×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

The Leap Second Is Here! Are Your Systems Ready?

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the about-time dept.

Bug 284

Tmack writes "The last time we had a leap second, sysadmins were taken a bit by surprise when a random smattering of systems locked up (including Slashdot itself) due to a kernel bug causing a race condition specific to the way leap seconds are handled/notified by ntp. The vulnerable kernel versions (prior to 2.6.29) are still common amongst older versions of popular distributions (Debian Lenny, RHEL/CentOS 5) and embedded/black-box style appliances (Switches, load balancers, spam filters/email gateways, NAS devices, etc). Several vendors have released patches and bulletins about the possibility of a repeat of last time. Are you/your team/company ready? Are you upgraded, or are you going to bypass this by simply turning off NTP for the weekend?" Update: 07/01 03:14 GMT by S : ZeroPaid reports that this issue took down the Pirate Bay for a few hours.

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

284 comments

Irony (5, Funny)

bughunter (10093) | about 2 years ago | (#40507561)

Leap years = no problem.

Leap seconds = kernel panic.

I fear for teh internets if we try a leap millisecond.

Re:Irony (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507957)

But with Linux, things get fixed really fast. Apparently they get fixed, but not deployed? I mean really - if this was fixed a year ago, what is the excuse for still running the old problematic version? I'm interested to hear what the excuse is - because it will probably sound a lot like the things you all flame Windows users for...

Re:Irony (4, Interesting)

0123456 (636235) | about 2 years ago | (#40507975)

I'm interested to hear what the excuse is - because it will probably sound a lot like the things you all flame Windows users for...

A lot of Linux systems are on private networks and have to be up 24/7. Dealing with a known bug is considered less problematic than installing a new OS version and invalidating all the testing which has proven that the system can run 24/7 over the last few years.

So I guess you're right, it is very similar to the reasons why there are many unpatched Windows systems out there.

Re:Irony (1)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 2 years ago | (#40508415)

Dealing with a known bug is considered less problematic than installing a new OS version...

If there's a kernel bug to be patched, you download and install a newer kernel, with the bug patch, then reboot (at some time when the outage will be the least inconvenient) into the new version. And, if you really can't afford the downtime, there are ways to get a new kernel running without even that. No need for a complete OS upgrade, just to get a more recent kernel.

Re:Irony (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508159)

The RedHat patch only came out 2 months ago, a lot of sites may not have had a downtime scheduled, and their sysadmins may have been too busy reading people's emails and changing printer cartridges to check the patch bulletins.

Re:Irony (4, Insightful)

pla (258480) | about 2 years ago | (#40508387)

I mean really - if this was fixed a year ago, what is the excuse for still running the old problematic version?

The excuse? I have a file server and a router that run 24/7/365.24 (+1/86400, on occasion), and they just work. I have no interest in even logging into them, and they will remain "stock" systems until either a critical SSL vulnerability (in the case of the router) or I absolutely need a feature not possible with that old of a system. And when I say "old", I mean, talking "Slackware 4" here until about a year ago.

One of the nice things about Linux - It just works. You don't get random reboots every two weeks when Microsoft decides you must install this particular update, It doesn't get "crufty" the same way the Windows registry does, it doesn't suddenly fail to boot one morning (though in fairness, the fact that we never shut them down probably leads to a bias in that regard). It just works, day after day, year after year. If it worked yesterday and no hardware failed overnight, it will work today.

Now... If you want to call that something that we complain about in Windows... Hey, I'll admit it, I want my software to "just work". Whether that means a Linux server that never goes down, or an XP desktop environment that (for the 18-24 months between puking) everything supports, I just want my hammer to pound nails and my crowbar to pull them back out, and I don't care if my screwdriver believes in Buddha or Jesus or Xenu.

Re:Irony (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#40508265)

Jokes aside, the issue is that leap seconds are not deterministic.

TAI, based on whatever flavor of atomic clock is currently the going standard, is markedly more regular than the observed time based on the movement of the earth(UT1). UTC ticks at the same rate as TAI; but is supposed to correspond to UT1, which ticks at an unpredictable rate. So, whenever UT1 and UTC drift too far apart(DUT1 approaches .9 seconds), UTC gets a leap second. The UTC tick rate is constant; but the leap-second days are 1 second longer.

Obviously, we should just abandon this UTC nonsense.

How is this an issue? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507567)

NTP says it's 12:34:56pm, then it's 12:34:56pm. Why would a leap second lock things up any more than a clock that's one second slow and is corrected by NTP?

Re:How is this an issue? (4, Informative)

swalve (1980968) | about 2 years ago | (#40507575)

When NTP tries to say that it is 12:34:61 and the computer only expects 1-60.

Re:How is this an issue? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507609)

You mean 0-59 and tonight is 60, right?

Re:How is this an issue? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507645)

When NTP tries to say that it is 12:34:61 and the computer only expects 1-60.

Why wouldn't they just jump from :05 to :07?

Re:How is this an issue? (1)

msauve (701917) | about 2 years ago | (#40507719)

That would subtract a second. While that is possible, it's never happened. In any case, leap seconds, added or subtracted, are preferably at midnight on the last day of June or December, second preference last day of March or September. They are, however, allowed to happen on the last day of any month.

"A positive or negative leap-second should be the last second of a UTC month, but first preference should be given to the end of December and June, and second preference to the end of March and September." - ITU-R Recommendation TF.460-4

Re:How is this an issue? (5, Informative)

mgscheue (21096) | about 2 years ago | (#40507651)

It actually goes 23h 59m 59s, 23h 59m 60s, 00h 00m 00s. See http://www.nist.gov/pml/div688/leapseconds.cfm

Re:How is this an issue? (3, Informative)

certsoft (442059) | about 2 years ago | (#40508371)

Unfortunately some GPS vendors don't get it right. I was testing conformance of a IT530 from FastRaxGPS which uses the Mediatek MT3339 receiver.

It put out the sequence 23:59:59, 23:59:59, 00:00:00 repeating second 59 instead of using second 60.

Re:How is this an issue? (4, Insightful)

msauve (701917) | about 2 years ago | (#40507653)

Poorly written software only expects seconds to go from 0-59. Positive leap seconds are counted 23:59:59 -> 23:59:60 -> 0:0:0. Leap seconds have been around since 1972, the same year Unix was rewritten in C. There's been plenty of time to get things right.

Re:How is this an issue? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507729)

For once i feel good for my lazy coding, at least it supports all kinds of leaps (and goto-s). Maybe we should only work on 64-bit unsigned integers to be sure? 64-bit hours, 64-bit minutes, 64-bit seconds?

Re:How is this an issue? (3, Insightful)

mcavic (2007672) | about 2 years ago | (#40508233)

Why would a Unix application ever see the :60? Any time someone checks the clock, the time should be derived from Unix time (seconds since the epoch) which doesn't account for leap seconds. So to an application it should appear as a duplicate :00 or :59.

Re:How is this an issue? (1)

whitedsepdivine (1491991) | about 2 years ago | (#40507589)

Today - 24 hrs = Today; Only Today.

Today - ( 24 hrs + 1 sec) = Yesterday

Re:How is this an issue? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507669)

Depends on the definition of an hour. Does the leap second make one hour slightly longer or does it not belong to an hour. If you add or subtract hours, are they always normal hours or does it depend on the date and time to/from which they are added/subtracted. The computer could treat a subtraction of 24 hours across the leap second as a subtraction of 86401 seconds. If however you subtract 86400 seconds, which is more likely, it couldn't do the right thing.

Natural time is hard, that's why at their core, computers use "(milli/micro)seconds since the epoch" as their primary notion of time.

Re:How is this an issue? (1)

whitedsepdivine (1491991) | about 2 years ago | (#40507751)

The problem is that an hour is a constant length a (TimeSpan), and is considered indepentant from the current time (DateTime).

An hour is equal to 3600 seconds. That is the standard definition of an hour until the last couple decades and not everyone knows that it can actually be 3600s +/- 3s.

So all the code that says this is wrong:
DateTime today = new DateTime(now.Year, now.Month, now.Day); TimeSpan day = new TimeSpan(86400000); DateTime tomorrow = today.add(day);

Re:How is this an issue? (1)

at10u8 (179705) | about 2 years ago | (#40507619)

Watch the excitement unfold as recent kernel patches unravel http://serverfault.com/questions/403732/anyone-else-experiencing-high-rates-of-linux-server-crashes-today [serverfault.com]

Re:How is this an issue? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507695)

I don't buy my cars from car.com, and I don't get my kernels from kernel.org.

I've been running FreeBSD since 1.0, and 386BSD before that. Never had a problem with leap seconds.

Re:How is this an issue? (2)

guruevi (827432) | about 2 years ago | (#40508365)

The problem is not necessary in the time representation, the problem is that when NTP tries to insert the extra second into the kernel, the kernel gets stuck in a spinlock (basically waiting until a lock becomes available which never does).

The thing is that NTP announces this adjustment to the kernel somewhere the day before so it doesn't necessarily happen at 23:59:59 GMT (although it could happen at that time too)

NO !! NO THEY ARE NOT !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507577)

I am okay with it !!

More important than kernel issues (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507639)

For those wondering whether they get one more second of sleep tonight or one less, the rule is 'spring forwards, fall back, summer stand there looking confused'.

Haha (-1, Troll)

ArchieBunker (132337) | about 2 years ago | (#40507649)

Enjoy your free operating system that was stopped by an extra second.

Re:Haha (4, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 2 years ago | (#40507677)

Enjoy your free operating system that was stopped by an extra second.

Yes, because we've NEVER seen Windows have problems dealing with things like Daylight Savings...

Re:Haha (-1, Troll)

ArchieBunker (132337) | about 2 years ago | (#40507801)

Yeah it had the wrong time but did not freeze up. What's your excuse?

Re:Haha (4, Insightful)

EdIII (1114411) | about 2 years ago | (#40507847)

Yeah it had the wrong time but did not freeze up. What's your excuse?

You're really trying that hard to troll huh?

A free operating system has a bug in it so you want to exaggerate the existence of the bug to show that free operating systems are inferior in such a condescending and acerbic way.

I guess that can work. It's not like there is any paid OS out there that has decades long histories of serious instability, security flaws, and badly implemented ideas...... so yeah, you're completely safe making such an arrogant argument.

Re:Haha (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507929)

A free operating system that source code is freely available and can't handle something that has been around for 40 years?... FAIL

And I'd like to know how many BSOD was caused by DST 2007. Oh wait, zero. The issues that Microsoft had to deal w/ was Outlook calendar appointments. Root cause of that was if you had appointments from an external source you had no way of telling if they were sent out with the DST update applied or not. So, whole issue was your calendar could be off by an hour for some appointments. Not a big deal for people who aren't meeting moths, but a huge deal for CxO level people.

Re:Haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507945)

"I have no sense of humor and will butthurt for Linux." - EdIII (1114411)

Re:Haha (4, Funny)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#40507875)

Windows: 95. Scene: LAN party. Game: Descent. Hilarity: All the Windows users cursing loudly as their computers spontaneously reboot for DST. DOS users get to feel smug for a change.

Windows has been boning DST as long as Windows has handled your RTC.

Re:Haha (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 2 years ago | (#40507933)

When daylight savings got shifted to the current longer format - which was within this past decade, mind you - millions of Outlook users discovered that many of their already-existing appointments were shifted by one hour. And, unless you knew when the appointment was created, you had no way of knowing the reported time was correct, or if it was off by an hour.

People had to deal with this for three bloody weeks, until the calendar ticked over to the "old" daylight savings start date. That's a bit more hassle than rebooting a Unix machine ever was.

Re:Haha (2, Informative)

alexborges (313924) | about 2 years ago | (#40507979)

Windows Azure is DOWN AS WE SPEAK: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazure/archive/2012/03/01/windows-azure-service-disruption-update.aspx [msdn.com] ... congrats on paying for your non working OS without any indemnity either.

Re:Haha (1)

LurkerXXX (667952) | about 2 years ago | (#40508293)

Congrats on your epic reading comprehension/what-day-is-today fail.

Re:Haha (1)

alexborges (313924) | about 2 years ago | (#40508299)

wrong blog post, but it is down. The apple appstore runs on it and it doesnt work.

Re:Haha (1)

LurkerXXX (667952) | about 2 years ago | (#40508369)

Yes, and Netflix was out for a lot of folks yesterday and today even though alot of folks pay for it, because of massive power outages due to storms. Are you going to bitch about that too because, "OMG, an Internet service went down!"

What's that got to due with a bug in an OS? Your story comprehension is as good as your reading comprehension.

Re:Haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508187)

...The difference is that Slashdot and it's users have spent the last decade crucifying Windows for things like that while exalting Linux as superior.

Re:Haha (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508295)

Finally Windows users have something to feel smug over! Maybe in another decade you'll have a second!

Does this affect desktop distros? (0)

Quantum_Infinity (2038086) | about 2 years ago | (#40507657)

Will this affect desktop distros such as Ubuntu? Seems like a few Debian based servers have crashed. http://serverfault.com/questions/403732/anyone-else-experiencing-high-rates-of-linux-server-crashes-today [serverfault.com]

Re:Does this affect desktop distros? (1)

nzac (1822298) | about 2 years ago | (#40507783)

Read the summary. This was fixed it appears in 2.6.29 kernels still used from before this will be old (and ironically considered "stable").
Modern Desktop distro's will be using 3.x which has had had this fixed for a long time. Ubuntu will be using 3.3 i would expect.

The only distros using old kernels will be some versions of Debian, CentOS and some based off it because this is a well tested stable kernel.

Re:Does this affect desktop distros? (1)

msauve (701917) | about 2 years ago | (#40507829)

You mean the GP linked article, where it is said "This affects RHEL 6 and other distros running newer kernels (newer than approx 2.6.26)"? Or where is says that Debian Stable (Squeeze, kernel 2.6.32) is affected?

Re:Does this affect desktop distros? (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | about 2 years ago | (#40508173)

Debian stable (sqeeze) is using 3.0, you can take it out of the list. I don't know about old-stable, but if even Debian already upgraded, there isn't probably any important distro using it anymore.

Re:Does this affect desktop distros? (1)

nzac (1822298) | about 2 years ago | (#40508235)

I expect they patched the kernel at some stage and the only people running the kernel either have not updated in years or know how to apply the workarounds.
Quantum appeared to be concerned if desktop Ubuntu that he was using was at risk of crashing.

Re:Does this affect desktop distros? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 years ago | (#40508223)

There shouldn't be any problems with operating systems at all. The only problems I know about are with critical real time systems which use GPS to set the time at both ends of an interface, but which slew the time by different rules.

Re:Does this affect desktop distros? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508329)

Google's Galaxy Nexus phones seem to be having some sort of GPS problem today. Everyone with a Galaxy Nexus says their GPS is showing them further west than they really are. Sounds like it may be related to this leap second stuff. Interestingly enough, I haven't heard of any other Android devices having this problem though, so who knows...

Re:Does this affect desktop distros? (1)

rHBa (976986) | about 2 years ago | (#40508317)

I'm running Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (long term support) Lucid which I keep up-to-date and I'm currently on kernel version 2.6.32 which shouldn't have a problem.

I also have an install of 12.04 (latest LTS) which I'm slowly transitioning to that runs 3.x so if that doesn't work I reckon 2/3 of the internet will fall over...

what about the metric time system? (2)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 2 years ago | (#40507661)

what about the metric time system?

Re:what about the metric time system? (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 2 years ago | (#40508205)

what about the metric time system?

We are using the metric time system. Under Chapter 4 Section 6 [bipm.org], days, hours, and minutes are acceptable units using the customary definitions.

Re:what about the metric time system? (1)

VMSBIGOT (933292) | about 2 years ago | (#40508327)

Are you referring to the table that is titled "Non-SI units accepted for use with the International System of Units"?

Metric Time != Acceptable non-SI units
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metric_time [wikipedia.org]
"Metric time is the measure of time interval using the metric system, which defines the second as the base unit of time, and multiple and submultiple units formed with metric prefixes, such as kiloseconds and milliseconds. It does not define the time of day, as this is defined by various time scales, which may be based upon the metric definition of the second. Other units of time, the minute, hour, and day, are accepted for use with the modern metric system, but are not part of it."

Now, not disputing that you can use them as a SI-style base, but wasn't the point of SI was easier math? No crazy unit conversions, just move a decimal point around. Diving by 60, 24 and 365 and etc. is ugly and on top of that, things don't exactly line up either. How long do you consider a year (Hint, there are several acceptable lengths of time as an answer)

I guess computers *do* use SI in the aspect that time is generally done in 10ms quantum's, or whatever your particular OS uses.

The leap second is done horribly wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507673)

Leap seconds have no place in Unix time. They make the assumption that time moves forward invalid (a subsequent call to gettimeofday may return a number the previous one), which is the cause of oncountable bugs. Raise your hand if you didn't know this is how it works.

Why don't they put leap second handling in the layer that converts from Unix time to user-visible representations, like timezones, DST and, oh I don't know, leap DAYS?

Re:The leap second is done horribly wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507685)

Meant to say that a subsequent call to gettimeofday may return a number less than the previous one.

Re:The leap second is done horribly wrong (1)

Electricity Likes Me (1098643) | about 2 years ago | (#40508219)

Isn't it always invalid? If the NTP server does a correction between the first call and the second call, then you could still get time not moving forward.

as of about a year ago, I started defensive coding (4, Interesting)

GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) | about 2 years ago | (#40507705)

Hello, Some of us code our systems somewhat like a finite state machine, and we figure our machine will never operate outside it.

If you're testing if something that increments ever hits a number(like 10) and goes back to 0, instead of checking if it ==10, check if it is >9.
There are a lot of defensive coding mechanisms you can use. The downside of this is that when you debug, something can sneak by and put you outside of a state you want, so it makes it ever so slightly harder to debug. But if you're making software that will be used by the public that is hard to give updates, defensive programming can save the day here and there. ,Jim

out of a state you want (2)

QuasiSteve (2042606) | about 2 years ago | (#40507931)

The downside of this is that when you debug, something can sneak by and put you outside of a state you want

Oh I do hate when that happens at work. We end up so bewildered. "Are we dead? Or is this Ohio?"

( cookies for whoever gets the reference without Googling. )

Re:out of a state you want (1)

JWSmythe (446288) | about 2 years ago | (#40508093)

Most of us are too old to still watch children's cartoons.

Re:out of a state you want (1)

QuasiSteve (2042606) | about 2 years ago | (#40508151)

But just old enough to still remember them and collect that cookie, I see? :)

( Too many here are too young to even know the cartoons. )

Re:out of a state you want (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508331)

The only things on TV I watch are My Little Pony and Phineas and Ferb.

Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507721)

If the ITU never inserted another leap second again, just letting UTC sloooowly diverge from solar time, it would not create any real problem for hundreds of years. And by that time either we'll either have developed the technology to adjust the Earth's rotation itself to correct the discrepancy, or else civilization will have been destroyed by nuclear war/global warming/etc. Either way we wouldn't have to worry about leap seconds.

Re:Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (1)

mynamestolen (2566945) | about 2 years ago | (#40507749)

what's your evidence that it wouldn't be a problem?

Re:Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507837)

Assuming an average of one leap second per year, it would take 300 years to accumulate just a measly 5 minutes of difference. Compare this to what we already have due to time zones: Since time zones are generally discretized to one hour, there will always be places which are already off from solar time by up to +/- 30 minutes. In fact, since time zone boundaries aren't perfectly lined up with meridians, there are places where it's off by even more than that. Moreover, daylight saving time throws things off by a whole hour. And somehow, life goes on. There is just no need for civil time to be synchronized with the sun all that precisely.

Re:Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (2)

msauve (701917) | about 2 years ago | (#40508001)

UTC is defined to be linked to Sol. It is used for things which depend on that characteristic (like astronomy and celestial navigation). If civil time doesn't need to be linked that closely, then it doesn't need to use UTC.

Re:Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 2 years ago | (#40508281)

Exactly. And this is why we have time zones in the first place; for most things, it is far better to be synched to each other than the local solar time.

Re:Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 years ago | (#40508239)

For a start we all live in kludged up timezones anyway. I could be as much as an hour from "the correct solar time". People in China could be three hours from that time, because they have fewer timezones.

Re:Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507775)

If the ITU never inserted another leap second again, just letting UTC sloooowly diverge from solar time, it would not create any real problem for hundreds of years. [b]And by that time either we'll either have developed the technology to adjust the Earth's rotation itself to correct the discrepancy,[/b] or else civilization will have been destroyed by nuclear war/global warming/etc. Either way we wouldn't have to worry about leap seconds.

Oh man you're funny.

Re:Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (1)

at10u8 (179705) | about 2 years ago | (#40507799)

The ITU doesn't insert anything, they just emit documents to which everyone is expected to conform, but the ITU-R process does not require consensus, interoperability testing, nor even a description of implementation details. All of that are Somebody Else's Problems.

Re:Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507827)

You'll want to look up this funny thing called "Atomic Time".
 
You're welcome to it, but we really shouldn't be changing UTC to duplicate TAI. If you want others to join you, get the world to switch from UTC to TIA.

Re:Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (1)

John Hasler (414242) | about 2 years ago | (#40508167)

> ...it would not create any real problem for hundreds of years.

It need not ever create any problems. Put the leapseconds in zoneinfo. There is no more reason to jigger the system clock to deal with the fact that the planet's rate of rotation varies than there is to jigger it to deal with the fact that the sun rises at different times at different longitudes.

Re:Leap seconds are an idiotic idea (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 2 years ago | (#40508271)

If they're worried about millisecond differences in stock trading, I suppose fortunes will be gained and lost over this extra second.

Better safe than sorry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507789)

At my shop, we did a dry run a couple of weeks ago. Things went very well and we had no issues. That said, I still unplugged the time server from the network this weekend, just in case. I really don't want to get a call from one of the far flung server admins, telling me something went wrong. The risk of issues caused by losing a few seconds across the network is much less than the potential damage from even one server doing the wrong thing.

Now you tell us. (1)

portablejim (1538997) | about 2 years ago | (#40507833)

Being UTC+10 means that I read this story and get excited about watching the leap second, only to discover it happened last night. I guess because I didn't notice means that I was ready.

Re:Now you tell us. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40507897)

Being UTC+10 means that I read this story and get excited about watching the leap second, only to discover it happened last night.

I guess because I didn't notice means that I was ready.

Ummmmm...no.

The change takes effect at 00:00 UTC, which would be 10:00 for you.

For me, being UTC-8 it would occur at 16:00PST, or 17:00PDT (which just happened while I was typing this!).

Nothing has crashed here...Fedora 16, Ubuntu 12.04, Windows 7.

Re:Now you tell us. (1)

spazekaat (991287) | about 2 years ago | (#40507905)

Uuugh...forgot to log in first, the above was my comment,

Credit is due where credit is due. ;-)

Re:Now you tell us. (1)

portablejim (1538997) | about 2 years ago | (#40508069)

*groan*

How stupid of me.

The occasion that I comment about missing something due to being several hours ahead is one of the few occasions where it does not matter.

Re:Now you tell us. (1)

msauve (701917) | about 2 years ago | (#40508017)

Leap second happens at midnight UTC, not at midnight local time. You posted about 8 minutes before the leap second occurred. I'm guessing you still missed it, though.

Goddamned Java (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508027)

All my Java processes peg the CPU since the leap second, even if I restart them. Maybe a reboot will help...

Re:Goddamned Java (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508083)

All my Java processes peg the CPU since the leap second, even if I restart them. Maybe a reboot will help...

So just like before, then?

Re:Goddamned Java (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508095)

Normally java is just in "waste memory" mode. Now it's "waste memory AND CPU".

Leap second got Reddit? (4, Interesting)

daff2k (689551) | about 2 years ago | (#40508067)

Looks like Reddit's systems weren't ready for the leap second. It been down since around midnight (UTC). You'd think a site as big as that would be ready for such an event.

Re:Leap second got Reddit? (1)

antdude (79039) | about 2 years ago | (#40508171)

I noticed Reddit had problems with my submissions, my liked feeds since last night. When did leap supposed to start? Last night?

Re:Leap second got Reddit? (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 years ago | (#40508249)

No I think it was okay for half an hour or so after 0000. Slashdot can make a profit for the next couple of hours anyway.

Applications with issues? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508213)

My server inserted the leap second around 90 minutes ago. Google Chrome 20.x, MySQL 5.5, and MythTV 0.25 on systems NTP synced to the server all did strange and wonderful things simultaneously. Yes, every system was completely up to date.

Anyone care to make this priceless moment from dmesg into a MC commercial?
Clock: inserting leap second 23:59:60 UTC
chrome[19727]: segfault at 0 ip (null) sp 00007fff32ef9b88 error 14
chrome[31567]: segfault at 27a00000000 ip 0000027a00000000 sp 00007fff32ef9b78 error 14

Perhaps it's just me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508225)

that thinks this whole thing is stupid... Go back a second by making one of the minutes have 61 seconds? WTF kind of solution is that? Why TF don't they just go 57...58...59...59...00. Or just stop the clock 57...58...5900

Don't even get me started on "Oh it's best to do it at midnight, in June or August". What what WHAT???? It's a fucking second! A second! Do it any time! Who decided "midnight" was best? Midnight GMT is fucking "wake up and go to work" in Australia and the middle of the afternoon in California - WHOSE midnight is supposed to be the best time to do it...

Fuck me, we have leap years with +1 extra days, we have +/-1 leap hours (DST, BST, whatever you want to call it), and we cope - yet these people are befuddled by a leap second.

Get a fucking grip...

Terminology? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508257)

If 2012 is a leap year, doesn't that make 2012-06-30 23:59 a leap minute?

ntpd doesn't keep accurate time anyway... (1)

pongo000 (97357) | about 2 years ago | (#40508325)

...at least not on any of my servers, so what's a leap second between friends?

fedora 13 w/ kernel 2.6.34.9-69.fc13.x86_64 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40508391)

After leap second, all programs doing pthread_cond_timedwait() were turned into busy wait loops (google chrome, mozilla thunderbird, others). Restarting programs didn't help.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...