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DNSChanger Shut-Down Means Internet Blackout Coming For Hundreds of Thousands

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the are-you-on-the-list dept.

Crime 264

Since you're reading this here, you're probably already aware that in the early hours of Monday, lots of DNS calls are going to fail as the FBI turns off servers from which Windows machines infected with DNSChanger have been served. New submitter SuperCharlie adds a reminder of the impending shutdown, and adds: "The FBI has a step-by-step method for you to see if you are infected in this PDF document, or you can go to dcwg.org for an automated check if you are so inclined."

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264 comments

DSNChanger??? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579761)

mods, wake up!

first p0st! ;-)

Re:DSNChanger??? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579927)

Wait, which OS does this malware run on?

Re:DSNChanger??? (5, Funny)

noobermin (1950642) | about 2 years ago | (#40580149)

No, in this case, the malware is installed between the keyboard and the chair.

Re:DSNChanger??? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580371)

Wait, which OS does this malware run on?

What makes you think it's OS-specific?

Re:DSNChanger??? (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | about 2 years ago | (#40580501)

Not sure why it was so important to mod this off-topic—there's a typo in the submission title!

Or... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579765)

Or I can look at the Apple logo in the upper left of my screen and know I'm not infected.

Re:Or... (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579779)

Zzzz, when will the ignorant Apple trolls get bored of these things?

Re:Or... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579807)

What was ignorant about my comment?

It is fact that DNSChanger does not infect OSX. It doesn't infect iOS. It doesn't infect Linux, or BSD, or Amiga, or Android, or BeOS, or Plan 9, or Chromium, or OS2, or Solaris, or EMACS. I happen to be running one of the many OSs it does not infect.

Re:Or... (5, Informative)

qwertphobia (825473) | about 2 years ago | (#40579841)

What was ignorant about my comment?

It is fact that DNSChanger does not infect OSX. It doesn't infect iOS. It doesn't infect Linux, or BSD, or Amiga, or Android, or BeOS, or Plan 9, or Chromium, or OS2, or Solaris, or EMACS. I happen to be running one of the many OSs it does not infect.

Seriously? https://www.google.com/search?q=dnschanger+osx [google.com]

Re:Or... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580251)

And AC got the +5 s/he was looking for...

Re:Or... (5, Informative)

wkcole (644783) | about 2 years ago | (#40579915)

Simply false. DNSChanger can infect Windows, MacOS, and many consumer-grade routers that provide DNS or DHCP.

What's special about MacOS infections is that the user has to be an ignorant pollyanna to get infected. If I were you, I'd check my DNS config.

Re:Or... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580437)

Pollyanna doesn't mean what you think it means.

Re:Or... (-1, Flamebait)

Ziekheid (1427027) | about 2 years ago | (#40580055)

Your point being? Just pointing out that you're an elitist "other OS" user? Who cares? It's about the biggest part of the martket being hit, which also happens to be infected most.

I'm not part of that market but your comment is entirely useless nevertheless.

Re:Or... (0)

krelvin (771644) | about 2 years ago | (#40580225)

Right... ignorant was the right word.

Re:Or... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580241)

And AC got the +5 s/he was looking for

Re:Or... (5, Informative)

Johnny O (22313) | about 2 years ago | (#40579789)

http://techland.time.com/2012/04/23/dnschanger-fbi-warns-infected-computers-will-lose-web-email-access-in-july/ [time.com]

"DNSChanger targets Windows or Mac systems (Linux, iOS and Android users are in the clear) by manipulating Domain Name Servers (DNS), which translate syntax-based URLs into IP addresses. "

Re:Or... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579851)

So what? I'm supposed to be impressed by what the FBI says? They shut the system down. Caught the guys. Have the program itself. Still don't mean they know shit about shit. I know shit about shit. It doesn't infect MACS! Period. Jobs told me so in a dream.

Re:Or... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580033)

Was it a wet dream he told you that in?

Re:Or... (4, Funny)

Eyeball97 (816684) | about 2 years ago | (#40579861)

iNo, iBut iYou iAre iNfected iWith iThe iFanboi iTroll iVirus, iWhich iS iNfinitely iMore iAnnoying...

Re:Or... (1)

chrismcb (983081) | about 2 years ago | (#40579909)

Are you sure? You may not be infected by this particular one, but it doesn't mean you aren't infected

Re:Or... (3, Funny)

ifiwereasculptor (1870574) | about 2 years ago | (#40580287)

What a great idea! I'll just write a similar wallpaper-based antivirus in MSPaint right now.

Re:Or... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580623)

Or I can look at the Apple logo in the upper left of my screen and know I'm not infected.

Mac user? You need to visit the free clinic and get tested.

i'm glad i don't use (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579775)

a SOHO router or Windows... Currently on a cisco 2901 and arch..... ahhh the good life.

Re:i'm glad i don't use (1)

ozmanjusri (601766) | about 2 years ago | (#40579963)

Lawful Intercept, aka your friendly neighborhood backdoor. As used by law enforcement officials and black hats alike.

The term "lawful intercept" describes the process by which law enforcement agencies conduct electronic surveillance of circuit and packet-mode communications as authorized by judicial or administrative order.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk583/tk799/tsd_technology_support_protocol_home.html [cisco.com]

Re:i'm glad i don't use (1)

Fjandr (66656) | about 2 years ago | (#40580253)

Yeah, I find it amusing when people talk about using enterprise networking gear when they've had legislatively-mandated backdoors installed for many years.

(Not that the hardware isn't better, just not for that particular reason)

"The internet isn't working again!" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579795)

I think their internet connection will be just fine, it's the DNS that's going to shit the bed. Why does every article make this mistake?
I guess anyone who's stupid enough to get dragged into a botnet wouldn't know the difference though.

OMG!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579797)

DSNChanger Shut-Down Means Internet Blackout Coming For Hundreds of Thousands

No. It means some folks with powned windows boxes will finally realize there is an issue, and call one of their friends/family to fix things for them. There was no reason to keep DNS service for these folks to begin with. Or, if they really were scared of taking some windows zombies off the net, they could have taken things down for a week, then brought their DNS back up and seen how many fewer users were hitting their DNS servers-- then make the decision on whether or not to down the replacement DNS. I bet in one week without the DNS working, they would have gone down to fewer users than all these months that have passed.

Why did this do it this way? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579799)

Why didn't they have Google Public DNS [google.com] take over the IPs that were used by the bot net (or something)?

Re:Why did this do it this way? (5, Insightful)

Dan541 (1032000) | about 2 years ago | (#40579819)

Is disconnecting hundreds of thousands of infected machines really a problem?

Re:Why did this do it this way? (5, Interesting)

Riceballsan (816702) | about 2 years ago | (#40579877)

IMO not informing them of what happened is. Believe it or not disconecting people, does not solve the problem, they buy a new computer take it to geek squad who nukes and paves it and sells them a rediculously overpriced unreliable antivirus. What could help would be to redirect the DNS servers to an informational page on how to clean off the current infection (IE hosting some cleanup tools), with tips of how to avoid infection again. No it won't educate 100% of them, some will take it to geeksquad anyway, some will find the download button and not read anything etc... but SOME will, and some is always better than none.

Re:Why did this do it this way? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580001)

Kill 'em all; Let God sort 'em out.

Re:Why did this do it this way? (5, Interesting)

Jiro (131519) | about 2 years ago | (#40580007)

You don't want to redirect them to a page which tells them how to get rid of a virus. Believing pages that tell them that their system has malware and they need to follow the instructions on the page to get rid of it, is one of the common means of *spreading* malware.

Re:Why did this do it this way? (1)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | about 2 years ago | (#40580275)

Redirect all queries from the malicious servers to a page explaining that they have malicious DNS servers configured and they need to fix the issue.
Some will check the problem themselves, others will call their ISP's,tech support,etc
Someone using the net should have a clue what DNS is about anyways

Re:Why did this do it this way? (3, Insightful)

Dan541 (1032000) | about 2 years ago | (#40580025)

Believe it or not disconecting people, does not solve the problem, they buy a new computer take it to geek squad who nukes and paves it and sells them a rediculously overpriced unreliable antivirus.

Actually that scenario does solve the problem. Infected machines need to be formatted and reinstalled.

Re:Why did this do it this way? (3, Interesting)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 2 years ago | (#40580141)

It's a massive win to me, because many of those people will probably sell their computer outright and buy another one, and then I can buy some of them (the nicer ones, anyway) at yard sales. A year or two ago (two I think) I got an Athlon 64 X2 4000+ system with a 20" LCD for $125 because the owner forgot the Admin password and couldn't figure out how to run recovery. The LCD also has S-Video, component and composite inputs and I'm using it for my PS2 right now...

Re:Why did this do it this way? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580307)

IMO not informing them of what happened is. Believe it or not disconecting people, does not solve the problem, they buy a new computer take it to geek squad who nukes and paves it and sells them a rediculously overpriced unreliable antivirus. What could help would be to redirect the DNS servers to an informational page on how to clean off the current infection (IE hosting some cleanup tools), with tips of how to avoid infection again. No it won't educate 100% of them, some will take it to geeksquad anyway, some will find the download button and not read anything etc... but SOME will, and some is always better than none.

Google has already been doing this. Quit acting like this hasn't been done. If they don't trust google you think they will trust some random message? Get real.

Re:Why did this do it this way? (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#40580333)

I What could help would be to redirect the DNS servers to an informational page on how to clean off the current infection (IE hosting some cleanup tools), with tips of how to avoid infection again.

That describes most of the techniques Trojans use I come across on the web

Re:Why did this do it this way? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580427)

IMO not informing them of what happened is.

They have been getting messages on the front google search page for months, as well as getting letters from their ISP with their bill every month for months.

They have been MORE than informed, and still take no action. These remaining people are the bottom of the stupid barrel and need banned from the Internet forever, not just their current computers.

Re:Why did this do it this way? (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | about 2 years ago | (#40580413)

What they could have done was to set the DNS:es to point to the same web page regardless of what address that was requested.

That would have been a lot more informative.

Re:Why did this do it this way? (2)

Jack9 (11421) | about 2 years ago | (#40580421)

> Is disconnecting hundreds of thousands of infected machines really a problem?

It doesn't disconnect the machines, as many people have already pointed out. It simply causes their DNS lookups to fail.

Pull the plug (5, Insightful)

Dan541 (1032000) | about 2 years ago | (#40579801)

Is anyone else sick of hearing about this?

Just shut the servers down already and be done with it.

Re:Pull the plug (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579817)

Please mod this guy up. If people are so dumb that they don't know they were infected, they are the first people who need to get unplugged from the Internet.

Re:Pull the plug (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579853)

A thousand times this.

Re:Pull the plug (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580301)

A thousand and one!
This is retarded.

Re:Pull the plug (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579905)

That would get rid of MILLIONS of morons on the internet, but you know, I don't think it'd stop the proliferation of trolls one bit.

Re:Pull the plug (2)

ae1294 (1547521) | about 2 years ago | (#40580481)

FUCK YOU yes it will....

Re:Pull the plug (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579865)

I would have pulled the plug immediately as soon as I got my hands on the server/s.

Re:Pull the plug (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | about 2 years ago | (#40579931)

I have not actually heard of this.

Re:Pull the plug (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579967)

I, too, am tired of hearing this.

I'm waiting for the headlines "AOL users can't access the interwebs."

Re:Pull the plug (2)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 years ago | (#40580009)

Just shut the servers down already and be done with it.

They should never have put alternative servers in place in the first place. Are the infected users paying for this service? I thought not.

Pulling the plug immediately would have generated business for Geek Squad, Genius Bar and other computer services that keep local people employed.

Re:Pull the plug (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580395)

They should never have put alternative servers in place in the first place. Are the infected users paying for this service? I thought not.

Pulling the plug immediately would have generated business for Geek Squad, Genius Bar and other computer services that keep local people employed.

You can't just keep generate business for Geek Squad for the sake of keeping local people employed, especially when those local people are mostly incompetent. If Geek Squad suddenly went away, nobody with a brain would miss them.

Re:Pull the plug (1)

shentino (1139071) | about 2 years ago | (#40580117)

Even allowing them to remain online is aiding and abetting everything they do.

Re:Pull the plug (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580389)

Even allowing them to remain online is aiding and abetting everything they do.

They're a LEA, so the prosecutor has most likely granted them immunity from prosecution. It's a dirty little trick which allows the law to only be applied to non-cops, i.e. "little people" while still maintaining the surface illusion that the law applies equally to all.

Re:Pull the plug (1)

antdude (79039) | about 2 years ago | (#40580553)

Yeah, at least our Internet will be slightly faster. ;)

Too Bad About the Geek Squad Layoffs... (2)

ilikenwf (1139495) | about 2 years ago | (#40579813)

They'll be getting lots of calls from all of the inept n00bs who got infected soon.

How the hell is this still front page newsworthy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579833)

That is all...

we're all going to die (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579837)

doesn't it suck that we'll all be dead before the century is over

Better Solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579869)

Rather than shutting the servers down suddenly, why are they not just sending all requests to a website informing people they are infected, and explaining how to fix it? Then, after a week or two, shut 'em down.

Re:Better Solution (1)

Eyeball97 (816684) | about 2 years ago | (#40579945)

You seem to be assuming the FBI kept them running all this time because they gave a crap about the affected people.

How delightfully quaint...

By the way - this message may come as a surprise but it turns out, I have a Nigerian Prince in my family who is struggling to make an overseas transfer. Please send me your Name, Address, Telephone Number, SSN, CC numbers (with PINs and CVV's) and bank account details (with web login passwords) and I'll cut you in for a $ couple of million.

Windows machines (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579873)

hahaha...

Why don't they... (4, Interesting)

Annorax (242484) | about 2 years ago | (#40579893)

.. instead of shutting it down redirect all DNS requests to a page that says "Hey, butthead, your computer is infected. Fix it!"

Re:Why don't they... (4, Funny)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#40579943)

cause it was originally infected by a page saying your computer is infected, here's how to fix it

Re:Why don't they... (4, Interesting)

Malcolm Chan (15673) | about 2 years ago | (#40580085)

OK, so it'll probably work, then? These were the users who were willing to do it the first time, so why not a second time?

Re:Why don't they... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580411)

Because it will work a second time... and a third... and a fourth... If you redirect morons to a "you're infected!" message, then they will be easily fooled by the fake one they receive tomorrow.

Re:Why don't they... (1)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | about 2 years ago | (#40580285)

In this case, they give you instructions to fix it. If you are on the net, and dont know what DNS is, you're on your own
The same thing that happens if you drive a car and dont know how to change a tyre

Re:Why don't they... (5, Interesting)

techno-vampire (666512) | about 2 years ago | (#40579969)

One of the easiest ways to infect computers is to put up a website with a phony virus scan and tell everybody that their system's infected, then offer to "clean" it for them. Most of us are trying to get our friends and family to understand that when a random website tells them that their computer's infected, it's a scam. What you're suggesting would just make our lives that much harder. Having all of their DNS fail, however, is going to make these people understand that there's something wrong, even if they don't have a clue about what's happening.

Re:Why don't they... (2)

BradleyUffner (103496) | about 2 years ago | (#40579983)

Maybe it could just redirect them to a page that tells them they should contact their Internet Service Provider for assistance fixing their DNS.

Re:Why don't they... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580177)

That's more or less what google did. But as long as it's working, those morons will not do anything. Cut'em off, if just 1% *stay's* off the internet, that means several hundert morons less.

Re:Why don't they... (5, Funny)

toygeek (473120) | about 2 years ago | (#40580305)

Various ISP's have been doing this for a while. I know of one Very Big ISP that does HTML injections, emails, and snail mail letters to their customers saying "Hey, butthead, your computer is infected. Fix it!" and guess what happens?

Big. Fat. Nothing.

Joe Jackass gets that letter in his mail with his bill, and goes "Huh, wonder what that is" and then trashes.

And the gorgeous part of it? Monday, guess whose fault its going to be? That's right, the ISP's.

People are ignorant of it, and when presented with facts, their ignorance turns into anger, and their anger turns to blame, and suddenly its somebody elses fault, so they feel justified in their ignorance.

Yes, I do tech support in a call center for a living. F'ing kill me now. Before Monday, please.

Re:Why don't they... (1)

toygeek (473120) | about 2 years ago | (#40580311)

And the worst part of it is is that half of the people I work with don't understand DNS well enough to understand the full scope of the problem.

Re:Why don't they... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580329)

[...] Very Big ISP [...]

Never heard of 'em.

Re:Why don't they... (4, Funny)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 2 years ago | (#40580589)

Yes, I do tech support in a call center for a living. F'ing kill me now. Before Monday, please.

Given that this population of your customers have proven themselves incompetent, couldn't you just hang up on them all day long and reason that they won't figure out how to give you negative feedback?

DSNChanger (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579895)

Is this a new one, or have the editors given up completely? /DNSChanger you fucktards

Security Awareness Fail (5, Informative)

zedrdave (1978512) | about 2 years ago | (#40579911)

"dcwg.org"? seriously?

Let me get this straight: the FBI is recommending people go to a nondescript .org website to run a security check on their computer?

Can I next invite them to go to submit their information at fswrxt.net to check that their credit card wasn't hacked?

Re:Security Awareness Fail (3, Insightful)

theskipper (461997) | about 2 years ago | (#40579985)

What's wrong with a four letter .org? They obviously vetted it. There was also a mention of "dns-ok.us". That domain looks even funkier but it's perfectly legit.

Re:Security Awareness Fail (3, Interesting)

wvmarle (1070040) | about 2 years ago | (#40580351)

It teaches people that those unknown, never-heard-of-before, nondescript .org domains are fully safe and a-OK. Just pretend to be from the FBI, send them to such a site, and you can infect them all you want.

Re:Security Awareness Fail (1)

adolf (21054) | about 2 years ago | (#40580353)

How about something ending in fbi.gov? I mean.........

Re:Security Awareness Fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580449)

Nope, too easy. It would have to be reviewed by a blue ribbon commission prior to it's submission to the committee for approval on submitting it to the adjutant director's approval for submission to the director.

Re:Security Awareness Fail (3, Insightful)

bmo (77928) | about 2 years ago | (#40580133)

>nondescript .org

DCWG is DNS Changer Working Group

How is it nondescript? It's a friggin' acronym for the name of the group.

Tell me, how descriptive is slashdot.org? Why are you here on a site that has a nondescript.org name?

>modded informative

Right. There's no accounting for taste among mods.

--
BMO

Re:Security Awareness Fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580157)

Oddly enough, I find myself agreeing with bmo these days...

Re:Security Awareness Fail (2)

collar (34531) | about 2 years ago | (#40580627)

In Australia they've promoted http://dns-ok.gov.au/ [dns-ok.gov.au] , which to me seems like a good idea (utilising the trust expectation of a .gov.au site) rather than going with a 3rd party site.

Damn it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579923)

First DNSChanger, and now DSNChanger?! Thanks for the bad news, Editors!

Should have been redirecting for months (0)

dufachi (973647) | about 2 years ago | (#40579959)

The "Feds" should have been redirecting these morons to a page that tells them how to get rid of it for months. Instead, now all these morons are going to be clogging up ISP tech support because "ma internets dun gone wonky and won't werk!"

Re:Should have been redirecting for months (4, Insightful)

Jiro (131519) | about 2 years ago | (#40580017)

1) It's a bad idea to train users that they should actually believe a web page that tells them they have a virus and how to remove it. This is typically used to spread malware, not remove it.
2) The FBI wanted this to go on as long as possible, because it allows them to spy on the traffic sent to the now FBI-controlled servers.

Come on now. (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 2 years ago | (#40579977)

Did they serve up a web page that says, "You're infected, please go to xyz.fbi.gov to clean up your machine."

When I forget to pay my ISP, they redirect all my web pages to their own saying, "Sorry!" (And as an aside, they are idiots because they don't provide a link to pay from that disabled-page. It seems so obvious there's probably somebody with a patent demanding money to do that.)

Re:Come on now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580015)

Did they serve up a web page that says, "You're infected, please go to xyz.fbi.gov to clean up your machine."

Okay, think this over. We've been trying to drill it into the morons' heads that "your computer is infected!" in a web browser is the number one sign that you're looking at an antivirus scam. We've been telling them not to click any links anywhere near things like that.

We've also been trying to drill it into their heads that anyone can claim to be anyone on the internet, and graphical logos of "officials" (i.e. the FBI) are trivially easy to spoof. Again, we've been telling them not to click links of that nature.

For the purposes of this situation, we can split the internet into three groups of people: People who know better and won't ever see that message; people who have vaguely paid attention to us, would be terminally confused by such a message, and would be calling us for help anyway; and people who are complete boneheads who haven't paid any attention to us and would still be calling us for help if they saw such a message (in the third case, they'd first be calling us to read it to them, what with all them fancy grammars and word-learnin' we gots). Your solution would solve nothing.

Redirect them... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40579995)

Why can't they just have all web traffic from the infected computers forwarded to a page with instructions on how to fix it instead of just shutting down the servers?

Re:Redirect them... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580167)

Why can't they just have all web traffic from the infected computers forwarded to a page with instructions on how to fix it instead of just shutting down the servers?

Redirect them to a page that says:

Please turn off your computer, put it back in the box, take it to the store and ask for your money back, you're too stupid to be allowed on the Internets.

"DSN"?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580011)

Derp. Seriously, now?

Only WinDoz 95-8,ME, 2000, XP, SP1, SP2, SP2, W7 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580023)

No worry here. We don't do WinDoz. :) :D

Snicker snicker.

LoL

dupes and typos -- Timothy in fine form (4, Informative)

1u3hr (530656) | about 2 years ago | (#40580089)

"DSNChanger Shut-Down Means Internet Blackout Coming For Hundreds of Thousands"

"DSNChanger"?

And this is yet another dupe of this tedious "story", last just two days ago.

FBI To Shut Down DNSChanger Servers Monday -- But Should It Cut Off 300k PCs? [slashdot.org]
Posted by Soulskill on Thu Jul 05, '12 04:18 AM

DSNChanger Shut-Down (2)

michaelmalak (91262) | about 2 years ago | (#40580131)

DSNChanger Shut-Down

And a thousand Microsoft Access fat clients lose access to their back-end databases.

Interesting statistics (4, Informative)

mcbridematt (544099) | about 2 years ago | (#40580211)

DNSChanger infections by AS [dcwg.org]

Top infected ISPs:

  • Comcast / AS7922 - 10211 unique IPs
  • BSNL (India) / AS9829 - 13818 unique IPs
  • France Telecom / AS3215 - 5075 unique IPs

source [dcwg.org]

Re:Interesting statistics (1)

Raistlin77 (754120) | about 2 years ago | (#40580447)

That's not as interesting as browser/OS stats would be.

Re:Interesting statistics (1)

Raistlin77 (754120) | about 2 years ago | (#40580463)

Also, keep in mind that most large ISPs have numerous ASNs. Comcast, for example, has somewhere around 50.

Fire the Editors (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580295)

Is it DSNChanger or DNSChanger? Pick one.

PDF from the FBI? (1)

sapgau (413511) | about 2 years ago | (#40580313)

How do I know the FBI posted a PDF?
Because it doesn't have any logos or official headings!

Re:PDF from the FBI? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580603)

Because it installs its own malare if the file is opened in Acrobat Reader.

Instructions in a PDF. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580369)

I am not sure I trust opening a PDF, especially with Adobe Reader. They should have just used plain html.

Ummm .... No (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40580405)

DNSChanger affects Microsoft Desktop and Server Product. 99% of the internet and World Wide Web will be completely unaffected.

Snicker snicker

LoL

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