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ISP 'Six Strikes' Plan Delayed

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the do-you-even-know-how-baseball-works dept.

Piracy 157

MrSeb sends this excerpt from DailyDot: "Shortly, a new system in the U.S. will allow your ISP to give you gradually sterner warnings and possible punishment if you download copyrighted material. The Copyright Alerts System (CAS) — more commonly known as the 'six strikes' policy, after the number of warnings users receive — is coming. Soon. Any minute now. Really. But it's not here yet, even though several news outlets — including CNN — said the system would go online yesterday, Thursday. Speaking to the Daily Dot, a press contact for the six strikes system says: 'We do not intend to launch until we are confident that the program is consumer friendly. We expect our implementation to begin later this year, with each of the ISPs launching at potentially overlapping but different times.' ... The six strikes system is officially helmed by an industry coalition called the Center for Copyright Information (CCI), which was created by the MPAA and RIAA. It counts the U.S.'s five top ISPs under its umbrella: AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon."

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No COX? (1)

Moheeheeko (1682914) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640873)

Sweet.

Re:No COX? (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641043)

Cox doesn't fuck around. I have their 50 Mbps package for $100 a month. I don't have cable. I don't get OTA broadcasts, because I've not bought an antenna. I do download about 2 TB of data a month between Netflix, Pandora, and others. I've never had a word said to me about it. They even give me additional bandwidth for the first few megabytes of a transfer when network congestion allows. They call this Superboost, I think. Works well when downloading a bunch of very small files that will be decoded and combined into a bunch of bigger files. They don't seem to care that their are effectively Superboosting the entire multi-gigabyte download.

Re:No COX? (4, Informative)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641201)

Officially, your account is capped at 300 GB/mo. I have the 25 Mbps Cox package and they 'cap' me at 250 GB, although i make sure i never hit that high. They now show your usage on their website if you care to look. Internet Usage i think its called. Somehow i doubt you are pulling 2 TB/mo without hearing anything from Cox.

Re:No COX? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641503)

2 TB a month is pulling nearly 1 MBps (~800 kBps), every second of the month, every month. I don't think even netflix would cause that much. Pandora is probably just noise in that kind of bandwidth measurement. Must hit the torrents really hard

Re:No COX? (3, Informative)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641071)

Cox has had a 3 strikes policy regarding DCMA notices since 2008. Enforcement has been spotty, but they treat it as a TOC violation.

Wanna try it out and see if they still enforce it?

Re:No COX? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641155)

Doesnt seem like they do to me, then again, I dont use pirate bay.

oh boy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40640877)

yup

Reminds me of a riddle (0)

TankSpanker04 (1266400) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640889)

from the do-you-even-know-how-baseball-works dept

Q: How many outs are in an inning?
A: 6

so maybe they do know baseball...

Re:Reminds me of a riddle (0)

TankSpanker04 (1266400) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640905)

nevermind, was comparing outs and strikes

(mod parent up +1 troll)

Re:Reminds me of a riddle (1)

sycodon (149926) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641035)

Six Strikes

There comes a time when baseball analogies cease to make sense.

Re:Reminds me of a riddle (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641117)

Well, if you're on the Boston Red Sox, you get 5 strikes [beyondtheboxscore.com] . That's close.

Re:Reminds me of a riddle (1)

Lucky75 (1265142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641871)

What if I have two strikes and then just keep fouling the ball? Does that mean you can just keep downloading pirated material?

Make up your damn mind! (5, Insightful)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640903)

the 'six strikes' policy, after the number of warnings users receive â" is coming.

We do not intend to launch until we are confident that the program is consumer friendly.

Either you're going to eventually launch it, or not. It will never be 'consumer friendly' since it's a blatantly anti-consumer move intended to whore out to an unrepentantly anti-consumer organization.

Re:Make up your damn mind! (5, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640935)

"Consumer friendly" in this case means, "Making sure people remain friendly." The last thing anyone wants is for consumers to realize they are being exploited.

Re:Make up your damn mind! (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641151)

Either you're going to eventually launch it, or not. It will never be 'consumer friendly' since it's a blatantly anti-consumer move intended to whore out to an unrepentantly anti-consumer organization.

Just wait until they've done this to about two dozen decent programmers... they'll invent some new crypto protocol that makes bittorrent look like the redheaded stepchild of piracy... "You can't stop the signal, Mel." -- Mr. Universe

Re:Make up your damn mind! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641445)

Mel?

Re:Make up your damn mind! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641603)

Serenity reference. Except the part where his name is "Mal" for Malcolm.

Re:Make up your damn mind! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641523)

That's "Mal".

Re:Make up your damn mind! (4, Informative)

Zmobie (2478450) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641719)

Either you're going to eventually launch it, or not. It will never be 'consumer friendly' since it's a blatantly anti-consumer move intended to whore out to an unrepentantly anti-consumer organization.

Just wait until they've done this to about two dozen decent programmers... they'll invent some new crypto protocol that makes bittorrent look like the redheaded stepchild of piracy... "You can't stop the signal, Mel." -- Mr. Universe

Already been done. It is called BTGuard and you can get it plugged into most torrent trackers for a small monthly fee. Lifehacker ran an article about it not long ago.

http://lifehacker.com/5863380/how-to-completely-anonymize-your-bittorrent-traffic-with-btguard [lifehacker.com]

http://btguard.com/ [btguard.com]

Also, as outlined in the lifehacker article there are other solutions to mask the traffic from an ISP and there is no way in hell they can block some of them because they have much broader uses than just hiding your torrent tracking traffic. VPNs are way too widely used by so many businesses for telecommutes and other such, so it will ALWAYS be an option. And since (at least I think) it would be illegal wiretapping for them to capture your packets and decrypt them, there is not a damn thing they can do about it.

Re:Make up your damn mind! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641405)

Replace "consumer" with "buyer" and it is a real argument. Non-paying consumers are not their target audience. If you insist on violating copyright laws and downloading things you have not purchased, you are definately consuming, but not the kind of consumer they want.
Their goal is to make it so that people not trying to violate copyright law are not bothered by their system are remain subscribers. Those are the only consumers they are concerned about. To that end, they have to do in-house testing to get the false positive rate low enough to avoid ticking off the subscribers they want, while keeping the true positive rate high enough to catch at least a few token copyright infringers every year.

So yes, we can argue day in and day out about what a horrible mess the current copyright laws are, and we can find enough evidence to justify the execution of hundreds of lawyers alongside the C*Os of many companies. Regardless of that, this is an attempt by a company (that made the mistake of being recognized as a possible filter of data) to limit the amount of copyright violations sent throught their tubes.

Re:Make up your damn mind! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641855)

They could all be false positives, just because i download something, doesn't mean i don't own it, if i buy a copy of windows and lose the disk, and just download an iso and use the same key that i legally purchased, what have i stolen? What if i buy a game at a store, never open the box and download it just to avoid the shitty drm and register the game using my perfectly legal key i purchased, my isp has no way of knowing any of this.

Re:Make up your damn mind! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40642389)

Have you ever heard of "collateral damage"? This Six Strikes nonsense doesn't require any courts to be involved (which means there will be no standard of evidence) and therefore will certainly affect innocents.

Re:Make up your damn mind! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641765)

I translate "consumer friendly" to mean "it doesn't accuse innocent people, which would piss everyone off".

Most people don't mind if real "pirates" are caught, so long as they themselves aren't bothered.

Too Late (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40640907)

Already switched to a local ISP -- the moment people realize some have it and others don't they will flock to non implementing parties. It's only those without a choice getting screwed.

Re:Too Late (4, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641013)

Already switched to a local ISP

That's great if you're one of the rare few who have that option for broadband. I have exactly two options for broadband in my community: a big telco and a big cableco (both of whom will certainly be participating in any MPAA/RIAA scheme). If you count 3G as broadband, you could add a couple of more options to that--but with such small bandwidth caps on those, no one is going to be using them for much pirating anyway.

Re:Too Late (3, Interesting)

lightknight (213164) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641077)

Which reminds me. Has anyone else noticed the price for fiber optic cables (outdoor) are extremely low these days? They can carry a signal for a mile without a repeater.

Over the hill, and through the woods...

Re:Too Late (1)

ProfessionalCookie (673314) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641981)

Where do you see low prices on Fiber? Does it get down to the price of Cat5e?

Re:Too Late (3, Insightful)

0racle (667029) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641247)

You are giving the general population far too much credit. They won't care.

CCI (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40640913)

It's good to know that this will be handled by an impartial organization...

Re:CCI (1)

lightknight (213164) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641095)

Made up of people whose objectivity can be measured by the number of fraudulent lawsuits they've filed, then quickly withdrawn.

DoJ, get off your fat ass, and spank these guys!

Re:CCI (1)

tnk1 (899206) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641153)

Made up of people whose objectivity can be measured by the number of fraudulent lawsuits they've filed, then quickly withdrawn.

DoJ, get off your fat ass, and spank these guys!

It's the man who does the spanking in this relationship, not the bitch.

Re:CCI (1)

ganjadude (952775) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641309)

you still have faith in this DOJ???

I do not think that word means what you think... (4, Informative)

Taibhsear (1286214) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640921)

We do not intend to launch until we are confident that the program is consumer friendly.

It is, inherently, not consumer friendly.

Re:I do not think that word means what you think.. (0)

lightknight (213164) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641109)

Exactly.

Well, you know what I think? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40640923)

Comment has been edited to fit with Comcast's Anonymous-Posting Policy found in our ToS.

Thank you for using Comcast, anonymous poster!

several news outlets — including CNN (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40640933)

Did you really refere to CNN as a news outlet?

It's the media arm of the DNC you fools.

News! Bwahahahhahhhahahahhahahaa.

Re:several news outlets — including CNN (1)

ganjadude (952775) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641325)

no, that would be MSNBC, fox = right msnbc = left, cnn tries to be impartial compared to the other 2

Re:several news outlets — including CNN (1)

Isaac Remuant (1891806) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641789)

Doesn't really matter when they manufacture information and misdirect almost as much as the other two. IMHO, You'll easily notice it if you don't live in USA.

Re:several news outlets — including CNN (1)

Lucky75 (1265142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641979)

CNN is just incompetent, not partisan.

Hollywood accounting is stealing (4, Insightful)

Dan667 (564390) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640937)

It is a much much bigger problem and steals directly from Artists and Musicians as well as US Taxpayers. When does it get some attention?

Re:Hollywood accounting is stealing (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641255)

when the people that realize that start paying for congress and the senate's re-election.

When you actually buy the MPAA/RIAA's crap you are paying for them to lobby the other way, which a majority of people do...

Re:Hollywood accounting is stealing (2)

royallthefourth (1564389) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641269)

When the people who work in Hollywood stand up and demand that they stop getting screwed over. If they won't first stand up for themselves, there's no way for anyone else to stand alongside them.

Walk (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40640943)

Everytime the mpaa or riaa issue 8 wrong dmca, the issued service (youtube, facebook, megavideo, ...) get a free pass for life. If the sue someone wrongly (hbp) he gets free pass for life too.

Just as long as they don't monitor (3, Interesting)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640947)

usenet. Keep ports 119 and 563 out of their meddling hands and I'll remain a happy camper.

Re:Just as long as they don't monitor (1)

LanMan04 (790429) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641261)

Get a provider that supports SSL. Then you can claim you downloaded 350GB of Linux distros last month!

Re:Just as long as they don't monitor (2, Funny)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641311)

Get a provider that supports SSL. Then you can claim you downloaded 350GB of Linux distros last month!

What, you mean you didn't?

Luddite.

Re:Just as long as they don't monitor (1)

Dins (2538550) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641363)

I'm with ya. But there have been a recent rash of DMCA takedowns, so somebody somewhere has finally caught on...

To who? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641877)

DMCA takedowns of who/what?

Re:Just as long as they don't monitor (1)

Jerry Rivers (881171) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641947)

I'm with ya. But there have been a recent rash of DMCA takedowns, so somebody somewhere has finally caught on...

How do you "take down" something that has been propagated to servers all over the world?

Re:Just as long as they don't monitor (1)

Dins (2538550) | more than 2 years ago | (#40642081)

They send takedown notices to the major usenet providers which then remove the posts from their servers. Yes the posts propagate, but if you want any sort of article retention time and completeness you subscribe to one of a handful of major providers. If those major providers nuke the posts from their servers, you're generally SOL. ...or so I have read...

Re:Just as long as they don't monitor (1)

jchawk (127686) | more than 2 years ago | (#40642391)

Dude!

The first rule of usenet is you do not talk about usenet!

Anyone else (1)

whythefucknot (2668899) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640959)

spend the first sentence wondering why on earth they called this thing "Shortly"?

Re:Anyone else (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641015)

I have a friend named Lee, who is only 5'3" tall. We call him Short Lee, as opposed to another Lee in our social group who we call Normal Lee. Normal Lee is 5'8" tall. We don't have a Tall Lee.

Re:Anyone else (1)

cvtan (752695) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641795)

That's Shirley.

Violates the Data Treaties with Canada and the EU (5, Interesting)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640975)

Too bad this violates the Data Treaties that the US signed with both the EU and Canada over Data Privacy and Copyright.

Canadian citizens have a stronger right to use material, as was ruled yesterday, and since the US Senate affirmed both International Treaties, it is bound to respect their rights, as treaties override any national laws or actions, as our US Constitution specifies.

But, hey, nice fake out, greed heads.

Re:Violates the Data Treaties with Canada and the (1)

American Patent Guy (653432) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641097)

Maybe so, but do you think Joe user is going to sue the big boys for cutting off his service? And if Joe wins, what do you think the damages will be? Restoration of service and some lawyer's fees? And what IP lawyer do you think will take on such a case?

Re:Violates the Data Treaties with Canada and the (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641481)

Maybe so, but do you think Joe user is going to sue the big boys for cutting off his service? And if Joe wins, what do you think the damages will be? Restoration of service and some lawyer's fees? And what IP lawyer do you think will take on such a case?

A Canadian or EU one working pro bono, is my guess. Most likely a class action case.

Re:Violates the Data Treaties with Canada and the (4, Interesting)

oxdas (2447598) | more than 2 years ago | (#40642007)

A woman sued Universal for issuing a DMCA takedown request to Youtube for a video of her baby dancing to Prince (see, Lenz v Universal). The EFF took on the case and she has won nearly every argument so far (The case started in 2007 and has a summary judgment hearing scheduled for October 2012). So, yes, I think someone will sue. The bigger question is could it be turned into a class action suit. If they win a test case, then lawyers will be salivating at the deep pockets involved.

Re:Violates the Data Treaties with Canada and the (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641165)

Like so many other things, it's real until it gets to court and a judge rules it's illegal/unenforceable. Nobody gets thrown in jail for this kind of extortion, but some poor suckers have to go through hell to get it fixed.

Re:Violates the Data Treaties with Canada and the (1)

greggem (1044620) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641581)

Too bad this violates the Data Treaties that the US signed with both the EU and Canada over Data Privacy and Copyright.

This is interesting. Does anyone know the names of these treaties?

Re:Violates the Data Treaties with Canada and the (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641647)

Too bad this violates the Data Treaties that the US signed with both the EU and Canada over Data Privacy and Copyright.

This is interesting. Does anyone know the names of these treaties?

I'll give you a hint. They have the word Data in them.

Re:Violates the Data Treaties with Canada and the (1)

greggem (1044620) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641931)

Too bad this violates the Data Treaties that the US signed with both the EU and Canada over Data Privacy and Copyright.

This is interesting. Does anyone know the names of these treaties?

I'll give you a hint. They have the word Data in them.

Yeah, data is kind of a common word on the Internet. :-) Do you know what year they were ratified or when the enabling legislation might have been passed? I'm just curious to read them.

What bothers me (2)

TaggartAleslayer (840739) | more than 2 years ago | (#40640981)

What bothers me about measures like this is how broad and intimidating they can be to the average user.

I see measures like this as nothing more than an intimidation tactic to force users into corporate marketplaces for everything. "I'm not sure if this download is going to get me a strike, so I better go pay for it on Amazon/iTunes/Google." This line of thinking is just going to cost the industry more in the long run. You don't piss off the masses with overbearing rules. The "let them eat cake" mentality is ultimately very self destructive.

Blah (1)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641017)

I hate having to explain to my friends and family why they should install and use TOR for all their internet activities. Shit, most of them have no idea about IP law at all and assume that if they can find it on the Internet it must be OK to download it.

Re:Blah (1)

lightknight (213164) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641129)

And, just out of curiosity, how many of them have ever considered voting third-party?

Re:Blah (1)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641179)

IP law is really quite strait forward - an IP looks like 123.45.67.8 and does not identify any particular person. Think of it as the phone number corresponding to a domain name. DNS is the phone book. Several addresses may share a phone number, or several phone numbers may all terminate at the same address. People can share phones or addresses, or have more than one of both.

Your friends and family should be capable of grasping that.

Whoosh is available as a no-cost option.

Respect for Privacy: The new ISP differentiator (3, Informative)

jcadam (964044) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641025)

Oh cool, I was beginning to view internet access as a commodity, with no real difference between ISPs... Now I have something to use as a discriminator when selecting a new provider.

So.... AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon just managed to remove themselves from ever being considered by me again (and no, I don't ever knowingly download copyrighted material without paying for it).

Something tells me the mom&pop ISP down the road doesn't have the time/staff/inclination to bother with this kind of crap.

--
P.S.: Internet business idea #3,633,235: Privacy-focused ISP.

Re:Respect for Privacy: The new ISP differentiator (1)

lightknight (213164) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641167)

And I was thinking that the triumvirate of money, stupidity, and law had decided to give it a miss after the ACTA / PIPA / SOPA debacle.

Still, it's nice to know that I have choices. Not ISPs, they seem eager to place themselves into the cross-hairs of 'not a common carrier' (good luck with that), but choices of which countries I live in. I swear, it's like that scene in the Simpsons where Principal Skinner is explaining to Lisa why they've been having so much 'magazine time.'

VPN (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641053)

Just pay for VPN service so not even your ISP knows what your transferring

Re:VPN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40642443)

And hope the VPN isn't a honeypot.

Almost all content downloaded has copyrights (1)

Vainglorious Coward (267452) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641055)

allow your ISP to give you gradually sterner warnings and possible punishment if you download copyrighted material

Sloppy stuff from DailyDot : we would probably all blow through our six chances on the very first web page we visit, since just about everything that is downloaded has copyrights. The distinction between authorised and infringing use of copyrighted material, which appears to have whooshed the article author, is likely the reason this scheme is having trouble getting off the ground.

Re:Almost all content downloaded has copyrights (1)

Shagg (99693) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641251)

we would probably all blow through our six chances on the very first web page we visit, since just about everything that is downloaded has copyrights.

True, and in most cases it is also virtually impossible for the average user to tell whether it's authorized or not.

Opposite Effect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641099)

I don't pirate anything. I run Linux for my desktop and I have legal access to all of the TV and music I need.

However, this makes me *want* to pirate. It makes me want to test the efficacy of their detection. Will it work with encrypted torrent traffic? Nntp? IRC? Freenet?

Sue the ISPs (5, Interesting)

DL117 (2138600) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641105)

I'm not a lawyer, however, I believe this could a breach of contract law. If the ISPs are making an agreement with third parties for conditions to terminate an agreement with their users, that could be considered acting in bad faith towards the consumers.

Re:Sue the ISPs (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641387)

I'm not a lawyer, however, I believe this could a breach of contract law. If the ISPs are making an agreement with third parties for conditions to terminate an agreement with their users, that could be considered acting in bad faith towards the consumers.

It's not a breach of contract law, because it's a violation of your contract (the TOS) to download copyrighted material.

That said, I'd argue for collusion and other anti-competitive behavior. They're all agreeing to place the same terms on their contracts, which prevents you from switching ISPs to someone without those terms in their contract.

Re:Sue the ISPs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641399)

The contract they signed with the consumer would have had a "we can alter this contract at any time for any reason" clause.

And how are these 'warnings' sent? (5, Interesting)

tekrat (242117) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641131)

If I know any of those major ISPs, they'll be emailing you at the @comcast or @verizon email address that they assume you're monitoring, because they gave you that email address when they became your ISP.

They aren't going to assume that you've been using the same email address for decades, long before you signed up for their broadband, and that's the email address you monitor.

I can see it now, they shut you off claiming you haven't responded to any of their emails -- meanwhile you're unaware that a mailbox you've never checked in your life is where those emails are....

I very likely have a Verizon mailbox, but damn if I know what it is. Or how to access it. My email comes to me through a mom&pop ISP where I have my webserver, not through my broadband provider.

And I'm sure I'm not alone in this -- how many people have a Yahoo, Hotmail or Gmail account as their primary email address?

Re:And how are these 'warnings' sent? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641219)

I've got business class paid for by my company. I definitely don't have that email address.

Re:And how are these 'warnings' sent? (1)

Comen (321331) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641297)

I do not see it in this artical, but from previous articles on this subject it made it sound like this process if different and instead of a email being sent you would get a browser pop up that would tell you the site you are going to, or the file being downloaded is copyrighted and illegal to download. Not sure how that would work for things like torrents, but I would asume you would get a notice when you go to the site that lists the torrent to download.

Re:And how are these 'warnings' sent? (3, Informative)

Comen (321331) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641441)

From this link http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/threatlevel/2011/07/ispplan.pdf

Subsequent alerts may include notifications in the form of pop-ups or redirection
to a special page displaying the alert. Failure to respond to these alerts will lead
to additional steps designed to ensure that the account comes into compliance.
These steps, referred to as “Mitigation Measures,” might include, for example:
temporary reductions of Internet speeds, redirection to a landing page until the
subscriber contacts the ISP to discuss the matter or reviews and responds to some
educational information about copyright, or other measures that the ISP may
deem necessary to help resolve the matter. These steps will only be taken after
multiple alerts and a failure by the subscriber to respond. This system consists of
at least five alerts.

Re:And how are these 'warnings' sent? (1)

Silentknyght (1042778) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641687)

From this link http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/threatlevel/2011/07/ispplan.pdf [wired.com]

Subsequent alerts may include notifications in the form of pop-ups or redirection
to a special page displaying the alert. Failure to respond to these alerts will lead
to additional steps designed to ensure that the account comes into compliance.
These steps, referred to as “Mitigation Measures,” might include, for example:
temporary reductions of Internet speeds, redirection to a landing page until the
subscriber contacts the ISP to discuss the matter or reviews and responds to some
educational information about copyright, or other measures that the ISP may
deem necessary to help resolve the matter. These steps will only be taken after
multiple alerts and a failure by the subscriber to respond. This system consists of
at least five alerts.

I don't see how that's going to work at all. Wouldn't most modern browsers block popups, especially those not at all affiliated with the target site? Wouldn't most third-party DNS providers warn you of a redirection as some kind of hostile activity? Wouldn't a NoScript (or similar) browser also defeat some/all of these "notification" methods?

Re:And how are these 'warnings' sent? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641879)

I'm sure Hollywood will happily pay the ISPs for US postage, not to mention an official looking seal and legal sounding threats.

Guardians of the Internets (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641175)

I'm surprised the MPAA and RIAA did not dress this up as "Consumer Relief Access Protection".

Bluffing (4, Insightful)

pwizard2 (920421) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641185)

I wonder how much of this is bluffing. There's no way they can watch everyone all the time. Even if they could, it would cost too much to do it indefinitely and if it cuts into profits too much (especially for another company that is giving little or nothing to them) I'm guessing the ISPS will only make a half-assed attempt to carry this out.

Are they seriously going to monitor every single FTP transaction or every Torrent swarm that passes through their infrastructure? Many people just go in, leech, and get out of the swarm as soon as they have all the pieces which leaves only a small window of time to catch them.

Re:Bluffing (1)

WrecklessSandwich (1000139) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641275)

I suppose they could outsource it to the NSA, they seem up for the job.

Re:Bluffing (2)

Shagg (99693) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641281)

No, the ISPs are just going to send out "strikes" to whoever the RIAA/MPAA tells them to.

Enforcement (2)

h4x0t (1245872) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641191)

When every user on using your service has 5 strikes in a week... enforcement of this will drop off really fast.

I will certainly be wardrivetorrenting when this drops.

What Kind of People Do They Think Pirate? (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641193)

six strikes system says: 'We do not intend to launch until we are confident that the program is consumer friendly.

The only people I know of that would enjoy this are usually called, "Cutters."

finally americans getting taken off the net (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641253)

fuck you america cya you losers

Downloading? (2)

_8553454222834292266 (2576047) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641443)

Why does every article say they're going to get you for "downloading" copyrighted material. Since when can they get you in the US for downloading copyrighted material? I thought the only issue was with distributing/seeding it.

Re:Downloading? (2)

Zimluura (2543412) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641829)

Exactly! I just downloaded your post (which is copyrighted automatically in the US), in order to read it, so presumably you can file a complaint with my ISP and that'll be strike 1 against me. Hmmm, in hindsight I should have posted anonymously. Perhaps I could send the RIAA an email and then sue them for opening it. If DOWNloading copyrighted material is illegal, then the internet as a whole is illegal.

Consumer friendly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641449)

Punishing consumers for consuming will never be consumer-friendly.

How will this work? (3, Insightful)

oxdas (2447598) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641803)

How can any ISP determine whether or not I have received the rights to any given copyrighted item? What if the items I am downloading are fair use productions using copyrighted material? Nobody really knows what fair use is and is not (it is very subjective), how can you write an algorithm to detect it? I just don't understand how this is technologically possible.

Courts have already ruled that you can sue for DMCA requests that don't consider fair use. It doesn't seem a stretch to apply that to "strikes" as well (and strikes are probably easier to demonstrate harm). The ISP's are going to have to tread very carefully to avoid class action lawsuits.

Cox (2)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641839)

for all their foibles (slow playing DOCSIS 3 in smaller markets; IPv6 will be as slow in arriving), they frequently are far less dickish than the other US ISPs. Not like I have an alternative even if they were, though (yay, monopoly and ~$160 monthly bills).

The polls are in (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40641891)

I just conducted a quick poll from the 3 cats in my room.
They all prefer the more consumer friendly law of 9 strikes and you're out.

Safety is important for auto autos. (0)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 2 years ago | (#40641983)

Autonomous automobiles pose a huge safety threat. To ensure public safety the following laws should be enacted:

1. A man carrying a flag must walk in front of the car to warn others.

2. The flag man should not alarm or panic the horses.

3. On approaching the intersection, the car should stop, the flag man should check for traffic and signal the auto to proceed.

Hundreds of such laws are possible and each city and village should create its own set.

The speed limit of 5 mph in the city of Bent Fork, Tennessee, should be adopted nationwide for the autonomous autos.

WiFi (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40642161)

I'll be feeling bad for my neighbors if this ever actually happens...

3ncrYpted Onion routers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40642223)

Just fully encrypt and use TOR networks.

All of your copyrights R Us

"...if you download copyrighted material." (2)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 2 years ago | (#40642405)

So that limits us to Project Gutenberg. Everything else is "copyrighted", and every time you "visit" A Web site you "download material".

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