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First Look: Microsoft Office 2013

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the go-ahead-and-peek dept.

Microsoft 369

snydeq writes "Ever since the first beta editions of Windows 8 appeared, rumors have circulated over how Microsoft would revamp its other flagship consumer product, Office, to be all the more useful in the new OS. Would Office become touch-oriented and Metro-centric, to the exclusion of plain old Windows users? A first look at Office 2013 provides the short answer: No. 'Office 2013 has clearly been revised to work that much better in Windows 8 and on touch-centric devices, but the vast majority of its functionality remains in place. The changes made are mostly cosmetic — a way to bring the Metro look to Office for users of versions of Windows other than 8. Further, Office 2013 has been designed to integrate more closely with online storage and services (mainly Microsoft's), although those are thankfully optional and not mandatory.'"

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all your document (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667019)

are belong to us.

Really.. we're not as dumb as you think, chairboy.

Re:all your document (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667085)

Here come all the FSF FOSS shills to derail MS. Facts are MS Office is the best office suite on the planet and this is only going to make it better. Also, unlike Linux where every app has its own look and feel because the developer decided to use "Joe's Random GUI Kit" instead of standardizing, this one will actually integrate well with the Windows 8 look. Flame on trolls.

Re:all your document (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667131)

Here come all the FSF FOSS shills to derail MS.

Not just FOSS "shills". Anyone with a lick of common sense will try to find their way out from under the thumb of an extortionist.

ARRRGGGHHHH! IT BURNS! (0)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667273)

It BURNS!

Like untreated BALLMER EXCRETIONS on NAKED RETINAS!

Re:all your document (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667697)

unlike Linux where every app has its own look and feel ... this one will actually integrate well with the Windows 8 look.

That Windows 8 look and feel will be horribly out of place on XP, Vista, Windows 7.

Gee, what if apps were skinnable and people could make them look like whatever they want? And then they came with skins appropriate for the OS you want to run them on, and the UI presentation you prefer from previous versions. Wouldn't that be amazingly clever, innovative, forward thinking...

PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (5, Insightful)

Trashcan Romeo (2675341) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667027)

Subscription model: HELL, No.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667047)

you clearly have no idea what the subscription model is for but do worry you can still buy it outright and install it on 5 computers

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (1)

Trashcan Romeo (2675341) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667225)

"what the subscription model is for" What it's supposed to be for? Or what it's actually for? Not the same thing, I suspect. Among other things, doing away with installation DVDs ought to shut down an avenue for piracy.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (4, Funny)

masternerdguy (2468142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667059)

Everybody knows the new metro interface will vastly increase productivity. Soon we will stop having to use keyboards and we can all live in the Star Trek future of colorful touch panels for everything! Multi tasking is sooooo 20th century.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667117)

I don't know how they steer that big ship with just a few buttons on an okudagram. For that matter I don't see how Picard does any work on his little PADD. It doesn't have a keyboard so how does he enter anything?

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (1)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667139)

It pretty much knows what you are doing. You just need to choose "Open web browser" or "Search Google"

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (3, Funny)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667315)

It pretty much knows what you are doing. You just need to choose

"change tea settings"

FTFY

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (1)

masternerdguy (2468142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667147)

Very carefully.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (3, Funny)

houghi (78078) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667287)

For that matter I don't see how Picard does any work on his little PADD. It doesn't have a keyboard so how does he enter anything?

Siri or something similar.

However we know it is fiction, because otherwise we would see much more sponsored responses.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667151)

Everybody knows the new metro interface will vastly increase productivity. Soon we will stop having to use keyboards and we can all live in the Star Trek future of colorful touch panels for everything! Multi tasking is sooooo 20th century.

Then we should stop calling it Metro interface and call it "KAAAAHN!" interface instead.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667499)

You forgot the "t"

Then it's the word most of us say when we try to use MS products.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (2)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667233)

Actually the problem with Office 2013 is it does not play nice with Metro at all. [arstechnica.com]

This looks very Windows 7 ish with corporate oriented features as a way to yank these corps off of XP. Obviously this version requires Windows 7 & 8. You may hate Windows, but many people love Office and it looks like a decent upgrade for the corps with its social integration and sharing features.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667247)

woosh

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667293)

And all error messages will have been replaced by the monitor exploding in your face.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (0)

jo42 (227475) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667113)

"You will like The New Orifice!!!"

- Steve

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (2)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667205)

Subscription model: HELL, No.

Metro Look is windows (ha!) dressing. Subscription would doom Office to the scrap heap of history.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (1)

xeoron (639412) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667545)

One of my problems with Metro, visually, is that everything is flat looking... so I think Metro lack dressing.

Re:PDF import: Yes. "The Metro Look": No (1)

just_a_monkey (1004343) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667559)

Subscription would doom Office to the scrap heap of history.

Why?

Metro look (1)

tooyoung (853621) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667419)

Wow. The Metro look is jarring when you first see it. The Office suite was never a model for great UI, but it certainly had somewhat of a visual "brand". At a glance you could always tell that you were using an Office product. Looking at the screenshots of Word, Powerpoint, and Excel without this brand is shocking. Excel might be the most shocking.

It is kind of like they are trying to pull a reverse-Apple: Apple provides gradients, shadows, reflection, and texture. Maybe Windows decided that they lost that game (and, yeah, they did), so they decided to go for some minimalist UI that oddly seems somewhat inspired by Facebook.

Business Software Doesn't Change (5, Insightful)

LeanSystems (2513566) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667037)

New look and feel means that the IT department has to give each user training on the new interface. Usually just because a couple of the managers refuse to spend a few minutes to "play" with it and learn it themselves.

It's funny that everytime I am asked to do Office training, 50% of the students are more skilled at Excel (acct. especially) and Outlook (admin asst. especially) than I am. So I am standing in front of a room baffeling the people that have no idea what a pivot table is, and looking like an idiot trying to explain it to the people that know it better than me.

Re:Business Software Doesn't Change (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667169)

Tell that to the idiots who designed Ribbon.
Tell that to the idiots who designed Windows Vis7a / Windows 8.
Tell that to whatever actual serious moron designed the new Explorer. The thing is such a terribly inconsistent user experience it hurts.

I think the only user interface design they have changed recently and has actually worked nice is the start menu and some context menus for windows. (such as Peek and the ability for program hooking useful commands to the context menu unlike the painful hack of a job you had to do in XP and previous)
Whoever designed those should replace THE ENTIRE UI design team. Completely serious. The rest of them are worthless.

It still kills me when they tried to defend Ribbon on their blog when they recorded some stats on the things people used most turned out to be menus and context menus, and they COMPLETELY glossed over that part because obviously people like HUGE TOOLBARS designed FOR FINGERS AND BLIND PEOPLE clogging up all their screenspace.
Toolbars and toolstrips are the most efficient quick-access system for lots of common features in large applications.
Don't force that crap Ribbon on people when they don't want it. Make toolbars, ribbon and other stuff snap-ins to the program that the user can enable or disable by default. I definitely know what I would be doing with the Ribbon definition file, deleting it. Most worthless UI in existence.

Microsoft needs to stop hiring college design grads. They are horrible, horrible people.

Re:Business Software Doesn't Change (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667231)

yeah, but no. The ribbon is a rock solid interface. It's a little inconsisten that it doesn't extend to ie10, but that's ok becasue there's not that many functions.

Other things that are rock solid:
* ie10 is a top-class browser. It replaced my ffx, and I won't go near chrome because it steals my info.
* office 2010 is super. Mostly the same as office 2007, which is also super.
* win 7 in general is a joy to use.
* bing is awesome, and on par with google for most things and way better for some.

Re:Business Software Doesn't Change (2)

excelsior_gr (969383) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667329)

The ribbon is a rock solid interface

bing is awesome

Are you high? Or just trolling?

Re:Business Software Doesn't Change (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667243)

Microsoft needs to stop hiring college design grads. They are horrible, horrible people.

No. Microsoft should hire all of them, then they couldn't fsck up Linux.

Re:Business Software Doesn't Change (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667597)

Too late [ubuntu.com] .

Re:Business Software Doesn't Change (4, Insightful)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667573)

Seems like your org need to reassess how it does user training... why aren't the trainees separated according to (1) their needs and (2) their competencies and then trained appropriately?

And why in the world is training being conducted in front of a room full of people? Might as well record a demo and distribute it. Training on software use should be done in small groups if you want it to be effective.

I don't think your experience is indicative of problems with MS Office (though those problems DO exist), but more with how businesses handle training.

Re:Business Software Doesn't Change (1)

s73v3r (963317) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667633)

So I am standing in front of a room baffeling the people that have no idea what a pivot table is, and looking like an idiot trying to explain it to the people that know it better than me.

Sounds like they've just got the wrong person doing the training. If they know it better than you, why aren't they assisting with the training?

Both ... (4, Insightful)

jamesl (106902) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667041)

although those are thankfully optional and not mandatory

One without the other would have been a disaster.

Re:Both ... (1)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667153)

You mean like Ribbon and menus?

Open! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667071)

OpenDocument format or Die!

Re:Open! (2, Interesting)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667167)

How do I embed an ActiveX object, with property bag, in an OpenDocument file?

Re:Open! (3, Insightful)

masternerdguy (2468142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667183)

You could start by not using an ActiveX object. Also, how is being able to embed executable code into a document a good thing?

Re:Open! (4, Funny)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667423)

Also, how is being able to embed executable code into a document a good thing?

An entire generation of crackers built their careers on exploiting executable code in Office documents. If not for Microsoft, they'd be cooking fries at McDonald's.

Still using Office 2003 (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667107)

I'm still using Office 2003 at work, and will for the forseeable future. Microsoft still provides a compatibility pack to read and write docx. What reason is there to upgrade?

Re:Still using Office 2003 (4, Insightful)

DeathFromSomewhere (940915) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667149)

Re:Still using Office 2003 (2, Insightful)

LurkerXXX (667952) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667327)

Which are pretty much worthless to 99% of users. For most folks, 2003 will do everything they need.

Re:Still using Office 2003 (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667361)

Jumplists, ribbon and skydrive integration are worthless

Out of touch neckbeard status confirmed.

Re:Still using Office 2003 (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667691)

Is your list intended to be ironic?

Re:Still using Office 2003 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667791)

Nope. Try leaving your moms basement. And shave that beard, it looks fucking gross.

Re:Still using Office 2003 (5, Insightful)

RatBastard (949) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667501)

Are you kidding? Office 97 was more than I ever needed. WordPad with a spell checker is more word processor than most Word users need.

Re:Still using Office 2003 (4, Insightful)

loufoque (1400831) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667415)

You realize than most of those new features are "revamped user interface", except for 2007 which added a new file format?

Re:Still using Office 2003 (2)

bertok (226922) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667671)

That's great, but this time, have they gotten around to fixing any of the bugs & quirks from the older versions that we've all learned to love to hate?

I mean seriously, it's 2012 already, and in Word 2010 SP1 I still struggle with issues like these:

- Can't use a font with a PostScript outline and export to PDF. Because of a ~7 year old buy in Word, it gets converted to a bitmap! MOST third-party fonts have PostScript outlines, including practically all of the Adobe Pro fonts. Printing to a "PDF Printer" strips out all the metadata and hyperlinks, so that's not a solution either.
- Still can't use advanced font features like the OpenType small caps [indesignsecrets.com] .
- Table padding and outlines are added to the cell content. This makes it impossible to create a table that is exactly as wide as a normal paragraph, because a table that is 100% wide is actually 100% + some extra wide, just for laughs. The only solution I've seen is complex macros that recompute the width of each table to some horrific fractional size to compensate for the padding.
- Certain style formats need to be left on "default" (e.g.: inherit from parent style) to prevent downstream formatting issues. However, once set, most style properties can't be unset back to defaults. Short of editing the XML by hand or possibly resorting to macros again, I don't see how this is fixable.

From reading the forums, most such problems have been present since forever, and will never be fixed.

Re:Still using Office 2003 (3, Insightful)

davydagger (2566757) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667155)

none. This year they put a 12 on it.

just a reminder libreoffice runs docx too. Unless you use an INSANE amount of formating, or have really special needs, libreoffice runs faster and works better.

https://www.libreoffice.org - LibreOffice

Re:Still using Office 2003 (2)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667207)

Simple tables and bullet points on my resume will not work right with the margins if I do not use Office. I even recreated my resume from scratch and it has the same problem. In a business your reputation is on the line if your documents look like crap. If you are a consultant and you send something that doesn't even look right you are fired immediately! I am paying this guy $60 an hour and he can't even use a margin?!

Re:Still using Office 2003 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667347)

Pshh, I do my resume using LaTeX.

Re:Still using Office 2003 (3, Funny)

eepok (545733) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667503)

And I made mine in cargo shorts, but what we wear while we type is neither here nor there.

Re:Still using Office 2003 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667727)

Simple tables and bullet points on my resume will not work right with the margins if I do not use Office.

Then use PDF, problem fixed. Why should some random company get my resume in raw form?!

Your other point is valid, though. There are a lot of settings where documents are shared for mutual editing; introducing incompatibilities and bugs is a nuisance, at best.

But then, the worst bugs introduced in our shared documents get in there by my colleagues using the same version of MS Office on the same hardware with the same Windows version and patch level. The most common is that they idiotically enter a page break when they want to influence the text flow.

But how to teach them that page breaks have nothing to do with text flow without looking like a giant jerk? Especially as this is the easiest bug to fix ...

Re:Still using Office 2003 (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667259)

Unless you use an INSANE amount of formating, or have really special needs, libreoffice runs faster and works better.

Well, you'd certainly have to have special needs to find LibreOffice a suitable replacement for MS Office.

And you'd also have to not mind the fact that it looks like a bloody day-old abortion, and works about as well.

Re:Still using Office 2003 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667569)

Using the same font-pack as windows office, libre-office has display errors with arabic fonts on my computer. Heck, even Wordpad displays them correctly. So, complete failure right there, no formatting included. And no, arabic is not a "really special need".

Re:Still using Office 2003 (1)

just_a_monkey (1004343) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667641)

I need to be able to insert comments in documents. That function was uselessly buggy in Libreoffice as late as a few months ago.

(Apart from that, I've been using LO for years without any problems, or any of my coworkers noticing.)

Re:Still using Office 2003 (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667219)

"What reason is there to upgrade?"

Heretic!

Don't you know Change is Progress?

Re:Still using Office 2003 (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667307)

I got you beat. I'm still using Office 97. I wonder what employers think when I send-out my resume and the little popup says, "Converting from Word97"? (shrug). I refuse to buy Microsoft again. If Office 97 refuses to run on some future Win8 or Win9, then I will just switch to freebie software like LibreOffice.

Re:Still using Office 2003 (2)

ColaMan (37550) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667483)

I wonder what employers think when I send-out my resume and the little popup says, "Converting from Word97"?

This guy can't even be bothered to convert his resume to PDF so it prints nicely on my printer?

Re:Still using Office 2003 (3, Interesting)

KhabaLox (1906148) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667785)

I recently applied for a job where the HR person specifically requested .docx format.

Re:Still using Office 2003 (2)

s73v3r (963317) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667717)

I wonder what employers think when I send-out my resume and the little popup says, "Converting from Word97"? (shrug).

Too much work. DELETED

Re:Still using Office 2003 (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667767)

I still use Office 2000 SR-3/with all updates and its compatibilty pack at home in an old, updated Windows XP Pro. SP3. I rarely use Office unlike at work (2007). I also have LibreOffice at home and work as a backup too. :)

The more I read... (3, Interesting)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667109)

... the less I want.

Anyone else long for the days when a word processor was for editing formatted text, a spreadsheet for mathematical calculations, and an email client sent and received emails?

Re:The more I read... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667173)

No thank you.

Call me crazy, but I kind-of like having a word processor that does grammatical checking, automatic table of contents, dynamically-created diagrams, templates for cover pages, and theme-based formatting when I paste in content from other sources.

I actually like it that Word can talk to Access and Excel for merge operations, and even output to Outlook when I want to send out emails. And yes, I like that as a programmer I can use VBA to further extend the apps whenever I need to with a little bit of code hunting.

Here's your typewriter. I'll take Office 2013.

Re:The more I read... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667317)

This message brought to you by: Microsoft Astroturf

Re:The more I read... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667447)

This message brought to you by: Ellison's Bitch

Re:The more I read... (1)

excelsior_gr (969383) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667517)

automatic table of contents, templates for cover pages

Yawn. LaTeX. Plus, every humble ASCII-editor has spell-checking features. Except notepad.

dynamically-created diagrams

You mean like, dynamically created while the Fortran simulation runs in the background?

theme-based formatting when I paste in content from other sources.

You mean like when I press ctrl+V and freak out on the broken formatting that gets pasted together with my text? And like when I have to paste the text to an ASCII-editor to get rid of the formatting metadata and then ctrl+X/ctrl+V back to Word/Outlook to just paste some freakin' text?

I like that as a programmer I can use VBA to further extend the apps whenever I need to with a little bit of code hunting.

Ah, yes. I always rejoice when I see my VBA code broken after an Office update. I haven't touched that sluggish pile of crap called VBA for years. One of my students did and regretted within the week.

Here's your typewriter. I'll take Office 2013.

No I think I'll pass on both. I'll take VIM.

Re:The more I read... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667749)

automatic table of contents, templates for cover pages

Yawn. LaTeX. Plus, every humble ASCII-editor has spell-checking features. Except notepad.

But they don't do either of the functions you actually quoted?

You mean like when I press ctrl+V and freak out on the broken formatting that gets pasted together with my text? And like when I have to paste the text to an ASCII-editor to get rid of the formatting metadata and then ctrl+X/ctrl+V back to Word/Outlook to just paste some freakin' text?

Actually Microsoft Word 2010 gives you four options for pasting in text. Using the destinations theme, keeping the formatting from the source, merging into the paragraph's formatting or just pasting the text. Also lets you preview all the options simply by mouse over on the buttons. There's nice option to set which ever default you want. Office 2003 has three paste options "Keep Source", "Match destination" and "text only". So Office is to blame for you inability to use a basic function on the product? Its not that hard, its all on a little UI button that appears at the end of your pasted text every time you use the functionality.

Are you sure you're able to use VIM if you can't have pasting with Word? Or is it just a cool buzz word you heard the programmer next to you say?

Re:The more I read... (5, Informative)

idji (984038) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667279)

No, because I work in an organisation with 1000 people around the world, and my Microsoft email client tells me who is sitting at their desk right now, has one click-desktop sharing, conferencing, file sharing, tasks, goals, sales tasks, decisions, votes, and still works when i have little or no internet. It is a cockpit for daily work and efficiency. (and I can program a plugin to do anything else that I find that I need) . When my laptop gets toasted, I have zero data loss and I get it all back as it was with 1-click, and while windows is being reinstalled I still have access to almost everything over any browser/smartphone. Did I mention that all my Russian, Greek, Arabic and Chinese mails all render properly? My word processor and my email client use the same richtext/html editor. Sure I can install 15 pieces of software to do that, but not throughout the entire organisation. MS-Office is installed & enterprise-licensed in 1 click, and with another click synchronized from the server.

Re:The more I read... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667623)

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Re:The more I read... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667661)

Someone said something positive about Microsoft! They must be paid to say such things. How dare they refuse to join our circle jerk hatred!

Re:The more I read... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667739)

'Circle jerk'?

What is this, Reddit?

Slashdot has groupthink, not a 'hive mind' or those bizarre group onanism sessions you Redditors seem so fond of.

And the GP really did seem like a shill. He didn't just say something positive about MS, he came across like a greasy marketing executive. And the rosy world-of-tomorrow picture he painted seems far too good to be true; indeed, it's the kind of product summary you expect to see in a brochure, not from a real-world toiler.

Re:The more I read... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667679)

Perhaps, but people who wear suits seem to get excited when their software integrates a calendar and email client, along with other office-mgmt stuff (like booking meeting rooms).

Even if the GP is a shill, some of the features mentioned do seem genuinely useful.

There are a few proprietary packages that do that kind of thing (MS Office, Google Office, Lotus Notes). I don't know of any GPL'd package that really competes with that. Another front for the war, I guess.

Re:The more I read... (4, Insightful)

humanrev (2606607) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667789)

The features he does mention ARE useful. If you know how to use your tools better than the next guy who continually questions what benefit the extra functionality and bloat provides in said tools, you're at an advantage.

I don't consider his post to be shilling - I consider it to be an info-dump of features he considers useful. The edge in his post suggests a frustration from being told continually by people here and other open-source fanatics that such features are bloat, and that somehow open-source software can work with the same level of functionality and integration (which it often can't for someone who's aware of the niceties and uses them in something like Outlook).

It's also amazing how many people, who've never worked in I.T. for a mid to large organization, and particularly a lot of young people (students), who think they know better about what a company needs than what people experienced in how the world works in the corporate environment know.

Re:The more I read... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667773)

This comment brought to you courtesy of Slashdot.org ...the site that for 15 years showed the world's biggest philanthropist as a borg and which refuses to use the actual Windows logo and instead childishly uses a broken window to represent the world's most popular OS.

Re:The more I read... (0)

fliptout (9217) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667657)

Good god, for real? Do you wear a helmet?

Re:The more I read... (1)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667681)

ok, but you still have days where a word processor is for editing formatted text, a spreadsheet for mathematical calculations, even if your mail client is a "groupware application"

Outlook was always a bit shit at HTML messages though, especially when replying without that stupid blue indent bar on the left, and failed at formatting mails with internet-standard > markers. Pity that. And how bullet formatting can be a bit wonky at times with almost impossible ways to fix them without deleting and starting again, not to mention the odd table formatting craziness that can quickly spiral out of control.

Mind you, I'm with you on all that 1-click ease-of-use. I use Google Docs too, it's great :)

Easy Skydrive Integration == IT Security Nightmare (4, Insightful)

joelsherrill (132624) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667127)

Easy integration with Skydrive sounds really cool until you think about this inside any organization which doesn't want its files stored on a public cloud. Can this be disabled across an enterprise install easily? Can it be switched to an organization's private cloud?

Re:Easy Skydrive Integration == IT Security Nightm (2)

TheRealMindChild (743925) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667175)

Sure. Welcome to the 1980's. It is called a firewall [wikipedia.org]

Re:Easy Skydrive Integration == IT Security Nightm (1)

DeathFromSomewhere (940915) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667713)

Considering they just announced this thing today, I doubt there will be anything official on group policies for a while. If I was a betting man I would say that there would be some mechanism to turn SkyDrive off. Maybe it would happen automatically when connected to a SharePoint server.

My theory (4, Funny)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667159)

Microsoft is going to replace the hated "Ribbon" with a more-hated "Bow".

On the downside it will require untying to get at the menu item you want. On the bright side it will be configured as a Moebius strip, so if you don't find the menu item your looking for you can just keep clicking and you'll eventually get there.

Re:My theory (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667331)

Hey now, "Ribbon" was awesome, it was one of the best pieces of protective gear you could get in Final Fantasy

Rick Santorum would not approve (3, Funny)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667165)

I'm sure that he, along with other good staunch conservatives, would be unhappy with a Metro-centric interface, because it's only a short step from that to some sort of Cross-Platform interface, and from there it could end up completely Homogenous and involve multiple machines.

For a more detailed look (5, Informative)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667171)

Arstechnica has a more comprehensive review [arstechnica.com] .

Also they were kind enough to divide the new features by individual product. Word is here [arstechnica.com] , so is excel [arstechnica.com] , outlook [arstechnica.com] , as well as powerpoint [arstechnica.com] .

I just briefly went through them but the general improvements is that you can share documents with your coworkers with its cloud add ons as well as import and export your work documents with integrated skydrive from your work/home pcs. For individual programs, Excel has a new intellisense that works in cells so you can select commonly used names and formulas with a transparent window that wont obstruct your data. MS calls this ghosting. Outlook has Bing and map integration for directions and travel data as well as having a multiview pane so you do not have to close the calendar to view your todo list for example. Word, well I didn't see anything worthwhile except for some extra formatting options for brochures and other material and a souped up track it list where you can even do text messages in them for things like "Bob redo these figures - boss". Does this mean they are axing MS Publisher? They seem to be covering the same functionality. There is some other stuff that I will read later because it is detailed.

What is clear is this is surprisingly strongly aimed at corporations. MS is getting back to its strength as a groupware product that ties to corporate infrastructure.
The ones who still are holding on to IE 6/8, XP, and Office 2k3. College students or home users will not see that much improvement. Also Neowin mentioned MS is killing both Vista and XP support [neowin.net] with Office 2013. This office suite is aimed to get those corporations dragging their feet with Windows 7.

Re:For a more detailed look (2)

Trashcan Romeo (2675341) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667267)

I suspect the Fortune 500 company I work for will contentedly continue using Office 2003 on Windows XP.

Re:For a more detailed look (1)

mister_playboy (1474163) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667763)

We are less than 2 years away from XP going EOL.

The time to start planning for that transition, especially at such a large company, was yesterday.

Re:For a more detailed look (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667341)

> I just briefly went through them but the general improvements is that you can share documents with your coworkers with its cloud add ons as well as import and export your work documents with integrated skydrive from your work/home pcs.

So, they've included their own, incompatible take on Dropbox? Which we've been using for 4 years?

Re:For a more detailed look (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667777)

Whats more likley to happen is that everyone using XP and office 2003 will continue to do so, whats the point of new computers, new operating systems and retraining eeryone on a new office interface when the shit you have has been doing fine for the last decade?

Brand new UI to learn (2)

gelfling (6534) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667285)

Now THAT'S productive. Because having to juggle Open Office, Office 2003 and 2007 aren't enough. Now we need a UI for an Office suite that purports to not require any physical input at all.

Re:Brand new UI to learn (3, Insightful)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667401)

How is there a new UI? It shares the same ribbon with Office 2007 and 2010. It's more like a skin on 2010 than anything else.

Enh. (3, Insightful)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667319)

Still using Office 2000. I still don't see any reason to upgrade. It's Office, not heart surgery.

Do they have a drop down menu option? (3, Insightful)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667357)

The only thing they need to do to improve office at this point is purge the blasphemy of the ribbon UI abomination and restore good pure drop down menu's to their righteous glory.

GUI Design - MIA? (0)

mholve (1101) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667395)

I'm wondering that they're thinking with the GUI... Applications go all-white, the rest (and dialog boxes, etc.) are color... Buttons and other controls are all "flat" now.

It would appear to me, that the GUI has devolved for the sake of simplicity - or something.

Let's play 'Guess what's a button'... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667525)

... Microsoft are such idiots.

Let's make everything as drab, dull, white and washed out as possible, let's hide any sign that a button IS a button, and make our users guess and try to click on every word on the screen.

Epic fail.

I wonder what it's like working for the pricks responsible for this shit. I bet it's like Stalin's Russia in there, nobody is allowed to question 'The Party', and everybody has to pretend that this STUPID user interface is an improvement. Bloody idiots.

Get rid of the bloody Ribbon, bring back drop down menus, and stop messing about with the user interface. Sack the doofuses responsible for ever user interface change since Windows 7 and 'The Ribbon'. Did I mention they were latte-sipping IDIOTS?

Re:Let's play 'Guess what's a button'... (1)

Murdoch5 (1563847) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667645)

You are completely right!

Re:Let's play 'Guess what's a button'... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40667755)

real users dont use the buttons anyway

One of the local authors had problems w centering (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667617)

One of the local authors I know was having problems with centering of HTML output, which we tracked down to the fact she was using IE, which nobody else used anymore.

Color me unimpressed. I'll wait until the Zune 3 ... um Windows Phone ... is released and then learn where they migrated stuff to.

Formatting? (4, Insightful)

Murdoch5 (1563847) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667631)

Will this be the first office to have a good formatting engine in place. Features such as auto numbering, auto bullets and the rest, are they all going to work? I say this after fighting with office 2007 and 2010 today as the auto numbering system completely corrupted my document. Office doesn't need any more cosmetic updates, it doesn't need any more ribbons, any more hidden menus or any more flash. What office needs is to be redesigned at its core, features like its formatting system need to redesigned to work. Features like it's grammar and spell check engine need to be worked on, if Microsoft tries hard they might be able to release a document system as good or better then Libre Office, but I doubt it!

Flashback (1)

archen (447353) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667719)

Is it just me, or does the interface as shown there look a LOT like Windows 1.0? What's old is new again I guess.

UGH (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#40667723)

I just started to get used to the ribbon interface

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