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Bill Gates: the Traditional PC Is Changing

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the long-live-the-pc dept.

Handhelds 552

Billly Gates writes "Bill Gates, in an interview with Charlie Rose last night, defended the move to Metro-ize Windows 8 and focus solely on the tablet experience (here's the video — tablet talk starts around 28 minutes in). When asked how traditional PC users will react, he explained that the world is moving into tablets, and a new PC needs to have both experiences integrated together. Also, he defended the move to build the Surface while charging his competitors a bundle for Windows 8. He says users have access to both experiences, whether it is a signature Microsoft one, or from an OEM. Is the a sign the desktop is dead or dying?" Gates stopped short of saying the traditional PC is dead, but dodged direct questions about its future. This is a big change to the stance he has advocated in years past.

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Le sigh. (5, Funny)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 2 years ago | (#40535983)

Mobile computing is the future -- just ignore the battery life.

Re:Le sigh. (4, Insightful)

camperslo (704715) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536085)

The latest Intel chip will help considerably with x86 battery life.

It is strange he talks about things being "integrated" when they've announced SEPARATE x86 and ARM tablets. And neither is binary compatible with their gaming platform (PPC).

Except for Intel probably costing more, why should they need ARM at all? If Intel is now viable for mobile, it would have made more sense to switch the phone to Intel.
Their eco-system is incredibly fragmented.

Re:Le sigh. (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536127)

So these metro apps that run in a VM are somehow tied to cpu architecture? Did you not see Microsoft's intention to insulate themselves from x86 when they released .net? It's a very slow process but it is still rolling along.

Re:Le sigh. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536327)

The metro apps are not pure managed. You can write Win8 metro apps with compiled C++.

Re:Le sigh. (2, Interesting)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536477)

The gaming thing is very deliberately a separate device designed to be a simplified streamlined experience. I'm sort of surprised they aren't doing a 'Windows Xbox' that's actually a fixed spec 86 PC that will then be guaranteed to play particular games.

The ARM thing doesn't seem to make any sense other than to try and coax Intel into believing there is some serious competition from a different direction than AMD, and hoping they'll innovate (or at least use their fabs to overpower ARM).

Battery life (2)

symbolset (646467) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536511)

We have heard that promise before, time and again. Time for show and tell.

Re:Le sigh. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536255)

Mobile computing is the future

You say that like it's a bad thing.

It's not. You just gotta look at it right.

First, the rise of tablets and the decline of the traditional PC will if not kill Microsoft, at least knock it down to a shadow of its former self. They exist solely because of their monopoly in Windows, and Windows is rapidly becoming irrelevant.

Second, it's a Star Trek future! Your mobile device will fit in a shirt pocket. It will be able to feed you information through a glasses or even contact-lens HUD. When you need to enter a lot of information or use a large display, it will talk wirelessly to a keyboard and monitor... all from your shirt pocket! Voice commands will also improve beyond where Siri is now.

The very near future beings shirt-pocket computing more powerful than Star Trek tricorders and communicators. It frees us all from being bound to one spot in order to compute and game and browse.

The future is bright. Don't sound so glum bro! It's a true integration of computing and life, in a way we've never seen before. The next 10 years during this transition will be exciting indeed.

Re:Le sigh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536437)

Sorry, didn't notice the nickname. I shouldn't have said "bro", but rest of point stands.

Keyboard or gamepad on shirt-pocket computers (4, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536539)

The very near future beings shirt-pocket computing more powerful than Star Trek tricorders and communicators. It frees us all from being bound to one spot in order to compute and game and browse.

One thing I don't see very often on shirt-pocket computers is a keyboard for entering large amounts of text or a gamepad for controlling a video game character. A completely flat touch screen is no substitute, as Intellivision II owners learned in 1983 [wikipedia.org] .

Winning! (3, Interesting)

noh8rz4 (2667697) | more than 2 years ago | (#40535987)

Bill is right, the traditional pc is changing... But is it too late for ms to figure it out, or has apple already sucked out all the oxygen? It sucks to be late to the party...

Re:Winning! (5, Funny)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536109)

Yeah, but ....

Asking Bill Gates about Microsoft's platform direction is like asking Mikhail Gorbachev about the future of Russia.

Re:Winning! (2)

symbolset (646467) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536363)

He's still chairman of the board.

Re:Winning! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536519)

like asking Mikhail Gorbachev about the future of Russia

... stll useful despite not being in power thanks to huge experience and knowledge of subject at hand?

Re:Winning! (5, Interesting)

PapayaSF (721268) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536115)

Isn't it amazing how Microsoft seems to have been put on the defensive? What a change from not that long ago, They no longer seem to have much strategic vision, and just respond (usually poorly) to Apple's moves. How freaked out they must be now that the iPhone alone makes Apple more revenue and profit than all of Microsoft. [businessinsider.com]

Re:Winning! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536453)

Apple is clearly in the driver's seat now. 10 years ago, I never thought fortunes could reverse that fast.

Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40535989)

Why, as a society, can't we take what we need from Bill Gates to fund projects we desperately need as a society? We have hungry people, poor people, people with a small tv, crummy roads/bridges/criss crossings, and people without pacemakers who desperately need them and we just let this man keep all these billion. NOT putting his money where it's needed is a failure of our society and we are condemned TO HELL for it.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (4, Informative)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536035)

Yeah, running a massive charity that helps eradicate disease around the world and improve education? What a selfish jerk.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536171)

He's not using 99% of his fortune on charities. And eradicating diseases on an overpopulated planet? It's going to do more harm in the long run.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (5, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536229)

Yeah, running a massive charity that helps eradicate disease around the world and improve education? What a selfish jerk.

Yeah, running A strongarm for big pharma that pretends to eradicate disease without being able to get into every country where it is an issue because of regressive IP policies and attempt to shape education in a way that results in more sales for Microsoft, using money that he effectively stole from the entire computing industry by illegally abusing a monopoly position in such a way that it held the computing industry back at least half a decade, and probably a whole one? I call that a selfish jerk, but I guess that's just because I own a dictionary.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536491)

Yeah, running A strongarm[sic] for big pharma[citation needed] that pretends to eradicate disease without being able to get into every country where it is an issue because of regressive IP policies and attempt to shape education in a way that results in more sales for Microsoft [citation needed], using money that he effectively stole from the entire computing industry by illegally abusing a monopoly position in such a way that it held the computing industry back at least half a decade, and probably a whole one? I call that a selfish jerk, but I guess that's just because I own a dictionary."

Citation needed or it isn't true and I am not talking about unreliable sources like Tech Rights.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536601)

In the Niger delta, Bill Gate's "charity" made more money off their oil investments (in oil companies destroying the niger delta with polution, and causing horrible illness, murdering/assassinating its citizens, and, of course, stealing their wealth), than the amount of money his "charity" provided to combat the health issues caused by the companies policies that his "charity" profits from. (simple google search)

Gates is scum. In every way. He has some good image PR though, as your reaction shows.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536047)

Why, as a society, can't we take what we need from Bill Gates to fund projects we desperately need as a society? We have hungry people, poor people, people with a small tv, crummy roads/bridges/criss crossings, and people without pacemakers who desperately need them and we just let this man keep all these billion. NOT putting his money where it's needed is a failure of our society and we are condemned TO HELL for it.

I guess "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness" are just empty words to you?

Fourth Amendment? Right to privacy? Takings clause? More empty words?

Jeez.

Do you REALLY believe that?

You seem to believe Gates keeps his money in a mattress.

What a clueless twerp.

Tell you what - if you REALLY want to improve society, sell your computer and donate the proceeds to a medical center so they can study the turnip that's grown where your brain ought to be.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (1, Insightful)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536251)

I guess "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness" are just empty words to you?

Are you aware that the original words were "life, liberty, and the pursuit of profit"?

Methinks the Founding Fathers felt a need to be less crass about what we stood for. Though maybe we should reinstate the original words, for the post-1980 era when greed is considered the highest civic virtue.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536377)

I guess "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness" are just empty words to you?

Are you aware that the original words were "life, liberty, and the pursuit of profit"?

Methinks the Founding Fathers felt a need to be less crass about what we stood for. Though maybe we should reinstate the original words, for the post-1980 era when greed is considered the highest civic virtue.

Strawman much?

Where the fuck do you get "greed is considered the highest civic virtue" from words about liberty, privacy, and preventing government appropriation of private property?

And you used the word "methinks". But the evidence says you don't.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (0)

CajunArson (465943) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536093)

I know a country [cracked.com] where no one like Bill Gates would EVER be allowed to get all that evil money, or live past age 10 for that matter.

Why don't you get a one-way ticket there?

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (1)

baker_tony (621742) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536121)

It's uneducated morons like you who are condemning society to hell. Always thinking that you're correct, everyone else is wrong, basing all your decisions on your newspaper headline educated attitude.
You are a moron (had to say it twice)

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536285)

Moron, don't you know a fucking troll when you see it, moron? ...Moron. Three times nice.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536347)

No, I think he's serious.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536475)

"He" is me. It was a troll. Note the /roads/bridges/criss crossings. What's a criss crossing? Ha. Also, "small tvs." Even dumb people wouldn't throw that in with the other concerns. And don't you think pacemakers were a rather arbitrarily specific way to talk about health care costs?

Your eagerness to see a left wing strawman everywhere tricked your mind into ignoring the little details. You've been cognitively pwned. Congrats. I rule YOU!

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (1)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536227)

Money is symbolic only, simply moving it from one place to another does not accomplish anything real. But if you find someone with a lot of money to be particularly disagreeable, you can refuse to accept their money. Money's only real value to the individual is their ability to spend it, and if no one will accept it, it becomes worthless.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536323)

Okay, you say that I am sure as an argument against "redistribution." But please, clarify how a single rich man paying 5 million for a yacht which puts people to work to create a good is fundamentally less about "moving money around" than taxing him to help build roads, which puts people to work, and which we all use as a good? How is the voluntary single point purchase got a magic multiplier factor in it that infrastructure spending does not have (in your opinion)? People like you can never answer this satisfactorily.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (-1, Troll)

epyT-R (613989) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536249)

because people should be able to keep the property they've earned? socialism just ensures that we all live in squalor. Just look at the ex-soviet state lifestyle.. look, I'm no bill gates fan, but the socialist rhetoric spewing forth lately scares me... you don't have a right to another's property without his permission.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536367)

For one, the parent was a troll. Get real. Your eagerness to see a socialist around every corner tricked your mind into ignoring the little details that make the troll nature obvious. Secondly, you don't believe in taxation at all, then? There really is not much socialist rhetoric out there in the mainstream press right now...there is just argument about the degree of regulation and tax rates. Again, get real.

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536311)

Why, as a society, can't we take what we need from Bill Gates to fund projects we desperately need as a society?

Except for perhaps not facing Reagan-era like tax levels, Bill is already voluntarily contributing large amounts to a number of very worth causes.

Perhaps you should look down the list of richest people in the U.S. to numbers 3 and 4, and see what the Koch brothers are doing with their money. Look up some of the groups funded.

from the WP:
"David and Charles have funded conservative and libertarian policy and advocacy groups in the United States.[7] Since the 1980s the Koch foundations have given more than $100 million to such organizations, among these think tanks like the Heritage Foundation and the Cato Institute, as well as more recently Americans for Prosperity.[8] Americans for Prosperity and FreedomWorks are Koch-linked organizations that have been linked to the Tea Party movement."

Re:Why is this man allowed to keep so much money? (2)

Voogru (2503382) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536387)

The federal government would spend all of Bill Gates money in like a week.

What's your plan for week two?

By the way, Bill Gates doesn't actually have all of that money. He has ASSETS which are worth all of that money.

Guess what? In order to confiscate all of his wealth, you have to confiscate those assets. Except those assets aren’t money, who are you going to sell the assets to? Who’s going to buy the assets if they know that the government could just confiscate them?

Is the a sign the desktop is dead or dying? (-1, Offtopic)

kwerle (39371) | more than 2 years ago | (#40535993)

No, it's a sign that /. needs editors.

Re:Is the a sign the desktop is dead or dying? (4, Funny)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536031)

No, it's a sign that /. needs editors.

Slashdot's editors are actually AIs that battle each other deep inside the Gibson. The stories are chosen by the one that survives 17 rounds of gruelling competition. If you listen carefully, you can almost hear the crunch of cheetos and the pounding techno music as hot girls in glowing costumes introduce the contenders. Malda didn't retire, he just returned to userspace.

Re:Is the a sign the desktop is dead or dying? (1)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536123)

Hah that's about right. The traditional PC isn't going to be going anywhere, at least not until quantum computing becomes the norm, or wetware exists. Until then there will always be a need for some type of box that's connected with low latency, and always available power, with plenty of processing and graphics power.

And with the rumored consoles coming out, and them being as bad in terms of graphics as the previous generation, I can't see why people would keep buying them.

Apple? (5, Interesting)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536011)

I don't see Apple shoving a grand unified UI down the throats of its tablet, laptop, and desktop users. And I don't see Apple users complaining or getting confused by tablet gestures vs keyboard/mouse operations.

How about we just standardize on the iPod? Put one wheel on the front of everything and be done with it.

Re:Apple? (3, Insightful)

vux984 (928602) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536053)

I don't see Apple shoving a grand unified UI down the throats of its tablet, laptop, and desktop users.

Really? Every time they update OSX it becomes more like iOS.

Re:Apple? (0)

cjpa (796302) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536129)

this! What with the way they changed the scroll-direction when doing a 2-finger trackpad-slide in Lion?
That pissed me off immensely!

Re:Apple? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536217)

this! What with the way they changed the scroll-direction when doing a 2-finger trackpad-slide in Lion?
That pissed me off immensely!

It takes 10 seconds to change in System Preferences if you don't like the new default. But I now prefer it because it's conceptually consistent across all my devices.

Re:Apple? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536305)

It also only takes 10 seconds to get accustomed to the change.http://tech.slashdot.org/story/12/07/03/2227234/bill-gates-the-traditional-pc-is-changing#

Re:Apple? (1)

cjpa (796302) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536587)

yeah. and i changed it the minute my macbook booted. But it's still a sign they are changing the desktop-environment to match the mobile-feel.
And no, it's not a consistent feel across devices. On my phone, it feel natural to pull my fingers up to scroll, on my trackpad it doesn't.

Re:Apple? (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536089)

I don't see Apple shoving a grand unified UI down the throats of its tablet, laptop, and desktop users.

Some Apple Mac applications are being switched to the iOS version (like the Airport utility) and previously iOS only applications are being added to Mac OS (like iMessage in Mountain Lion). The direction is there, but not yet a unified UI.

And I don't see Apple users complaining or getting confused by tablet gestures vs keyboard/mouse operations.

With the magic pad and mouse, Mac users already are familiar with gestures on a desktop OS.

Re:Apple? (4, Interesting)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536269)

With the magic pad and mouse, Mac users already are familiar with gestures on a desktop OS.

Yes, we are. And it's taking something that works pretty well on a tablet, and trying to port it over to a larger device. Some times it works, others, not so much. My Magic mouse has features that are kind of cool, but some, like the swipe between pages can be very frustrating, and have to be turned off .

But it's a weird sort of logic that some people think that what works and looks good on a 4 inch screen is going to be the same as what looks good on a large monitor. For years, computer people have fixated on a monocultural universe. And I dare say it is mostly the Windows people - no insult intended there, but as the largest user base, it's not surprising they think that way. But here we have Gates saying in essence, "Fuck you and how you think it should run! We say it is going to be like this and you will use it!

I love my pad, and I love my desktop and laptops too. But I sure as anything do not want the Pad and the other devices to have the same look and feel.

And I feel strongly enough about it that Windows 8 will not be on any of my computers. The Preview edition was enough to tell me that.

Re:Apple? (1)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536559)

The problem here is a cognisance gap, the failure to realise the difference between content creation and content consumption. M$ is relying on the majority feedback of users who allowed M$'s experience software to run ie by and large content consumers. M$ is now fooling itself that the majority of the computer market, the content consumers, now defines the PC market rather than the content creators which M$ is choosing to ignore to M$'s peril.

Content creators are largely the business market, people who create business plans, feasibility studies, building plans and, reports. Next up you have science and advanced education, with every imaginable kind of content being created. Then there is the school experience and unlike the expectation of M$ marketdroids selling content to students will not educate, students need to create content to learn.

M$ seems determined to stick with Uncle Festers idiot plan because their privacy invasive feed back software tells them to. Either that or the typical every second version of windows must be shite in order to force upgrades is running to plan.

Re:Apple? (4, Funny)

Anderu67 (1179779) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536095)

Re:Apple? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536433)

funny stuff. give him some pts!

Re:Apple? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536097)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BnLbv6QYcA

Re:Apple? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536333)

Obligatory... Introducing the Macbook Wheel!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BnLbv6QYcA

Re:Apple? (2)

je ne sais quoi (987177) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536395)

Don't use Lion, do you? It is moving very much in the direction of iOS. Read this [gizmodo.com] article. It is rather inflammatory, but the guys makes an interesting point. There is no VP for OS X development listed in Apple's leadership team after Serlet left. He was the one responsible for OS X versions 10.4-10.6, which were the best ones (IMNSHO). If you spend some time talking with long time OS X users, you'll find tepid enthusiasm for 10.7 at best and worst, rabid hatred. Read the comments in this [macworld.com] OS X hint on disabling the new autosave in os x. A lot of people don't like the changes in 10.7.

The PC is dead (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536037)

The PC is dead, long live the...

You know what? Screw that.

Forget Microsoft, install Linux!

Nope... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536081)

The traditional PC won't go away as long as we have PC games.

Re:Nope... (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536271)

The traditional PC won't go away as long as we have PC games.

Yeah, Company of Heroes 2 just won't be the same on a hand-held.

Yep... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536371)

Read this [cnn.com] - it interviews many of today's leading game designers. The next generation of games are being written to operate on both mobile devices and traditional consoles. You'll be able to start a game on your console, then continue it on the bus on your mobile device.

This means the games people play will work just fine on tablets, and will be designed for that kind of input control. The graphics processing power of tablets is growing very rapidly and they will very soon be powerful enough for this.

This isn't a bad thing. Means more choices about when, where, and how to play.

Genres that don't work well on tablets (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536591)

This means the games people play will work just fine on tablets, and will be designed for that kind of input control.

Which leaves fans of genres that don't work well on tablets out in the cold. Based on comments to previous Slashdot stories about the phone vs. 3DS/PS Vita battle, these genres include at least platformers and fighting games. Or are tablet gamers expected to buy a Bluetooth gamepad?

He doesn't get it (1)

jmorris42 (1458) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536083)

The vast majority of people who used a Windows PC because it was the only way to do basic things like web, email and simple word processing or data entry never really needed one. Those people will now move to something else, since at long last there actually IS something else other than a Mac that cost about twice as much as was still almost as complicated.

But there are those who DO need a PC. As they realize that Windows 8 isn't a PC operating system anymore they have a choice to make. Suck it up and try to keep using it because of the legacy app problem, move to a Mac or try Linux. (For the people I'm talking about it is probably, try Linux.... again.)

Linux blew the opportunity offered by the Vista fiasco by having most popular distros all but unusable during that period due to the PulseAudio debacle. And now when we get a redo every major distro is as deeply into "Tablet Madness" as Microsoft. We just can't win. Only consolation is Apple is ALSO terrifying their own user base with the increasing iOS creep into OS X. Option #4 anyone? What would it be though?

Re:He doesn't get it (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536197)

Option #4: Amiga OS, BeOS, etc.

Re:He doesn't get it (2)

jmorris42 (1458) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536291)

> Option #4: Amiga OS, BeOS, etc.

Linux with an alternate desktop is still probably 100x the size of those in installed base and available apps. Problem is nobody big is pushing the alternate desktops and nobody at all is pushing Amiga OS (which doesn't currently run on any available hardware btw) and BeOS doesn't exist at all. Haiku pretty much only runs in virtual machines at the moment because finding physical hardware with working drivers is beyond the ability of all but the hardest of the hard core.

So a potential refugee from "tablet madness" is going to get a hundred fanboy recomends for obscure choices where support consists of the one hardcore fan and a forum. If Apple announced a clear plan to keep the Mac a Mac (i.e. no DRM lockdown, no forced app store, no touch madness, etc) they could probably even convert me at this point. And I HATE Apple with the heat of a thousand suns. But the choices are disappearing fast and Mac OS is POSIX when all is said and done. But Apple has already telegraphed their intent to do just the opposite so that isn't an option. If Microsoft gets their way with Windows 8 the cheap PC hardware us penguin folk have relied upon is going to get scarce. Dark times are coming.

Re:He doesn't get it (2)

Teresita (982888) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536267)

The future isn't PCs, tablets, or phones. It's smart glasses, with blinks and eye movements replacing the mouse. Cross your eyes to zoom. We just need to make sure cars have a safety interlock so you can't drive with your smart glasses on.

Re:He doesn't get it (3, Funny)

jmorris42 (1458) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536313)

> We just need to make sure cars have a safety interlock so you can't drive with your smart glasses on.

Why? The cars will be driving themselves by then so we will need something to do while travelling.

The PC is not dying. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536103)

Some people browse the web on iPads now. This is approximately the only piece of evidence I've seen that the PC is "dying".

We all still have a PC in our office to do real work. People write code, write papers, design things, run simulations, SSH into servers, work with complicated spreadsheets and databases, run custom software applications, etc. When there's any sign at all that most of that work is moving onto tablets, then it'll be reasonable to start saying the PC is dying.

Re:The PC is not dying. (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536419)

Some people browse the web on iPads now. This is approximately the only piece of evidence I've seen that the PC is "dying".

We all still have a PC in our office to do real work. People write code, write papers, design things, run simulations, SSH into servers, work with complicated spreadsheets and databases, run custom software applications, etc. When there's any sign at all that most of that work is moving onto tablets, then it'll be reasonable to start saying the PC is dying.

... time machine whirling back 27 years in your office ...

Some people browse terminal emulation software on PCs now. This is approximately the only piece of evidence I've seen that the mainframe is "dying". We still have a Mammonth IBM Mainframe in our office to do real work. People write code, write papers, design things, run simulations, x3270 into our mainframes, work with complicated accounting software and databases, run custom software applications, etc. When there's any sign at all that most of that work is moving onto PCs, then it'll be reasonable to start saying the mainframe is dying.

Asymco predictions about tablet vs PC sales (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536133)

This guy makes a strong argument [asymco.com] that tablets will pass traditional form factor PCs (desktop/laptop/notebook) by Q3 2013. It isn't very far out to forecast.

My anecdotal data bears this out. Among buddies buying new systems when old machines die or are given away, very few replace a PC with a PC. They replace them with tablets at least 80% of the time.

The world is changing, and it's an interesting inflection point, very much like when PCs took over from workstations as the main "go to" computer for most tasks. People didn't believe it then either - had all kinds of reasons it could never happen - but happen it did. Just like then, there is a crowd now that doesn't believe it, but the sales numbers don't lie. Tablets are growing 100% year over year, and PCs sales are flat (declining in the developed world, slight increase in the developing world).

Just goes to show you (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536135)

This man is a reptile and Rothschild Zionist. He is all about population control and GMOs, when his controllers brought the moon here they never could have imagined the control they would end up with.

Hey, Look! (5, Insightful)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536201)

It's like that time in the 1990s when Bill Gates discovered the Internet several years later than everyone else...

But it's Bill Gates, so some people listen and think he's said something profound!

Re:Hey, Look! (2, Insightful)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536283)

Bash him all you want but he is a brilliant and great CEO.

He almost owned the internet too with IE 6 by taking it proprietary and halting to encourage client/server apps instead. Evil for us but great for his company. Balmer was the one who made MS from a tiger to a paper tiger in 10 years since he left.

Gates was not that slow with the internet. By 1996 he saw how serious it was after spending an all nighter in the computer lab browsing the web with Netscape and seeing how it can be used for apps. No one was even talking about a browser as a platform yet. He had the vision and IE (you may hate the browser today) invented AJAX to win over Netscape.

Is he right now? I do not know. My guess is he doesn't do much at Microsoft anymore besides lecture Balmer every now and then and focuses on his charity work. If he were still CEO I bet you Windows 8 would not be so hostile to desktop users and METRO would be much better.

Re:Hey, Look! (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536309)

It's like that time in the 1990s when Bill Gates discovered the Internet several years later than everyone else...

But it's Bill Gates, so some people listen and think he's said something profound!

I suspect that when you've got as money as he has you end up surrounded by people who pretend everything you say is profound, whether that's what you want or not.

"suckup" seems to be in our genes.

What about developers? Real gamers? (5, Insightful)

Spacejock (727523) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536211)

If the PC is dead, what are the developers writing dinky little games and apps for your shiny new tablets going to use? Have you tried designing a gui with gestures? Typing 150,000 lines of code on a touchscreen? Sure, you can attach a bluetooth keyboard and mouse ... as long as the batteries hold out.

In addition to that, if PC gamers wanted a braindead machine they'd get a handheld or a console. The sort of games I enjoy need a mouse, keyboard and very large screen. Tablets have their place but they're no substitute for a real computer.

Re:What about developers? Real gamers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536507)

You'll do it with, as you say, a wireless keyboard and monitor. Your batteries will last all day, so that won't be an issue. Just plug in over night, and you're good to go. The real interesting part about that is you can continue your work on the bus. On the airplane. Anywhere you are. Tablets will have quad core very soon (maybe already? I haven't kept up). The gap between tablets and PCs will close just as PCs quickly passed the workstations in power, just because the market was SO much larger and so more money went into their development.

PC's will be dead when (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536219)

they pry the last one from my cold, dead fingers.

Or nuke me in my bunker. Same diff.

Not Yet! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536239)

Until we can fit a dual GTX 690 or Tesla card into a tablet and not have it melt our hands or fry the battery. The big box with a massive power supply plugged into the wall with a dozen fans or liquid cooling, 10 or more usb ports, 6x Display support with room for expansion, isnt going anywhere.

CAD: I still need a good desktop computer (4, Interesting)

gemtech (645045) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536257)

When I'm designing stuff (mechanical, schematic, PCB layout), I need a desktop computer: good optical mouse, comfortable chair, big monitor, full-sized keyboard, fast/loaded computer. I have tried to do that on a tablet or notebook, it's not even close. I agree with Spacejock, there is no replacement when you need real development.

Re:CAD: I still need a good desktop computer (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536329)

You need a keyboard, monitor, mouse... not a desktop computer. All those things will be able to connect wirelessly to your tablet.

For the few uses that really NEED a desktop, they'll still exist, but will be a niche market and more expensive. They won't die entirely, just like mainframes haven't died entirely. There's still a mainframe market and business. Neither will desktops die, but they won't be used by the masses any more, so the price will rise accordingly as it becomes more and more niche.

How is this a sign of its death? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536259)

I'm willing to give that tablets and tv's together will replace the "infotainment" desktop. But I don't see them replacing the serious work desktops have been used for. That's where the PC started (because it was better than what people were using at the time) and maybe that's where it's going back to.

Dear Mr. Gates (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536263)

Why change interfaces we're accustomed to (Win9x shell) for metro? Why change menus for ribbons in other apps??

People are telling you they do NOT want them (despite your "research groups" saying otherwise).

Sir - a basic marketing rule: You cannot sell people what they don't want.

Signed,

Disgruntled and Frustrated PC user

*facepalm* ... Dumb, dumber, ... this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536273)

This so dumb, I don't even know how to comment on it anymore...

A computer is a universal information processing machine.
You have to stop and think about how awesome that is. It's the holy grail of information processing, for fuck's sake!!
Would there be the same thing for physical matter/energy, it would be the be-all-end-all of technology!

And they don't get that AT ALL. They think it's like a vehicle, where you make specialized models for specialized purposes...
YOU DON'T NEED TO! IT ALREADY DOES *ALL* PURPOSES! THAT'S THE WHOLE DAMN POINT!

The only reason they actually want this, are...
1) because retards who don't understand computers, and have never ever in their life actually used one themselves. (Using applications that happen to run on a computer is *not* "using a computer". Automating *your* work away, is.)
2) because they want to have full control over the system, allowing nothing, and charging for everything. You breathe at the device? Two dollars. Click an icon? 50 dollars. Dare to actually create anything with it? 5000 dollars. Minimum.

As always... the reasons are greed and stupidity. Which go so well together... (And are what Bill Gates [among others] got his entire wealth from.)

The Desktop is Changing, Not Dead or Dying. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536287)

Sigh...I don't know why it's so difficult to understand, but I guess tech is just any likely as any other industry, even science, to suffer from fashionable ideas.

Not to say that touch-based interfaces are a fad, they are not. I'm saying that the desktop is not dying, but adapting. It is really that hard to realize that both the desktop and mobile touch UIs are going to merge? I'm sure many of you slashdot readers could figure that out a long time ago.

However, given MSFT's track record of major releases, I'm guessing it's going to be another buggy semi-disaster like Vista. But hey, they're the ones that always liked the concept of "give it 3 versions at least." So maybe the next version, or if we are lucky, a relatively quick service pack or two will do the trick. (Not that it matters, but I mostly use products from the "overly expensive fruit factory" (Apple) these days. It just seems that "MSFT computers" only offer low monetary cost.)

I'm confused with... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536299)

"Also, he defended the move to build the Surface while charging his competitors a bundle for Windows 8"

Gates is CEO again?

64k of ram (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536303)

His track record is hardly reliable....

Re:64k of ram (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536449)

Wow. You got TWO things wrong in just one sentence fragment...

Win8 is problematic however you slice it.... (4, Interesting)

Junta (36770) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536315)

The premise that Metro is a forgone conclusion for the way a tablet/phone experience succeeds is a poor one. The market has not shown that to be true. I figure Win8 is their move to try to force the issue and gain some traction by effectively throwing the desktop market under the bus, since they don't have to worry about losing those to competitors by and large (Vista proved that in relatively modern history).

I've always hated hot corners, and Windows 8 demands they be used a lot. Both in the annoying 'mouse happened to go to a corner of a screen, do something without user 'clicking' anything' and the somewhat more forgiveable hidden UI element to click on and do things. The hotcorners aren't as bad as the 'activities' hot corner of Gnome 3, but I find it a questionable choice, *particularly* in the context of touch interfaces where hot corners don't even have their 'auto-find' aspect that people like so much.

The jarring difference between 'Metro UI' and Desktop applications is unfortunate. It's especially bad where you have two 'Internet Explorers" that behave very differently. OSX full-screen really did this right, the full-screen app management pretty much let's the apps be the same in windowed and fullscreen mode, and just tweak the navigation/task switching.

The search feature is 'hidden' (a common theme in the Metro interface) as there is no visual indication of it's availability. For a keyboard user, I consider this minor, but wonder how it plays in a tablet UI, where typically a text field is a cue for virtual keyboard. More annoying is that the search by default hides all but 'Apps' results, meaning you have to note the non-Apps categories count when searching. Worse yet, that summary will auto-hide, leading you with no UI indication of actual results that you actually want.

All that said, conceptually there is one thing I think is nice about Metro and Gnome 3, the general concept that when you do 'Start' or 'Activities', that the entire screen real estate is dedicated to the action. I kind of prefer Gnome 3's view over the Metro start (the former giving better consideration for task switching rather than just launching).

Re:Win8 is problematic however you slice it.... (1)

SpryGuy (206254) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536503)

The "hot corners" are mouse only, so your comment about them on touch interfaces is misplaced. You get the same actions on a touch-device by "swiping in from the edge". The Hot Corners are basically a kludge to enable usage by people on mouse/keyboard devices without touch.

And the search may be hidden, but it doesn't take long to learn that "swipe in from the right" does a context senstitive search from wherever you are (it's the same for printing in whatever app you're in). Basically, swiping in from the right is the old "File" menu of sorts... the main menu you use to do common things, like print or search or share. For the mouse, it's either right-hand hot-corner that brings up the same charms menu. It takes a little bit to wrap your mind around this new paradigm, but it is consistent and "makes sense" after a while.

And if you are searching from within the app, the app's results show by default, not "Apps". Again, it's true to the context in which you invoke it. If you invoke search from the Start Screen, of course it defaults to apps, since the Start Screen is all about listing and launching apps.

And task switching is smooth too, on a touch device... just swipe in from the left. And the ability to dock an app in a side-bar is also useful and unique.

Multiple and large screens (1)

michaelmalak (91262) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536331)

For atom-based businesses, the tablet will replace the clipboard and the PC. For bit-based businesses, larger and multiple screens will replace the single-screen PC, but they will still be keyboard/mouse based.

Metro will work just fine on both. Windows, even in this day and age, still has app lock-in. I tried bringing up one of my PowerPoints in Impress on Ubuntu, and my text boxes were all incorrectly word-wrapped because the fonts were different. So annoying. I've also been doing some C++ on Eclipse. Had a linker error but all Eclipse would report is "make failed". I had to hunt down and manually run the make file to find my linker error.

So Gates is wrong in his prognistications of the future, but he can rest assured that Windows will continue to sell nonetheless.

Bill doesn't understand what we need (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536339)

he explained that the world is moving into tablets, and a new PC needs to have both experiences integrated together.

Yes, integration between the desktop and the tablet is important. But in no way does that imply that they need to share the same GUI.

We need two OSes from Microsoft: One specifically designed for a mouse, and the other specifically designed for the touchscreen. We want those two OSes to provide seamless interconnectivity with each other. But we have absolutely no need for those two OSes to use the same GUI design. Microsoft is badly confused, and is giving us the latter when they should be concentrating on the former.

The gui vs CLI (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536355)

I wanted to post in the story, but didn't want to appear off topic is how similar this is when Gui's in Mac/Windows were competing against Dos/Unix in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The IPhone is almost 5 years old and parallels to 1989 when the Mac just turned 5 years and Windows 3.0 was in beta with the same too companies today.

Is this new trend similar to the gui vs CLI wars? X was hated and used in the UNIX community too back in the late 1980s similar to Gnome-Shell/Unity today as well. Ironically it was the Macintosh that brought the gui and professional IT staff and programmers HATED it! Hipsters or those who could afford one loved it, but many preferred Unix or Dos if you could not afford a $30,000 workstation.

Is the Tablet UI the new gui and a new age in computing? It seems professionals love the old way better.

Desktops won't die... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536369)

Desktops won't die...

What else are you going to use to code all those little mobile apps?

Changing? Not willingly. (5, Insightful)

linebackn (131821) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536391)

I get it now. He says the PC is changing. Because he (well, Microsoft) is going to MAKE it change. Change to a locked down environment that can only run Microsoft approved OSes. And do things the Microsoft way. And you are going to like it because they will spend bazillions in marketing dollars making everyone think it is the best thing since sliced bread.

Count me out.

Not dead, not even kinda (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536411)

I develop software and sites. I use a 'traditional pc'. A tablet is useless to me. I deal with software, that is mostly words, not mostly pictures. Tablets are like a big-people speak-and-spell. If you don't need to deal with words (specifically words that you input, rather than words you read), a tablet is shit, and a PC is a thing of beauty. You can read text as easily on a pc as you can on a tablet. A PC has a million times as much processing power as a tablet. If you have to refer to text while typing other text, a tablet is useless (unless you have a book beside you, or two tablets). I commonly use two screens at the same time when using a PC. When the minicomputer came along, people questioned whether the mainframe would die. When the PC came along, people questioned whether the minicomputer would die. The tablet comes along and people question whether the PC will die. Next, smartphone users question whether the tablet is dead. Some may no longer need PC's, I'm not one of them.

What are we going to use to program on? (1)

sprior (249994) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536421)

Tablets may be great to consume media and apps on, but I don't know what he thinks we're going to use to write this stuff with, and I mean either multimedia authoring or programming. Can any of you really see running a programming IDE in a Metro based environment while referring to some documentation at the same time? I didn't think so.

Re:What are we going to use to program on? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40536595)

Two choices:

(1) Desktop PCs won't totally die, any more than mainframes did. They'll still be available, but they won't be the computer used by the masses, so they'll be very expensive due to smaller volume. But you'll be able to get one if needed.

(2) Mobiles will interface with keyboards and screens wirelessly. They'll have quad core CPUs very soon. You'll be able to use them for programming.

I am really glad there is linux. (5, Interesting)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536445)

May be the PC is changing. And may be this is where money is and this is where highly amortized commodity mass market devices are heading. But I am glad our company kept linux support alive. Our product does heavy duty scientific computing and number crunching. Traditional mainframe/unix support was the mainstay. One by one our platform makers succumbed. Cray fell. Then SGI irix tru64. Then DEC alpha. Then HP-UX. Then Sun-Solaris. We were forced to switch to Windows as the main development environment. They took command line batch build away in Ms-Dev 4.0. We laboriously converted our nice Imakefiles and makefiles and home grown scripts that will build on PC from Imakefiles to vcproj files. Then they brought it back in Ms-Dev, but our Imakefiles and scripts were irrecoverably damaged. We were forced to use mainsoft for porting. Then mainsoft broke up with Microsoft. Some idiot in Remond thought "no executable is going to be built using more than 10000 source files!" And his monkey of a manager approved. Our builds broke.

Through it all we persevered. A few of us were preaching separating "GUI from kernel" "event driven code from procedural code". And we pulled extra hours to practice what we preached. Fellow developers from MS world randomly included afxwin.h deep inside non graphical kernel library code to add a one line debug statement, broke the linux builds and threw tantrums when called to fix the offending code, "it is working in Windows, so it can't be my problem. You fix it in Linux". We suffered all these indignities and got our product to build and run in Linux all the time. We no longer have a 3 month delay in releasing linux version.

Now this. Good riddance. Let the windows and its market dominance and its subsidizing the computing platform go chasing the tablets or whatever. Before Wintel monopoly we had 90% revenue fro unix sales, it dropped to 10% at the height, now linux is back up to 40%. If they cram the win-8 interface down the throat or make our software to be sold through appstore or something, our windows version sales will have no place to go but down. Finally sanity will return. We will separate content from presentation. We will separate gui code from non-graphical code. We will separate event driven code from procedure libraries. Vindication at last.

Dear Apple : Please release for generic hardware? (2)

addikt10 (461932) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536467)

Dear Apple :
Microsoft believes that the PC is dead.
Would you please go ahead and release your OS for generic hardware?
Or simply release a mid-tower box. Good enough for me.

Signed : A Lover of PCs

Fortunately Windows 7 has lots of life left. (3, Insightful)

xs650 (741277) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536469)

Windows 7 will soldier on until MS replaces 8 with a useful PC OS. Just like XP did when Vista bombed and MS needed a couple of years to replace it.

Re:Fortunately Windows 7 has lots of life left. (1)

Teresita (982888) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536543)

Yeah, the replacement to Windows 8 will bring back the Start Button. Microsoft will advertise it with a commercial featuring the Rolling Stones' song "Start Me Up".

Oh ffs... (0)

Internetuser1248 (1787630) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536471)

Is the a sign the desktop is dead or dying?[sic]

Why do I keep hearing this? The desk top has been around since recorded history, and it's use has only increased - drastically - in modern times. Oh you were talking about computers that you put on a desk? I put mine under the desk, and I put my mobile device on desks sometimes. Oh you were talking about square box non-portable personal computers? Well I think there will always be a market for a computer that can fit under an office desk and not in your pocket, for those that need a bit of extra data storage or more processing power than the average pocket can contain. Oh wait you were talking about... what exactly? People who say X is dead should be tied up and tortured until they reveal exactly what dead means in this context. Bill Gates stopped short of saying the desktop pc is dead because he is less of an idiot than the writer of the slashdot summary. Seems the average person is.

In other news lot's of people drink soft drinks, is this a sign that water is dead or dying?

You need to re-read that (2)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536479)

"that the world is moving into tablets" actually means "we want to move the world into tablets".

Obvious (1)

Tagged_84 (1144281) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536495)

I can see file-based user interfaces becoming a niche, 99% of the world doesn't need to learn how to manage a file structure! Why does this program want to install to C Drive? What's C Drive? The common user has all their computing needs in their pocket these days with a task/action based UI that's far easier to understand and near impossible for them to delete that "windows" folder or format that drive.

I've seen a huge decrease in people needing my help in the last five years to fix their desktop and an increase of people asking me to make them an app. This is because the common user is better able to understand their computer (phone or tablet) because functions and actions aren't hidden behind a complex layer of little folder pictures.

Yes, your PC is changing! Well, your Windows PC. (1)

Kaz Kylheku (1484) | more than 2 years ago | (#40536599)

It's changing right now, in ways you don't know about. Both malware and non-malware alike is having a field day with your system configuration.
Soon you will be "solving" the problem by buying a new PC and migrating whatever files you're still able to salvage.

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