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South Pole Neutron Detectors Given New Role in Predicting Space Weather

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the what-can't-those-things-do? dept.

Space 17

sciencehabit writes "A team of researchers has found a way to forecast the intensity of solar storms by monitoring neutron sensors at the South Pole. The approach could help give advanced warning to astronauts and satellites, which would otherwise be irradiated and fried, respectively. Smaller versions of these sensors could one day be standard equipment on interplanetary spacecraft."

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17 comments

Neutrino detectors? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40581163)

Neutrino detectors?

Re:Neutrino detectors? (1)

zero.kalvin (1231372) | about 2 years ago | (#40581203)

I thought the same, they are not talking about ICECUBE.

Re:Neutrino detectors? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40581263)

Nope neutrons. It's explained pretty well in the article.

Sometimes a neutron is just a neutron. (4, Informative)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | about 2 years ago | (#40581289)

UD Bartol Neutron Monitor program. http://neutronm.bartol.udel.edu/Welcome.html [udel.edu]

Detects high energy neutrons produced by high-speed protons colliding with the Earth's upper atmosphere. TFA is that they have figured out the specific signal for high-energy solar flares.

(Last 30 days. [izmiran.rssi.ru] )

Editing standards (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40581221)

In other news, scientists have developed software which allows detection of incorrect spelling, which involves neither sattelites nor satellites.

Re:Editing standards (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40583133)

In other news, scientists have developed software which allows detection of incorrect spelling, which involves neither satt elite snore satellites.

fixed that.

Dear Timothy... (-1, Flamebait)

pongo000 (97357) | about 2 years ago | (#40581399)

The approach could help give advanced warning to astronauts and sattelites, which would otherwise be irradiated and fried, respectively.

"Sattelites"? "Irradiated and fried, respectively" like meat? Respective of what? Timothy, please take some free advice: If the editorial duties of /. are becoming too much of a burden for you, please, for the love of <deity_of_your_choice>, share the responsibility. I couldn't help but notice that the last 25 submissions were "edited" by you. Is this now the Timothy Show? Are there no other editors with /. that can provide its readership with a variety of submissions?

And in case you're thinking that I'm jealous, Timothy, I promise you that is not the case. My ID might not be 4 digits, but I've been a faithful reader for the past 16 years, and I find myself slowly slipping away from /. due to your sloppy editorial practices and uninspired editorial selections. The problem here, Timothy, is that while I might be one person, as a teacher I influence hundreds of students, and they in turn influence many. I cannot in all conscience continue to offer up /. as a paragon of IT news so long as you are still given free run of the office. Really, where are the other editors? Are you not willing to share the duties?

Re:Dear Timothy... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40581563)

The approach could help give advanced warning to astronauts and sattelites, which would otherwise be irradiated and fried, respectively.

"Sattelites"? "Irradiated and fried, respectively" like meat? Respective of what?
[snip]

People get irradiated (ie cells affected by radiation)
Satellites get fried (ie circuts and/or other electronic components get shorted)

Both are common use terms (adjectives if you will) for the respective nouns that they are used to describe.

Respectively, in that sentence refers not to the sense of of the word which pertains to 'honor', but to the sense of the word that defines the order in which the given adjectives apply to the nouns. I.e. the term 'respectively' denotes that Irradiated refers to the Astronauts, whilst Fried refers to the Sattelites.

Your rant at the editor is as ridiculous as the content of your post...

Re:Dear Timothy... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40583007)

Who would've thought Timothy has his fanboys? The fate of /. is more dire than I once thought...

Re:Dear Timothy... (1)

mug funky (910186) | about 2 years ago | (#40587671)

fuck off, kdawson.

Re:Dear Timothy... (1)

khallow (566160) | about 2 years ago | (#40586549)

One slashdot editor ought to be good enough for anyone!

Useful discovery (1)

PPH (736903) | about 2 years ago | (#40581603)

After all, solar storms can knock the 'ell out of satellites.

Predicting space weather? (1, Funny)

Eyeball97 (816684) | about 2 years ago | (#40581629)

Great idea, because they've totally mastered predicting the weather here on earth...

Re:Predicting space weather? (4, Funny)

jo_ham (604554) | about 2 years ago | (#40581759)

Great idea, because they've totally mastered predicting the weather here on earth...

Since they haven't mastered it, it's the perfect time to just quit, right?

Re:Predicting space weather? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40588009)

They would quit, but they can't predict a good time to do so.

"sufficiently accurate proton detector" (1)

awollabe (464677) | about 2 years ago | (#40586839)

Why is it hard to accurately detect high energy protons? They're charged; they must leave a huge wake of ionized particles behind them. Is it just that they are so energetic the detectors have to be huge? I'm sure the neutron detectors are actually detecting secondary (charged) particles from neutron interactions, meaning the polar detectors are "tertiary" (protons --> neutrons --> more charged particles).

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