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Nexus Q Stretches "Made in USA" Label

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the is-a-honda-from-tennessee-made-in-the-usa? dept.

Google 241

sl4shd0rk writes "Among the much ballyhooed tech at Google I/O last week was the Google Nexus Q. Google made an effort to proudly point out the device was "Made in the USA" and even had it stamped on the back of it. A tear-down at ifixit.com however, reveals the guts of the thing are mostly manufactured overseas at the expected locations (China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, et al). Wired also posted a tear-down in which they reveal a die-casting shop in Wisconsin is the source of the zinc housing, but certainly not the entire device as some news sources reported. It's great that Google decided to utilize the struggling U.S. manufacturing sector for this, but claiming the device is USA made, and being blatantly vague about its origins is quite misleading." How struggling the U.S. manufacturing sector is depends on who you ask and how you measure, remember.

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Timothy's anus stretches "Goatse" label (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553329)

sodomy horsecock slashdot.

Re:Timothy's anus stretches "Goatse" label (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553437)

Serious question. On some stories (there are certain patterns but I won't bore you), I notice a lot of the kinds of comments I am replying to right now. These comments have blatant racist/vulgar/nsfw word-spewings and are almost always from AC's. Is this some kind of coordinated effort to keep people at work or anywhere else there may be filters for this kind of stuff from reading this content? I notice it a lot on anything that praises open source or even tangentially like this Android running device. Just curious about people's thoughts.

Re:Timothy's anus stretches "Goatse" label (2)

fustakrakich (1673220) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553757)

Place holders for threadjacking when it gets crowded..

Re:Timothy's anus stretches "Goatse" label (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553763)

Serious question. On some stories (there are certain patterns but I won't bore you), I notice a lot of the kinds of comments I am replying to right now. These comments have blatant racist/vulgar/nsfw word-spewings and are almost always from AC's. Is this some kind of coordinated effort to keep people at work or anywhere else there may be filters for this kind of stuff from reading this content? I notice it a lot on anything that praises open source or even tangentially like this Android running device. Just curious about people's thoughts.

The problem is that Slashdot's "4Chan and Mutant Repellant" shield works as well as the rest of Slashcode. That is, it's pretty buggy. Sometimes it gets the job done, other times not so much.

"Blatantly vague"? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553335)

Slashdot should really consider hiring an editor.

No, it isn't misleading (5, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553357)

The housing and assembly is done in the US.

The article is from someone who will go to pedantic lengths to justify their hate.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553403)

Yes it is misleading. There is an implied meaning in the "Made in the USA" label that they're trying to take advantage of.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (4, Funny)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553555)

They should put "Designed by Google in California."

Re:No, it isn't misleading (2)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553683)

This is what Nokia does - my N900 says "Designed in Finland" on the back. It was made in South Korea (but that's not written anywhere on the outside of it).

Re:No, it isn't misleading (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553855)

For a brief moment there, I confused N900 for "Lumia 900" and was ready to heap scorn (if only in my own head). Ha ha. You're off the hook though. :-)

Taken (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553923)

There's already a patent on that...

Re:No, it isn't misleading (5, Insightful)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553569)

There is an implied meaning in the "Made in the USA" label that they're trying to take advantage of.

Nobody who knows anything about electronics thinks that the entire Q is made from raw minerals in the USA.

Heck, the Q is more 'Made in the USA' than many automobiles advertised as such.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

ohnocitizen (1951674) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553797)

Counterexample: Me. If I see "Made in the USA", I wouldn't expect to find out it had been made in China. Leaving aside the reasons behind, and impact of, labeling something "Made in the USA" - if it isn't - it is false advertising.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (4, Insightful)

slimjim8094 (941042) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553899)

Do you similarly object to computers "made in China" but using chips made in the USA and Israel [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:No, it isn't misleading (0)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554027)

You're comparing someone buying a US made processor and putting it into a much larger device primarily made of Chinese bits, vs Google taking 90% Chinese work and slapping it inside a US case and calling it American made. It's not exactly the same scenario whether people agree or disagree with you.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40554203)

If you'd bothered to spend one minute looking at the component breakdown you'd know that your argument is completely false. The device is designed, manufactured and packaged in the US. Many of the components are made in the US. Some components obviously aren't, because it's not even possible to source them from US companies.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (4, Insightful)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553927)

Counterexample: Me. If I see "Made in the USA", I wouldn't expect to find out it had been made in China.

So, you expect all parts, pieces, components, and processes materials to be made, from raw materials, in the USA if it has that label?

Do the raw materials have to be mined or grown here as well?

Re:No, it isn't misleading (5, Interesting)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553863)

Heck, the Q is more 'Made in the USA' than many automobiles advertised as such.

I bought a new car earlier this year. I wanted to "buy American", so I looked into where the cars were made, and were the components were made. Of the cars I considered, the "most American" was a Honda.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554005)

Nice research. I wonder if anybody published such a metric?

Re:No, it isn't misleading (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40554149)

the statistics are available. Here are a couple articles about those statistics.

http://www.bankrate.com/finance/auto/is-your-car-american-made.aspx
http://abcnews.go.com/Business/american-cars/story?id=13801165

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

kubernet3s (1954672) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553967)

Anybody who knows anything about electronics bought a Roku already. This is a marketing gimmick targeting people who don't know better. People should know better, that is true, but just because someone is stupid doesn't mean tricking them is okay.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40554239)

Nobody who knows anything about electronics thinks that the entire Q is made from raw minerals in the USA.

Heck, the Q is more 'Made in the USA' than many automobiles advertised as such.

This is news? About 10-15 years ago 60 minutes tore down an "American" car. They found out that just about the only part that was made in America was the "Proudly made in the USA" badge. Everything else was made overseas and assembled in the US. The US/UK dumped manufacturing and went for the "service economy", the Germans on the other hand stuck with manufacturing. Not that long ago the Chinese inked a $pound; 1 billion trade deal with the UK which looked really impressive until the same trade commission flew over the North Sea and inked a £ 9 billion deal with the Germans. I am sure some of your American readers can tell similar stories. Three cheers for the "service economy" (especially the financial services industry) !!!

Re:No, it isn't misleading (3, Funny)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554233)

Maybe the "Made in the USA" on the label just meant the label itself.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (5, Insightful)

David89 (2022710) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553435)

Some US production is way better than none

Re:No, it isn't misleading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553481)

I agree with this. Everybody knows that there is no electronic anything "made" in the USA.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (2)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553695)

To be fair the average Joe won't know to take that into account when considering how much of this thing is actually made in the US.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (5, Interesting)

Xest (935314) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553505)

Yes, even with shit that's made in China you can claim the oil required for the plastics came from Iran or wherever the fuck.

Normally "Made in" refers to the final assembled products, not necessarily every constituent component. America may not even have the facilities to produce every single last component but fundamentally even bringing assembly to the US is a step more than most other companies are doing.

This story is just another desperate clutching at straws troll.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (-1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553639)

I think this is another example of Google good, Apple bad. They're both doing the same thing, leading consumers to believe that more is happening in the USA than really is, or that some kind of good technical job is created by the manufacture of the device.

The reality is, final assembly is menial work at minimal pay. There really isn't a shortage of menial work at minimal pay in the US right now, it's more a case of a shortage of people who will work at those terms.

In terms of altruism for the American people as a whole, where does this rate? Pretty much a dead heat with where we'd be if they did final assembly at Hon Hai, and instead ran a chain of thousands of retail outlet stores employing people at menial work and paying all kinds of taxes and driving other retail traffic.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553869)

All manufacturing is menial work.
That's why people thought it would be a good idea to move the menial work somewhere else so we could free up our workforce for more qualified work, like designing making the machines needed for the manufacturing. Problem was, most people who had menial work had it for a reason.

Now I would rather have lots of people with menial work rather than letting them go unemployed.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553949)

There's a significant difference between the people needed to do what Google is having done in the US, essentially operating a screwdriver - a job that doesn't require literacy, skill, or really even sight - and other types of manufacturing that resemble skilled labor more closely.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554001)

Manufacturing ICs isn't all that menial.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (0)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553749)

Well then Apple should just have a robot in the US snap the last piece of their iShinies on and say that all their products are made in the USA!

I'm no Google hater but most of the Nexus Q's internals weren't made in the US.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (2)

slimjim8094 (941042) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553917)

Do you similarly object to computers saying they're "made in China" but using chips made in the USA and Israel [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:No, it isn't misleading (2)

ceoyoyo (59147) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553991)

Yes. "Made in" labels are stupid. They might mean something if you're manufacturing pencils and all the raw materials are made and processed in the same country. For electronics they're silly.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554243)

You can swap around the nationalities any way you like, same problem IMO.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (4, Funny)

halber_mensch (851834) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553767)

Yes, even with shit that's made in China you can claim the oil required for the plastics came from Iran or wherever the fuck.

Quite obviously the heavy elements in the chemical compounds were not created by fusing lighter elements in a lab in Mountain View. Those lying bastards, "made in the USA" my ass. More like "made in the collapse of RX J185635-3754."

Re:No, it isn't misleading (2)

hiroshii (2677753) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553533)

Agreed. When do you ever see an electronics product state "Made in China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, etc."? It's the final step that matters and there's always only one country mentioned.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (0)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553551)

"Made in the USA" and "Assembled in the USA from foreign and domestic parts" have substantially different meanings, and Google is using the wrong one of these phrases in order to fool fools.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (3, Informative)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553819)

Most of Nexus Q's non-silicon parts were made in the USA, including the die-cast zinc base. You're kidding yourself if you think that falls in the realm of "assembled in the USA" vs. "Made in the USA".

Re:No, it isn't misleading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40554049)

Most of Nexus Q's non-silicon parts were made in the USA, including the die-cast zinc base.

Since virtually all of the Nexus Q's value and function come from its silicon parts, I think this definitely falls into the realm of "assembled in USA." The parts that come from the USA amount to a fancy box to hold the device in.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553637)

Speaking as someone who's worked with Customs for years, once you have a product broken down and the parts identified, it can be quite easy to tell if it's made in the USA... from a legal standpoint:

http://www.international.gc.ca/trade-agreements-accords-commerciaux/agr-acc/nafta-alena/texte/anx401a.aspx?lang=en&view=d

Annex 401 specific rules of origin. To summarize, there's various methods by which you can determine the country of origin of something if the parts are all made elsewhere. If all of the parts qualify for Annex 401, or the value of all non-US origin parts is less than say... 40% of the total value (can't remember the exact percentage, can't be bothered to look it up, but you get the general idea), then that there is a made in USA product.

Technically, you can have an item with absolutely zero individual pieces of it made in the USA, but if the final product is assembled here, and it qualifies in having the right tariff code changes, then that just became made in the USA.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553941)

Speaking as someone who's worked with Customs for years...

I wouldn't call taking instruction from Customs ("sir, please bend over and spread your cheeks", and, "permit me to touch your junk") exactly "working with" them.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

Zorpheus (857617) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553677)

Yes.
And it is the same for devices made in China. The final assembly is done there since they beat everyone in this with low wages and small profit margins. The expensive parts that require specialists and experience are often made somewhere else.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (2, Insightful)

synapse7 (1075571) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553703)

Not trying to justify any hate, but maybe it should read assembled in the USA? Also, is there a threshold for electronics to meet for made in the USA?

Re:No, it isn't misleading (4, Informative)

russotto (537200) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553909)

Not trying to justify any hate, but maybe it should read assembled in the USA? Also, is there a threshold for electronics to meet for made in the USA?

The FTC standard [ftc.gov] is that "all or virtually all" the components are made in the USA. And if you look at iFixit, you find that virtually all the major components were or could have been made in the USA; they didn't check the lot numbers to see if the parts which are made in multiple countries were, in fact, made in the US. While in general if you order a bunch of parts from a supplier you get them from wherever the supplier chooses to send them from, I'm sure that's negotiable.

(Disclosure: I work for Google, but not on the Nexus Q)

And that is what is required (5, Informative)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553747)

Those labels are required by law, and what they require is that the country of final assembly is where things are labeled. Now you can argue if that is stupid or not, but that is how it is done, and has been for a long time (back when it was implemented it made more sense).

Almost all tech devices are a hodge podge of components from different places. Even a single component can have many places. Like say you get a 22nm Ivy Bridge Intel processor. Well it was fabricated in the USA, in Chandler Arizona. That's where Intel's 22nm fab is (though I understand they are bringing up 22nm at their fab in Israel soon here). However once it is fabbed, it is shipped off to another site for testing and packing. There is one in the US, but also one in Costa Rica, Singapore, and other places. So your processor may well be stamped "Costa Rica" even though the fabrication was done in the US.

Of course that then goes on a motherboard almost certainly made in China, they are pretty much the only place that makes them. However on that motherboard is components from all over. The capacitors are often from Japan, they are really big in that market. The southbridge chipset is probably from the US, other incidental chips often from Taiwan. The memory that goes on there then depends on the brand. A lot of it is made in Taiwan, some in Germany, some in the US, just depends on who you get it from it is a lot more world wide. The harddrive is probably from Malaysia, that is where most are made, though there are other places and of course the harddrive itself has a bunch of components from different places.

This just continues. We live in a global economy and most things are built of components from all over. In some cases, you discover that only one country really does a given thing. They've gotten good at it, so nobody else really competes.

The "made in" labels always specify the place of final assembly. If you want that changed, well you can work on that, but it is pretty entrenched and I doubt it is going anywhere. No way we are going to list every place. Otherwise you are going to have a device that says "Made of components from the US, Canada, Mexico, China, Taiwan, Japan, Malaysia, Germany, France, and oh fuck it about 20 other nations."

Re:And that is what is required (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553811)

They can always print the percentage of foreign manufacturing on their package.

Re:And that is what is required (1)

PuckSR (1073464) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554221)

Ok, and then should they also be required to track that? That can change day-to-day on most electronic components. They order transistors to spec, not from a specific country. So, they want a component that meets spec, they don't care who made it.

Also, should they keep track of where the original sub-components came from? The raw material? The ore for that raw material? No one keeps track of that? Fungibility is a bitch

Re:And that is what is required (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553901)

With semiconductors expensive enough to actually have labels, you sometimes see 'diffused in' and 'packaged in' indicated individually.

Re:And that is what is required (1)

gman003 (1693318) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553971)

Better solution:

"Made on Sol 3" ("Made on Earth", if you want to be less pedantic).

Re:And that is what is required (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553983)

No

What they require is that the label reflect the country where the final assembly WORK was done. I can, literally, manufacture a car in Korea, complete everything but connecting the battery cables, and as long as that final step is left until the wheels touch the USA, I can say it was assembled here.

USA! USA!

Re:And that is what is required (2)

Altus (1034) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554113)

I know mostly we don't like attributed facts on this site but maybe a link to the FTC would be in order since they, you know, actually enforce this stuff.

http://business.ftc.gov/documents/bus03-complying-made-usa-standard [ftc.gov]

It looks to me like this might not qualify for an unqualified made in the USA label especially if a considerable amount of the electronics assembly is done in another country.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (2)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553951)

The article is from someone who will go to pedantic lengths to justify their hate.

Of course! By the same token, you'll see Google "fans" go through the same exercise when an article mentions their "nemesis".

Every thread that mentions Apple, Google, Microsoft, etc will generate comments from both fans and foes. This is why websites gravitate to articles that mention these brands despite its newsworthiness.

Anyway this article is one of those "no shit sherlock" articles that points out the obvious that Google was doing this as a PR stunt. There isn't any real commitment being made to keep the facility open nor to increase the number of domestic parts being used. The fact that only the final assembly is being done in the US is used mostly for PR and possibly as political cover from Apple's (and Microsoft's, Nokia's, etc.) attempts to block importation due to patent infringement, since technically only the parts are being imported not the media device.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553997)

If I build a trophy out of lego and put it on a bit of wood I made, it doesn't change the fact 95% of the trophy was made elsewhere. Assembling it doesn't change that.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554007)

Which would make it more right to state "Assembled in the US from domestic and foreign parts."

But it's interesting that the foreign parts are the high-tech parts and the domestic parts are the low tech parts.

Re:No, it isn't misleading (1)

slew (2918) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554117)

The housing and assembly is done in the US.

So if I took bananas out of a crate and put them into a bag for retail sale in the US and the bag and the label was made in the US, would you be okay with a Made in the USA label on the bag?

For the record, there are a few chips inside that are likely to have been made in the US, although they could have chosen some of the other high value chips to be so as well, but apparently didn't. They used an Elpida*** (fabs in japan/taiwan) DDR2 dram which might have been substituted with a Micron (fabs in Idaho) mobile dram. They used a Samsung Flash which is made in Korea (Samsung's Fab in TX is for Apple production, and I think Intel/Micron also makes a comparable flash manufactured in utah), and they OMAP processor was manufactured by TSMC in Taiwan, but they could have had the chips made in WaferTech (a TSMC compatible fab in Camus, WA)... But they didn't... Why? Probably because these options weren't available at a reasonable price.

The article is from someone who will go to pedantic lengths to justify their hate.

Maybe true, or maybe not, but that doesn't invalidate this question.

***recently Micron bought the bankrupt shell of japanese Elpida...

"Assembled in the USA" (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553379)

Would be more appropriate for most items that claim to be made here.

Perhaps if you have a % of US sourced parts to go along with being assembled here, but until then its not really made here by any stretch of the imagination.

Re:"Assembled in the USA" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553579)

Yeah, I'd like to see a few more tag lines rather than "Made in XXX", here would be my list along with what they may indicate

"Designed in XXX,YYY,ZZZ" - white collar jobs
"Supported in XXX,YYY,ZZZ" - phone support
"Materials from XXX,YYY,ZZZ" - environmental impact, blue collar jobs
"Manufactured in XXX,YYY,ZZZ" - environmental impact, blue collar jobs
"Assembled in XXX" - blue collar jobs

Where XXX,YYY,ZZZ are countries ordered by their % of work contribution. Some cutoff of only countries >30% might be good.

Re:"Assembled in the USA" (1)

ZeroSumHappiness (1710320) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553657)

So do 31% of the manufacture in the USA and 30%, 30% and 9% in China, India and Taiwan? "Manufactured in the USA."

Besides, why is this wrong? (1)

F69631 (2421974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553621)

I can understand why people dislike misleading marketing but why is it a positive thing if something is made in the USA? Humans are humans everywhere and companies are not more evil if they employ 100 people in Korea than if they employ 100 people in the USA (especially when they can probably employ 200 people in Korea instead of 100 people in the USA) I guess you could make a point about it being wrong because of the financial support (tax credits, etc.) that companies receive for staying in the states but most of the time the bureaucrats/politicians who award them do know how many people the companies employ so I doubt there is that much cheating going on...

If companies dodge tax (make their profit in one country, taking advantage of all the infrastructure, etc. provided by that country but then pay 0% taxes to some remote island), that's unethical and obviously just gaming the system. But if companies just employ people who don't ask so high material rewards that the planet can't support it in the long term, I have hard time seeing what's wrong.

Re:Besides, why is this wrong? (0, Troll)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553813)

I can understand why people dislike misleading marketing but why is it a positive thing if something is made in the USA

If you don't understand this, then you are either part of the problem and need to leave, or live somewhere else already.

Support your own country, and its people.

Support Your Hood (2)

RobertLTux (260313) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554021)

If you are living in the US then buying stuff MADE IN THE USA is buying stuff made by "your fellow citizens".
In fact i would bet that many folks here would pay a bit extra for something if they knew that it was "Made By Fred Rogers #586-23-6431D" and they could in fact Meet Mr Rogers"

so if you are living in %other country% you might prefer an item made in %other country% unless you knew that %other country% was absolute rubbish in making %item%

Get A Clue (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553395)

If was assembled in the USA it's considered Made In America. More than 90% of the products you buy are put together from parts sourced from elsewhere.

Re:Get A Clue (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553645)

A somewhat valid point. At what point do we consider something "made"? Google is going with the final assembly. However, if we go a step back to all of the final parts, just before they're put together as one, then they're from all over. And I'm sure those individual parts have smaller parts that were either partially made elsewhere yet, or else the raw materials are from all over the place.

Re:Get A Clue (1)

ZeroSumHappiness (1710320) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553945)

We actually have some laws and rules [wikipedia.org] about it. I suggest we start there.

Re:Get A Clue (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554031)

Made in America means that it can be made in Chile or Canada too.

Re:Get A Clue (1)

camperslo (704715) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554111)

It's still B.S. It's a tech product, and the circuit board isn't even stuffed with imported parts in the U.S. Having the case or frame here might as well be called a marketing expense instead of a manufacturing expense. It's done for marketing reasons, and isn't the meat of the product. They might as well throw a can of spaghetti sauce in a pot and call it homemade after adding a pinch of salt.

It would be funny to see this used as precedence in an immigration case.
"Yes, I'm made in U.S.A., it says so right here on my can of hair spray."

Leave it to corporations to twist things using geography. Banks get away with using regulations bought in Delaware even for customers not in Delaware? Can we throw Delaware out of the U.S. meanwhile until they get their act together?
Google seems happy to exploit everyone elses data. Since some corporations call them selves personal, so maybe I.P. issues should be treated as personal too?
It seems like Google is handling everyone one elses data, grabbing taking it from many places and profiting from it. Maybe we should start calling what they do "data laundering".

Why does the U.S. allow this level of deception? In the U.K. things are so different they didn't even let Apple describe the iPhone as accessing the whole internet because Flash wasn't supported. Because the 4G in the U.S. doesn't actually meet the full 4G specification, Apple got penalized in Australia when they said the iPad supported 4G. Which agency needs a reboot to bring some truth to claims made in the U.S.? The Commerce Department? We shouldn't put up with this.

who ever would believe it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553401)

Since the USA does not have the technological capability to create the level of sophisticated electronics in these devices, who would ever think the contents were "made in the USA"? It is not possible.

Duh? Of course it'll have overseas parts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553409)

Designed by Google in California
Assembled in the USA

Re:Duh? Of course it'll have overseas parts (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553661)

Designed in California, Assembled in Wisconsin, Parts from Asia, Raw Materials from All Over The Fscking Place

Like cars.. (4, Informative)

QuantumRiff (120817) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553411)

Perhaps they have never disassembled an "american car" with all the parts stamped "made in Canda" or "made in mexico".

Re:Like cars.. (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553735)

I've always wondered if this is why my last two "American made" cars had a weird mix of imperial and metric bolts. My current car is a Hyundai that was built in Alabama and it also has a mix of Imperial and metric bolts, although mostly metric.

"Don't be evil" allows for "Be misleading" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553423)

Well, what do you expect from an overgrown ad agency that makes money by selling your privacy?

Re:"Don't be evil" allows for "Be misleading" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553629)

I didn't think we were talking about FaceBook security in this thread?

Oh, we are talking about Google security. Humm....almost the same thing as talking about FaceBook security.

Well, that's what we get... (4, Insightful)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553431)

Well, what do you expect? The USA has outsourced just about all of its high-tech manufacturing overseas. There are a lot of parts that Google probably can't even get domestically. I think the point is that they're making more of the thing in the USA than most electronic gizmos. If they're successful and there's a lot of demand for the Nexus Q, and more importantly, if other companies follow suit and the demand for electronics supply to be close-at-hand increases, then you'll see a ripple effect for more things like chips being manufactured in the USA.

Re:Well, that's what we get... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553497)

>The USA has outsourced just about all of its high-tech manufacturing overseas.

Including its favourite operating system, Linux.

WSJ Link (3, Informative)

mat.power (2677517) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553433)

Love it when /. editors add links to paywalled articles...

Re:WSJ Link (3, Informative)

RogueLeaderX (845092) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553571)

But you can get eight weeks free! All WSJ asks for is some personal information ...

Fortunately the good professors school posts the article for free: http://www.umflint.edu/som/images/Perry_WSJ_022511.pdf [umflint.edu]

Google lying like other big companies? (-1, Offtopic)

l0ungeb0y (442022) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553507)

B-b-b-ut they said they wouldn't be evil!!

Frankly, the day they said that was the day I knew for certain that they could never ever be trusted. Google is not cool, they are not any better than any other corp -- in fact they are amongst the worst, since they see you and the information about you as a commodity to be exploited to it's fullest extent.

Re:Google lying like other big companies? (1)

andydread (758754) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554095)

LOL how idiotic. What public relations firm are you representing? Do you write code? Is google actively seeking to destroy your ability to write sucessful system code with the use of software-patents like Apple and Microsoft are doing? Even though the code you write is totally different from any code they have or have used in any products they produce? Is Google launching "Thermonuclear" lawsuits against their competitors? Is google running a software-patent extortion scheme in order to hobble open-source and free software ala Microsoft? Please elaborate on how google is exploiting information about me to the fullest extent?

I see a business opportunity (2)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553527)

Making stickers in the USA, that have "Made in the USA" printed on them....

Re:I see a business opportunity (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553567)

I bet we could outsource that to China to save a few cents.

Re:I see a business opportunity (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553787)

You could do it cheaper if you used Chinese glue, paper and ink!

Re:I see a business opportunity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40554141)

And printing. That'd be cheaper in China too.

You're paying for jobs, and you're getting them... (3, Informative)

Squeebee (719115) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553595)

Many of the parts listed in the article had multiple possible source countries, and several of them listed US plants as potential sources. Conceivably Google could have requested those plants be used as much as possible.

Even if that's not the case, we're talking chips here. The housing was made in the USA, several of the chips were as well. It's reasonable to assume that the boards were made in a US plant, that the work of mounting chips to boards, of attaching connectors, of assembling the units, of doing QA, etc. etc. was done in a factory in the USA.

Most of the human labor (in other words the actual jobs) was performed in the USA. The foreign-sourced components are small enough that there was likely a lot more robot labor than human labor involved.

I'd say what you're really paying for in buying that Made in the USA label is employment for Americans, and you're getting it.

If you have a problem, file a complaint. (4, Informative)

coldfarnorth (799174) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553601)

Even if it is a bit fuzzy, the FTC regulates the use of express claims like "Made in the USA" See this webpage for details:
http://business.ftc.gov/documents/bus03-complying-made-usa-standard [ftc.gov]

In short, not every part of the device needs to be from the US for the device to be "Made in the USA". Here is a relevent exerpt for people who are interested, but not THAT interested:
-------------------
What factors does the Commission consider to determine whether a product is "all or virtually all" made in the U.S.?

The product’s final assembly or processing must take place in the U.S. The Commission then considers other factors, including how much of the product’s total manufacturing costs can be assigned to U.S. parts and processing, and how far removed any foreign content is from the finished product. In some instances, only a small portion of the total manufacturing costs are attributable to foreign processing, but that processing represents a significant amount of the product’s overall processing. The same could be true for some foreign parts. In these cases, the foreign content (processing or parts) is more than negligible, and, as a result, unqualified claims are inappropriate.

Example: A company produces propane barbecue grills at a plant in Nevada. The product’s major components include the gas valve, burner and aluminum housing, each of which is made in the U.S. The grill’s knobs and tubing are imported from Mexico. An unqualified Made in USA claim is not likely to be deceptive because the knobs and tubing make up a negligible portion of the product’s total manufacturing costs and are insignificant parts of the final product.

Example: A table lamp is assembled in the U.S. from American-made brass, an American-made Tiffany-style lampshade, and an imported base. The base accounts for a small percent of the total cost of making the lamp. An unqualified Made in USA claim is deceptive for two reasons: The base is not far enough removed in the manufacturing process from the finished product to be of little consequence and it is a significant part of the final product.

Never say "much ballyhooed" again (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553611)

Dear sl4shd0rk,

Never ever say the phrase "much ballyhooed" again.
You have no idea how retarded it sounds. You probably don't realize it, but every time you say it, at least 12-15 people around you wish they could watch you die a slow, painful death.

Sincerely,
Concerned Humans Everywhere

Actually... (3, Informative)

Junta (36770) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553667)

The teardown lists the chips and *potential* points of origin, a few which could not have been produced domestically. The proportion of chips that actually might have been sourced from US is actually pretty significant (more than I thought would have been possible). Of the components that might have been sourced from overseas or domestically, they have no idea how those parts were fulfilled (though at least for DIMMs, the SPD reveals the manufacturing plant if you understand the manufacturer specific location codes).

He's Holding a Thermal Detonator! (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553737)

Maybe they OEM'd parts from Bosch.

Where is the circuit board built/populated? (1)

guidryp (702488) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553803)

That is really the key element to me, and the most significant assembly work. The actual components actually need to come from the suppliers where-ever they may be.

If they are actually doing the circuit board building population in the USA, I think that warrants a made in USA kudos.

If they are putting the assembled circuit board in a case, that is just lame BS.

I got your "struggling" manufacturing sector... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553859)

right here [blogspot.com] .

Don't be surprised (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553877)

Some day this kind of labeling [foodsafetynews.com] will be made illegal.

Surprise Surprise (1)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | more than 2 years ago | (#40553881)

Imagine that, a company that makes a habit of being overly vague about how it gleans your personal data and what exactly it does with it also being vague as to the origins of another one of their products. Yeah I can use another search engine, but unfortunately they are a defacto standard. Everyone on Slasdot likes to beat up Microsoft for their corporate policies, but Google can't seem to do any wrong. OK, now it's time for the Gmail zombies to kick in and tell everyone how it's good to put more of your personal data on their servers since Google does no harm... never mind a company's private data. Google is just as slimy as any multi billion dollar company. Even if it does provide an essential service; like AT&T or Con Ed. So now why exactly should I want to give Google my cell phone number when I want to post a video of whatever on YouTube?

Will not buy Made in the USA EVER (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553895)

I will wait until it is 100% made overseas until I purchase one.

Thanks.

Product of Canada (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40553959)

In Canada there are rules that say you can label a product as "Product of Canada" provided that 50 percent of the cost of the product was spent in Canada. Thus fish caught and cleaned in another country and shipped to Canada, where they are packaged for store shelves, are labelled "Product of Canada" because the final packaging makes 50 percent of the total cost.

Made in Canada has different rules I believe.

What are the rules of the Made in USA label?

Buried Lede (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554023)

Yes, I praise Google for doing at least some sourcing and assembling in the USA, but remember: they did this just for a very niche product that they know they won't sell many of for two reasons. First, it is at least 1.5 times the cost of similar multimedia devices. Secondly, it cannot stream ANY local media; an as-designed flaw mainly to help bump up Google Music usage.

This is another Google experiment they will kill sometime next year after the hype of embarrasing Apple for building just about everything in China dies down. Also: don't hold your breath for any Nexus phones or tablets to be built in the USA - not sure they actually could be anyways.

The sticker (2)

Frankie70 (803801) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554057)

I heard that the 'Made in the USA' sticker was made in Mexico.

Tax cheats want to appear patriotic (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 2 years ago | (#40554071)

If they want appreciation they can start by paying their fair share of tax. Slapping some Chinese hardware into a US case does not make me think anything different of them.

"Google made an effort to proudly point out..." (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40554115)

Actually, the suit making the statement went to great lengths to play-down the "Made in the USA" point, going so far as to say that it would not be a significant part of their marketing strategy. Don't let things like facts get in the way of a good hate, though...

Even US automakers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40554153)

...do this. Parts are made outside the US with final assembly inside the US. Now they can claim "made in the USA." I'm looking at you, Harley.

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