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Nokia: Google's Nexus 7 Tablet Infringes Our Patents

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the this-is-a-storm-and-that's-got-ports dept.

Google 183

walterbyrd writes with a story at The Inquirer outlining the latest volley in the patent wars surrounding mobile hardware, this time aimed at the new Aus-built Nexus 7 tablet from Google by Nokia, in which the company's spokesman says, "Nokia has more than 40 licensees, mainly for its standards essential patent portfolio, including most of the mobile device manufacturers. Neither Google nor Asus is licensed under our patent portfolio. 'Companies who are not yet licensed under our standard essential patents should simply approach us and sign up for a license.'"

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183 comments

Good ol' Microsoft (5, Insightful)

Severus Snape (2376318) | about 2 years ago | (#40528533)

Can't prove it but we all know this is another one of Microsoft's proxy wars.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528695)

Can't prove it but we all know this is another one of Microsoft's proxy wars.

Never know, Apple might have caught on and started a few themselves.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528941)

Yes, nowadays each time I see Nokia I just mentally substitute it for Microsoft and it all makes far more sense.

I don't know how Elop and Ballmer pulled it off, but getting Elop to pull off the coup he did in turning Nokia into a defacto subsidiary of Microsoft was pretty fucking impressive.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529073)

I don't know how Elop and Ballmer pulled it off, but getting Elop to pull off the coup he did in turning Nokia into a defacto subsidiary of Microsoft was pretty fucking impressive.

A large bloc of Nokia shareholders insisted on Elop's placement. It wasn't much of a coup, rather something the right people wanted.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (1, Insightful)

hsmith (818216) | about 2 years ago | (#40529037)

Wouldn't doubt it. It is really amazing the difference between debuting the Surface v the Nexus 7. The demos were unbelievable different.

Hell, look how the demo of Google Glass went v the Surface. A toy project performed light years better than the Surface. MS has fallen from grace, badly.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (2, Insightful)

Circuit Breaker (114482) | about 2 years ago | (#40529183)

MS ever had grace?

They've been having demos crash and bluescreen since forever.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (2)

Dishevel (1105119) | about 2 years ago | (#40529477)

Microsoft DOS 6.22 with the 4DOS command.com replacement was seriously graceful.
Almost better than a linux command line. Power, Grace, and Beauty.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (5, Informative)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | about 2 years ago | (#40530199)

Right because Google never experienced any crashes [youtu.be] during a demo. Apple as well, known for their presentations, have always put on a perfect show with everything performing exactly as expected [youtube.com] .

Have you ever given a high-stakes presentation? Have ever given hundreds of them? Shit happens, and the more you get up there and put yourself on the line, the more shit happens.

Steve Jobs had the right take on it.

Even though Steve was a fierce competitor, he actually drew the line at taking advantage of competitors’ demo woes. I remember one time during the “think different” years when Bill Gates suffered a terrible failure demoing a new Microsoft technology. We at the agency thought it would make a very funny commercial for Apple. It seemed like an idea being handed to us on a silver platter. We would simply show Gates failing and end the ad with a clever line about Apple.

Steve laughed — but he rejected it immediately. He said that demo crashes are an unavoidable part of the business, and that his own demos could fail as easily as Gates’.

Source - The Joy of Demo Crashes [kensegall.com]

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (1, Insightful)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about 2 years ago | (#40529149)

Or it could be Nokia being ridiculously desperate. Microsoft has NOTHING to gain by patent trolling Google. Zero. The Nexus 7 isn't competing with the Surface.

Nokia on the other hand, does.

So which is more likely, Nokia is trashing about in an attempt to remain relevant or Microsoft is fighting a secret proxy patent war?

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (2, Insightful)

dc29A (636871) | about 2 years ago | (#40529769)

Or it could be Nokia being ridiculously desperate. Microsoft has NOTHING to gain by patent trolling Google. Zero.

Care to explain why HTC and Samsung are paying Android royalties to MS? MS always wanted to prove that Android is not free, what better method to achieve this than patent trolling.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (0)

Riceballsan (816702) | about 2 years ago | (#40529899)

If my memory serves right, microsoft was one of the first to fire in the patent wars, possibly the first. What i recall was microsoft made the anouncement that microsoft would handle defending the cases and legal fees for all phones using windows phones, and then promptly fired the first offensive shot at one of the android manufactures, starting a large random surge of lawsuits firing in every direction.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (2)

Dishevel (1105119) | about 2 years ago | (#40530025)

Microsoft has much to gain by smacking down Google whenever they can.
Bing / Google, WP8 / Android, Windows 8 on ARM / Chrome OS.
I am not sure that Microsoft is pulling the strings on this one but....
I am sure that you have to be a shill to put forth the idea that Microsoft has nothing to gain on ANY attack on Google.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (4, Funny)

jimicus (737525) | about 2 years ago | (#40530259)

Microsoft has NOTHING to gain by patent trolling Google. Zero.

Not true, I'm quite sure they'd love to bring their office furniture repair costs down.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (1, Interesting)

gbjbaanb (229885) | about 2 years ago | (#40529181)

Good old Nokia....

so this is their "Plan B" [techradar.com] : become a patent troll.

Good move Nokia.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (4, Informative)

MikeMo (521697) | about 2 years ago | (#40529407)

Come on, they're not a "troll". Patent trolls are regularly regarded as companies that make no product, have never implemented their patent, and exist only to sue. Nokia clearly invented a lot of the basic stuff that makes cell phones work today, and many of the standards in existence use these patents.

This is a FRAND issue. Nokia is stating that Google is using technology covered in the standards, which require FRAND licenses, and which they have not acquired. They just need to step up and get them.

Further, as far as I can tell, Nokia has been one of the best-behaved FRAND licensors in the business.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (4, Insightful)

Riceballsan (816702) | about 2 years ago | (#40529939)

Nokia was under completely different management 2 years ago, which essentially makes every point on behavior prior to the microsoft deals entirely unrelated points.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (2)

toriver (11308) | about 2 years ago | (#40529333)

Don't know about that: When Apple released the iPhone, Nokia pounced with a lawsuit then, too, long before Microsoft were their partners.

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 2 years ago | (#40529413)

Maybe, but Nokia has been more than willing to sue everyone in the past, so it's not surprising that they'd do it now, even on their own.

Yeah, nokia is microsoft's bitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529437)

*Going down the drain... lalalalalaa*

Re:Good ol' Microsoft (3, Interesting)

wulva (564057) | about 2 years ago | (#40529673)

You are forgetting that Nokia as a company has done a major share of R&D in mobile space since 90's, thus they have huge chunk of patents covering the fundamentals. Now that their phone business is suffering they have to monetize somehow, and that how is their IP portfolio.

It would be irresponsible of Nokia not to sue, as their shareholders want to see money.

Most manufacturers have licensing agreements with Nokia besides some of the new comers such as Apple and Google and Apple already paid them off after getting sued.

Now there is no question that Nokia fucked up. The fuck up was mainly caused by internal politics where different division screwed with others. I mean they had a mapping company bought years before google but they only got to market a year after them.

Shit happens and now they've only got the low end and what ever IP they've developed. As they have to rebuild their credibility on the high end they need some cash to cover it, as such IP is the best source.

Built in Australia? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528547)

Apparently.

Re:Built in Australia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528607)

Someone tell Asus they've been dropped from the project

Transformer Line? (5, Interesting)

brunes69 (86786) | about 2 years ago | (#40528601)

Asus has been making the transformer line for years. If Asus is not licensing required patents for Wifi, why has Nokia delayed on demands for so long?

Re:Transformer Line? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528717)

Why now? Because Microsoft can't innovate worth a shit, and they suddenly got caught with their pants down, again. So they do what they know best: throw chairs out the window and shout how they'll "fucking bury" them.

Re:Transformer Line? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528727)

I would imagine because Microsoft doesn't have a beef with Asus (or doesn't see them as a threat), but does with Google.

Patents? (1)

fatphil (181876) | about 2 years ago | (#40528619)

Do they have any left after selling so many off to patent trolls?
Apparently so, if they're turning into litigious patent trolls themselves.

Ahhhhh, feels good to be able to use the third person to refer to them - now Nokia-free for 2 days! (But still a dedicated n900 fan.)

Re:Patents? (1)

duranaki (776224) | about 2 years ago | (#40528709)

It would be hilarious for them to retract the statement. "Oops, turned out we sold that and no one told me." I'm now Nokia-free for 6.5 years. Welcome to the ex-Nokia club!

Re:Patents? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529131)

Oh, get lost, you haters. Nokia's phones are a head above Apple's/Samsung's/HTC's and others'.

-- Proud owner of Nokia 3310 (had to change batteries, but otherwise still going strong)

Re:Patents? (1)

fatphil (181876) | about 2 years ago | (#40530027)

I left Nokia about 7 years ago too! (And 11 years ago too.) I must be like one of those beaten wives who keeps returning to their abusive husband!

Re:Patents? (1)

characterZer0 (138196) | about 2 years ago | (#40528893)

Refering to a company in the first person because you use their products is like refering to a sports team in the first person because you bought a jersey and went to a few games.

Re:Patents? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528945)

As a former serial killer, I'm glad that I gave it all up. I found religion, and now know that what I was doing was wrong. I haven't killed someone in almost a week! I suppose it's unfortunate for my victims prior to my rebirth, but what matters is that I'm in recovery now.

(Though I'm still a dedicated 'snuff film' aficionado. Thank goodness for Tor and TrueCrypt.)

I wonder.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528655)

Ok, Google and ASUS may not be licensed.... But I wonder about Motorola Mobility (if it has to do with IEEE 802.11 WiFi standard, that "belongs" to WiFi Alliance, well, Motorola Mobility is part of it.. and Motorola is Googles now).

Wifi patents (4, Insightful)

chrb (1083577) | about 2 years ago | (#40528673)

I guessed that this was probably something GSM related, but TFA says "It's believed that the patents in question have to do with the IEEE 802.11 WiFi standard". It's hard to imagine that Asus doesn't already have a license for essential wifi patents, they must have sold millions of devices over the last few years that have featured wifi as standard.

Bit odd that this has not been an issue until the moment that they release a Google branded device.

Re:Wifi patents (2)

whoever57 (658626) | about 2 years ago | (#40528739)

It's hard to imagine that Asus doesn't already have a license for essential wifi patents, they must have sold millions of devices over the last few years that have featured wifi as standard.

It's also hard to imagine that Google doesn't already have a cross-license agreement in place through the Motorola Mobility acquisition. Also, what about the various Nexus phones -- surely they included WiFi?

Re:Wifi patents (1)

fa2k (881632) | about 2 years ago | (#40529625)

I guessed that this was probably something GSM related, but TFA says "It's believed that the patents in question have to do with the IEEE 802.11 WiFi standard". It's hard to imagine that Asus doesn't already have a license for essential wifi patents, they must have sold millions of devices over the last few years that have featured wifi as standard.

Bit odd that this has not been an issue until the moment that they release a Google branded device.

Well, you know how it goes with SW patents, it could be something silly like displaying an icon next to the SSID while connecting to a network and then changing the icon when the connection is complete.

Re:Wifi patents (1)

fa2k (881632) | about 2 years ago | (#40529689)

Sorry, I don't seem to have RTFS. "standards essential patent" is a stretch for my example. Please ignore.

Jigsaw puzzle patents (1)

k(wi)r(kipedia) (2648849) | about 2 years ago | (#40529773)

Public support for patents appear to be premised on the idea that patents protect inventions. An invention is generally understood to be some useful thing like the lightbulb or the telephone. The reality, of course, is that most patents don't cover standalone objects but bits and pieces of them.

Re:Wifi patents (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 2 years ago | (#40529823)

It's hard to imagine that Asus doesn't already have a license for essential wifi patents

It was also hard to imagine that Microsoft didn't already have a license for essential MPEG-4 patents, and yet Motorola sued them over one that applies to Xbox.

There's no guarantee that a patent pool for a given technology contains all patents necessary to implement that technology, even if everybody believes it to be the case. It only takes one submarine patent to prove that theory wrong.

Re:Wifi patents (2)

Zebedeu (739988) | about 2 years ago | (#40530121)

It's unlikely that it's GSM related, since the Nexus 7 doesn't have cell data connectivity.
The complaint is pretty odd to me too.
Even if ASUS's existing licenses are not appliccable since they are selling the tablet under Google's brand, Google still owns the mobile branch of Motorola, and is hard to imagine that they don't have those patents.

Furthermore, all of the nexus devices up to now have had WiFi. Why complain only about the tablet?

MS's lapdog (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528677)

MS's lapdog attacks again.
What a sad end for an amazing 130 years old company...

Oh you, silly you. (1)

kiriath (2670145) | about 2 years ago | (#40528683)

Silly Patent Thievery You. All you had to do was ask. Tsk. Anyone else sick of the "MY patent - no MY patent" douchebaggery?

Re:Oh you, silly you. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528819)

Anyone else sick of the "MY patent - no MY patent" douchebaggery?

No. We've all been perfectly happy with it for the past ten years or so. There's not a single one of us here who can imagine the dark, dark times when patents are abolished or completely overhauled. Oh, what terrible times those would be! Nobody would be able to innovate anything without fear of some large company stealing their ideas and using their clout to manufacture the YES, DIPSHIT, WE ARE SICK OF THIS DOUCHEBAGGERY, STOP BLATANTLY FISHING FOR COMMENTS WITH STUPID QUESTIONS.

Dear Nokia... (2, Insightful)

JasonDT (550477) | about 2 years ago | (#40528731)

Fuck off and die already... A shame too, I really used to like their hardware... Why oh why does patent trolling have to become the new business model for dying companies...

Re:Dear Nokia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529137)

I love your sig, especially the number of spelling and punctuation errors.

Can no one else see where this is going? (4, Insightful)

gman003 (1693318) | about 2 years ago | (#40528741)

The whole massive patent portfolios thing was hinged on mutually assured destruction. Everyone was violating at least one of everyone's patents, but as long as you either had enough of an armory yourself, or paid your dues to the patent portfolios, you were safe (disregarding wild patent trolls). Sort of like the actual Cold War - as long as you had enough nukes, or allied yourself with someone who did, you were safe (disregarding "rogue nations" and proxy wars).

Well, this Patent Cold War is becoming a Patent World War.

It's been going on for a while now, ever since the smartphone lawsuits first stated, but it's ramping up. They're coming faster and faster now, and going for bigger and bigger things. Pretty soon, you'll be seeing injunctions against entire companies, or multi-trillion-dollar fines.

I expect, in the end, most of those involved will end up out-of-business. And, hopefully, it will end with a massive patent system reform.

Re:Can no one else see where this is going? (4, Insightful)

savuporo (658486) | about 2 years ago | (#40529031)

I expect, in the end, most of those involved will end up out-of-business. And, hopefully, it will end with a massive patent system reform.

You know, i get scared whenever anyone calls for a reform. I mean no doubt that the current system is broken, but i dread to see what the current powers would come up with to replace the current system.

There was some sanity and integrity still around when the last system was designed - and now it has outlived it's usefulness, but we are also all out of sanity and integrity.

Re:Can no one else see where this is going? (1)

erroneus (253617) | about 2 years ago | (#40529121)

Predictions:

Google will get through this pretty well. So far, nothing has really stuck to them.

OEMs will struggle through this because they will be targeted for supporting Google's platform. Google will help, but it will still burden the OEMs. Despite this, the OEMs will not stop supporting Android though one or more may throw Microsoft a bone by making a device or two featuring Microsoft's platform... they will fail despite the added marketing push simply because Microsoft keep s failing on the support side. (Count how many Microsoft mobile devices you have ever seen and then count how many are currently supported.)

Re:Can no one else see where this is going? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529195)

Everyone was violating at least one of everyone's patents, but as long as you either had enough of an armory yourself, or paid your dues to the patent portfolios, you were safe (disregarding wild patent trolls).

It's apparently gotten to the point that nobody can make or do anything anymore without running afoul of some patent somewhere. Devices are complex and require hundreds of individual components or technologies, so there are potentially hundreds of patent licenses/royalty agreements to be negotiated for the event the simplest phone. If a company wishes to engage in anti-competitive behavior, it need only refuse to license the patent at a reasonable price and then seek an injunction to shut down the competition. That should be unacceptable.

Predicated upon the realization that mobile communications has gone from luxury to critical industry in the world economy, we can no longer tolerate patent disputes/nonsense that cripple anybody's ability to do anything. It's time for the US and EU to step in and compel cooperative behavior by establishing a mandatory patent consortium/pool/clearinghouse for mobile tech. Everybody in mobile should be compelled to pool their patents, license all requestors without discrimination, and accept reasonable royalties.
   

What to do about it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529217)

Hi, I'm a peon. I can send letters, emails, and texts to my representative and I just get a formed response back.

Frankly, I don't know enough to go all point by point - disputing- what they say.

As far as I'm concerned as a consumer, I just take it or leave it. Hence why I'm buying less and less of - well - everything.

Corporate America is a rip off. No exceptions.

Re:What to do about it? (1)

gman003 (1693318) | about 2 years ago | (#40529285)

See, there's the beauty of this.

We don't have to do anything. We just sit back and watch the various factions of Corporate Earth (it's not just America) kill each other off.

Re:What to do about it? (2)

DM9290 (797337) | about 2 years ago | (#40529967)

See, there's the beauty of this.

We don't have to do anything. We just sit back and watch the various factions of Corporate Earth (it's not just America) kill each other off.

That isn't what happens. Corporations are not like natural human beings. When a human kills another human, you end up less than what you started with.

When 1 corporations kills another, the victor often becomes more powerful than both corporations were as separate entities. This is the accumulation of capital. The trend is that, in time, there will be only 1 corporation left, and it will own absolutely everything.

Re:What to do about it? (1)

gman003 (1693318) | about 2 years ago | (#40530145)

In traditional buyouts, yes. But this war is different. They aren't conquering, they're destroying. They're killing each other's profits and expending huge amounts of capital in lawsuits.

They aren't in a period of increasing strength. They're in a period of vulnerability. Small, light companies can rise up and exploit the situation, gain a significant market share while still being relatively untouched by the war.

Yes, the "one winner uber-mega-corporation" outcome is a possibility. But it's more a worst-case than a probable-case.

Re:Can no one else see where this is going? (1)

gehrehmee (16338) | about 2 years ago | (#40529353)

With all these companies suing each other out of doing business, exactly what is the impact on the economy? Can a weakened economy afford this kind of nonsense?

Of course, the law firms on laughing to the bank.

Re:Can no one else see where this is going? (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 2 years ago | (#40529455)

I expect, in the end, most of those involved will end up out-of-business.

Why? Is that how it happened in previous patent wars?

Ugh (4, Insightful)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | about 2 years ago | (#40528749)

Even though it's got nothing to do with Apple, I'm still going to blame them anyway since, as we all know, everyone copies off Apple, be it rounded corners or patent trolling

:P

Apple owns that idea (1)

AshFan (879808) | about 2 years ago | (#40528793)

The way things are going, we will all need a license to post comments online, as it will infringe on someones intelectual property.

"standard essential patents"?!?!? (-1)

Omega Hacker (6676) | about 2 years ago | (#40528801)

I read "standard essential patents" as "you exist therefore you must pay our blackmail". That makes it blindingly clear that these patents utterly fail every possible test as far as non-obviousness, inventiveness, etc.

Re:"standard essential patents"?!?!? (0, Troll)

Dog-Cow (21281) | about 2 years ago | (#40528955)

So, basically, you're an utter fucking moron. I am not sure it's useful knowledge, but I don't mind picking up a bit of trivia now and then.

Re:"standard essential patents"?!?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529199)

Hahah, based on your comment history, you must be off your meds. Why such hate? I guess that's what being on Slashdot for so long does to you, although the parent poster has apparently been around for much longer and manages to not be such an asshole.

Re:"standard essential patents"?!?!? (2)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | about 2 years ago | (#40529065)

That makes it blindingly clear that these patents utterly fail every possible test as far as non-obviousness, inventiveness, etc.

Um, this isn't an issue of rounded corners or unsubstantial software patents. Nokia was a pioneer of mobile wireless technologies, none of which were obvious at the time. These patents were then incorporated into an operability standard, not the other way around.

Balls (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40528837)

ASUS have about a million different models of tablet and laptop and what-not out there. They've been doing this for donkey's years - how can they not have the proper licenses for the tech at this point? Not believable.

WTF! (3, Interesting)

kurt555gs (309278) | about 2 years ago | (#40528881)

I used to be a total Nokia Fanboi. Hell, I use a Nokia N9 as my everyday cell phone. I cried like John Boehner when Elop took over and made Nokia Microsoft's bitch.

Now I'm mad! I just ordered one of those Google 7 tablets, and my former love, Nokia is trying to stop me from having it!

Phuque!

Where is this world going?

Re:WTF! (1)

hendridm (302246) | about 2 years ago | (#40529027)

I pre-ordered a Nexus 7 for my wife as well. I am impatiently holding out for the Nexus 10 for myself. I really hope this doesn't delay it!

Agreed (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529123)

This, along with Apple's latest bullshit, is all it took to convince me to buy the Nexus 7 tablet [google.com] . And I'm now seriously considering the newly upgraded Galaxy Nexus [google.com] phone (4.0.4) as well.

..you mean the CSIRO's Wifi patent? (1)

Sneeze1066 (1574313) | about 2 years ago | (#40528933)

Nokia claiming that "their" wifi patent is being infringed? It's already been decided that Australia's CSIRO invented Wifi and that and manufacturers using the technology would need to licence it from them. http://slashdot.org/story/12/04/01/2011245/australian-wifi-inventors-win-us-legal-battle [slashdot.org]

Re:..you mean the CSIRO's Wifi patent? (1)

idontgno (624372) | about 2 years ago | (#40529355)

Nokia claiming that "their" wifi patent is being infringed? It's already been decided that Australia's CSIRO invented Wifi and that and manufacturers using the technology would need to licence it from them

And in related news, SCO continues to claim that THEY, not Novell, owns the copyrights to Unix and therefore, to all Unix derivatives (like Linux).

The precedent makes me mildly skeptical of Nokia's claim. A Microsoft business partner (and investee) claims that a competing product infringes on a numbered but unnamed pool of patents? Where have I seen that "numbered but not enumerated patents" thing before... Oh, yeah [cnn.com]

More to the point, what patents on Wi-Fi would be in play that aren't automatically licensed when you buy the appropriate hardware? Maybe I'm naive, but I thought all of the important IP was implemented in silicon, and the license was satisfied by the chip manufacturer.

Seriously. Microsoft proxy FUD, until demonstrated otherwise in an actual court of law.

Re:..you mean the CSIRO's Wifi patent? (1)

russotto (537200) | about 2 years ago | (#40530103)

More to the point, what patents on Wi-Fi would be in play that aren't automatically licensed when you buy the appropriate hardware? Maybe I'm naive, but I thought all of the important IP was implemented in silicon, and the license was satisfied by the chip manufacturer.

They get sneaky about this. They'll patent both the new hardware containing the actual inventive stuff, and the combination of that hardware with all and sundry. Then they claim that when you buy the hardware, you still need a separate license to combine it with any of the things they claim. It's like buying a fancy new unobtainium hammer, and finding out they've also patented hitting nails with said hammer in order to fasten materials together, so you need a license for that.

Ahh... I remember my last Nokia phone! Oh, wait... (1)

Picass0 (147474) | about 2 years ago | (#40528995)

...No I don't. Because most of their stuff is low end crap. Samsung and Apple ate their lunch.

Barnes and Noble was right all along (2)

andydread (758754) | about 2 years ago | (#40528997)

B&N warned that this attack from Nokia and MOSAID was coming. B&N said this was conspired with Microsoft. Microsoft's Steven Elop (Nokia CEO) is doing his former company's bidding. Now we see what B&N warned about mestastisizing. brace yourselves. The days of writing your own code and having it become successfull without paying a patent license fee for your OWN code is coming to an end. Thanks particularly to MS and their partners oh and Apple. And of course the geeks will sit back and take it lying down. I for one has influenced a few hundred people away from Microsoft and Apple products. Will continue that push along with more donations to the EFF.

Are we reading too much into this? (4, Insightful)

IrrepressibleMonkey (1045046) | about 2 years ago | (#40529051)

There's not a lot to go in the Inquirer article (there never is in my experience), but isn't it possible that Nokia's stance is entirely reasonable? Maybe it does hold standards essential patents relevant to the Nexus tablet and is entitled to FRAND payments. It's not threatening to seek injunctions. On the face of it, Nokia is seeking payment for licenses that it believes it is entitled to.

Not sure how we get from here to alleging Microsoft-led conspiracies... At least wait for the Google/Asus responses before taking sides.

Re:Are we reading too much into this? (4, Interesting)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 2 years ago | (#40529201)

The Nexus 7 isnt fundamentally different from their other tablets/phones in regards to these patents. Why bring suit now?

Re:Are we reading too much into this? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529247)

Because this one looks like it'll actually sell.

Re:Are we reading too much into this? (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | about 2 years ago | (#40529431)

Maybe it took them a while to realize it, maybe they've been insisting and wanted to escalate it, to pressure them...

Re:Are we reading too much into this? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529433)

Not sure how we get from here to alleging Microsoft-led conspiracies

This is Slashdot. The starting point here is a Microsoft-led conspiracy until proven otherwise.

Re:Are we reading too much into this? (1)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | about 2 years ago | (#40529541)

Considering the first post in this story is "Can't prove it but we all know this is another one of Microsoft's proxy wars" that seems about right

Well THAT didn't take long. (2)

Dega704 (1454673) | about 2 years ago | (#40529063)

And the saddest part is how surprised I am; which is to say not at all. In fact I will be surprised if Nokia is the last one to make claims about Google's tablet. No company can announce any new significant mobile device without patents hitting the fan.

I really hope that (1)

Adult film producer (866485) | about 2 years ago | (#40529155)

Google has enough patents in his portfolio to blow this fucked-company out of the water and finish it off for good.

Re:I really hope that (1)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | about 2 years ago | (#40529599)

Problem is, unlike Google with Android, Microsoft will step in. Part of the Windows Phone license is patent protection by Microsoft. So if Google wants to go after Nokia, they're effectively going after Microsoft, which is not the best idea in a patent war.

Abolish Patents Now! (1)

lasermike026 (528051) | about 2 years ago | (#40529175)

Patents were created to encourage development. It's obvious that patents do the opposite. Abolish patents, remove patent protection from the constitution, and ban patents by constitutional amendment. This nonsense is intolerable.

Cowardice by Microsoft (0)

belgianguy (1954708) | about 2 years ago | (#40529197)

Even their legal strategies are taking a chapter or two from the Apple playbook... They sat on their asses and missed the mobile boat, but instead of pursuing original ideas and providing competition, they'll just try to slow Android down with frivolous patent lawsuits with the ultimate target to create a void where their outdated and locked-down toy OS can compete on a tilted playing field. I'm pretty sure they'll move in to try and land some free punches once Apple starts going after Android again. Evidently Apple won't even peep about Microsofts' tablet products, as they both want to split up the market among themselves, after eliminating Google by using every dirty trick in the book.

Such cowardice of Microsoft, having a once deeply-respected company like Nokia do its dirty work. But it's not surprising in the current climate.

Enjoy your walled gardens, as an unlimited stream of frivolous software patent suits (and the USPTO will make sure there are enough to go around) will make sure only those survive.

Ceo elop (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529377)

The Nexus 7 also violates Nokia’s patent for “a method for losing money on hardware sales.”

Re:Ceo elop (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529987)

That patent was invalidated, Sony claimed prior art.

Wait a minute! (1)

corvax (941506) | about 2 years ago | (#40529651)

Doesnt broadcom make the wireless chipset? Doesnt broadcom pay for a license and pass the costs on to manufacturers when they buy said chipset? Why doesnt google just buy nokia pay double what its worth if they have to dump windows phone and stop the insanity?

TACO (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40529801)

she had no fear of its core exemplified by population as Weel good manners rival distribution,

Nokia is sinking to new lows (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40530237)

It is a sign of utter desperation when a company resorts to abusing patents in an anti-competitive way, like this.
The rats are on floating above deck, as the Nokia ship sinks below the waves, full steam ahead; the deranged captain still screaming that he his heading in the right direction (and perhaps in a twisted sort of way, he is - to the bottom of the sea, never to be seen again)

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