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Ouya Android Console Blows Past Kickstarter Goal

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the smells-like-2001 dept.

The Almighty Buck 270

mikejuk writes with a winner for quickest follow-up in a while as the Ouya console managed to raise over $2 million in a mere eight hours. From the article: "On the surface it all sounds like a really good idea. The OUYA games console is planned to be an open competitor to the likes of Xbox and PS3. It seems so good that it has been crowd funded to the tune of $1 million — but why exactly is it needed? There must be a good reason — after all the wisdom of crowds is never wrong. The simple answer seems to be freedom. The company claims that you can do what you want to the machine. A CyanogenMod port would allow you to do what you like to the OS and it wouldn't void your warranty. You can hack the hardware or software. However, it is important to note that this isn't open hardware. ... In the same way the software seems to be open and yet controlled. ... The Kickstarter page says 'When we say, "open" we mean it. We've made many decisions based on this philosophy:..' But it isn't Open Source. And yet it is so much better than the alternative. Perhaps this is a sign of just how desperate we all are to get away from the control of the big console manufacturers, that we will fund anything that sounds even slightly reasonable. The walled gardens of Apple, Sony and Microsoft no longer seem the warm and welcoming places they once did (if they ever did)" Issues not raised on yesterday's post; the console will require a significant number of binary blobs just to function, and it's really unclear whether or not it will actually be DRM free. Anyone remember Indrema?

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270 comments

Holy funding, splatman! (4, Insightful)

raydobbs (99133) | about 2 years ago | (#40615325)

That's got to be a serious contender for the record of fastest funded project on Kickstarter in the category of nearly a million dollars... But anyway, I hope this means we'll get to see what they come up with - a 99 dollar console is just about in the range of 'sure, I'll bite - see what it's like' in terms of risk to the consumer.

summed up in the summary (0, Redundant)

poetmatt (793785) | about 2 years ago | (#40615341)

Perhaps this is a sign of just how desperate we all are to get away from the control of the big console manufacturers

Yep. 100%. The big manufacturers are shit and add DRM to games. Of course people want competition. The question is, how much can Ouya really do, and how out of date/not will the hardware be by the time it's released? If the hardware sucks (binary issues, etc), it might not even be a competition for android handsets.

Re:summed up in the summary (2, Funny)

dmbasso (1052166) | about 2 years ago | (#40615773)

You could at least try to fake you were replying to raydobb's post. Replying to the first poster just for the sake of placement is extremely lame IMHO.

Re:Holy funding, splatman! (5, Insightful)

MrSome (2587847) | about 2 years ago | (#40615451)

Agreed 100%.

At $99 it's cheaper than... well, any gaming platform, right? (Android Phone, iPhone, Nintendo DS, Wii, PS3, Xbox360)

So if it can offer the same type of entertainment options... (Netflix, HBOGo... etc), why not give it a try?

All they need is some developers who know to focus on the FUN factor of games. I'm tired of the industry rating games on graphics and realism. I want games that are fun, with a high replayability factor. I have enough realism from 8-5. I don't need to see individual hairs on the back of my character's neck stand up when he gets shot in the face.

Re:Holy funding, splatman! (2, Insightful)

Loughla (2531696) | about 2 years ago | (#40615767)

All they need is some developers who know to focus on the FUN factor of games. I'm tired of the industry rating games on graphics and realism. I want games that are fun, with a high replayability factor. I have enough realism from 8-5. I don't need to see individual hairs on the back of my character's neck stand up when he gets shot in the face.

Why shouldn't we try for both?

Re:Holy funding, splatman! (4, Insightful)

AuMatar (183847) | about 2 years ago | (#40615943)

Because graphics cost a lot of money, and effort there would be better off on gameplay or the next title. or on a cheaper game-I'd rather have it coat half as much and have snes era graphics.

Add for realism- for some games, it's good. For most, out actively detracts from fun gameplay. Concentrate on it only if it's a key concept, otherwise ignore it

Re:Holy funding, splatman! (4, Insightful)

DemonGenius (2247652) | about 2 years ago | (#40616115)

Add for realism- for some games, it's good. For most, out actively detracts from fun gameplay. Concentrate on it only if it's a key concept, otherwise ignore it

As a long time gamer I wholeheartedly agree. While we've seen an increase in graphics quality over time, we've seen very little movement in terms of innovative gameplay/controls/storylines/etc. Lately, it's only the indie games that I've seen that have implemented really original ideas. I love the idea of a console like this coming to market, it will give the big guys a run for their money.

Re:Holy funding, splatman! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40616049)

Team Fortress 2; the most fun you can have on your PC that isn't pr0n!

Re:Holy funding, splatman! (1)

joocemann (1273720) | about 2 years ago | (#40615729)

99 bucks is so little money nowadays. I would gladly shell out 200 for a way better version of the same concept.

I think this will be for casual gamers. Nothing about this idea sounds like immersive graphics and physics. Sounds more like an android Wii.... meh.

More power, please. Gamers that use their systems and hang around like blockbusters far more than popping bubbles.

Re:Holy funding, splatman! (4, Insightful)

raydobbs (99133) | about 2 years ago | (#40616159)

The problem with your argument is that the Wii is actually a pretty good console - it's just saddled with crappy games because that's all that makes it past Nintendo's vetting process. Cheap and sleezy ports and titles that are just 'phoned in' make up a large bulk of the console's 'shovelware'. If Nintendo didn't require you to be an A tier developer with blockbuster games already in your stable - then they'd have some room for innovative products on the platform. As it is - they have geared their developer's licensing to poach developers from other consoles.

Given the Android platform, this could really open the world of console game development to the independents - those who could never convince Nintendo or Sony to even sell them a development kit - or pay for Microsoft XBOX's QA for deployment on XBOX Live. I've seen some really impressive indie games out there - and this could be their shot at getting in on a console that hasn't already 'cherry-picked' their developer base.

Of course, there is also a lot of $hit indie games as well - but that's kind of to be expected with no vetting process of any kind. Perhaps as the market matures, places like Metacritic and game magazines will review and rate indie titles on such systems as this more frequently - and it will not be such a crap-shoot.

Re:Holy funding, splatman! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615853)

Let the Microsoft XBOX shills commence in 3.. 2.. 1..

55" tablet (3, Informative)

Jurramonga (1922438) | about 2 years ago | (#40615333)

This is the equivalent of hooking a tablet to your television. You'll have access to the same Android games that every smartphone and tablet has, assuming that the app even supports a controller.

Re:55" tablet (2)

Tx (96709) | about 2 years ago | (#40615471)

Yes, that was my first thought, you can of course already hook up a tablet/phone/Rikomagic to your TV and play Android games on the big screen. But I guess this console can stay permanently hooked up to the TV, which has some advantages, and if they can get enough units shipped, maybe developers will do some optimization with their controllers, as games developed for a touchscreen may not translate well to traditional sofa gaming.

Re:55" tablet (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#40615689)

But I guess this console can stay permanently hooked up to the TV, which has some advantages

And it'll also come with a gamepad, which brings other advantages.

games developed for a touchscreen may not translate well to traditional sofa gaming.

Nor vice versa. Sofa gaming has traditionally been reserved for established companies, with indies limited to PC (mouse and keyboard, one player per machine, few players think to plug in a gamepad) or mobile (flat touch screen) platforms.

More recent games have controller support (1)

Dr. Manhattan (29720) | about 2 years ago | (#40616001)

My Transformer Prime can hook up to a TV via HDMI, and can use PS3 controllers via Bluetooth with no extra software. (You just hook the controller up via USB, turn on Bluetooth on the tablet, and hit the "PS" button. Boom, paired.)

Not all games support controllers, but 'higher end' ones do. I have three in particular - Max Payne, Shadowgun, and Dead Trigger. The graphics are pretty good - not much below current-gen consoles, actually. So long as more and more games support gamepads like that, I can see a niche for the Ouya.

Re:55" tablet (1)

David_Hart (1184661) | about 2 years ago | (#40615889)

I have a HP Touchpad (got it during the fire sale) running CM9. I've installed an application (Sixaxis Controller) that allows my PS3 controller to connect via Bluetooth. I tested it out on a jetski racing game (Riptide GP) that I bought from the Google PLAY market. It works really well. It turns my touchpad into a portable gaming platform. I am not sure how many other games support a game controller as I've been busy playing Skyrim instead of tablet games...

innovation? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615369)

Where is the innovation here? The fact that it is an open platform? This isn't a consumer product either, it is for hackers and developers who make up 1% of the consumer market share for video games (who are also the idiots who funded this project). I don't see anything spectacular coming from this, except maybe a good marketing campaign with all the money they've raised.

Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615377)

As a game developer I see this machine as just another source of piracy. I imagine most users will get it because they know they will not need to pay for a game. Is there a good excuse for a "hackable" console device other than being able to do piracy of multiple types of content?

Re:Piracy (2)

91degrees (207121) | about 2 years ago | (#40615393)

I find it hard to believe you're a game developer.

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615725)

As an ex-android developer, having been forced out by massive piracy, I completely agree with his position, regardless of his being a game developer or not.

Re:Piracy (1)

biraneto2 (910162) | about 2 years ago | (#40615911)

That's my current situation. I'm THIS close to quitting so I will be able to sleep 8 hours per day again. I have to work on the job that pay my bills at day.

Re:Piracy (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40615965)

So they beat you until you stopped being able to work?

Or was your game not good enough to get actual sales. Remember than the cost of entry to pirate is infinitely lower than to buy.

Re:Piracy (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40615449)

Are you trolling or stupid?

All my android devices are rooted, I have pirated exactly 0 applications or videos or movies.

Why would anyone need an excuse to own their own devices?

Re:Piracy (3, Insightful)

biraneto2 (910162) | about 2 years ago | (#40615651)

I posted as AC by mistake... but yes I am an independent game developer (not hard to find these days with mobile devices).
And I am not trolling or stupid... I just need to Google my games to know they are available for free and being copied. I have data from my transactions and number of what countries buy or download my games. I can tell that although Americans buy a lot but this is not true for other countries. For instance, one of my games has sold almost less copies than there are download sites with cracked versions of it. The fact some people don't do it don't mean it won't be the main attractive for most people (specially outside us)

Re:Piracy (3, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40615775)

So what?

I mean that seriously, you are not losing money, it is no different than if someone did not buy the game. I know that sounds harsh, but the reality is every minute you spend worrying about people like that is one less you can spend getting actual customers. To an indie dev, I would suggest making a version to post on such websites. Change some models/sprites/backgrounds to pirates or zombies or something, and leave out the ending. This way it will at least be harder for people to find the pirated full version and you will get free advertising.

Spend more time making it worth me buying and less time worrying about what broke folks do. Some people will never give you their money, don't worry about what you can't change. Worry about getting those of us who might give you money to actually do so.

Please also tell me what game it is so I can go check it out.

Re:Piracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615839)

I'm sure you've heard this before, being on slashdot and all. You can't assume that all pirated copies are lost sales. (And the less popular corollary that piracy does cause some people to stiff you rather than pay)

You can argue the above until you're blue in the face, but I suggest you forget all that. When somebody pirates your game you've actually got a very valuable asset that another industry screams for. Eyes and attention. Brand recognition. You /can/ capitalize on that, but you have to be clever.

I don't know if this has been tried, but I think it's a great idea. I say, insert some code in to your game that activates when the game knows it's been pirated. (Which should be trival with a little call-home routine? Its how you track your piracy rates anyway, right?) What does this code do? Show ads. That is all. Your pirated game becomes the de-facto ad supported version automatically. You may even already have an ad supported version on an app store, but you're letting the pirates believe they're getting a free ride anyway. They get the psychological validation of saving some money and you make your ad revenue, while they distribute your wares for free.

Re:Piracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40616319)

You /can/ capitalize on that, but you have to be clever.

Wrong. Sometimes a tiny, tiny minority are able to capitalize on it out of sheer luck. Cleverness has nothing to do with it.

The fact is, lots of people are directly harmed by piracy (me included). The general response I get from people is that I deserve to lose everything and that they deserve to steal everything and that I'm the one who broke some imaginary contract in their head. Basically, as many studies have constently proven, most pirates steal because they feel they are self entitled for having done absolutely nothing other than steal. And so the Entitled Generation was born.

Not American? Your money is no good here (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#40615901)

I can tell that although Americans buy a lot but this is not true for other countries.

How much of this is because a lot of countries didn't have paid apps for the first year or so that Android Market was in operation? Lack of support for paid apps in some countries has driven a lot of Android application developers to either A. derive revenue from ads instead of payments, especially after the success of Rovio's Angry Birds, or B. handle their own payment processing for unknown-source APK downloads.

Re:Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615817)

All my android devices are rooted, I have pirated exactly 0 applications or videos or movies.

I've arranged so that your devices will be checked by our TSA Intellectual Property Safety Agents, when you next fly. If in compliance, you are instructed to enjoy your flight, but be ever vigilant against threats to the profitability of America corporations.

Janet Napolitano
Department of Homeland Security
"Protecting America from imaginary hollywood plots of terrorists, copyright infringement, due process and pleasant travel since 2003"

Re:Piracy (2)

peppepz (1311345) | about 2 years ago | (#40615517)

News from the world: all commercial, closed, heavily secured, drm-laden game consoles currently available on the market have already been deeply pirated, and therefore users already don't "need" to pay for a game.

Piracy after Other OS was taken away (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#40615925)

It took three years for the PlayStation 3 console to be pirated, and I seem to remember that that didn't start until after Sony had already removed Other OS support. The Ouya console, on the other hand, comes with its devkit.

Re:Piracy (2)

Jeng (926980) | about 2 years ago | (#40615531)

So, what are your thoughts on PC gaming?

Major labels have reasons to avoid the PC (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#40615805)

Given the lack of fighting games on PC apart from the major-label Street Fighter IV and the indie MUGEN, and the complete absence of party games in the style of Mario Party, I'd say major labels have found their own reasons to avoid the PC for some genres.

Re:Major labels have reasons to avoid the PC (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40616101)

Those are living room games, the PC is probably a bad place to put them.

For the best of both worlds an emulator is so far the only way to go. This device might change that.

Android terminal (1)

k(wi)r(kipedia) (2648849) | about 2 years ago | (#40615385)

Scanning the title I thought they got a Kickstarter project for creating an Android command terminal app that would allow you to run standard GNU/BSD tools like grep, find and sort without rooting the phone. Would be really nice to have if you can use an external keyboard with it.

Re:Android terminal (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40615479)

KBOX terminal.
http://kevinboone.net/kbox.html [kevinboone.net]

External keyboard support would be included if you have an android device that takes external keyboard. My understanding is anything past 2.2 should be able to use a bluetooth keyboard.

Is it still a scam? (1)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 2 years ago | (#40615389)

I read a big blog post the other day going on about why this was a scam, is it still a scam or has our thinking changed?

Re:Is it still a scam? (3, Informative)

flitty (981864) | about 2 years ago | (#40615591)

There's two flip-out reactions about this console 1) It's a Kickstarter scam to steal money and always be vaporware or 2) It's an underpowered box that will be laughed out of the market because It's so underpowered and stupid that any Phone will be better than this box by the time it's released and AAA developers won't make any games for it.

Gamers are notorious armchair analysts who usually have no idea what they're talking about. (See: Xbox360 vs PS3 hardware power arguments when they were launched) Gamers should be cautious, mostly due to Kickstarter's sketchyness, but I don't see why this Kickstarter is any more suspect than other Kickstarters.

Ouya vs. $100 phones (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#40615721)

It's an underpowered box that will be laughed out of the market because It's so underpowered and stupid that any Phone will be better than this box by the time it's released

Any phone, even the bargain-basement $100 phones that Virgin Mobile and other prepaid carriers sell? And would such a phone include a Bluetooth gamepad, or would games still rely on thumb swipe gestures?

Re:Is it still a scam? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615605)

It's a scam, but a scam that people want to believe.

Scam-like points of note (5, Interesting)

oGMo (379) | about 2 years ago | (#40615799)

At a glance it seems legit, but on rereading, I had to wonder this myself:

  • Promise of "killer" opening price-point of $99.
  • Promise of "every game free-to-play".
  • Use of Android and other buzzwords.
  • Multitude of unrelated screenshots of unrelated, unsupported, non-Android games.
  • Promise of "easy rooting" (why would you need to root something if root was manufacturer-supported?)
  • Lots of pseudo-appeal to the "non-mainstream".
  • Release in 10 months with <$1mil budget.
  • >10,000+ consoles already promised at or below price-point.

This has a lot of "too-good-to-be-true" tempered by some things to make it seem reasonable. But with the promises made, I'm not sure. "Estimated Delivery: March 2013" is awfully soon to manufacture a console with presumably no prior hardware development experience. Do they have all their contracts already lined up? Is their software already developed? Just look how long it took to get the OpenPandora [wikipedia.org] out.

All of this starts making you wonder "wait, is this really legit?" I certainly can't say it's not, but it seems either naive or too good to be true.

Re:Is it still a scam? (1)

geminidomino (614729) | about 2 years ago | (#40616031)

Can't speak for others, but it definitely has a "too good to be true" smell to it as far as I'm concerned.

Basically, it looks like a non-portable version of the GP32/GP2X of a few years back. The hardware turned out to suck, the "professional" games never materialized, leaving it as a sub-standard media player and a halfway decent 8-bit emulator system (16 bit was iffy. MegaDrive/Genesis was good, SNES was not).

Combined with a price point that seems to be made out of unicorn farts and pixie dust, I find myself thinking that this might be the big flop that shines some reality on this idea of "crowd-funded" gaming which, I think, still hasn't actually produced anything but big promises and hype.

I could be mistaken on that last bit, though, and welcome any reasonable corrections.

Cool tech... but... (5, Insightful)

mystikkman (1487801) | about 2 years ago | (#40615401)

>after all the wisdom of crowds is never wrong

Really? Or was that sarcasm?

Here are the problems I foresee:

1) They're either selling the hardware at cost or taking a loss at $99. Big console manufacturers make it back on $60 games. It will be really tough to make it off 30% of 99c games.

2) Storage, 8 GB(minus OS space) is really low, and you don't want to be downloading from the cloud all the time. XBox gets away with a 4GB model because it has a DVD drive. Throw in a SD card slot atleast or a cheap SSD.

3) Hardware: The hardware seems woefully inadequate. Tegra 3 is okay for now but in 2013 when they actually launch? Also, it's not a good thing to upgrade hardware even every year because that will fragment the games, so that hardware at launch is a very important baseline.

4) And the last big thing: PATENTS. The big players and patent trolls will be all over this company by the time it even sees minimal success. With the controller looking very similar to the existing ones, expect a huge patent attack.

Anyway, nice to see an underdog coming up in the console games, but it's hard to understand why Google can't make something like this. They already have Google TV and they release something like the Nexus Q at $299?

Re:Cool tech... but... (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40615561)

1). Why would they be taking a loss? Tegra 3 SoCs run I think $15, can be more than $50 worth of parts total. I bet chinese assembly gets it done cheap enough for a small profit on each. There is no need to make the kind of profit the big boys do, most businesses don't have those kinds of margins and still survive.
2). 8GB seems fine, they are not going for blockbuster games. sure an SD card would help

3). I disagree a Tegra 3 today will not get worse with age, it will still be "good enough". It could be better, but so could the current crop of outdated crap consoles.

4). This will probably kill them.

Re:Cool tech... but... (1)

Talderas (1212466) | about 2 years ago | (#40615615)

2). 8GB seems fine, they are not going for blockbuster games. sure an SD card would help

Exactly. This article is about twenty ways wrong and misunderstands the gaming environment.

This won't increase competition because the developers who want DRM or other restrictions will continue to flock to Sony/Nintento/MS. It just so happens that most of the blockbuster developers go this route. This is probably going to end up as nothing more than perhaps a slightly more powerful smartphone for the purposes of gaming. At best it will compete with PCs for indie developers.

Re:Cool tech... but... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40615637)

I think this would be huge for OnLive, Netflix and a whole host of others that want to provide service to a cheap dumb endpoint.

It would also be big for indie devs and smaller game houses. I bet it could run all the Tell Tale games for instance. Not a huge dev, but their franchises are pretty historic. Sam and Max, Monkey Island, etc.

In short I am old and I think I would like to use this to play old games and new versions of said old games.

Re:Cool tech... but... (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 2 years ago | (#40616087)

It would also be big for indie devs and smaller game houses. I bet it could run all the Tell Tale games for instance. Not a huge dev, but their franchises are pretty historic. Sam and Max, Monkey Island, etc.

The problem is the Ouya store will be just as bad as the Apple App Store, Google Play Store and Xbox Live Indie Arcade. Everyone and their dog will want to try to cash in on the action (and with a kickstarter like that... cha-ching) and release tons of crap ass games.

They'll have the numbers but if it's practically impossible to find the good ones in the pile among the junk (it's hard enough already for Apple and Google - Apple bought an app search company to help improve things, even),

And yes, Tell tale games should work on it. Of course, my experience has been their games run like crap - frame rate losses on simple scenes, stuttering, etc. They have lots of great retro licenses, but their execution seems poor.

Of course, this thing will see great success as an emulation platform - play all those old console games on your TV again.

Re:Cool tech... but... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40616203)

I run the telltale games on wine and don't have those issues. At least not so far, what platform are you using?

8GB is actually a bit low, I'm afraid (1)

Dr. Manhattan (29720) | about 2 years ago | (#40616097)

8GB seems fine, they are not going for blockbuster games. sure an SD card would help

Games that actually use that Tegra3 have to have textures and other art assets that take up space. I have 4 of the big 'Yay Tegra3' games for Android - Max Payne Mobile, Shadowgun THD, Dead Trigger, and Dark Meadow. Every one of them had a lengthy post-'install' download of around 1 GB each. That'd fill up over half that 8GB space.

I'd figure an SD card slot, or even an external USB drive connection, would be necessary in practice. Or you'd be limited to smaller games and one or two big ones, period.

Re:Cool tech... but... (2)

euxneks (516538) | about 2 years ago | (#40615583)

Your other points are valid, but I take a bit of exception to this one:

3) Hardware: The hardware seems woefully inadequate. Tegra 3 is okay for now but in 2013 when they actually launch? Also, it's not a good thing to upgrade hardware even every year because that will fragment the games, so that hardware at launch is a very important baseline.

I wouldn't say it's woefully inadequate. I think it would be similar to the way the Wii is underpowered compared to the PS3 and Xbox 360 right now. It's a cheap system, I wouldn't expect game-changing graphics... I would, however, expect there to be interesting games coming from the indie game crowd. Canabalt is a very simple game that is super fun to play. Super meat boy doesn't require a heck of a lot of computing power.

Worth the risk (1)

BillCable (1464383) | about 2 years ago | (#40615405)

I threw my $99 behind the project. Hopefully it turns out to be a fun system. That's a hell of a lot less than I paid for either my phone or my Playstation3. I don't expect to be playing Uncharted on the thing at that price... I just expect to play something comparable to what I have on my phone. My kids play iPod games for hours on end, so this console will see use one way or the other.

Re:Worth the risk (0)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40615577)

With OnLive I bet you could play uncharted.

Why you would want to play a press button X now to make the movie continue game I am not sure.

Re:Worth the risk (1)

BillCable (1464383) | about 2 years ago | (#40615761)

If you think that's all the Uncharted series is, then you haven't played it. It has its rails, but they're needed for what is an unmatched gaming experience.

Re:Worth the risk (0)

citizenr (871508) | about 2 years ago | (#40615961)

If you think that's all the Uncharted series is, then you haven't played it. It has its rails, but they're needed for what is an unmatched gaming experience.

I totally agree, I mean sometimes you have to press X really fast for something to happen, thats RADICAL!

Rhythm games, for example (1)

tepples (727027) | about 2 years ago | (#40615769)

Why you would want to play a press button X now to make the movie continue game I am not sure.

Yet people play a press buttons X, Y, and Z in the displayed sequence to make the song continue game. Such games go by the titles Parappa, Dance Dance Revolution, Amplitude, and Rock Band.

Re:Rhythm games, for example (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40616289)

To me they all suck.

I like playing a game, not doing what the box says to do.

Big game companies may look away (1)

Ravaldy (2621787) | about 2 years ago | (#40615411)

Big game companies don't want consoles being easier to hack for easier game piracy. This may shy away some of the more serious game makers. On the other hand, MMO, RTS and other such games can finally find themselves in the console world.

Shocker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615413)

Yes, a brand new project with little to no details, no actual work done so far, no actual design just a theory ... is going to blow away the entrenched big game platforms which have all spent hundreds of millions of dollars into ACTUAL research rather than 'this dude I know said he'd totally buy a android game console'.

What just happened is that a whole bunch of people just gave some random guys on the Internet a cool million dollars which will be squandered away because they all just got scammed.

While Kickstarter is a nobel idea, its implementation is retarded and knowing multiple projects on there personally, I can safely say that in my anecdotal experience, they are ALL scams due to the more or less complete lack of anyone bothering to determine anything about the projects before hand. There is no validation at all done before hand. Unless the two line summary of the idea is clearly not possible, it'll get through. One project I'm thinking off has literally 10 different peer reviewed scientific papers stating flat out their theory is wrong and why it can not happen that way given the current laws of the universe. The project is to create life from lifelessness using a synthetic compound with special sauce that 'life loves to start on' ... the synthetic compound ... its just C60. Yes, buckyballs are the key to making life in the universe. If you believe that, I'll be happy to direct you to the project so they can steal your money too, I've personally got a fuckton of ocean front, commercially zoned realestate in Arizona currently valued at 3 billion dollars an acre, I'll sell it too you for $1 total, and throw in a bridge across san francisco bay, think of the money you could make on tolls!

--BitZtream

Re:Shocker (1)

Bohnanza (523456) | about 2 years ago | (#40615503)

Yes, a brand new project with little to no details, no actual work done so far, no actual design just a theory ...

While I agree that it could just be a scam, they actually claim to have a working prototype.

Re:Shocker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615979)

While Kickstarter is a nobel idea, its implementation is retarded and knowing multiple projects on there personally, I can safely say that in my anecdotal experience, they are ALL scams

Hrm. If all the Kickstarter projects you find are scams, I think that says something more about your ability to search than it does about Kickstarter projects.

Which isn't to say that none of the projects are scams, just that I've backed several and been rather pleased with what showed up on my doorstep or in my inbox.

But then I've mainly back books that were already written, videos that were already in production, and games that had demos or betas. Those that didn't came from people with several completed commercial projects of similar scope.

A vote against (3, Interesting)

argStyopa (232550) | about 2 years ago | (#40615437)

I think people like the convenience of consoles, mainly. Turn them on, and bang, you're playing in a moment. The locked-in hardware means that everything you run on it will be compatible, or updates will be auto-installed.

However, we've gotten sick of the console-makers' sense that somehow they OWN us as customers, and can reach further and further into our lives to control the console experience downstream.

If I mod my console, that's MY BUSINESS, not the hardware-sellers. I don't think anyone would object to the developers saying "ok then that voids your warranty" - that's fair. But when they push updates that then (pretty obviously deliberately) break modding, brick systems, and contrive to rope us back into their definition of what we should be doing with their systems, we resist and look for alternatives.

Which is why I hope this works, but its main impact will be in policy, not product. It's a vote against the proprietary walled-garden mentality of the big hardware makers. PERHAPS they'll see that a console player just wants to play the damned games, not become part of the dev's 'family'.

Re:A vote against (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 2 years ago | (#40615535)

However, we've gotten sick of the console-makers' sense that somehow they OWN us as customers, and can reach further and further into our lives to control the console experience downstream.

We have; most gamers and people in general have not. Note the immense popularity of consoles and console games, and other locked down vendor-controlled devices (cell phones, iPads, etc.).

Re:A vote against (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 2 years ago | (#40616103)

This is why in the last thread I suggested implementing alternative game marketplaces to PSN store and Xbox Live! Store.

What is really needed is something like "son of BNetD" for consoles, accessed by telling the console to connect through the service's special proxy portal. It tries to call the mothership, but gets the replacement service instead.

As far as I know, the container format and cryptographic mechanisms used on the 360 to sign packages has been known for awhile, and the ps3's loss of cryptographic integrity is legendary. Other than the inevitable lawsuits from MS and Sony, the only obstacle is in reverse engineering the protocols used.

If the service only advertises for already banned consoles due to their being modified, and doesn't overtly encourage piracy, just alternative game markets, I don't really see the problem with it, and would gladly fund a kickstarter project that was suitably located in a country with appropriately sensible copyright laws.

If the complaint is that the console makers are officiously controlling the experience, then make an alternative experience for use with the console.

Reinventing the wheel (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615439)

Hey guys, have you ever heard of this open platform where you can install whatever software you want, plug a controller into it, and even attach it to a television? It's called a laptop.

Oh, so much citation needed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615441)

There must be a good reason — after all the wisdom of crowds is never wrong.

[[citation needed]]

[[no, seriously, citation so very, very needed, more than any citation has ever been needed in the history of this running joke about Wikipedia's near-fetishistic demand for citations]]

All I ask... (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 2 years ago | (#40615473)

Is for C64 and Apple ][ emulators.

Re:All I ask... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40615611)

Both already exist on android.
I bet if that is all you want you could right now get a cheap android tablet, bluetooth keyboard and mouse. hook that up to your TV and away you go.

Sounds Interesting but.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615493)

A CyanogenMod port would allow you to do what you like to the OS and it wouldn't void your warranty.

Isn't this the last thing you want in a console? The whole point is to give developers a closed, controlled, static environment upon which to write their software. If you allow the masses to do whatever they want with the console it will make difficult to determine potential software sales too. How many of these consoles can still even run the games? How many are running FOO/OS 0.8?

Seems like they are just shooting themselves in the foot.

Suckers. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615497)

$2 million all for the price of a flashy presentation. Let me say this again, they just made $2 million in DONATIONS with 0 requirements to actually bring this device to market. Show of hands, how many people remember the Phantom console?

And people wonder where their money goes and why they are in so much debt...

I agree that the console market needs to have more open source contenders, but guess what, they HAVE contenders! There are plenty of open source / open hardware solutions that you can even build yourself! These solutions come with a variety of software options including Ubuntu and Android. Heck there are even a few portable handheld open consoles available. The difference is that these are actual devices for sale and not a list of shiny specs with no solid strategy for being profitable, especially at the $99 price point they mention.

One of these days I need to make a flashy shiny kickstarter presentation with a lot of loaded promises just so that I can cash out and retire early...

A Kickstarter Console for Kickstarter Games! (4, Interesting)

na1led (1030470) | about 2 years ago | (#40615597)

Sounds like a Win-Win situation to me. Once you have the hardware, people can Kickstart projects to make software and games for it.

Re:A Kickstarter Console for Kickstarter Games! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40616167)

I actually think that was part of the point. One of their stated inspirations is game developers who are fleeing the established industry and going indie, some of whom have Kickstarter projects for new games. I'd love to see them publish for this console (and Android, since it's the same OS) along with Windows/Mac/Linux and iOS.

Why did they need Kickstarter? (3, Insightful)

Cereal Box (4286) | about 2 years ago | (#40615631)

This is sort of a recurring theme in a lot of Kickstarter projects -- why did this particular project need to go to Kickstarter?

If you look at their pitch video, clearly no expense was spared getting the Ouya to its current point. Fancy office space, dozens of designers/developers, Macs for everyone, etc. Somebody has pumped serious cash into this venture. So why do they have to beg common people for a mere million bucks to get this thing off the ground? Were they just going to give up if they didn't get the money? Somehow I doubt that.

I've never seen anyone raise that particular question about this project. They obviously have some deep-pocketed investors, so why do they have to beg for money from a bunch of regular Joes who will certainly feel the financial impact if this thing never comes to fruition?

Re:Why did they need Kickstarter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615819)

It's a good strategy. If you went to investors for a couple of million dollars, they expect a return - they get a cut of the company, they get ongoing
profits once you launch, they might interfere with your plans etc. GO to kickstarter, and they are basically getting donations and/or pre-order purchases.
Gets you off the ground, you know the first round will sell because they are already sold. It also gets a *lot* of press, so free PR advertising. plus once
all the pre-order goodies are sent out those people have no further stake/interaction/control/or cut of your business.

Re:Why did they need Kickstarter? (1)

Cereal Box (4286) | about 2 years ago | (#40615867)

My point is, unless the pitch video is all BS, these guys already have secured millions from investors given that they have prototypes, dozens of employees, slick office space, etc.

Re:Why did they need Kickstarter? (1)

godrik (1287354) | about 2 years ago | (#40615919)

real life measure of your userbase? Not in term of "I promise I'll buy one!", but in term of "I already committed money to it!" ?

It seems a little late, though.

Re:Why did they need Kickstarter? (1)

Cereal Box (4286) | about 2 years ago | (#40616015)

It's way late for that. Obviously some investor has determined that the idea will attract enough users to make this thing a good investment. It's not like they're trying to attract VC, they've already got it (unless the video is all smoke and mirrors, of course).

And they're doing the same thing that so many other Kickstarter projects do, they're painting the fundraising as the only way this amazing, 99.9% complete project will ever see the light of day.

Re:Why did they need Kickstarter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40616067)

Kickstarting like this means you don't have to sell your soul to vulture capitalists to raise funds.

I just want to see what happens.. (1)

goruka (1721094) | about 2 years ago | (#40615677)

As a backer, I'm not really sure if i'm interested in purchasing a product like this. Yet I'm very eager to see what happens with it. Despite fragmentation, android as a platform is somewhat of a standard, and I'm sure that, after seeing this, other manufacturers will attempt to launch similar and compatible devices. So, at the end of the day, if just an interesting enough library of console-style games is created for Android, this could as well be a revolution.

MINUS 4, TROeLL) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615757)

start7ing turn paranoid conspiracy and exciting;

Not wisdom of the crowds (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40615759)

'Wisdom of the crowds' as a principle requires that everyone choose independently, not knowing what other people choose. This is wisdom of the mob. See:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wisdom_of_Crowds#Four_elements_required_to_form_a_wise_crowd

Software? (1)

stinkbomb (238228) | about 2 years ago | (#40615787)

From their FAQ:
"We have begun work on the user interface and software."
Begun? Wouldn't that come first? I mean, if you're going to run into legal issues, that's where it would be, right?

Lots of moolah (1)

kiriath (2670145) | about 2 years ago | (#40615827)

I like the concept, I see a couple of potential flaws though =\

My biggest thing is yeah I play the $.99 games on my phone or tablet when I'm away from any 'real' gaming devices (i.e. my desktop, or my laptop). I don't know that you could really draw me to dedicate a TV to playing angry birds... to me the $.99 games are secondary to whatever it is I am actually doing (watching tv, working, reading slashdot, taking a bathroom break =D ). If the quality of game we get is along those lines, it wouldn't be that enticing because I already have *that* device like 10 times over. Alternatively if there are some free to play games on like on steam (I'm looking at you Tribes) that are well made, and could be played to their fullest without paying a cent - it could be worth it. Certainly if steam jumped on board with this, it could be big for both sides.

Another issue that I have is the open-ness itself. If the device is that open, then you'll have people choosing their flavor of non-standard OS for the device, games being released not being compatible with the non-standard OS. Game developers not wanting to put any time and effort into testing on anything other than the base OS. Game developers stop making games for it altogether due to the amount of support issues from people using the device with a non-standard OS and it fades into the sunset. On the other hand, you could have a system that is so easy to make awesome games for that the big dogs might feel a bit of a hit. This could really be a game changer. You would end up seeing the other consoles (already intrenched, with internet based game delivery already possible) releasing games with the same structure and the entire game marketplace shifts from large up front purchases, to recurring purchases over an infinitely variable amount of time.

Time will tell, all in all I am glad they got the funding they needed and I'd probably buy one when it came out because lets face it, it just plain looks awesome.

stupid idea... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40616055)

...will not purchase that product, but I can't wait to see how spectacularly it fails. ;D

Will this burst the Kickstarter bubble? (1)

TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) | about 2 years ago | (#40616155)

One of these days someone is going to post a project that generates millions and then not offer a product to market, I have a feeling this might be one of them.

Sure, someone might be able to slap together an android powered prototype and ship it to project contributors to appease them that "something" was accomplished. Of course the box probably won't work well or as proposed.

But at what point does a kickstarter project be declared fraud? What are the ramifications of taking millions from contributors and not being able to deliver a product? What about not delivering a product for the price-point suggested, or not having the features expected, or any number of many many things that could change from the original proposal? What about delivering a product that nobody wants or doesn't generate revenue? People are buying into the idea of a $99 android game console, what happens when its shipped as a $299 under powerd crap-box, if its even delivered at al?

There are, or course, no ramifications which is why crowdfunding is probably one of the dumbest ways to waste money offered on the web (right up their with buying Carbon offsets). Straight from kickstarter.com "Kickstarter does not investigate a creator's ability to complete their project." There is just a bunch of wordage about "responsibility" and "open communication with backers", but I mean, come on, once your credit card has been charged forget about any active involvement or due diligence into expecting your money is being responsibly utilized. There is ZERO creator accountability on Kickstarter, just a lot of hopeful promises and finger crossing. Not saying all Kickstarter projects are scams, but I am sure there are more then a few in progress at the moment.

I do, however, applaud anyone that can find a way to separate stupid people from their money. This is capitalism in its purest form. I just think the bubble is going to burst when some high-profile project generates millions and does not deliver, which is going to happen eventually or is already in progress.

The Reality (1)

polyp2000 (444682) | about 2 years ago | (#40616213)

Once the once potentially great console starts to gather momentum , gathering the interests of investors, larger game studios and so forth. Once money is on the cards the ideals of a completely open and hackable console will slowly start to become less important.

Somebody has to make money from this and to stand a real chance of success it has to have the backing of major game studios. The console will need some killer apps , maybe even exclusive titles. Without it this will end up just a hackers dream. I imagine the first things that will get ported will be emulators such as Mame, WinUAE etc. In the end it will just be a glorified GP32x / Pandora that plugs into your TV with a few shitty ports of TuxRacer and a ton of casual games like Super Angry Tortoise Catapault Brothers!

Still I would love to be proven wrong and we have a very real competitor to the big boys!

N...

hypocrits! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40616309)

Slashdot apple fanboys dissing sony/microsoft and ouya's limited openness..... lol.

Mod me troll because I'm right and it looks bad on you. If you mod me down, it makes your apple "open" as soon as I am forgotten.

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