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Gloves Translate Sign Language Into Auditory Speech

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the babel-gloves dept.

Communications 78

Zothecula writes about some pretty cool sensor gloves. From the article: "Since beginning in 2003, the Microsoft Imagine Cup has tasked students the world over with developing technology aimed at solving real-world problems. In this, its 10th year, students were asked to build their project around a specific Millennium Development Goal ... The winners have just been announced ... [and winning] first place (and US$25,000) in the Software Design category was the Ukraine's quadSquad with their EnableTalk gloves that translate sign language into speech in real time."

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78 comments

And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40616729)

Another $20 an hour [bls.gov] job gone...

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (3, Informative)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#40616997)

Wrong translation direction, this going from signs to speech so a deaf person doesn't have to carry a txt2speech or a notepad and pen or learn to speak (yes deaf people can learn to speak, like one of my friends did, confuses the hell out of people who assume being able to speak means being able to hear)

Another thing is one of my kids former school teachers worked her way thru school in the opposite direction translating speech to signs. The general impression I got was it was much closer to the fry cook pay level than the $20 claimed above. You can get $20 if you have deep technical knowledge and translate tech docs from english to Chinese, or if you have a security clearance and know Arabic or other ME languages, but...

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (1)

FatAlb3rt (533682) | about 2 years ago | (#40617211)

My wife contracts around $30/hr - so it's a bit more than fry cook. I think that it varies widely from region to region though.

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40617305)

So what would the translation be if you used the gloves to masturbate?

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (4, Funny)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#40618041)

So what would the translation be if you used the gloves to masturbate?

a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40618965)

Real men say c c c c c c c c c

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (1)

dunnomattic (2590531) | about 2 years ago | (#40619409)

So what would the translation be if you used the gloves to masturbate?

a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a

In all honesty, it's closer to :
O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

ps - My wife is an interpreter for the deaf

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#40620893)

So what would the translation be if you used the gloves to masturbate?

a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a

In all honesty, it's closer to : O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

Well, that all depends on the size of the "ship," now doesn't it? Methinks thou art giving AC a wee bit too much credit in regards to the size of their dinghy.

ps - My wife is an interpreter for the deaf

That's pretty awesome man, no sarc. FWIW, one of my closest cousins is deaf, so I've learned quite a bit of sign language by proxy, although most of what he has taught me cannot be repeated in polite conversation...

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (1)

EkriirkE (1075937) | about 2 years ago | (#40621485)

To be fair, maybe he cups instead of encircles (I.. ahem.. know something about this...). If the thumb is parallel to the other fingers, it could be interpreted as "a a a a a ..."

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40618241)

If you are multilingual with a clearance, expect over the $50/hr mark and closer to 60+/hr. They are in dire need of languange specialists in Chinese or any Arab languange that you can probably negotiate higher than that.

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 2 years ago | (#40618559)

being able to speak means being able to hear

A lot of folks I've met can't or don't want to do the latter . . . especially politicians and managers . . .

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40619343)

This would be a useful device to interpret what other drivers are trying to tell me.

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (1)

optimism (2183618) | about 2 years ago | (#40619449)

Wrong translation direction, this going from signs to speech so a deaf person doesn't have to carry a txt2speech or a notepad and pen or learn to speak

If you read TFA, it was designed for people "with hearing and speech disabilities".

Learning to speak is a big hurdle for many deaf people, but it is an insurmountable hurdle for those who are mute, even if they can hear.

Anyway. If you're going to wear a computerized glove that can speak for you, it seems that a chorded keyboard would be a much better choice. Faster, more accurate, and more expressive than an ASL translator.

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40620947)

I hate to get all Ayn Rand on you, but replacing interpreters with cheaper machines is a loss for the interpreter, but a net gain for society as a whole.

Re:And thousands of interpreters stomachs sank (1)

Jappus (1177563) | about 2 years ago | (#40625305)

That is not not something Ayn Rand was the first to state. It's even older than basic capitalism. For example, the ancient Greek and Romans knew that while slave labour was bad for the slave, it was essential for their society, and thus a net-gain for it.

But as you can quite clearly see, whether a net-gain for society is morally good or wrong depends on what kind of society you are talking about.

And then of course, the windowmaker-fallacy is also not very far away. Just because you break a window and give a window-maker a new job, that doesn't mean that it's a net-gain.

As good and as valuable as more automation is (after all, for most people the times of 60h+ working weeks are long over), there are some corner-cases where its over-all effect can be and is damaging.

Old News... (5, Funny)

inthealpine (1337881) | about 2 years ago | (#40616753)

Until I see a gorilla using them to talk about a secret diamond mine, I'm unimpressed.

Re:Old News... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40617859)

Amy, good Gorilla. Amy pretty. Amy love you.

Re:Old News... (1)

AtomicBison (2667343) | about 2 years ago | (#40627221)

Amy, good Gorilla. Amy pretty. Amy love you.

This is immediately what I thought of when I read the headline as well!

Re:Old News... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40618487)

Seeing this article immediately made me think of the Essential Reality P5 Data Glove [simulus.org] sitting on my desk. Seems to me that sign-language reading gloves have been around since the early 1990's. Here are a few related links [unsw.edu.au] . I'm not sure what is new here that hasn't already been done.

Obvious...after you see it (1)

tomhath (637240) | about 2 years ago | (#40616825)

This is a cool idea. But it kind of only goes half way. Now they need a Thing that can translate spoken speech into glove movements. Oh, yea, baby!

Re:Obvious...after you see it (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#40617001)

Or just into words? Most people that understand sign language also understand written language.

Re:Obvious...after you see it (2)

Anubis IV (1279820) | about 2 years ago | (#40617039)

So, this device only actually allows the signer to sign letters that can be used to spell words, rather than translating full words and phrases.

If that's all they were going for, then I already have a tried and true set of devices that allows for the two-way communication you're talking about, and it's far cheaper, to boot.

Paper and pencil.

Re:Obvious...after you see it (1)

Riceballsan (816702) | about 2 years ago | (#40617159)

Well considering deaf people are the large majority of who needs this technology. A good portion of them are particularly good lip readers. Especially ones who are in the habit of being around non-deaf people. So them telling you what they want, is a tenfold larger challenge then them understanding your response.

From TFA: (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40616905)

"Although the software was developed under Windows Phone 7, the team was forced to turn to the older Windows Mobile platform for their entry because Windows Phone 7 doesn’t provide developers access to the Bluetooth stack, which is how the gloves communicate wirelessly with a mobile device running the translation software."

And that tells me all I need to know about WP7!

No, it translates fingerspelling into speech (5, Insightful)

wanderfowl (2534492) | about 2 years ago | (#40616929)

After watching the video, it seems that what they've done is create gloves which recognize the various fingerspelling signs. If somebody wants to sign "I need to withdraw money" (like, at a bank), what this allows them to do is to make the sign for "I", then "N, E, E, D", then "T,O", and so forth. Then the gloves feed that output into a TTS system. This works (because ASL users and English speakers share a writing system), but is horribly inefficient, and would be equivalent to a translation module that makes you speak every letter of the written words individually before putting the words into Spanish.

This is fundamentally different from "translating sign language", where the gloves would recognize the (much more complex and spatially oriented) sign for "I", for "need", for "withdraw" and for "money", and then translate that into "I need to withdraw money" and speak it aloud. Adding in the fact that ASL syntax is fundamentally different than in English, it's quite a tall order. Interpreters need not fear.

This is cool, nobody's denying that, and for some jobs, this might be great, but at the moment, I don't see it working much faster than taking out the requisite smartphone and writing down what you're trying to get across.

Re:No, it translates fingerspelling into speech (1)

FatAlb3rt (533682) | about 2 years ago | (#40617261)

I came here to say what you said. There's quite a ways to go on this Sign language is conceptual - they sign the concepts, not the literal words. To complete it, they need to add a display that will do speech to text for the other person. At that point, the interpreters might start to worry.

Finger Spelling is NOT Sign Language (4, Informative)

cwgmpls (853876) | about 2 years ago | (#40617291)

Mod parent up! Finger Spelling is *not* Sign Language. If all this does is translate finger spelling into synthesized speech, the same thing could be done much faster and cheaper by just typing the words on a standard smartphone device.

This is not even cool. It is just, plain, wrong in so many ways. All of the money and hype spent making and marketing this device would reap 10X as much benefit if the same money were spent educating people about the real nature of deafness and sign language. The developers of this waste of time could start by taking a class about deafness themselves.

The fact that Slashdot perpetuates the inaccurate headline equating finger spelling with sign language just demonstrates how ignorant we all are.

Re:Finger Spelling is NOT Sign Language (1)

IcyWolfy (514669) | about 2 years ago | (#40617593)

And the next question is... which finger spelling language are they translating? American? Irish? British? Australian? International (a mish-mash of English finger-spelling systems) ... every language uses a different set.

Re:Finger Spelling is NOT Sign Language (2)

cwgmpls (853876) | about 2 years ago | (#40617693)

They are not translating anything. They are transcribing within the same language. In the demo clip I saw, they are transcribing from English fingerspelling to English speech. There is no translation involved. You are right, even within a language, there can be regional variations. American fingerspelling differs from British. But they are transcribing, not translating.

Re:Finger Spelling is NOT Sign Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40621027)

While finger spelling is not sign language, I imagine the underlying issues of interpreting gestures are related, and solving the "finger spelling" problem is a necessary first step to solving the "sign language" problem - not that one problem is a subset of the other, but one problem is similar and much easier.

As to "educating people about the real nature of deafness and sign language", I think people are sick of being "educated", if you never meet a deaf person you don't really need to know about all this stuff. And I'm sure the developers were well aware of this distinction (and we all know journalists and slashdot summary writers are well beyond education).

Re:Finger Spelling is NOT Sign Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40621131)

WOW so negative, and yet they still won first prize and 25k... how did your entry do again?

Oh, I see...
 

Re:Finger Spelling is NOT Sign Language (1)

cwgmpls (853876) | about 2 years ago | (#40627543)

I'm sure they aren't the first people to exploit pity for others to make money, out of total ignorance.

Re:Finger Spelling is NOT Sign Language (1)

Jyms (598745) | about 2 years ago | (#40649211)

I am with you. We (http://www.coe.uwc.ac.za/index.php/SASL.html) have been working on this for a while. We are totally ignoring finger spelling for sign recognition and rendering.

Re:No, it translates fingerspelling into speech (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40617399)

After watching the video, it seems that what they've done is create gloves which recognize the various fingerspelling signs. If somebody wants to sign "I need to withdraw money" (like, at a bank), what this allows them to do is to make the sign for "I", then "N, E, E, D", then "T,O", and so forth. Then the gloves feed that output into a TTS system. This works (because ASL users and English speakers share a writing system), but is horribly inefficient, and would be equivalent to a translation module that makes you speak every letter of the written words individually before putting the words into Spanish.

This is fundamentally different from "translating sign language", where the gloves would recognize the (much more complex and spatially oriented) sign for "I", for "need", for "withdraw" and for "money", and then translate that into "I need to withdraw money" and speak it aloud. Adding in the fact that ASL syntax is fundamentally different than in English, it's quite a tall order. Interpreters need not fear.

This is cool, nobody's denying that, and for some jobs, this might be great, but at the moment, I don't see it working much faster than taking out the requisite smartphone and writing down what you're trying to get across.

I work with a deaf person, and believe me, they can sign incredibly fast. I reckon that he could say something simple "do you want to get lunch" fast enough with finger spelling that it'd sound completely normal speed to me. Sure, adding memory for all the words for various languages would be neat (very hard though), but for now, it's quite useful. Keep in mind that they don't always carry paper/phones with them, so sometimes the only option is to sign.

Re:No, it translates fingerspelling into speech (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40617455)

Finger spelling is not how ASL normally works though.

Think of even simple phrases like "thank you" no finger spelling involved.

If they have to carry this device to finger spell they might as well use the phone it is connected to type out the message. If they are not carrying anything than this device would do them no good.

Re:No, it translates fingerspelling into speech (1)

cwgmpls (853876) | about 2 years ago | (#40617723)

Ask your coworker. They are signing, not finger spelling. Big, big difference. Using the money from this project to teach people about the difference would be much more beneficial to everyone.

Re:No, it translates fingerspelling into speech (1)

excelsior_gr (969383) | about 2 years ago | (#40617767)

You are right in every aspect, but you also have to factor in that this is was merely a student project. It serves extraordinary well as proof of concept. Now someone (perhaps MS?) needs to focus on it and improve it by making it able to translate the actual sign language gestures. If fingerspelling is possible, the jump to sign language should be not that hard.

Re:No, it translates fingerspelling into speech (1)

catmistake (814204) | about 2 years ago | (#40618307)

where the gloves would recognize the (much more complex and spatially oriented) sign for "I"

Actually, the sign for "I" and the sign for the letter "i" are pretty much identical... but your excessively intensified and outrageously exaggerated point is well taken.

Bravo (0)

phazemstr (1405173) | about 2 years ago | (#40616989)

This actually does solve a real world problem and I commend them for accomplishing as much as they did. Often people who communicate via sign language are able to understand what other people are saying but they are at a complete loss in having others understand them. This bridges that specific gap in a way that is convenient for both sides.

Re:Bravo (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40617165)

Only if they spell out each word, which is not generally what ASL users do. Even many phrases, my limited knowledge of includes "Thank You" which is one motion, not spelling out the words.

Re:Bravo (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 2 years ago | (#40617973)

This actually does solve a real world problem

Use case?

Re:Bravo (1)

crashumbc (1221174) | about 2 years ago | (#40618421)

It very much DOES, just not in the most efficient way.

while this may have limited to no REAL value at the moment, there were a LOT of saying the EXACT same thing about the internet in 92-94.

You naysayers might want to think about that.

Re:Bravo (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 2 years ago | (#40618695)

I just want to know the use case. What if it were perfect and could precisely translate sign language into spoken or printed English - what advantage would it hold over a keyboard or smartphone or even a pen and paper? Plus, many (most?) deaf people can speak.

Re:Bravo (1)

crashumbc (1221174) | about 2 years ago | (#40621171)

Maybe your mute? you can't speak. sign language (real sign language) is much faster then typing or writing from what I understand. Wear the gloves leave your phone in your pocket, wear a small speaker around your neck. You look fairly normal standing at the bank instead of like a freak waving a clip board.

keep in mind to do sign language, you don't need to be able to see your hands like with typing. you don't have to fish a device out your pocket every time you want to talk...

It would be perfect for any situation where speaking isn't possible. and maybe even typing

  Loud machine rooms? built in speakers in the sound protection gear.
scuba diving?
someone on a respirator?

I'm not saying it would be a airplane or internet, level game changer but I could seriously see folks coming up with some nifty uses for this.

Actually more I sit thinking about it more game changing I think this COULD be... ( if perfected of course)

Re:Bravo (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 2 years ago | (#40623461)

You are right I suppose - if they could get it to do more than just simple letter signs (which are slower than typing). And if they could get it to translate sign to English. And if you could still use your hands while wearing the gloves.

But I gotta tellya, when stuff like this is happening [msn.com] , the uses for something that depends on exaggerated hand motions seems to diminish :)

Re:Bravo (1)

zippthorne (748122) | about 2 years ago | (#40623833)

Maybe your mute? you can't speak. sign language (real sign language) is much faster then typing or writing from what I understand.

If true, this is the really interesting part. If signs could be interpreted like typing, but faster, the gloves would replace keyboards in a way that voice-to-text can never do, even if done perfectly.

Why not just use a cellphone? (1)

scorp1us (235526) | about 2 years ago | (#40617003)

With a text to speech app?

Re:Why not just use a cellphone? (1)

Kergan (780543) | about 2 years ago | (#40617199)

With a text to speech app?

Presumably because it's faster to sign than it is to type, in much the same way as it's faster to speak than it is to type.

Re:Why not just use a cellphone? (2)

cwgmpls (853876) | about 2 years ago | (#40617337)

Presumably, but its not. These gloves transcribe finger spelling. Finger spelling is not a separate language, it does not require translation, and no deaf people use it as their primary form of communication. Any deaf person who knows how to type can easily type faster than they can finger spell.

Re:Why not just use a cellphone? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#40618223)

With a text to speech app?

Presumably because it's faster to sign than it is to type, in much the same way as it's faster to speak than it is to type.

Indeed, it is.

Unfortunately, the glove does not translate sign language, but rather transcribes finger spelling.

In this case, the text-to-speech app would be superior.

Not going to work (4, Informative)

Cyberax (705495) | about 2 years ago | (#40617073)

The gloves translate dactylology (finger spelling). That's fairly easy, but it's horribly inefficient.

'Real' sign languages (like ASL) are much harder to translate because they are somewhat non-linear. A single gesture can describe several things at once: size, direction, emotional state, etc. There's no way you can translate it without fully understanding the context of the speech. And we all know how good computers are at such tasks...

Re:Not going to work (5, Interesting)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40617149)

Also ASL does not have articles, so it does not translate directly to english. It is really a visual spatial language, people always seem to miss that.

"Auditory Speech" (0)

CaptainOfSpray (1229754) | about 2 years ago | (#40617129)

Wow! That's new! Speech never used to be "auditory" before. That's a real breakthrough. Maybe these guys can tackle the old problems of Visual Sight, or Sensory Touch, or even ... Olfactory Smelling.

Re:"Auditory Speech" (1)

ryzvonusef (1151717) | about 2 years ago | (#40626079)

Olfactory Smelling.

I am anosmic, you insensitive clod!

(btw, I really am anosmic, a smelling device would be awesome :p)

Didn't I see this in Congo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40617147)

It's been 17 years already!

Re:Didn't I see this in Congo? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40617377)

^ This is exactly the kind of post /. will be filled with the day transporters or flying cars are actually built.

Done over 25 years ago. (1)

Animats (122034) | about 2 years ago | (#40617289)

A grad student at Stanford at the Center for Design Research did this in the mid-1980s. It had to be connected to a workstation back then, of course.

When you make that Star Trek hand symbol, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40617299)

the gloves say "Please fondle my buttocks".

Car analogy - well sort of (1)

Mattygfunk1 (596840) | about 2 years ago | (#40617415)

Close palm, raise middle finger. Universal language at it's best.

Re:Car analogy - well sort of (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40618073)

Matty, you should have used "its" in your sentence, because "it's" always means "it is".

If the alphabet is all there is to English... (1)

rk (6314) | about 2 years ago | (#40617469)

Then I guess it translates sign language. Finger-spelling is just an alphabet. I don't know about other sign languages, but ASL is a full language with its own grammar and conventions, and it would take a lot more than a glove to interpret it. Positions of hands with respect to the body are important, as are facial expressions, and ASL's pronoun system is largely spatial with the handshape only indicating the type of pronoun (e.g. personal vs. possessive). Even if a piece of technology could reliably capture and interpret all that information, you're still back at the problem of natural language translation into the destination language.

Still, a cool hack.

In true Microsoft style... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40617533)

They reward something basically worthless. All this glove can do is translate letter-by-letter "finger spelling" which is NOT ASL... it's finger spelling. I know virtually NO sign language, and I can basically read finger spelling. So... Microsoft gives someone 25,000 dollars for making a device that does what any decent American education can, in about a day. Yeah, I'm saying the common, empty-headed Twitter-reading, Facebook-using American idiot child can memorize 26 symbols made with fingers in a day. Most already know several, demonstrating their abilities to learn them... signs such as "the Bird", (meaning more than just one letter, it indicates general displeasure with someone or a group, and the hopes that they will soon be forcibly penetrated, or have an otherwise similarly bad day,) and "the Shocker," (expressing a general approval of the idea of manually stimulating the vagina and anus simultaneously...), "the Love" sign, (thumb, index and little fingers extended, middle and ring fingers curled down toward the palm, indicating affection for someone or something, or just approval of the idea of love itself,) "the peace" sign, similar to "the Shocker" except little finger curled down, and index and middle fingers spread... this is also commonly the victory sign, and is similar to a sign that indicates the same meaning as "the bird" in other cultures, mostly in Europe, although the other side of the hand is show.

If you want to impress me, make a pair of gloves, or some sensors worn on a hand, that can translate REAL ASL, not just 26 letters... or better yet, stop addressing, as is so common in the world today, the minor problems, and get on to the major ones, like figuring out how to enable people who might have to use ASL to hear and speak like everyone else on the planet. I am sick and tired of hearing about people throwing up their hands in defeat, in a sense, and trying to make the lives of disabled people better, by building a better wheel-chair, for example. Screw the better wheel-chair, focus on figuring out a way to let them WALK again!!! You want to help people, stop making ways to make minor, incremental improvements in their lives, and ACTUALLY HELP THEM. We have a society in which stem-cell research is controversial, but yet every new building that goes up has to be wheel-chair accessible. I heard on NPR that public swimming pools around the country are at risk of closing because some disabled people can't get in them because they don't have some ridiculous contraption allowing them to get into the pool if they can't walk or whatever. Instead of forcing people to spend millions or billions of dollars to accommodate a few people who mostly won't use those accommodations anyway, just so they can pretend they're not disabled, while at the same time making something people will probably misuse, or abuse, (kids will play with these things...) why not spend that money on helping them walk again?

This society's priorities are completely ass-backwards. There was an article in The Onion joking about the President signing the "Americans with No Abilities Act"... I sometimes wonder how far off from that moment we really are.

Offended (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40617737)

Having watched their video presentation on YouTube, this is downright offensive.

You know they don't work closely with hearing-impaired people, because the video is not Close-Captioned (oops: this presentation is not for the intended users); they also misrepresent the scope of the prototype: to recognize signs for individual letters is one thing, to translate from a sign language with its own grammar rules and idiosyncrasies is another.

The punch-line is that they say they use a Microsoft text-to-speech framework, as if that was somehow an enabling factor for their technology. Of course, it's mighty good that Windows text-to-speech is usable for their purposes, and they didn't have to turn to one of the half-a-dozen third-party frameworks.

Re:Offended (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40617897)

I can't wait for them to have one that uses Kinect!

Re:Offended (1)

zztzed (279) | about 2 years ago | (#40618897)

While I suspect that was a joke, in theory Kinect would actually be a better platform upon which to build an ASL-to-English translator, if not for the fact that the skeletal data it provides does not include fingers.

Re:Offended (1)

optimism (2183618) | about 2 years ago | (#40619675)

And the fact that you'd need to wear some kind of exoskeleton that mounts the sensor far forward of your body, so it can see what your hands and arms and face are doing.

Mobility is the point here. If you can sit at a computer, you can just type instead.

Of course you can just type on a smartphone too, without wearing a freaky bulky obtrusive glove. But others have already mentioned that.

Big Deal it's been done before (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40617755)

Big Deal this was done already. http://www.wired.com/gadgets/miscellaneous/news/2002/01/49716 [wired.com] the kid did texting but that could just of easily been speaking. I call prior art on this one! And this kid also got a 103,000$ scholarship out of the idea! (from 2002)

Now lets just make the price affordable. Hey were is the Kickstarter on this!

if you accidentally scratch your ass, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40618543)

Sucks for someone still learnign sign language.

"Tom, regarding your point about source control
(you accidentally scratch your ass midsentence)
you're an ass --
(you try to cover up this interpretation by coughing into your fist)
you cocksucker! cocksucker! cocksucker!
(you turn beet red, cover your eyes in embarrassment)
I can't even look at you.
(try to salvage the situation)
Tom, I am so, so sorry! Sorry! This was a communications problem. I mean to say, your idea is very, very good, so
(give thumbs up sign)
up yours!

Keyboard Replacement? (1)

Telos06 (1608981) | about 2 years ago | (#40619667)

What kind of WPM can be achieved with dactylology? Could this evolve into a replacement for keyboards?
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