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LHC Discovers New Particle That Looks Like the Higgs Boson

Unknown Lamer posted more than 2 years ago | from the and-it-didn't-consume-the-earth dept.

Science 396

The wait is over: new submitter Roger W Moore (among many, many other submitters) writes "The ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN have just announced the discovery of a new particle which is consistent with a Standard Model Higgs boson. There is still a lot of work to do to confirm whether this really is the Higgs, and if so whether it is a Standard Model Higgs, but this is a major result."

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I found it last week. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540611)

The legendary Higgs Boson is in my pants, and it feels great!

Re:I found it last week. (5, Funny)

erdos-bacon sandwich (2676113) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540975)

The legendary Higgs Boson is in my pants, and it feels great!

Scientists also report the particle is much smaller than expected

Re:I found it last week. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541099)

It's also not a Hadron.

Found at 125 GeV (4, Insightful)

hcs_$reboot (1536101) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540623)

Does somebody mind to explain why a particle that gives mass is... that heavy? (no pun intended, just my total ignorance. Intuitively I'd thought it'd be very light, since it's used to give mass to other particles)

Re:Found at 125 GeV (1, Informative)

masternerdguy (2468142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540679)

I think thats the energy level needed to isolate it not the mass of the particle itself.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (5, Informative)

Pro-feet (2668975) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540797)

No, no, it is really the particle's mass.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540929)

Big deal! I'll fuck everything about your ass until it's leakin' out cum like it's a faucet!

Sorry, but I'm coming to the garbage of this place this minute!

It is the mass (5, Informative)

Roger W Moore (538166) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540927)

The mass of the Higgs boson is just the energy needed to make the Higgs field vibrate. The reason that the Higgs field gives particles mass is that, at its lowest energy level, the value of the Higgs field is not zero and this non-zero field then fills the universe and binds to particles giving them mass.

Hence the mass of each type of particle depends on the zero energy value (vacuum expectation value) of the Higgs field and how strongly the particle couples to it while the mass of the Higgs boson depends on how the energy density of the Higgs field changes as the strength of the field varies.

Re:It is the mass (5, Funny)

Cow Jones (615566) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541129)

[the Higgs field] ... then fills the universe and binds to particles giving them mass.

I'm not a physicist, so please correct me if I misunderstood. Are you saying that this field surrounds us and penetrates us, and that it binds the galaxy together?

Re:Found at 125 GeV (5, Informative)

Remus Shepherd (32833) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540703)

The Higgs particle is just the particle manifestation of the Higgs gauge field. Think of it as a huge block of jello through which all massive objects move. 125 GeV is the energy required to scoop out a bit of that jello and isolate it.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (5, Funny)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540799)

That sounds disturbingly like aether theory.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (2)

simcop2387 (703011) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540867)

if you think it's disturbing now, realize that the mass that that field gives everything will also bend and twist light like aether was thought to!

Re:Found at 125 GeV (3, Informative)

Rei (128717) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540935)

Photons are massless and don't interact with the Higgs field. In fact, it's the opposite of æther theory - almost everything *but* light (and a few other particles) interacts with it ;)

Re:Found at 125 GeV (1)

tmosley (996283) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540947)

Photon propagation is affected by gravity, though.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (5, Interesting)

dkf (304284) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541125)

Photon propagation is affected by gravity, though.

But the Higgs mechanism isn't there to explain gravity. It's there to explain why some particles have rest masses at all. AIUI, a large part of the mass of a proton or neutron is explained by the energy stored in the Strong Nuclear binding field that couples the component quarks, but the Higgs mechanism is there to explain the rest.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540987)

Why does light bounce off objects like mirrors then? Why are they attracted at mass at all? If completely massless, wouldn't they be able to escape a black hole?

Re:Found at 125 GeV (1)

Rei (128717) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541305)

Reflection is not due to attraction. The incoming light induces a corresponding oscillation in the electrons of what it's striking which is re-radiated. As for black holes, gravity bends space itself. The light is traveling in a straight line, but space is curved.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (3, Informative)

Carewolf (581105) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541101)

Photons are massless

Yes and no, photon has no mass at rest, but photon never rest. When moving they have the effective mass of their kinetic energy.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541275)

Bending light... Sounds like curved (space-time)... And that sounds like bullshit.

If a game stored on a flat disc in binary, does the disc bend when the world is viewed through the curved lens on the screen? Or is it just your perception when that happens?

Re:Found at 125 GeV (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541167)

Funny that, considering that relativity is essentially a fixed version of aether theory:)

Re:Found at 125 GeV (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540717)

Because dealing with so many particles that he deals with on a daily basis is heavy.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540725)

This efect is called mass deficiency. Einstein predicted this efect. When you take particles from atom and add their mass not as a whole atom but 1 particle at the time. Next you mesure mass of atom build from thesse particles you will notice that particles alone are heavier. It's because when particles are creating an atom energy is relesed according to: E=mc^2. The energy released is equas mass deficiency times c squared. Siencits knew that Higs particle can be realy heavy but in atom it can be quite light.

 

Re:Found at 125 GeV (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540829)

Mod:-1 Completely clueless

Re:Found at 125 GeV (2)

Pro-feet (2668975) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540861)

Reference? This makes no sense at all. You got binding energy upside down, and that has nothing to do with the Higgs boson, which has a fixed mass.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (4, Informative)

zygotic mitosis (833691) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541239)

What the hell, people??? Parent has binding energy right. The particles alone are heavier. This goes for chemistry, as well as nuclear chemistry, as well as nuclear physics. For example, helium: Wolfram Alpha tells me that 2n + 2p = 6.695E-24 g

The mass of helium is 4.002602 g/mol. Divide by Avogdro's number, and a single atom of helium weighs 6.646E-24 g. The difference in mass is what powers the sun. Parent is simply making the same argument on the scale of a proton split into its parts.

(disclaimer: I know, blabla deuterium, not protons and neutrons. However, see the definition of a state function.)

Re:Found at 125 GeV (0, Troll)

Swampash (1131503) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540931)

What tard moderated that Informative?

Re:Found at 125 GeV (4, Funny)

jampola (1994582) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540745)

Dr Emmet Brown called. His response. "Whoa.... This is heavy!"

Re:Found at 125 GeV (4, Funny)

Fixer40000 (1921598) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541241)

More importantly, with increased knowledge of the subatomic mechanics of mass we may still be on track for hoverboards and flying cars by 2015!

Re:Found at 125 GeV (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541293)

Dr Emmet Brown called. His response. "Whoa.... This is heavy!"

I'm pretty sure that it was Marty McFly made this comment, to which Dr. Emmet Brown responded with, "There's that word again... heavy. Why are things so heavy in the future? Is there a problem with the earth's gravitational pull?"

Re:Found at 125 GeV (1)

Pro-feet (2668975) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540783)

We know all about the Standard Model Higgs boson, except its mass which is a free parameter; at least in the Standard Model. We knew also that it couldn't be too heavy (~1TeV) or theoretical problems would arise that need new physics to remedy.

Re:Found at 125 GeV (2)

agentgonzo (1026204) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540923)

Yeah, I don't understand this either. If the Higgs boson gives all other particles mass, how can it weigh 133 times more than a proton? What gives the proton mass? It can't be 1/133th of a Higgs surely?

Yo mama (-1)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541015)

Yo mama is so fat, she give all the particles in the Universe their mass.

Look, this is almost as sensible as what the newspapers have been printing about this. So far, the most coherent bit of journalism I've seen outside New Scientist is possibly The Daily Mash, which is at least mildly amusing.

huh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540625)

OMG - now what?

Re:huh (5, Informative)

Rei (128717) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540893)

Now we just need to solve gravity, dark matter, dark energy, unify quantum chromodynamics with relativity, and a ton of other stuff.

Party's not over, folks. :)

I suspect dark matter will be easiest. Wouldn't be surprised at all if the LHC solves that one. All you need to see is what looks like a clear violation of conservation of energy/momentum at a consistant, high energy in your results, and you've got evidence that something heavy that interacts weakly or not at all with normal matter is flying off in the opposite direction. That something would probably be dark matter.

The others... that's probably going to be a long, hard slog.

Re:huh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541247)

Now we just need to solve gravity, dark matter, dark energy, unify quantum chromodynamics with relativity, and a ton of other stuff.

Relativity (special relativity, that is) is pretty damn central to our understanding of quantum field theory, and thus quantum chromodynamics. And gravity is already "solved" in the sense that it's described perfectly well by Einstein's equations (aka general relativity), outside of regimes that are practically impossible to probe experimentally. The unification of quantum chromodynamics with that understanding of gravity (i.e., general rel) would be the next thing. (Sorry to nitpick and all...)

Massive (4, Funny)

burisch_research (1095299) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540633)

This is a weighty finding.

Re:Massive (3, Funny)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540675)

This is a weighty finding.

It's massive.

Re:Massive (5, Funny)

jampola (1994582) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540757)

That's what she said.

Sorry, 6 beers in and I couldn't help myself :)

Re:Massive (1)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541201)

6 beers in at 8 AM. Sir, I salute you!

Re:Massive (2)

msclrhd (1211086) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540871)

Why are things so heavy in the future? Has the Earth's gravity increased or something?

Careful Announcement (4, Insightful)

Quantum_Infinity (2038086) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540635)

I am glad they are being careful with their announcement and not jumping on it to claim 'I have found the Higgs Boson. Take that Tevatron!'

Re:Careful Announcement (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540733)

I don't think they give a flying fuck about the Tevatron. Seriously.

Re:Careful Announcement (5, Informative)

klmth (451037) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540749)

That's because they're not in competition as such. The results are complimentary. The Tevatron was able to isolate the same signal, just to a lower degree of precision (2.9 sigma as opposed to 5.0 sigma).

Re:Careful Announcement (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540819)

And there are plenty of smart people in Batavia sitting atop the dormant tevatron (literally), in their little glass box linked to CERN, working on this. It looks like a mini NORAD in there.

It's not a football game. It's a scientific pursuit.

Re:Careful Announcement (2)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541073)

Well, you can have both at the same time but so far the NFL's Large Athlete Collider has failed to produce anything besides a few new Super Bowl commercials.

Re:Careful Announcement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540941)

"complementary".

Re:Careful Announcement (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540845)

Of course they didn't literally say "take that, Tevatron!", they're not kids. But whether you like it or not, what happened today it's clearly a huge and historical victory for CERN and the european scientific community over the american. And it's July 4th...

Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (5, Informative)

klmth (451037) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540643)

In the press conference, Dr. Higgs summed the findings up nicely: "This is an achievement in experimental methodology." To detect this signal has required a momentous effort, and the good people at CERN have had the good fortune of reaching results quicker than anticipated.

This isn't earth-shattering news or anything even unexpected, but it is still cause for celebration. Let us rejoice and then continue to push on towards new findings.

Re:Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (5, Interesting)

toruonu (1696670) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540715)

Well it's not that much good luck really. CMS showed the expected significance of a SM Higgs boson for the full 5 channel combination to be ~6 sigma for 125 GeV. So seeing 4.9 sigma is actually a downward fluctuation (or in other words unlucky) or it's not Higgs.

Also, it's odd to see how much worse ATLAS was. They got 10% more statistics, yet see about the same significance as CMS. They also presented only 2 channels (true, the most sensitive ones) and didn't even attempt to fit the mass of the new particle (while CMS gave 125.3 +- 0.6 GeV, a precision of 0.5%!!!) nor did they look at the other supporting channels that could indicate if this is SM Higgs or some other particle. CMS as an example sees some tension in the 2tau final state where there is actually a downward fluctuation and almost exclusion of SM Higgs. CMS also showed first fits of couplings to fermions and bosons and that was very interesting result. ATLAS just claimed the 5 sigma and approximate mass. Really expected more of them...

Re:Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (1)

rbrausse (1319883) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540855)

Also, it's odd to see how much worse ATLAS was.

Atlas shrugged, though the evil spirit Cms [wikipedia.org] won again :)

Re:Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540863)

Jumping to conclussions much?.. this is recent news, and I'm sure all the details haven't been released.

Re:Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (5, Informative)

toruonu (1696670) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540901)

I'm in CMS and we pretty much released all the details now at the seminar. If ATLAS held back until publication, then either they didn't manage to get it approved or they cut corners and didn't feel presenting the results right now yet. In any case it's CMS that showed most thorough investigation here. Though I can understand delaying the lower priority channels until some time this/next week I don't understand why they didn't provide a mass fit at todays seminar which was to be a discovery seminar (or they didn't expect CMS to have 5 sigma).

Re:Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540807)

Let me guess, this isn't "earth-shattering" news simply because it didn't happen in the US? Whether you like it or not, this is the greatest scientific discovery in the last 20 years, and it happened in europe. And the best thing is that it's july 4th, haha!

Re:Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (1)

sgent (874402) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540993)

Greatest discovery in physics....

I'd put the mapping of the Human Genome (2003), or creating new organs from stem cells (2008), or Synthetic Biology creating a cell with a fully artificial genome (2010) all up there as well. Don't forget faster than light neutrino's (confirmed a second time), or a vaccine for HIV. That's in the last 10 years, much less 20.

Re:Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541121)

Human Genome, stem cell research and HIV vaccine (which seems to have been kept under wraps otherwise it would have been touted with greater ferocity) are all advances in BIOLOGY. As for the faster than light neutrinos, this has been debunked. A cable was loose. But I gather from your comments about the HIV vaccine that you're behind with the news. Catch up at the back, please.

Re:Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541215)

The parent (and I quote) said "the greatest scientific discovery". Biology isn't science all of the sudden?

Re:Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541243)

Most of those were biological engineering. FTL neutrinos were a fail.

Inventions not discoveries (1)

k(wi)r(kipedia) (2648849) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541303)

I'd put the mapping of the Human Genome (2003), or creating new organs from stem cells (2008), or Synthetic Biology creating a cell with a fully artificial genome (2010) all up there as well. Don't forget faster than light neutrino's (confirmed a second time), or a vaccine for HIV. That's in the last 10 years, much less 20.

Except for the supposedly FTL neutrinos, I wouldn't exactly call these things discoveries. "Creating" organs and cells and vaccines would qualify as inventions. You don't find these things in nature. The mapping of the human genome is best described not as a single discovery but as the foundation or springboard for discovery. From examining the information, a researcher might make a discovery about, say, the origin of certain genetic disorders. As it is, the data from the Human Genome Project is simply a data dump no different from the TB's that the CERN computer spit out (otherwise the discovery of the Higgs would have been mechanically announced months ago and not just now after careful vetting by physicists).

Re:Dr. Higgs himself said it best... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541059)

Let me guess, this isn't "earth-shattering" news simply because it didn't happen in the US? Whether you like it or not, this is the greatest scientific discovery in the last 20 years, and it happened in europe. And the best thing is that it's july 4th, haha!

I think they chose July 4th hoping a lot of Americans would be too busy to fill the online forums with dumb comments.

A good introducton to the Higgs mechanism (5, Informative)

anandrajan (86137) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540657)

Here's a good introduction to the Higgs boson [profmattstrassler.com] and why it matters.

Re:A good introducton to the Higgs mechanism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540951)

The picture at the top of that page is funny. The most powerful particle accelerator ever made with a little fire extinguisher hanging on the wall by an exit door. Yea, I'm sure it's to meet some fire regulation, but still.

God upstairs.... (2)

nerdyalien (1182659) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540683)

Phew.. that was close !!!

Was the mass .1313131313... ? (3, Funny)

Mal-2 (675116) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540693)

Glad to see we may not be a Type 13 planet [tvtropes.org] after all...

Re:Was the mass .1313131313... ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541281)

Dr. Longbore: "... the collider will reach the energy level required to determine the mass of the Higgs-Boson. Achieving this energy level will of course also destroy this planet by collapsing it into an ultra dense particle about the size of a pea, but you will die knowing the true mass of the final building block of nature ... You should thank me for letting you share in the joy of discovering the mass of the Higgs-Boson"

slashdot == stagnated (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540701)

Your mom's face looks like Higgs Boson.

Why do you cower?

Fake! (3, Funny)

RockMFR (1022315) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540709)

Obviously this is a grand conspiracy by the Europeans to distract us from what really matters today - blowing shit up! If they really wanted to celebrate the Fourth, they would have blown up CERN.

Re:Fake! (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540811)

Obviously this is a grand conspiracy by the Europeans to distract us from what really matters today - blowing shit up! If they really wanted to celebrate the Fourth, they would have blown up CERN.

Or Syria... be patient it'll be a shooting war soon enough. Gotta keep the military industrial complex profits up in a election year, after all.

Re:Fake! (1)

Rei (128717) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540955)

They blew up chunks of the LHC once already, does that count?

Live announcement coverage (1)

Mal-2 (675116) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540713)

This just a few minutes old...

Live coverage of the announcement [telegraph.co.uk] , courtesy of The Telegraph.

Should be turning up on eBay soon (1)

Boss, Pointy Haired (537010) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540731)

Got to be a CERN insider in for a quick $$$

Worth the waking hours (5, Interesting)

Pro-feet (2668975) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540763)

I made it in the auditorium after queueing through half the night, but it was totally worth it. The atmosphere was collegeial and almost rapturous, one of sharing a feeling that we have as a whole community worked for so long to prove some mathematical construction of almost 50 years ago to be really realized in nature.

And let it now please NOT be a standard-model Higgs boson, but something a little more intriguing!

Re:Worth the waking hours (3, Informative)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540859)

Did you see this character there with you (assuming you're not Jester posting on /.):

http://resonaances.blogspot.com/2012/07/h-day-live.html [blogspot.com]

My favorite line from the onsite report "10:46 Standing ovations, screams and shouts, the audience throwing bras and underwear at the stage."

Personally I like this image:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Cmf9NdNvpWw/T_Pm8cpuljI/AAAAAAAAAww/LF-1GXkBNfM/s320/godparticle.jpg [blogspot.com]

Re:Worth the waking hours (2)

Pro-feet (2668975) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541037)

I don't know this (French) person (though I have been told the name but I forgot).
From the pictures and comments it is clear that:
- he/she arrived before 4.10am, becuase when I arrived the queue was longer.
- he/she was sitting quite a bit left and 1 or 2 rows behind me; I didn't watch my back much.
- he/she doesn't know Joe or he/she wouldn't call him boring.
- we must all have been wearing invisible underwear.
- I have never made out with him/her.

Great (4, Funny)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540765)

Now the "god particle" is proved everyone has to believe in Jesus

Re:Great (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540877)

Now the "god particle" is proved everyone has to believe in Jesus

I always preferred the TOS trek version where its discovered the gods are real and living... the greek gods, not judeochristian.

Re:Great (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540991)

It's easier to build a good story using them. They are real characters, while the judeochristian God just doesn't have a personality to explore and tends to create massive plot holes via omnipotence.

I survived the discovery of Higgs Boson... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540775)

...and all I got was this lousy T-shirt.

From The Telegraph (4, Funny)

jampola (1994582) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540785)

"Based on the Cern results alone there appears to be less than one chance in a million that this is fake, which is roughly the same probability as flipping a coin heads-up 21 times in a row."

One can make a good argument (1)

Stirling Newberry (848268) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540841)

That this is the day the 20th century ended, as the discovery of the boson attached to the Higg's field is the last major prediction of 20th century physics. The stuff of mass and gravity itself lies open to exploration.

Possibly something else (5, Informative)

Twinbee (767046) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540849)

It's something, and probably the Higgs Boson, but we're not 100% sure. Here's a comment from a CMS worker:
http://www.reddit.com/r/science/comments/w0tty/higgs_boson_confirmed_at_5sigma_standard/c599ijb [reddit.com]

Actually, we observed a new state at 125 GeV and it seems consistent with a Standard Model Higgs boson. We have NOT discovered the SM Higgs boson because we simply haven't confirmed that this new particle is the SM Higgs because we're only looking at mass itself. It could be something else with a mass of 125 GeV. To actually claim it is the SM Higgs, we need to confirm that it has spin 0, the right coupling ratios, etc. And that's what I'm working on right now. But it is very exciting because we have discovered new physics. Source: Working at CMS

Particle That Looks Like the Higgs Boson (5, Funny)

Higgs Bosun (2676655) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540857)

So, they might be mistaken. They've probably just detected me and got confused.

Fermi Paradox (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540883)

Now we've sorted out the Higgs, let's turn up the power until we solve the Fermi Paradox!

Stuxnet strikes again? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540905)

Is this an Independence Day gag? They made it coincide with 4th of july by tampering with the data?

Get 'em whilst they're hot ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540909)

Stocks are limited so book early !

http://www.ebuyer.com/390394-higgs-boson-higgs126

'Tractor' Barry - who can't log in anymore 'cause Slashdot's dumbass system has not only reset (deleted ?) his password but also lost the password recovery email...

Yeah? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540959)

So how's this gonna help me get all my free shit from Obama?

Hacking Particles (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40540965)

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. Albert Einstein

It is akin to the television show "Ghost Hunters". You might see something cool every now and then, but most of the time, not much at all. If you took away the background music, it would be a very boring show of countless "Did you hear or see that?" and "What the heck was that?" in the dark.

Patent applied for (5, Funny)

Harold Halloway (1047486) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540979)

Already Apple have patented the new particle, on the basis that it gives the iPad mass so they must have invented it.

"Discovers"? (0, Troll)

quenda (644621) | more than 2 years ago | (#40540989)

They "discover" it by looking exactly where is predicted? That is like me getting on an Air France jet, and "discovering" Paris.

Re:"Discovers"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541085)

It's more like you making a prediction about a far off unknown land and sailing there. The fact it was "predicted" meant it may not have been found.

Re:"Discovers"? (1)

ledow (319597) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541253)

This is more akin to predicting that, say, a particular town, on a particular planet, in a particular star system, looks like Paris - even though NOBODY human has ever been there before and we had no other information but some complicated (and mostly previously unobserved) science to help us.

And then going there and it turning out to be the case (or at least substantially correct if not a perfect Paris replica).

Higgs Mass predicted by the 4 Color Theorem 2009 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541003)

http://arxiv.org/pdf/0912.5189v1.pdf

WOW!!!

Operators are standing by. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541069)

So why not just announce when it's verified. Sounds like marketing to me. Must be on a pledge drive at CERN.

Higgs boson does not explain mass in general (1)

Framboise (521772) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541083)

Let us remind that while the Higgs boson to some extent "explains" the mass of the heavy particle sector (quarks, thus protons and neutrons), the Higgs boson sheds no light on the mass of neutrinos, nor on the mass of the expected dark matter particles.
Also the particular value of the Higgs mass remains a natural constant escaping explanation.

   

Let's just hope that the US Patent office... (0)

DusterBar (881355) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541089)

Let's just hope that the US Patent Office does not issue a patent on this "new" boson.

It would be a sure way to claim patent enfringement on any physical thing.

Higgs Boson Mass predicted in 2009 using math (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541111)

A paper from 2009 predicted the Higgs Boson Mass at 125.992 126 GeV using the Four Color Theorem.

http://arxiv.org/pdf/0912.5189v1.pdf

IMPRESSIVE!!!

Re:Higgs Boson Mass predicted in 2009 using math (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541151)

From 2009 paper "Higgs Boson Mass predicted by the Four Color Theorem" http://arxiv.org/pdf/0912.5189v1.pdf

"Using all the specications of our mathematical model, we show how to calculate the values of the Weinberg and Cabibbo angles on the particle frame. Finally, we present our prediction of the Higgs H0 boson mass MH0 = 125.992 126 GeV ,as a direct consequence of the proof of the four color theorem."

From 2012 CERN Press Release http://press.web.cern.ch/press/PressReleases/Releases2012/PR17.12E.html

"We observe in our data clear signs of a new particle, at the level of 5 sigma, in the mass region around 126 GeV. The outstanding performance of the LHC and ATLAS and the huge efforts of many people have brought us to this exciting stage,” said ATLAS experiment spokesperson Fabiola Gianotti, “but a little more time is needed to prepare these results for publication."

Win / Win (1)

Flipstylee (1932884) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541143)

If we can't confirm it as a Higgs Boson, (1) we have many new toys to play with, investors, landlords, etc. are happy, science got done.
If we can however confirm, see (1) . What a great day.

4.9 BITCHES! (1)

acidfast7 (551610) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541265)

n/m

Re:4.9 BITCHES! (2)

acidfast7 (551610) | more than 2 years ago | (#40541277)

4.9 "SIGMA" BITCHES! hey ./, now that the second-largest methodologically driven task has been completed (to 4.9 sigma) ... can you get this crappy system here fixed (the first-largest methodologically driven task.)

What better way... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40541283)

... to give comic sans some love...

http://www.theverge.com/2012/7/4/3136652/cern-scientists-comic-sans-higgs-boson

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