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Internet Explorer Market Share Drops To Almost 15%

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the glass-15-percent-full dept.

Internet Explorer 423

glitch0 writes "Internet Explorer used to be the most prevalent browser with a market share that peaked at 88% in March of 2003. Now they're down to almost 15% due to stiff competition from Google, Mozilla, and even Apple. What implications does this have for the future of Microsoft?"

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423 comments

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none (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586483)

at this point, they should just exit the browser wars

Re:none (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586517)

Yes. All these other browsers still run on Windows, and they make no money from IE. I for one don't understand why they would really care that much.

Re:none (5, Interesting)

turbidostato (878842) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586607)

"I for one don't understand why they would really care that much."

Because it was (and still it can be, since it's bundled on Windows for free) a cornerstone on their lock-in strategy (along with Office and Exchange, and currently Sharepoint too). If they allow "the cloud" to reach the point when vendor lockin is not possible, Microsoft will have a very worrisome future.

Re:none (5, Insightful)

amiller2571 (2571883) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586657)

If Win 8 does not do well, they will have much more to worry about then IE's market shares

Re:none (5, Insightful)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586885)

Windows 8 will be a trainwreck. Too many changes for most users. The issue is windows 9 (whatever that will look like).

Re:none (5, Funny)

jamesh (87723) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586937)

Windows 8 will be a trainwreck. Too many changes for most users. The issue is windows 9 (whatever that will look like).

Windows 9 will be called "Windows Classic" after the outcry that people don't like the taste of the New Windows. It will mostly be the same as Windows 8 except it will have a Start menu and people will love it, because they really aren't that smart.

Re:none (4, Insightful)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586993)

If that's what people actually want what's wrong with that?

All the backend stuff in windows, the x86/ARM stuff, processes, multiprocessor features etc. are mostly irrelevant to the day to day user experience of 'how do I start the program I want to run?'. If customers, because of 20 years of practice want a start menu... why not just give it to them.

No one is obliged to buy windows 8, if it's not what you want, don't buy it, and wait till they have a version that is what you want. (Or change OS's, which of course the big risk, as people don't have any desire to tolerate this sort of success-failure-success cycle MS has had going for a while).

Re:none (5, Insightful)

Nutria (679911) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587127)

No one is obliged to buy windows 8

There are "strict" obligations and then there are practical obligations.

MSFT's Windows lock-in with the manufacturers means that you'll buy Windows if you buy a pre-built computer from anyone except tiny Linux shops. Or Apple.

Re:none (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586981)

Win8 will do well, IMO. It will come out coupled with touchscreens, on which it really does work well - certainly far better than 7. I'm going to get it just for the various improvements such as insanely quick boot times and a huge improvement to the taskbar's multi-screen usage. Do I care about the looks of the new start menu? Yes, but not enough for me to overlook the other improvements. Besides, someone, probably stardock, will modify Win8 to have a classic start menu again. Until then, I'll just use windows key+F.

Re:none (3, Insightful)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586995)

No, they won't. People will just stick to windows 7 for a long time (like they did with XP). Even if windows 8 and 9 are complete bullshit people will still migrate to them when windows 7 support ends. Why? Because so much software is windows-only that no one will be able to move to linux or mac.

Re:none (5, Funny)

noh8rz5 (2674523) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586809)

three letters, baby - ie6! I haven't bought new underwear in 8 years, i fail to see why i should download a new browser.

Re:none (2)

amiller2571 (2571883) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586633)

Most people who use IE (at least the people I know) only use it because they just go for what ever the default is. This means they also go with IE's default settings which is MSN and BING, and this do make MS money.

Re:none (4, Informative)

Nutria (679911) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587175)

People use IE in the business environment because it's the default and IT departments frown on (and in almost all cases prohibit) individuals from installing FF or Chrome.

Even though, since I telecommute and so have admin rights on my company-provided laptop, I've installed and primarily use FF, sometimes I still must use IE for some stupid intranet app or other that only works with IE.

Re:none (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586855)

Microsoft needs HTML as a UI platform, as everything they've added to Windows in the last 10 years has flopped (WPF, Silverlight, etc.)

Re:none (2)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586955)

Well... the thing is that people still desire a browser as part of their OS package. Without one, its too hard to get Firefox etc. Having to tell users to resort to the command line and FTP to get a web browser would confuse and anger a great many Windows consumers.

Microsoft...a blast from the past... (-1, Troll)

MindPrison (864299) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586491)

...they hardly come up with any innovations these days, now do they?

Re:Microsoft...a blast from the past... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586661)

Listen, Microsoft did popularize the optical mouse. So at least there is one positive thing they have done for technology. And the second thing is, um, er...

Re:Microsoft...a blast from the past... (3, Insightful)

Jello B. (950817) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586911)

I'd figure the optical mouse would popularize itself with people who don't like cleaning gunk out of their electronics. That said, I wish I could find an optical mouse that I liked as much as this ball mouse I've been using for the last 14 years...

Re:Microsoft...a blast from the past... (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586925)

Logitech M-BA47 forever!

(with rubber sides, not plastic ones)

Re:Microsoft...a blast from the past... (-1, Troll)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586687)

...they aren't very good at stealing innovations these days, now are they?

FTFY

Re:Microsoft...a blast from the past... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586871)

just like apple did in the 80s with xerox and does now with patents?

us too! (4, Funny)

jank1887 (815982) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586493)

what about Opera?

*goes back to sit in the corner*

Re:us too! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586567)

Opera is well on its way to replace the x-axis.

Re:us too! (1)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586637)

LOL... well played.

For the record, I like Opera. :)

Re:us too! (2)

Bromskloss (750445) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587151)

For the record, I like Opera. :)

But, what about on the stage?

Really one a sample size of 1 website? (5, Insightful)

Karlt1 (231423) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586503)

Yes, IE is losing marketshare but w3 schools statistics says nothing about the general population. Of course people who are studying web technologies are going to use other browsers. I would have more confidence if a site like Google or Yahoo published statistics.

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (4, Informative)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586597)

Global Statistics from StatCounter [statcounter.com] is more holistic. 32.76% for Chrome this month, vs. IE's 32.31%. Not shabby, but hardly the landslide w3schools is reporting.

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (2, Insightful)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586843)

People running IE are far less likely to have blocked statcounter.com than those running other browsers.

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (1, Troll)

pspahn (1175617) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586629)

That 15% is still kinda scary though, huh?

Every now and then I'm forced to debug something in IE and I have yet to really figure out how to use their debug tools.

To think that 15% of their visits are in IE makes me wonder what the hell that 15% produces for clients.

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (1)

LordLucless (582312) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586697)

Probably eactly what the client deserves; the likelihood is they're internal developers from an organisation that specifies Internet Explorer as part of the standard operating environment and refuses to allow people to use alternatives.

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (2)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586945)

Considering how many revisions firefox has been through this year, I'm more sympathetic to locking to IE if you have to lock to something. Firefox has been averaging two - three months between major releases, chrome isn't far off.

When you do a contract for someone you don't want to have to go back every 3 months because their browser changed how your page is rendered or how your plugin works or the like.

It would be great if you could do everything as a web service properly, where browser choice doesn't matter. Unfortunately that doesn't always get the job done.

It's not just that IE is part of the standard operating environment, it's that they don't seem to be changing things up quite as often as the competition.

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (3, Interesting)

Ambassador Kosh (18352) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587173)

After building this stuff for about 12 years now I have found that stuff is more likely to break in IE than other browsers. Firefox and Chrome over the last 2 years or so have rarely broken my sites with an update to any new version however IE7,8 and 9 have all had minor patches that broke completely standard behavior.

I know it seems like it should be breaking more often since they update so often but I have not run into that problem. Chrome updates especially I have never encountered something breaking. It updates all the time but since I don't have to care about the version number and it keeps itself, flash and some other stuff patched I recommend it to all my clients. By silently updating you don't have to worry about users updating their systems and you have far fewer security problems.

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (0)

man_of_mr_e (217855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586821)

IE8 and IE9 are not that bad. IE10 is actually quite competitive with other browsers. I'm a web developer, and I use IE for 90% of my browsing. For a long time it was a lot safer than FF as well, as IE on Vista and W7 ran in protected low-rights mode. Chrome eventually started doing low-rights as well, and I think FF is planning to release a low-rights version as well.

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (5, Informative)

kesuki (321456) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586775)

i just checked and wikipedia paints a different tale http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_share_of_web_browsers [wikipedia.org]
i consider wikipedia as a pretty common denominator of who uses the web, google cheats, and some web based spyware is commonly blocked by advanced users (with ghostery or the like)
android users are 4% of the browser marketshare at wikipedia.

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (1)

JanneM (7445) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586997)

"android users are 4% of the browser marketshare at wikipedia."

Does that count app users as well, though, or only those who use their browser directly?

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (1)

micheas (231635) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587159)

I suspect it depends on the app maker.

I tend to use the latest beta user agent string from safari with my app name and version added to the end for iOS. For android apps I use the same user agent string and add "-a" to version number.

As most developers seem to develop for iOS first I wouldn't be surprised if several android apps besides mine identify themselves similarly to websites.

Re:Really one a sample size of 1 website? (4, Informative)

man_of_mr_e (217855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586797)

Indeed. I have access to logs from entirely non-computer or technology related sites, and on average IE is still well above 50%, in many cases closer to 70%.

However, that could be because our sites appeal mostly to older users, and few technically literate people visit them (sort of the inverse of w3schools).

Certainly, if you add in Mobile browsers, IE's market share is probably more realistically in the 30%. However, since Mobile browsers are not really in the same competitive field, that means you need to remove a large percentage of safari and chrome/android browsers from the statistics.. otherwise you're not comparing apples and oranges.

What I want to know is how far IE usage ON PC'S has dropped.

Oh wow, really? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586505)

That is statistics FROM THEIR WEBSITE.
Worse, it is statistics from a website that technically literate people visit!

Why this managed to reach the frontpage is beyond me.
This isn't indicative of browser usage in any realistic manner.
Hell, they even said so on the page. It is their own user logs.

Re:Oh wow, really? (1)

the_B0fh (208483) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586529)

It's a good sign.

Re:Oh wow, really? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586539)

Hahahahaha. Cry more, you little bitch.

Re:Oh wow, really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586641)

Right, but it's the same statistic that showed IE had a > 80% market share back in 2003. Cry more, bitch.

Re:Oh wow, really? (1)

amiller2571 (2571883) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586695)

It may just be the statistics of just that web site that only technically people go to, but this is an all time low for them. This kind of drop in market shares is showing up on other sites that keep track. I hope it god it continues to drop, because IE has been a nightmare for web developers!!!

Re:Oh wow, really? (1)

lazybeam (162300) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586791)

Indeed. Might as well report Daring Fireball's statistic. 14% of his visitors are from Windows (as IE only runs on Windows it's clear much less than 14% of his visitors run IE) http://daringfireball.net/linked/2012/07/03/ios-6-9to5mac [daringfireball.net]

Re:Oh wow, really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586891)

> Worse, it is statistics from a website that technically literate people visit!

Technically literate people actually do not visit W3Schools. It's a terrible reference, and only exists so that PHP 'developers' can copy-paste SQL injection vulnerabilities.

Re:Oh wow, really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40587053)

Seventy six years after the infamous poll that sank Literary Digest, Alf Landon wins again [aim.org] .

Maybe it'll just mean fading out ActiveX (1)

TWX (665546) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586515)

I would love IE to be irrevelant- maybe it would mean proprietary apps would finally work cross-browser in the future if the companies behind them want to remain relevant...

Re:Maybe it'll just mean fading out ActiveX (1)

GiMP (10923) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586565)

ActiveX was already on the way out for IE users, being replaced by Silverlight. I'm not sure it is really a much better option, but at least there is a Mac plugin. The Linux alternative (Moonlight) is dead, however.

Re:Maybe it'll just mean fading out ActiveX (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586623)

Silverlight got stomped by Flash.

Re:Maybe it'll just mean fading out ActiveX (1)

Tridus (79566) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586669)

Which was then promptly beaten into submission by Apple not allowing it. So that whole trend is going places.

Metrics seem strange (1)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586519)

I know a lot of businesses that have still standardized in IE. I can't believe that it could be that low. Also, with all the Macs and iPhones, Safari should be higher. I know many people have switched to Firefox and Chrome, but I don't think they have killed the others yet.

Re:Metrics seem strange (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586789)

While there are a lot of iPhones out there, the number of Macs is small enough to be largely irrelevant.

This again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586525)

Why does this table keep getting posted, as if it's some sort of accurate measure? FTFA:

"These facts indicate that the browser figures above are not 100% realistic. Other web sites have statistics showing that Internet Explorer is a more popular browser.
Anyway, our data, collected from W3Schools' log-files, over many years, clearly shows the long and medium-term trends."

It's browser usage on W3Schools' website.

One site means the whole internet? (4, Insightful)

countach74 (2484150) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586531)

I'm no Internet Explorer fan, but let's be fair here... The statistics are from visitors of w3schools.com, a site that people go to for web development. How many web developers or people interested in web development use Internet Explorer? I imagine it would be an easy point to argue that most of these individuals decidedly do not tend to use Internet Explorer. Claiming IE use is down to "almost 15%" sourcing nothing but a single web site's logs seems hardly trust worthy.

Re:One site means the whole internet? (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586795)

How many web developers or people interested in web development use Internet Explorer?

Aparently, a bit more than 15% of them. That's a very worrysome number.

Re:One site means the whole internet? (2)

awollabe (464677) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586917)

Actually, the IE stats could actually be INFLATED, since some visitors to w3schools may be trying the same tricks simultaneously in multiple browsers to get a feel for browser compatibilities.

What implications? (1)

noobermin (1950642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586533)

Oh, I mean still accounting for almost three fourths [wikipedia.org] of the OS market share won't save them? Let's remember what OS those browsers run on...

Opera user here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586535)

the Opera user base really doesn't change much uh... even though It's such a good browser that has everything you could possibly want from a browser and more... I guess that fact that it is not heavily advertised like firefox and chrome means a lot uh

Re:Opera user here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586831)

That, or it's an ageing mediocre browser bloated with features that nobody wants or needs.

Re:Opera user here! (1)

epyT-R (613989) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586963)

older doesn't automatically mean worse, and more features aren't always a problem.. if anything, these days, software is getting far too simple to be truly useful for all but the most troglodytic mouth breathers.

Re:Opera user here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40587047)

Some of us have allergies you insensitive clod.

Re:Opera user here! (2)

Johann Lau (1040920) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587011)

I don't get it either, but I stopped wondering years ago.. I think it has something to do with most people being fucking stupid. While recently Firefox and Chrome have nice things, Opera also was the "underdog" when *no* other browser had *anything* on it. So, yeah. GG, interwebs :P

Slightly misleading... (4, Informative)

adamchou (993073) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586543)

This is just browser usage for w3schools. The first paragraph underneath the charts even states

W3Schools is a website for people with an interest for web technologies. These people are more interested in using alternative browsers than the average user. The average user tends to the browser that comes preinstalled with their computer, and do not seek out other browser alternatives.

Re:Slightly misleading... (1)

DarkOx (621550) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586619)

Yea its certainly a poor sample to use for drawing conclusions about the browser market as a whole.

Still W3CSchools is mostly reference material. Developers probably do go there using their browser of choice. As a general rule mass market users follow where the developers are after some time to over come inertia. IOS probably being the big exception to that rule in recent times where the massive user base has drawn the developers in.

So this might say something about what the browser market share of the future will look like.

From TFA (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586553)

Statistics Are Often Misleading

You cannot - as a web developer - rely only on statistics. Statistics can often be misleading.

Global averages may not always be relevant to your web site. Different sites attract different audiences. Some web sites attract professional developers using professional hardware, while other sites attract hobbyists using old low spec computers.

Also be aware that many statistics may have an incomplete or faulty browser detection. It is quite common by many web-stats report programs, not to detect the newest browsers.

(The statistics above are extracted from W3Schools' log-files, but we are also monitoring other sources around the Internet to assure the quality of these figures).
Quotes

"The pure and simple truth is rarely pure and never simple."
Oscar Wilde

"First get your facts; then you can distort them at your leisure."
Mark Twain

Re:From TFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586563)

Or the better quote I should have chosen:

"W3Schools is a website for people with an interest for web technologies. These people are more interested in using alternative browsers than the average user. The average user tends to the browser that comes preinstalled with their computer, and do not seek out other browser alternatives.

These facts indicate that the browser figures above are not 100% realistic. Other web sites have statistics showing that Internet Explorer is a more popular browser.

Anyway, our data, collected from W3Schools' log-files, over many years, clearly shows the long and medium-term trends."

No, it's well above 15% (3, Informative)

F69631 (2421974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586571)

First of all, it's closer to 17%. With the current rate of decrease we'll hit 15% in something like four months if nothing happens before that. More importantly...

(The statistics above are extracted from W3Schools' log-files, but we are also monitoring other sources around the Internet to assure the quality of these figures)

Audience of W3Schools is people who are trying to learn the basics of certain web-related technologies and don't yet know that W3Schools is hardly the best place for that [w3fools.com] . Whether you like W3Schools or not, it's hardly representative of general population.

Re:No, it's well above 15% (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586603)

They round down like my wife does when she tells me how much she spent on her last shopping trip.

She thinks $130 is "about one-hundred dollars."

Shrivel up and DIE already. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586601)

Maybe, though, what M$ did wasn't all that bad, after all, once they used their monopoly power to crush the competition despite offering a demonstrably inferior product, using FUD and leverage... they spurred the creation of FLOSS projects that might never have had reason to come into being without them. Remember, at one point, if you wanted a copy of Netscape Navigator, it cost like MONEY! Microsoft destroying their company by being able to undercut them since they also had an operating system that they were selling for NOT free, caused the folks at Netscape to give their product away for nothing, which has benefited us all immensely. Netscape, (in the form of Mozilla Firefox,) crushes Microsoft's comparatively crappy browser from beyond the grave. Pretty cool, when you think about it.

Whenever I think about this situation, I picture the scene from Star Trek II, with Netscape as Kahn, and Microsoft as Kirk, with Ricardo Montalbán saying "From Hell's heart I... STAB at thee... for hate's sake, I spit my last BREATH... at thee...." except in this case, the Enterprise doesn't get away in time, and now their market share is approaching 15%... I assume that means it's over 15%, and dropping. Great news for web developers who now have less reason to have to worry about whether or not M$'s non-standards-compliant browser will properly render their webpages, I guess. Microsoft continues its inexorable slide into irrelevance.

Stats from a non-technical website (4, Informative)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586605)

In my free time I run a vegetable gardening website - so a very non-technical, home-oriented audience. Looking at the entirety of 2012, Google Analytics reports the following (everything else is at 1% or less):

IE 34.19%
Firefox 22.52%
Safari 21.38%
Chrome 14.80%
Android Browser 4.42%

For OS I see

Windows 65.68%
Macintosh 15.57%
iPad 5.24%
Android 4.53%
iPhone 3.95%
iOS 2.09%
Linux 1.23%

Re:Stats from a non-technical website (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586859)

Is it organic gardening?

I happen to admin web sites for a family of friends who are into all things gardening. One of the sites is for their outdoor power equipment business, one for their general gardening products, and two different ones that are focused on organic gardening. They are storefront/article/forum sites.

The stats aren't too different from what I see, but there is a significant bias in favor of Safari on OSX/iOS for the organic sites. Those sites also have the least traffic but make the highest sales margin, possibly via some Steve Jobs RDF butterfly wing effect.

Re:Stats from a non-technical website (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586947)

Is it organic gardening?

Not especially. My personal biases lean that way, but I'm not strictly organic (I've got a bottle of Round-up on the back porch somewhere) and I don't really use the site to advocate for that approach. It's more about what to start and when to start it (for my local area), trying to advocate for people to try year-round veggie gardening since our climate is reasonably mild, stuff like that. I do try to get people to figure out why a problem is occurring before breaking out the spray, though, and do advocate for using the least toxic effective methods to deal with them - so there could be some crossover.

The missing number, (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586919)

In my free time I run a vegetable gardening website - so a very non-technical, home-oriented audience.

You haven't told us the number of visitors to your site or its location.

No one who posts stats like yours to Slashdot ever does.

So we don't know how representative you are when compared to Burpee Seeds, Better Homes & Gardens...

The 4-H, Cornell University, Cooperative Extension (broken down by state and county) and any of the other 15 million or so "vegetable gardening" sites that will be exposed in a search through Google.

Re:The missing number, (5, Informative)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587049)

You haven't told us the number of visitors to your site or its location. No one who posts stats like yours to Slashdot ever does.

If I had posted a link, then I'd be accused of being a shill or trolling for page hits - there's no winning either way. But here's the info from Google Analytics since 1/1/2012:

Visits: 138,719
Unique Visitors: 117,592
Pageviews: 237,555

Traffic sources:

72.08% Search Traffic (99,994 Visits)
16.11% Referral Traffic (22,344 Visits)
11.81% Direct Traffic

URL: http://westsidegardener.com/ [westsidegardener.com] - There, now I'm a shameless shill.

98% of world population does not own bike helmet (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586609)

which makes me wonder why only 2% wants to wear a helmet when riding a bike?
It's madness, MADNESS!

Re:98% of world population does not own bike helme (-1, Redundant)

billcopc (196330) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586819)

<sarcasm>Because bike helmets are ULTRA GAAAAAAY.</sarcasm>

The helmet does fuckall, that's why. It's a great cash cow for helmet manufacturers, but unless you're a competitive racer, the helmet is really useless. It does not offer any protection in the most common types of accidents seen in urban settings: sideswipes and t-bones. It also doesn't account for the fact that the great majority of urban cyclists are morons, completely oblivious to their surroundings and not in control of their bike. In other words, they ride the same way they drive their car. Helmets don't protect you from your own stupidity.

Not too long ago, some guy died by smashing into a light pole, instantly crushing his neck. What was he doing riding at high speed on the sidewalk ? Being a moron, that's what.

Re:98% of world population does not own bike helme (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40587115)

They're better than nothing. Truth be told people should be wearing similar helmets to the ones that motorcyclists use. But, what you're suggesting is dangerous, what about the times where the helmet would have helped but the person wasn't wearing one? A helmet isn't a license to behave recklessly, it's there for the times when you get hit on the top of the head. You should have something that protects the face and the back of the head, but it's still better than nothing.

What's more the reason why 98% of the population doesn't own one is that many people don't have a bike and others can't afford to buy one. Around here I'm not even sure where I'd go to buy one if I owned a bike.

IE corporate usage (1)

erp_consultant (2614861) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586663)

I suspect that a lot of that 15% are corporate users that are told they must use IE for their internal applications. Keep in mind that a lot of companies are still using IE 6 and IE 7 because of vendor lock in on browser standards. Also, ASAIK SharePoint won't run on anything other that IE. Perhaps Firefox with the appropriate plug-ins but not Chrome or Safari. The other group to consider are the newbies whose PC came with IE installed. For many people, they think the only way to get on the internet is to use IE. As far as sophisticated users go, I know hardly anyone that uses IE by choice. My preference is Chrome. I haven't used IE in a non-corporate setting in years and I use computers every day.

Implications for Microsoft (5, Informative)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586671)

What implications does this have for the future of Microsoft?

It means they failed to pwn the internet, thank all the gods

But after Netscape withered it was Apache + BSD servers that kept them from it, not Firefox. If Microsoft had won on that front, they could have easily forced a MSInternet on us.

It was a close thing, but settled quite a few years ago. This story is about a symptom of *that* failure, not a failure in its own right. No need to use Microsoft products, if Microsoft doesn't pwn the infrastructure or file format.

They haven't given up pwning the PC yet, though. (New "secure" boot loader - mostly secure for Microsoft.)

note to self: (2)

jsh1972 (1095519) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586673)

invest in office chair companies.

In a related story... (5, Funny)

Tridus (79566) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586677)

windowsupdate.microsoft.com reports 99.9% IE user agents. IE is on a comeback!

(What? It's just as useful a metric as TFA.)

Re:In a related story... (2)

dark_knight_ita (995074) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586851)

And the remaining 0.1 % is from people curious to see how WindowsUpdate looks with a browser other than IE.

Submitter fail, again (3, Insightful)

billcopc (196330) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586683)

From TFA itself:

W3Schools is a website for people with an interest for web technologies. These people are more interested in using alternative browsers than the average user. The average user tends to the browser that comes preinstalled with their computer, and do not seek out other browser alternatives.

These facts indicate that the browser figures above are not 100% realistic. Other web sites have statistics showing that Internet Explorer is a more popular browser.

Glitch0, please submit your résumé to CNN. They greatly value your kind of selective reading skills.

Confirmation bias. (2)

westlake (615356) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586727)

W3Schools has always posted this disclaimer:

W3Schools is a website for people with an interest for web technologies. These people are more interested in using alternative browsers than the average user. The average user tends to the browser that comes preinstalled with their computer, and do not seek out other browser alternatives.

These facts indicate that the browser figures above are not 100% realistic. Other web sites have statistics showing that Internet Explorer is a more popular browser.

Net Applications collects stats for 12,415 clients the size of Disney, Apple, Microsoft, Roche, the Moz Foundation, CNN, the WSJ, the New York Times and so on. The guys paying for these stats don't give a damn about the geek. They do give a damn about what is happening in their core markets.

Desktop Browser Market Share [hitslink.com]

Statcounter exposes more of its stats --- and there can be some big surprises:

Top 12 Browser Versions In China [statcounter.com]

Mobile vs. Desktop in China [statcounter.com]

Huh. (1)

toddmbloom (1625689) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586745)

You mean to tell me that making a non-cross platform browser that's only available on the latest version of your OS is a BAD idea? ;)

Cherry pick your results much, Slashdot? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586749)

http://www.w3counter.com/globalstats.php

http://gs.statcounter.com/

http://www.netmarketshare.com/browser-market-share.aspx?qprid=2&qpcustomd=0

But you know, another anti-MS article. Whatever floats your boat I guess.

Article Should Be Modded down As Troll (5, Insightful)

Zamphatta (1760346) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586755)

The link shows the browser stats ONLY for visitors to w3schools.com, which is notoriously skewed away from IE due to it being a techy site for people who tend to use other browsers 'cause they're web developers who use a variety of browsers. This is not news by any standard. Even the text below the chart says "W3Schools is a website for people with an interest for web technologies. These people are more interested in using alternative browsers than the average user." & "These facts indicate that the browser figures above are not 100% realistic. Other web sites have statistics showing that Internet Explorer is a more popular browser."

Does it matter? (1)

mapuche (41699) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586777)

Back in that time, Gates et al discovered the internet and its potential. At that time almost the only way to use the internet was via a web browser inside a PC (remember the AOL disks, trumpet winsock, etc?) Nowadays we have access to the web in many other ways. Now, if you tell me that xbox live usage is going down, then this is something to worry about.

biz8atch (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40586847)

when IDC recently leaving core. I those obligations. SLING yOu can was in the tea I on an endeavour 0nly way to go: Nigger Association

Biased site is...biased (1)

Siberwulf (921893) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586873)

Look people, let's all step back and look at what's going on here. /. is an anti-MS site. From the Bill Gates Cyborg, to the inherent bias of the articles published, it's not a fanboi of MS. Let's get over that.

Linux/OSS Fans: Take the feather out of your cap, it doesn't mean anything. It's probably not even valid (just like it is invalid here).

Windows Fans: Stop getting butthurt about these types of articles. The OS market share is there, and that's the revenue generator.

/. would be a lot more fun to read if everyone would just get off their high horse already. Goddamn.

Re:Biased site is...biased (0)

Doctor_Jest (688315) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587035)

Indeed... there is an anti-microsoft bent to /. So what? It's obvious and no one pretends to hide it. Bill Gates the Borg should've been clue enough for anyone looking to get a Microsoft circle-jerk out of this site.

It's not about a high-horse. It's about what the people who run (and frequent) the site like. They don't like Windows. I don't like Windows. I haven't used Windows at home since Win98 was bundled with computers. Does that mean I'm on a high horse because I like, and advocate, an OS that doesn't treat one like a criminal as Windows does when it "phones home" to be sure you are not a "dirty thief"? I hate Apple too, but I did have a stint where I liked OS x. The company's practices and desire to turn a computer into an appliance with no possibility of user maintenance or control just steams my beans.

The fact that IE is taking a dive (how precipitous a dive remains to be seen) is not an advocacy of Linux or OS X. It is an acknowledgment that even the most green and inexperienced computer users like to install software they find useful. Be it Chrome or Firefox or Opera or Safari... they aren't going to be fed a line of crap from Redmond that the "one true way" for computing is Windows and what gurgles from the bowels of Microsoft Way.

You should be happy that even the oft-maligned Windows users (oft-maligned on here quite frequently) are getting a clue without being beaten with a cluestick.

Goddamn, life's too short to be pissing contest between Redmond and /. We really just like something else here. If it reeks of an air of superiority, usually that means the person is a windows fan.

For Microsoft? (3, Interesting)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#40586999)

...almost nothing, on the short term. Microsoft used IE and the fact that a lot of broken code on the net would only run on IE to drive sales on Windows. IE no longer drives sales on Windows, for a few reasons -- (a) the perception that IE is not as secure as other browsers, (b) Most competing browsers run on Windows, (c) the perception (less now) that IE is way behind in technology compared to other browsers.

So why would Microsoft care? I can think of one reason -- as has been pointed out by others [xkcd.com] , the more time people spend in a browser, the less they care about the underlying OS. When the user community is not dependent on a browser that's locked to a particular OS, the OS becomes less important, because you can run Chrome or Firefox or Opera on a lot of different platforms. Unlocking the browser from the OS is the first step -- causing a movement en-masse to a different operating system (or systems) is the next logical step. I would argue it is already happening.

So for the long term, if Microsoft isn't scared, they should be. I would expect over the next couple of years many attempts at embrace, extend, extinguish to get ...something... that everyone uses, locked into their one platform. I mean, how else are they going to compete?

They should get focused (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40587025)

Microsoft will die if they don't drop Windows 8, Internet Explorer, Windows Phone, etc and focus on what they're GOOD at; that's making games and game consoles.

Although I think that if Valve (blessed be their holy name) decides to enter the console arena in a big way (Steam Box, anyone?) the Xbox's market share will crash, too. Microsoft just doesn't know how to compete with a real contender. It can claw it's way to the top of the food chain when all it has to deal with are Sony and Nintendo, but if Valve gets serious, there's no hope for Microsoft whatsoever (and we can waive goodbye to Sony, too).

IE Is Commentary On MS (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40587107)

Internet Explorer. A technology developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana, by NCSA staff programmer Eric Bina, improved by undergraduate (David Thompson, Marc Andreessen) and graduate computer science students, renamed Mosaic, was licensed by Spyglass (Spyglass Mosaic) and later licensed by Microsoft Corp. (Internet Explorer).

Yet again.

Microsoft Corp. had nothing to do at all with the development of the internet and neither the world wide web. They with little effort licensed a technology given their dollar reserves at the time. And true to form Microsoft Corp. could not and did not posses the necessary intelligence nor even comprehension to understand the technology which they had bought with their inflated dollars at the time.

Thus we have as exhibit A the Microsoft Lost Generation.

Who is the Father of the Microsoft Lost Generation?

LoL :D

Wow troll much (1)

philofaqs (668524) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587111)

I know this is slashdot but to quote that site as representative? why not the FSF's to get a bit of balance? Or the Firefox developers'? Actually I'm shocked that 15% of their visitors do use IE given the antipathy to Microsoft. When Google's stats show something similar then that will be another matter.

we don't precive this to be a problem (1)

issicus (2031176) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587129)

1 . consumer using IE
2 . ?????
3 . profit

I imagine its more important that it exists , then how many people use it.

We are stuck with it (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40587143)

Several apps we have *require* it. Ones we will use for the foreseeable future, and they have no plans on rewriting it. ( heavy OCX stuff )

Rather frustrating actually.

Meanwhile (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40587169)

Safari has almost 100% on iOS excluding opera mini and other "browsers" which are just webkit wrappers.

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