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US "the Enemy" Says Dotcom Judge

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the know-your-enemy dept.

United States 469

First time accepted submitter Flere Imsaho writes "During the NetHui Internet conference last week, the NZ judge to hear the Dotcom extradition case was speaking on the Trans Pacific Partnership agreement and how the U.S. entertainment industry is pushing to make region code hacking illegal, when he said 'Under TPP and the American Digital Millennium copyright provisions you will not be able to do that, that will be prohibited ... if you do you will be a criminal — that's what will happen. Even before the 2008 amendments it wasn't criminalized. There are all sorts of ways this whole thing is being ramped up and if I could use Russell [Brown's] tweet from earlier on: we have met the enemy and he is [the] U.S.'"

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And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (5, Funny)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662499)

And even if your country doesn't have a DMCA (and they WILL soon, if not already), don't think for a second that the U.S. can't extradite you here for punishment anyway, or that your government won't fall to its knees like a trained lapdog when the FBI snaps their fingers and says "Put him on a plane."

The sooner you people accept that the U.S. is large and in-fucking-charge, the easier it will go for all of us.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (0)

Mike Wag (2683017) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662513)

Mod this +5 Insightful, it's so good post. Go Microsoft!

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662537)

What does MS have to do with the DMCA? The DMCA is primarily for the entertainment industry.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662855)

Bullshit!

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662533)

Tell that to China. China literally owns America.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662617)

False: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Estimated_ownership_of_treasury_securities_by_year.gif

While I'm dispelling myths, US manufacturing is alive and growing, automation has simply replaced all the jobs.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662637)

China owns about 8 percent of publicly held U.S. debt. source: http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/2011/07/21/who-owns-america-hint-its-not-china

remember that raise you didn't get? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662897)

You think its about debt?

You remember that raise you were supposed to get last year?

Well you cheap Chinese imports instead and shopped at tax dodgers like Amazon and Walmart.

Re:remember that raise you didn't get? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662993)

:/ Lol, Wat? Confusing argument is. . . confusing.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662735)

Really? They literally own America? When did they purchase it, and for how much? Got links to a bill of sale?

Sincerely Yours,

The AC that hates people using the word literally when they say things that are anything but literal.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662783)

No they don't. What they *do* have is rampant inflation happening along side a growth bubble that's already in the midst of cooling off. More or less, they're pretty much fucked. I truly feel sorry for them.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662879)

The chinks own nothing. 1 billion gooks are the human equivalent of about 20 inbred rednecks.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (2)

mc6809e (214243) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663021)

Tell that to China. China literally owns America.

Nah. They just own those young Americans that will be paying off the debt.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (2)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663137)

Nah. They just own those young Americans that will be paying off the debt.

Meaningless. There is no plan to pay off the debt, ever.

And there will be no such plan, ever. We're well and truly caught in the "living beyond your means" trap....

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662619)

Dogs don't have knees.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662651)

They'd have a hard time walking, running, and jumping if they didn't.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662717)

Dogs don't have knees.

Of course they have knees. They're land mammals.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662687)

the U.S. is large and in-fucking-charge

Almost like a... MegaUSA!

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (5, Insightful)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662863)

War is Peace
Freedom is Slavery
Ignorance is Strength
Land of the Free
Home of the Brave

Repeat the phrase "Land of the free, home of the brave" with a straight face. Now, repeat until some one has to pick you up, off the floor with the laughter cramps preventing you from remaining upright.

Re:And the U.S. law is YOUR law now too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40663037)

hahahaha haha

hahahahahahahahahahah ahahahahahahah ahaha hahahaha

omg can't stop laughing.

Then buy NZ music (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662551)

If you buy music produced in the US you buy it under the terms of the license. Don't like those terms? Buy music produced elsewhere.

Re:Then buy NZ music (4, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662757)

Or we could have a license-burning bonfire. That would be fun. I'll bring the marshmallows.

Re:Then buy NZ music (5, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662779)

I'm sorry, but do USA copyrigth laws cover every country on the planet? No, they do not, so people need to learn to deal with the fact that some countries take a different approach to promoting the distribution of science and art.

Oh, what, you were hoping to turn music into a form of property? That's cute.

Re:Then buy NZ music (3, Interesting)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662825)

but but but but but... we have the missiles!!

look at the warships!

Re:Then buy NZ music (5, Interesting)

Antipater (2053064) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662975)

Funnily enough, NZ people don't have to look at the warships (or at least they didn't 10 years ago; this might have changed). NZ at some point declared themselves a "nuclear-free" zone, meaning not only no warheads but no vessels running on nuclear power are welcome there. And since that means the US Navy has to skirt waaaay around NZ to get to their Australian naval bases, it's actually been a major source of diplomatic tension between the two countries. But it also shows that the Kiwis have no qualms about giving America the middle finger, so don't expect them to cooperate with this copyright stuff all too quickly.

Re:Then buy NZ music (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40663123)

But it also shows that the Kiwis have no qualms about giving America the middle finger

Awww! Isn't that sweet!?! They think we're number one!

That'll work fine in peacetime (1)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663169)

But if there was a war amd the US needed to get to those bases fast then it would just do what it damn well pleased and worry about upsetting the Kiwis later. And given that the feminised socialist government of NZ in 2001 removed all the new zealand air forces combat aircraft they couldn't even launch a token protest against it. Perhaps they could just hold hands and sing CND songs loudly instead?

(I'm not american btw , but countries who think they have the yanks by the balls are almost always deluding themselves)

Re:Then buy NZ music (3, Insightful)

Goth Biker Babe (311502) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662883)

I don't buy US produced music anyway. Its not like you make it all or far from it. The UK makes better music!

Re:Then buy NZ music (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663057)

I started digging through my DVD collection. All my region 1 discs state "Licensed for sale only in the U.S." or something similar. If they say anything at all.

Re:Then buy NZ music (3, Interesting)

StripedCow (776465) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663131)

Sorry, that music may have been produced in the US, but contains ingredients taken from music produced elsewhere. Ergo, there is no basis to declare that US copyright laws should extend to other countries.

The enemy among us. (5, Insightful)

Q-Hack! (37846) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662567)

I know that this is normally a forum to bash **AA, but the fact still remains that Kim Dotcom made his fortune by providing a service that was used to circumvent paying for content. Never did he even attempt to stop this illegal activity, and at times, promoted it. People like to talk about how the rich make there fortune off the backs of the working class... this guy is your poster child.

Re:The enemy among us. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662625)

This interview by Cambell paints a different picture about what Kim Dotcom actually does.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pF48PjCtW4k

Re:The enemy among us. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662653)

Certainly he's a shady character, but last time I checked, this guy actually wanted to pay the artists [techcrunch.com]

Dotcom described Megabox as Megaupload’s iTunes competitor, which would even eventually offer free premium movies via Megamovie, a site set to launch in 2012. This service would take Megaupload from being just a digital locker site to a full-fledged player in the digital content game.

The kicker was Megabox would cater to unsigned artists and allow anyone to sell their creations while allowing the artist to retain 90% of the earnings. Or, artists could even giveaway their songs and would be paid through a service called Megakey. “Yes that’s right, we will pay artists even for free downloads.

Re:The enemy among us. (5, Interesting)

NotSanguine (1917456) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663191)

Certainly he's a shady character, but last time I checked, this guy actually wanted to pay the artists [techcrunch.com]

Dotcom described Megabox as Megaupload’s iTunes competitor, which would even eventually offer free premium movies via Megamovie, a site set to launch in 2012. This service would take Megaupload from being just a digital locker site to a full-fledged player in the digital content game.

The kicker was Megabox would cater to unsigned artists and allow anyone to sell their creations while allowing the artist to retain 90% of the earnings. Or, artists could even giveaway their songs and would be paid through a service called Megakey. “Yes that’s right, we will pay artists even for free downloads.

The above, if true, raises an interesting point. MegaUpload operated using the same model for years. Somehow, once they talked about creating a service that directly competed with iTunes -- and charging artists less for the privilege of selling their music via the MegaBox service, the FBI got quite frisky. Seizing servers, requesting arrest and extradition, freezing assets, etc. Now MegaUpload is no longer a threat to iTunes. I wonder what changed?

[Removes tinfoil hat]

I'm not saying that Apple owns the FBI, nor am I saying that these events weren't coincidental. It just gives you something to file away for future reference.

Re:The enemy among us. (5, Insightful)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662659)

I know it's popular to sound all level-headed and point out the law, but many of us think copyright law desperately needs an overhaul. I, for one, would like to see anything released over 10 years ago go into the public domain. Then, much of the Megaupload activity would've been legal.

Re:The enemy among us. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662789)

I know that this is normally a forum to bash **AA,

I know it's popular to sound all level-headed and point out the law,

I hate this emo crybaby style so much. If you have something to say, say it. If you don't, shut up. If you don't have the guts to write a post on an anonymous internet forum because people might disagree with you, see a therapist.

Re:The enemy among us. (5, Interesting)

Durrik (80651) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663003)

10 years is probably too short, but you're right that copyright laws are broken. I do like 10 years as a good number to work from.

I think copyright should be broken into personal and corporate copyright. Personal copyright is owned by the author. Corporate by a corporation.

Personal copyright should have a maximum 10 year exclusive license limit, after ten years the license should be renegotiated, and perhaps transfered to another publisher. He time limit for personal copyright should be Death or twenty years whichever is longer.

Corporate copyright should be free for 10 years. And then renewed in each country that the corporation wants to enforce it in for $10,000 for then next 10 years, then $100,000 for ten more years and so on. So:

0-10 years free
11-20 years $10,000 per country
21-30 years $100,000 per country
31-40 years $1,000,000 per country ...

If a company wants to bankrupt itself to keep a copyright that's fine but it'll quickly become too expensive for companies not to let copyrit lapse.

Breaking digital locks should not be illegal. You blame the lock if it gts broken, safes and locks are rated by how long it takes to break into them. Also you could look at it as a National Security question, if you my cryptography illegal, only crimals will be cryptologists. And then how are you going to secure your communications? Digital locks are a good way to train the next generation of cryptologists, and keep them practiced.

Re:The enemy among us. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40663095)

Hey, exponential fees, I like this idea!

Let Disney keep Mickey... but suing the pants off of anyone who produces a likeness of Oswald the Lucky rabbit, or something equally trivial should be scorned (and illegal).

Re:The enemy among us. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40663101)

seems like a great way to keep those pesky start-ups in silicon valley at bay.

Re:The enemy among us. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662675)

Attention: **AA does not represent the working class. Dotcom made his money off the backs of the already rich guys. Thus we frankly don't give a damn as long as he's given a fair trial in NZ for any crimed committed in NZ against NZ law.

Re:The enemy among us. (2)

OldSport (2677879) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663063)

And let's not forget that the "rich guys" made THEIR money by leeching off the artists in the first place. If you're going to complain about artists being screwed, you'd better be prepared to propose an entirely new system, because the music industry's traditional business model has been blatantly and obscenely ripping off artists for *decades* now, long before Megaupload, The Pirate Bay, Kazaa, Napster, CD-Rs, and even cassette tapes came onto the scene.

Re:The enemy among us. (4, Insightful)

wisnoskij (1206448) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662707)

Providing a service that he got paid for is not making your money off the backs of the working class, weather it is illegal or not.
Dismantling companies and peoples pensions for profit, paying low wages, company towns, and monopolies are taking advantage of the working class.

Re:The enemy among us. (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662711)

A pedicab driver makes money from a service that gets you from point A to point B without paying for gasoline! THE HORROR!

Re:The enemy among us. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40663035)

Obviously the petroleum industry must engage the US federal government to enact legislation demanding payment for lost profits caused by the pedicab operators.

Re:The enemy among us. (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663129)

To be more precise: The pedicab makes money without paying the gasoline tax, which funds the roads. Maybe the government should add an additional tax on this deadbeat... also bicyclists, horse-drawn carriage riders, and EV drivers. (That was sarcasm.)

Re:The enemy among us. (4, Insightful)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662729)

Which is why he is the perfect bogeyman for this suit that will serve as a precedent to make online file storage illegal. But many overlook that when their judgement is clouded by their (however justified) personal dislike of Dotcom.

Re:The enemy among us. (3, Insightful)

MadKeithV (102058) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662787)

I know that this is normally a forum to bash **AA, but the fact still remains that Kim Dotcom made his fortune by providing a service that was used to circumvent paying for content.

And the recording industry made their fortune by providing a product that was used to circumvent paying for artists playing their music live.

Re:The enemy among us. (4, Insightful)

blind biker (1066130) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662809)

I know that this is normally a forum to bash **AA, but the fact still remains that Kim Dotcom made his fortune by providing a service that was used to circumvent paying for content.

Sop do DVD and Blu-ray writer manufacturers, and blank media manufacturers. Also HD manufacturers. Also all Internet service providers. All these are used to "circumvent paying for content."

Re:The enemy among us. (5, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662813)

>>> Kim Dotcom made his fortune by providing a service that was used to circumvent paying for content.

If he's such a horrible person, why was he able to get ~50 top-of-the-charts singers (and musicians and audio engineers) to perform a Megaupload song for him? If he really was hurting these people, they would have refused to do the ad. But instead they helped write, sing, and produce it.

I suspect your attack is without merit. Dotcom no more wanted to hurt people than does Googlemail or the Amazon Cloud (which is also used to share content w/o payment). If anybody is guilty here it's the U.S. government for overstepping its legal authority. Last I checked its juris diction ends at the border or the 14 mile oceanic limit.

Illegal but not necessarily wrong (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662817)

You seem to be treating legality in the area of copyright as a natural law of physics and carved on tablets of stone. Well it's neither, and everything is in a state of flux..

The law in this area was never subject to public approval in any country, and it runs totally contrary to how the VAST majority of people seem to feel about it when asked. Instead it was developed through intense lobbying of politicians by content creators in a completely one-sided manner. What's more, much of it was developed out of the public eye and turned into law through a process of direct bribery, particularly in the US where bribery is legal and called "campaign contributions".

So while you're factually correct in calling it "illegal" by US law, it's only "illegal" because this totally corrupt and non-democratic system has defined "illegal" to suit itself. It may be illegal in your country, but it's not illegal everywhere, and it's regarded as "wrong" by only a small percentage of the world's population.

Things aren't as clearcut as you make out.

Re:The enemy among us. (4, Insightful)

Riceballsan (816702) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662835)

Megauploads model was not illegal, at least no more so than dropbox etc... No more so than memorex and roxio were in the late 90s. You think memorex really believed that the massive surge in sales for blank CDRs were from people backing up documents? Or roxio believed that most people burning MP3s onto CDs and didn't download them from napster? Megaupload followed the DMCA to a T, they gave the IAA's a tool to instantly pull copywrited materials with the push of a button, something they used freely and even very clumsily (quite a few reports of them killing legitimate software that was using megaupload as their distribution system). Now I admit if the alogations of megaupload actually directly conspiring with others to upload pirated material to megauploads servers are true (what they actually are charged for), then there is a case. However I find it absolutely apauling that the US somehow had the right to shut down a full business BEFORE the trial. If the FBI's case is true, they should have had NZ police establish a search warrent, and check some parts of megaupload (IE they should not have been able to fully close down the business indefinently), then tried him in NZ, and were he found guilty THEN shut him down. This method of bogus due process is ridiculous, could you imagine if the anti-trust cases against microsoft worked that way. "OK we have accusations of antitrust, we need to pull every copy of windows from the shelves, halt all development, and put bill behind bars, once the trial is over we can decide if we'll let you re-release or send you to jail. I dislike microsofts tactics, but even against microsoft I would have found that result BS.

Kim Dotcom is a scumbag (3)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662859)

And yet the USA by their actions make him look saintly

Re:The enemy among us. (4, Insightful)

Xest (935314) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662861)

"I know that this is normally a forum to bash **AA, but the fact still remains that Kim Dotcom made his fortune by providing a service that was used to circumvent paying for content."

Right, and all car manufacturers made their fortunes by providing cars that were used to break the speed limit, all gun manufacturers made their fortunes by providing guns that were used to kill, and Apple made it's fortunes by making media players that were used to play pirated MP3s.

Similarly neither Ford, nor gun manufacturers, nor Apple have done anything to stop illegal speeding, illegal killing, or illegal downloading, and at times have "promoted" it.

Honestly, your argument extends to many industries, as the whole data loss fiasco has proven, Megaupload had many legitimate customers. The point being that the service he was providing was not illegal, not any more so than the industries mentioned above. The problem is that his industry is one that:

a) The US is spending a fuckton of money attacking at the behest of corporate interests

and:

b) Not as big as the likes of Apple, Google, Microsoft, or Ford, or whoever to have had the money and lobbying power to protect themselves

Re:The enemy among us. (1)

Skapare (16644) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662871)

Any and every online storage system can be used for such. Even the owners of the pipes are making money on the theft of copyright. Maybe they should all be put out of business.

Or maybe not.

Re:The enemy among us. (1)

P-niiice (1703362) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662901)

Link to proof of your claim is needed here - the service quite regularly and quickly removed infringing content.

Re:The enemy among us. (2)

AngryDeuce (2205124) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662963)

**AA

working class

Clearly our definitions of 'working class' are pretty disparate. The MAFIAA organizations that were most harmed by this are anything but working class, they're little more than middlemen that are using their immense wealth and every legal maneuver available to them to continue to justify their existence in an era when artists are eschewing the mainstream industry entirely and self producing more and more.

When the horse fell out of favor as the preferred method of transportation, the harrier became an endangered species, and I doubt very many people shed too many tears over that fact. Now that the MAFIAA organizations are no longer the preferred method of distribution, they're living on borrowed time, and they know it. Imagine if the harriers of yesteryear possessed the political clout at the turn of the 20th century that the MAFIAA possesses at the turn of the 21st and the negative impact that would have had on the automotive industry.

As a consumer of media, I have as much use for an A&R rep these days as I do for the harrier, which is to say, none at all. 99% of the music I listen to is self produced and put on the 'net free of charge by the artists themselves, and what's more, an ever growing percentage of the videos I watch are as well. The days of the "Major Label Darling" riding around in limousines snorting coke off of hookers tits and trashing hotel rooms is quickly coming to a close. I have a hard time feeling bad about that, no matter how much David Lowery cries about it [slashdot.org] (whose band Cracker almost epitomizes the problems in the industry in the 90's before Napster took off, go back and listen to Kerosene Hat, the album endlessly pimped on MTV when "Low" was a Buzz Clip...a handful of decent tracks and a shit-load of low-production filler bullshit that were obviously recorded as fast and loose as possible and shoved on the album to justify charging LP prices for EP content).

Re:The enemy among us. (3, Informative)

nashv (1479253) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662965)

" the fact still remains that Kim Dotcom made his fortune by providing a service that was used to circumvent paying for content."

Calling your opinion a fact , does not a fact make.

The fact would be that Kim Dotcom provided a service for file sharing, hosting and distribution. The files the clients of said service chose to share , host and distribute happened to contain content that they were not licensed to do so with. The clients are the criminals, not the provider of the service. This is the the technical and legal fact.

Since they can't prosecute a million people and possibly maintain their political office at the same time, the US (politicians and agencies) chose to go for the easiest and softest target in this case - namely , Kim Dotcom.

Why is he a soft target? He is a single identifiable individual, who is obese and rich from doing something that is borderline legal. The psychological impact of seeing a fat , pompous and rich man , who got that way doing something the common man is repeatedly told is a very very bad thing is rather irritating.

If you think there is even a shred of legality in the behavior of the US you are fooling yourself. Even if Kim Dotcom turned out to have facilitated crimes (which is debatable but may be alleged), the US did not stay within the law either. That just brings it down to a case of Might is Right. This is why this case should be an indicator to the US public that their system is going to the dogs.

"All murderers are punished unless they work in large numbers or to the sound of trumpets" - Voltaire. He said it best.

Re:The enemy among us. (2)

Loughla (2531696) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663067)

While I agree with your arguments, mostly, there is one place that I just don't get.

This is why this case should be an indicator to the US public that their system is going to the dogs

Do you really believe that the US is falling apart? It seems to me that around 99% of the problems we see today are mostly manufactured by various news agencies/websites to drum up viewers (or, rather, pointed out in grand fashion and made to seem much, much worse than they are – what’s the word? Oh, yeah, sensationalism). It seems to me that this alarmist “THE PRESIDENT IS A TYRANT”/”CONGRESS IS EVIL”/”HOLLYWOOD IS KILLING INNOVATION”/”OCCUPY PROTESTERS RAPED 10000 PEOPLE” arguments are just varying degrees of ‘get off my lawn’.

It just seems that this panicked running around is a bit much? Or maybe I’m off the mark on this.

While our congress may be bought and paid for, don't we have a long history of crooked politicians being led around by their purse strings? The president may be grasping power for some aim, but don't they all? And haven't young people always hated what the generation before them loved?

Re:The enemy among us. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662991)

Yea so? "This illegal activity" is illegal under current U.S. law. But guess what bozo? Do you think we the billions of people around the world are going to stand for much longer to have our collective culture locked away behind a Great Copyright Wall by a few MPAA/RIAA Executives and the comparatively handful of "made men" artists?

How many VINYL LPs that your parents listened to have reverted to the public domain? Answer: NONE! It is ALL LOCKED AWAY!

Dotcom is no hero. But what he does does further the goal of widespread dissemination of cultural works.

PS: hint for "ownership model" artists: what you want to keep for yourself, keep it in your Mom's basement. As soon as you decide to publish / shout from the rooftops, it is no longer yours. It's public. And with what's in the public, the public will decide what is going to happen.

Re:The enemy among us. (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663069)

Uh, how was it circumventing paying for content? If you mean that he paid them directly (more profit directly to artists) instead of through the label, then yes.

Since when is it his job, even remotely, to monitor how people use his service if it's not a child porn issue? In no country on the planet does such a requirement actually exist except China, I suppose.

He has indeed tried to pay artists as highlighted by the anon post - in taking this down a number of artists *lost* a revenue stream for distributing their music. Plenty of Independent artists started on megaupload. [techdirt.com]

Re:The enemy among us. (1)

silas_moeckel (234313) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663171)

In NZ that is a civil issue extradition from NZ requires something that would be a crime in NZ.

Re:The enemy among us. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40663177)

And a company that sells radar detectors is making their fortune off illegal activity.

And handgun manufacturers are making a portion of their fortune enforcing illegal activity.

And most pawn shops carry almost 30% stolen goods.

Besides, megaupload is much like... say... a storage business.

Certainly it can be used to store stolen goods. Is the owner of said storage lot liable for what is stored.

In the same way, the ISP is not liable for stolen property going over their lines, despite the fact that estimates are, between streaming media and porn, those comprise half the Internet.

Thoughts?

Easy solution for Australia (And NZ?) (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662579)

It's at least true in Aus that it is illegal to lock things down to a region.

Make cracking the region locks illegal but make every region coded item illegal too. And put equal effort into persuit of the wrongdoers in each case.

Does NZ have the same law? Seems likely. In which case: sorted.

Re:Easy solution for Australia (And NZ?) (5, Informative)

Tastecicles (1153671) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662793)

In the UK we have this thing called the Trade Descriptions Act 1968, which among other things prohibits misdescription of goods. A DVD-video must by definition comply with the DVD-video standard (Part 3, Book B and DVD Video Recording Book) or it CANNOT be referred to as a DVD video.

Now, people do still have choice over whether or not to purchase a barcode for a particular title. If one does purchase a DVD video, then he has a statutory expectation that that is what he is getting. There is NOTHING in the standards to cover region locking, CSS encoding, or any other restrictive mechanism. ANY DVD that employs any of these mechanisms CANNOT claim to be a DVD-video.

Having made the choice to purchase a barcode with the DVD-Video logo, if one then finds out that one cannot play that DVD in a standard, open-region player (lots of Chinese players are not region locked hence will play ANY otherwise compliant disc), then IMO there would be a case under 1968 (c. 29).

My boggle with the region coding thing is the fact that unless specified on the box that a player is region-free*, there is no indication whatsoever on the hardware or the packaging (or the manual!) that the player is region locked and to what region. This is clearly a violation of 1968 (c.29)?

*Since DVD-video units hit mainstream in around 1997, I've been aware of the region coding and studiously avoided region locked players, unless there was a clear-cut and simple way of jailbreaking them. The only player I ever had to jailbreak was a Meridian 586 (bought near the end of 1997 and cost a bloody fortune).

Fuck the UN! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662621)

The UN is a fucking JOKE. They want to impose their laws and morals on the rest of us and I will not stand by for it!

Oh wait, this is about the U*S*? Never mind then.

Stop using the word "US" (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662657)

We read "US" as "us", same as "we". It's the United States of America, not the United States.

And by the way, American means someone from America, not someone from the USA.

More importantly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662777)

Don't use "us" OR "we" to desribe the actions and words of government. If government was made of "us" and "we", then logically, government wouldn't need guns.

Re:Stop using the word "US" (3, Funny)

JWW (79176) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662795)

Whooossshh.

You're totally missing the point. The famous quote is "we have met the enemy and he is us."

That is why it is a snarky (and accurate) turn of phrase to say "we have met the enemy and he is (the) U.S."

Relating to the old quote is meant to give context via the truth of the snarky new stating of it. It gives the statement more weight.

You're literally taking it to literally.... ;-)

Re:Stop using the word "US" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662801)

What about someone from Chile. Are they also American?
How about Mexico? Are they American?
Or Argentina? Brazil? Uruguay? Panama? Puerto Rico? Are they all Americans?

Re:Stop using the word "US" (1)

WindowPane (150285) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663041)

Yes.

Re:Stop using the word "US" (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663073)

I noticed you left out Canada.

Re:Stop using the word "US" (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662867)

>>>American means someone from America, not someone from the USA.

So what are we supposed to call ourselves instead? United Statesians?!?!? Until you can come-up with a better name, we'll just keep saying Americans. And US. And EU. And RF.

Re:Stop using the word "US" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40663099)

>>>American means someone from America, not someone from the USA.

So what are we supposed to call ourselves instead? United Statesians?!?!? Until you can come-up with a better name, we'll just keep saying Americans. And US. And EU. And RF.

We are to call ourselves CITIZENS OF THE GREAT AND GLORIOUS UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AS FOUNDED BY GOD THROUGH HIS MIGHTY AVATARS GEORGE WASHINGTON AND RONALD REGAN, FOREVER AND EVER, A SUBSIDIARY OF THE HALLIBURTON CORPORATION, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, AMEN. Yes, every word is vital. Yes, the capital letters are important. You wouldn't want to sound unpatriotic, now, would you, COMRADE?!?

Re:Stop using the word "US" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662969)

oh shove it. You may read US as us and we - unfortunately for the rest of the world you are US. Move on jackass

Re:Stop using the word "US" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662973)

You should look at some of the ISO country code definitions.

alpha2 = US
alpha3 = USA
UN num = 840
FIPS = US

As a simple exercise go through http://www.onelook.com/?w=american, please respond with the number of dictionaries that
1) DO NOT include "citizen of U.S." as one of the definitions.
2) DO include "citizen of U.S." as one of the definitions.

You could do the same thing for "America" being a synonym for U.S.

Re:Stop using the word "US" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40663115)

doesn't change the fact your a blight on the planet though

Re:Stop using the word "US" (0)

ciderbrew (1860166) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663151)

Can we all just say U? As is "U crazy Americas".. It works well for everyone outside that bit of the world. Some people are not so polite and change the word crazy. But then THOSE people will do that... Is it home time yet?

Re:Stop using the word "US" (3, Insightful)

geogob (569250) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663185)

And by the way, American means someone from America, not someone from the USA.

Please, present me a single person from Canada or Mexico describing himself as "an American". Better, find me a single person from Brazil or Peru that presents himself as "an American". Furthermore, per definition you are correct, but the word "American" is also defined as a citizen of the USA.

Taking into account usage and accepting the fact that this usage definition of "American" is correct, I'd simply say that you are wrong.

It's all about who you know. (3, Insightful)

Picass0 (147474) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662679)

Dotcom is a comparatively little guy who had his own service and when the sh-t hit the fan didn't have anybody else in his corner. His antics and courtroom theatrics aside, what separates him from Youtube? An 800 pound gorilla named Google. People upload copyrighted material to Youtube every day but Google somehow makes it all right.

Is Google more responsive to takedown notices than megaupload? Is there more infringing material on one service vs. the other?

My opinion is Megaupload's biggest problem in the end is they never made friends in high places.

Re:It's all about who you know. (2)

TemperedAlchemist (2045966) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662815)

Yeah, but the MAFIAA know they can't actually challenge Google and get away unscathed with the same pedantic antics. By the time the word litigation reaches their doorstep an army of layers will already be deployed via autonomous cars.

Re:It's all about who you know. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662837)

Is Google more responsive to takedown notices than megaupload? Is there more infringing material on one service vs. the other?

YES! That's the point of this whole argument isn't it?

Re:It's all about who you know. (1)

eriklou (1027240) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662847)

My opinion is Megaupload's biggest problem in the end is they never made friends in high places.

I think you mean pay off, not make friends.

Re:It's all about who you know. (3, Informative)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662891)

> Is Google more responsive to takedown notices than megaupload?

Google have been sued many times on this issue, and are definitely have state of the art capability in this area.

Re:It's all about who you know. (0)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662933)

I like playing devil's advocate -- A guy worth hundreds of millions is "a little guy". In other fora, mwny of you leftists would be bitching about him as an evil rich.

Also, he got wealthy providing a trading house, like Napster, where the vast majority of the business was copyright violation, and he plays Sergeant Shultz, "I see nothing...nothing!"

Re:It's all about who you know. (2)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663025)

Google's Content-ID program lets companies submit their own content that is then matched against every single frame of every uploaded video using state-of-the-art recognition technology and lets them block it or make money off the ads.

Megaupload took down links on request.

Yes, it's different.

one of the most beautiful quotes I know. (4, Informative)

Johann Lau (1040920) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662761)

Traces of nobility, gentleness and courage persist in all people, do what we will to stamp out the trend. So, too, do those characteristics which are ugly. It is just unfortunate that in the clumsy hands of a cartoonist all traits become ridiculous, leading to a certain amount of self-conscious expostulation and the desire to join battle.

There is no need to sally forth, for it remains true that those things which make us human are, curiously enough, always close at hand. Resolve then, that on this very ground, with small flags waving and tinny blast on tiny trumpets, we shall meet the enemy, and not only may he be ours, he may be us.

Forward!

-- Walt Kelly

I heard "we met the enemy, and he is us" a million times before I bothered checking out the full quote, and I think it's kind of a shame to truncate it like that.

(and yes, I know this is off-topic, I don't care :D)

Re:one of the most beautiful quotes I know. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662927)

I hope for your sake that you have the licence to redistribute that quote.

Re:one of the most beautiful quotes I know. (1)

Johann Lau (1040920) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663051)

Or this panel [sandboxx.org] , for that matter :/ But I learned on Slashdot that Germany doesn't extradite; so even if I go to jail, it won't be pound-me-in-the-ass prison. YAY!

Re:one of the most beautiful quotes I know. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40663027)

I agree, Walt Kelly was the best. The original cartoon and quote is available on Wikipedia here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pogo_(comic_strip)

Re:one of the most beautiful quotes I know. (1)

Johann Lau (1040920) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663097)

Thanks! I either didn't know, or forgot, that it's actually a parody of something else as well!

Pirates dont care about region codes (2)

voss (52565) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662831)

The only people that are affected by region codes are people who want to want to watch foreign dvds often stuff that has never been released and never will be in other parts of the world. Often stuff purchased legally on vacation.

With enemies like that... (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662845)

The US is the enemy...because we don't want you getting our shows without paying for them? You just want friends with benefits without having to buy us dinner, first?

Re:With enemies like that... (5, Insightful)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662915)

People have a problem with the USA when we start applying our laws in other countries, and rightly so. New Zealand has a legitimate, democratic government that creates its laws, so what business do we have trying to extradite NZ citizens for violations of US law that did not occur in the US?

Yeah, blah blah blah, he registered a US domain name. If we start using the Internet as a vehicle for applying our out-of-control legal code in other countries, we are just going to make more enemies.

Re:With enemies like that... (3, Informative)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662929)

No, but if someone buys a DVD while abroad, and brings it home only to find out that they're not allowed to watch it (since the American copyright groups are pushing to have breaking the region encoding declared a criminal act) then they're expected to sit there with a dud DVD and not play it.

This isn't about getting the content without paying for them. This is about taking a good you bought, and using it where you live.

Breaking the region encoding just allows you to play a product you legally purchased, and legally brought home without waiting for the same product to be re-released where you live.

America is basically trying to export laws which strip the right of first sale and other fair use rights they already enjoy.

There's a huge difference between that and what you describe.

Re:With enemies like that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662937)

Right... Because buying region-coded DVD's from out of region magically makes the money vanish out of MPAA wallets?

Re:With enemies like that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662945)

So you want to be considered a friend without having to do something nice first, like allowing people to watch your shows for free?

Definition of enemy (3, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 2 years ago | (#40662955)

Suppose that some arab country starts accusing and claiming extraditions of women all around the world because them commited adultery. Or that Sweden do the same with all men all around the world that had sex with a sleeping woman. Or a country with a corrupt government, where shady men or private companies pushes laws for criminalize people that drinks coke or read certain books, that exports that laws to all the world and claims extradition for people breaking that laws elsewhere.

That is what is doing USA, and that is what other governments are letting them to do while signing "cooperating treaties". I suppose that yes, the enemy is us, or at least USA and the people in your government that signed that kind of treaty.

USA - Enemy of the world since 1776 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40662995)

The US has always been an enemy of the world since dumb fucks declared independence because they feel capitalism is the way to go. They, like the European nations of old, wanted to be supreme and destroy any and all "heathens" and "infidels" because they are not Christian. Fortunately Europe is maturing while the US still hates anyone and anything that comes from an atheist or communism. Why do you think open source has not taken off in the US? Simple the fucktarded USians hate communism and open source is communism, which is why it works. Today the fucktarded USians want to protect their capitalist empire from collapsing when in reality the US will collapse from within and the rest of the world will be cheering once it happens. The US, an illegal nation since it's inception as it was created from land stolen from the natives.

Sincerely,

Signed : The rest of the world.

Judicial misconduct? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40663079)

Would this kind of statement be considered judicial misconduct? It sounds like he's making impartial/prejudicial statements in a case he's presiding over.

Opportunities (4, Insightful)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 2 years ago | (#40663089)

I will say that the US media industry and content providers have gotten way too powerful. What's worse is that there is little to no checks or balances against this power. But, in their greed, the industry has created an opportunity for a bourgeoning Indie media growth spree. The Internet makes an awesome distribution platform, so there can be Indie television shows and movies without the big studios greedy, restrictive hands in the pot. This is why I check out platforms like Vimeo for the Indie stuff. Much of it is surprisingly good. I would love for Indie to move beyond podcasting.
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