pressure required to join the elements together (now how they know how things were back then I don't know). But yeah, it's a pain when so-called journalists write but don't communicate much of anything.

Re:And they know this how? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40463687)

Most journo's are female, hence...etc etc

just saying....*ducks*

Re:And they know this how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40467643)

Heh...You said taint.

Re:And they know this how? (3, Informative)

Fred Ferrigno (122319) | about 2 years ago | (#40463363)

And now you know: [doi.org]

We have studied Pb-isotope systematics of chondrules from the oxidized CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende. The chondrules contain variably radiogenic Pb with a (206)Pb/(204)Pb ratio between 19.5–268. Pb-Pb isochron regression for eight most radiogenic analyses yielded the date of 4566.2 ± 2.5 Ma. Internal residue-leachate isochrons for eight chondrule fractions yielded consistent dates with a weighted average of 4566.6 ± 1.0 Ma, our best estimate for an average age of Allende chondrule formation.

Penguinite! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40463009)

Finally they've found Batman's one weakness :D

Ridiculous? (0)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 2 years ago | (#40463011)

'Panguite’s primordial nature means that it was actually around before the Earth and other planets formed

How could they possibly know that? Do we know the composition of every mineral on every planet and in every asteroid in the entire solar system? They could have broken off of another planet due to a meteorite strike 200 years ago and we'd have no idea.

Also, I'm halfway through season 2 of the X-files on netflix and they've already discovered three previously unknown elements lol. Unfortunately, none of them were so blatantly named after Linux as the one in this story.

I'm actually trying to be nice when I say this.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40463131)

Yes, they _blatantly_ named it Panguite in honor of the Linux operating system... Are you retarded?

On a side note, can anybody clean up this gibberish?

Panguite (IMA 2010-057), (Ti4+,Sc,Al,Mg,Zr,Ca)1.8O3, is a new titania, occurring as fine-grained crystals with Ti-rich davisite in an ultra-refractory inclusion within an amoeboid olivine inclusion from the Allende CV3 carbonaceous chondrite.

I feel like I suddenly don't understand english?

Re:I'm actually trying to be nice when I say this. (4, Insightful)

aiht (1017790) | about 2 years ago | (#40463511)

Yes, they _blatantly_ named it Panguite in honor of the Linux operating system... Are you retarded?

On a side note, can anybody clean up this gibberish?

Panguite (IMA 2010-057), (Ti4+,Sc,Al,Mg,Zr,Ca)1.8O3, is a new titania, occurring as fine-grained crystals with Ti-rich davisite in an ultra-refractory inclusion within an amoeboid olivine inclusion from the Allende CV3 carbonaceous chondrite.

I feel like I suddenly don't understand english?

I am not a geologist, but...
Panguite [discovery ID?], [chemical composition etc.], is a new [titanium mineral] occurring as fine-grained crystals with [titanium]-rich [other mineral also discovered in the same meteorite] in a [high melting-point] [section] within an [irregularly shaped] [other mineral] [section] from the [meteorite].

Does anybody who actually knows what they're talking about want to chime in?

And, for people who still had trouble with the above:
Panguite is a new [mineral], occurring [with other minerals] [in a meteorite]. :P

Re:I'm actually trying to be nice when I say this. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40466253)

You got most of it.

IMA is the International Mineralogical Association, which certifies any new mineral claims and places them in an official catalog by that number. "Amoeboid" just means mineral grains "shaped like an amoeba", i.e. kind of "blobby" with lots of projections and embayments. This is pretty typical for olivine from this particular meteorite type (carbonaceous chondrite [wikipedia.org] ) and the particular fall, Allende [wikipedia.org] (named after the place where it fell in Mexico -- this happens to be a particularly famous and well-studied fall, if not *the* most famous one. Hell, even *I* have a piece of this meteorite because there is so much of it. It's one of the cheaper ones to buy). "CV3" refers to the exact meteorite classification.

Olivine [wikipedia.org] is a common iron-magnesium silicate mineral on the Earth, well known for forming the Earth's upper mantle, but perhaps better known as the gemstone peridot. As the "olive" name suggests, it is often greenish in colour (yellow-green is typical). The new mineral is found as an inclusion (i.e. inside) the olivine grains, and these inclusions are also amoeboid in shape. So, tiny blobs of Ti-rich minerals inside bigger, blobby-shaped olivine crystals. The new mineral is mixed as tiny (i.e. "fine-grained") crystals within davisite, a previously-known Ti-bearing mineral that also is common on Earth (and davisite compositions vary, so they mention that this is the Ti-rich version of it). The "ultra-refractory" part refers to the fact that the minerals involved in the inclusions have very high melting/vapourization temperatures (typical for Ti minerals), implying that if they solidified/condensed in the solar nebula, they were probably formed very early in the process as the stuff was cooling down, before the formation of the olivine grains that surround them. As such they may preserve the early history of this material as it started clumping together to form what eventually became a large meteorite chunk.

Carbonaceous chondrites are special among meteorites because they preserve an early stage of the clumping together and differentiation of solar system material -- they didn't get big enough to melt most of their material and separate the denser metals into the core versus the crust and mantle, like happened on the Earth and all the other large planetary bodies and moons. They were "frozen" in a relatively unaltered state compared to larger bodies. It's kind of like you have all the ingredients for a nice cake (planet), but they got shoved into the freezer and left for a few billion years instead of getting cooked in the oven.

Okay, okay, I'll try a car analogy. It's like you have the iron ore, aluminum ore, oil, sand, and all the other raw materials that go into manufacturing a car, but they haven't been processed yet. If you want to know how to build a car "from scratch", this could be useful material to compare to the finished product (the car being analogous to a planet in this case).

Re:I'm actually trying to be nice when I say this. (1)

DMUTPeregrine (612791) | about 2 years ago | (#40475269)

The above is a good example of why technical language gets used. Anyone skilled in minerology understood the two-line version. Laypeople need the 3-4 paragraph version. Technical language is far more information dense than basic language.

Re:I'm actually trying to be nice when I say this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40469571)

Does anybody who actually knows what they're talking about want to chime in?

This is a Panguite meteorite. All craftdwarfship is of the highest quality. It menaces with spikes of Davisite. On the on the item is an image of the sun in Olivine. The sun is being born. On the item is an image of asteroids in Starmetal. The asteroids are grouping into planets.

Re:I'm actually trying to be nice when I say this. (3, Informative)

polymeris (902231) | about 2 years ago | (#40464239)

Panguite (IMA 2010-057), (Ti4+,Sc,Al,Mg,Zr,Ca)1.8O3, is a new titania, occurring as fine-grained crystals with Ti-rich davisite in an ultra-refractory inclusion within an amoeboid olivine inclusion from the Allende CV3 carbonaceous chondrite.

A titanium-bearing mineral has been accepted into the International Mineralogical Asoc.'s catalgoue. Chondrites are a class of meteorites, the important part being that they are supposed to have formed as such and were not part of a larger body. (No evidence of impact or melting).
Some carbonaceous meteorites have large (several mm diameter) grains of material which were formed in vacuum, in particular those of the CV subtype. This particular meteorite's chrondrules (that's what those grains are called) contain refractory (i.e. heat-resistant) material in the amoeboid (rounded, irregular shape) olvine inclusions. Olivine is a basic ( = low silica content) mineral series common in celestial bodies (also the inner earth) and very suceptible to weathering, that is, exposure to water. Altered olivine has been found in fragments of meteorites from mars, which is the reason it is believed that there once was a water on that planet. But that's another story.

Re:Ridiculous? (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#40469989)

How could they possibly know that?

The comment right above yours explains it. Stop trying for fisrt post and actually do a little reading and you might actually learn something.

Unfortunately, none of them were so blatantly named after Linux as the one in this story.

*sigh*... you kids hate reading, don't you? It's not named after Linux, it's named for the ancient Chinese god Pan Gu, the creator of the world through the separation of yin (earth) from yang (sky). And it doesn't even sound like "penguin", do you have dyslexia or something?

I know some folks think it's against the rules, but next time read the fucking article and stop wasting our time with worthless comments.

6 in just 1 little rock? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40463023)

It's pretty amazing that we can discover so many from 1 rock. The future looks pretty bright for the material engineers out there and those working with meta-materials... I wonder what other combinations of the basic elements can exist stably.

Re:6 in just 1 little rock? (1)

JustOK (667959) | about 2 years ago | (#40464489)

Imagine what you can find out from 30 Rock.

Re:6 in just 1 little rock? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40472223)

Not much, unless you're smoking Crack Rocks while doing so. o.O

unobtainium? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40463379)

i think this would be the most awesome name to call it... hehe

eBSD is not dead ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40463471)

it's on the stars [geoscienceworld.org] :-p

Headline misleading (2)

CanEHdian (1098955) | about 2 years ago | (#40463605)

The headline is terribly misleading;

Panguite’s primordial nature means that it was actually around before the Earth and other planets formed

It's actually a very old mineral that has been found.

Someone tell Batman, the Panguin is on the loose! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40464933)

Na Na Na Na Na Na Na2CO3

I find this more exciting than element finds. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40465351)

We can typically predict fairly well how new elements will act, and so far the super-heavies have been pretty accurate.
But when we come across new element combinations, that there is really exciting, something we never thought of.
Brute-forcing element combinations is just too much work unless you are looking very specifically for a small subset of those combinations (whether you are in semiconductors or trying to produce even more heat-resistant engine blades)

Still, if we ever find that Island of Stability in the super-heavies, oh dude oh man.
Maybe colliders might get a bit more money thrown at them if any of them are of any use. (especially medical or military, more so military, sadly)

http://www.brand-onlinerabat.dk,nike free run blac (-1, Offtopic)

lincici9 (2671681) | about 2 years ago | (#40466091)

http://www.brand-onlinerabat.dk/nike-free-sko-c-277.html [brand-onlinerabat.dk] http://www.brand-onlinerabat.dk/nike-shox-sko-c-188.html [brand-onlinerabat.dk] nike free run orange blue men nike free run +2 herre sko nike free pink yellow nike free run billigt nike free run black orange nike free run black white women nike free run blue black yellow nike free run b?rnesko nike free run dame pink sort nike free run dame sort pink nike free run damesko purple-white nike free run grey pink nike free 3.0 limited nike free 3.0 pink and yellow nike free 3.0 red nike free 3.0 sko nike free 3.0 nike free 3.0 nike free 3.0 black blue nike free 3.0 black/blue nike free 3.0 blue v3 nike free 3.0 gray green nike free + 2 black yellow white nike free + 2 women billige sko nike free 0,5 til kvinder nike free nike free 2 nike free 2 max reed nike free 2 red nike free 2011 nike free 3,0 nike free 3,0 herre nike free 46 nike free 5.0 nike free 5.0 herre black... nike free 5.0 men blue/orange nike free 5.0 v4 st?rrelse nike free billig nike free billigst nike free billigt nike free black and pink nike free black and white woman nike free black orange nike free blue and pink nike free b?rnesko nike free dame pink nike free fit tr nike free herre nike free kvinde nike free orange grey nike free piger nike nike free 3.0 v3 nike free sko til m?nd nike free sko+pink nike free til herre nike free til kvinder nike free tr fit 2 nike free tr herre nike free tr?ningssko nike free women shoe black

No superhero transformation? (1)

sproketboy (608031) | about 2 years ago | (#40466509)

And none of these new minerals have changed Chi Ma into a super hero yet? How disappointing.

Lets try it on.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40469337)

It might be gray Kryptonite.

Lets try it on Superman, to see what it does to him.

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