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63 comments

It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N9 (2, Insightful)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40668375)

When they decide to put countries like China on the backburner and start making things like this available in more conventional markets, this might be an improvement. Otherwise, it's just the N9 situation all over again.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (5, Insightful)

the plant doctor (842044) | about 2 years ago | (#40668527)

If you're a startup I don't see how it's a mistake. From TFA: "China was selected because it is the largest, most rapidly expanding smartphone market in the world, according to Jolla Chairman Antti Saarnio." This seems like a logical first step to me. Get established there first, then move on to more expensive markets once you are established.

Except that it makes the phone *worse* that way (1, Informative)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40668595)

When it is made for the First World markets first - the quality does not decrease and it generally does well. These phones are made with the First World audience in mind.

When it is made with the Third World in mind, quality suffers. What the First World gets is largely a defective product with no thought or attention to the First World user aside from the poor quality translation of a manual in GB2312.

Re:Except that it makes the phone *worse* that way (4, Interesting)

YoopDaDum (1998474) | about 2 years ago | (#40670979)

China is a very big and diverse country, and going China doesn't necessarily mean going low cost nowadays. Costal China is first world (or close enough already, in any case not 3rd world by far), with a very high adoption rate for smartphones. And not crappy ones, also high end ones. Plus, Android is impaired in China by no official Google Play support if I understand correctly, and side channels are full of malware making Android reputation poor. The iPhone doesn't support TD-SCDMA so is not carried by the first operator, China Mobile. WP is mostly nowhere (as everywhere). There is a gap to fill there, and if you come with a new OS it may be easier to get a foothold in such a context than in Western countries with entrenched iPhone and Android, and only a few slahsdotters like me possibly interested in a Meego phone ;) Historically China Mobile was interested in Meego for this reason BTW. And Nokia was very popular there. So there could be a card to play for a well spec'd phone in China, seen as a successor to the old Nokia.

Re:Except that it makes the phone *worse* that way (1)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40679361)

China is a very big and diverse country, and going China doesn't necessarily mean going low cost nowadays. Costal China is first world (or close enough already, in any case not 3rd world by far), with a very high adoption rate for smartphones

Yet the products seem to fail to hold up to that standard save for the few (and large) exceptions.

And not crappy ones, also high end ones. Plus, Android is impaired in China by no official Google Play support if I understand correctly, and side channels are full of malware making Android reputation poor. The iPhone doesn't support TD-SCDMA so is not carried by the first operator, China Mobile. WP is mostly nowhere (as everywhere). There is a gap to fill there, and if you come with a new OS it may be easier to get a foothold in such a context than in Western countries with entrenched iPhone and Android

Even with the region hobbling of the N9 to intentionally kill sales of the product, it did better than the Windows Mobile phones by a wide margin.
Until Nokia was introduced to the Trojan Horse that Elop brought in, they had a viable alternative - the Maemo/Meego platform.

Re:Except that it makes the phone *worse* that way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40682305)

Costal China is first world (or close enough already, in any case not 3rd world by far)...

All of China is second world.

Re:Except that it makes the phone *worse* that way (1)

rtfa-troll (1340807) | about 2 years ago | (#40680193)

In the sense that the iPhone came from the idea that a 'rich American' can afford a phone which includes both consumer features like picture sharing and music together with 'corporate' features like email and security and is willing to pay for all of them in one package, I think you are right. However, Microsoft has designed for the first world and that is the source of many of it's Windows Phone's fundamental failings [phonearena.com] . Problems like lack of Bluetooth file tranfer come from an assumption you always have a network and can always afford it. Problems like lack of memory card support (shared with the iPhone) come from the assumption you have your own WiFi network at home and so can afford to move large chunks of data on and off the phone wirelessly. Clearly design for the first world has had a bad influence here and these design failures even make Windows phones bad for use in their home markets.

Japan is obviously the ultimate "first world" location. Networks there are much more advanced than in the US. Consumers mostly have more money to spend on gadgets. Despite that, systems designed for Japan rarely do well in other countries until culturally translated and simplified considerably.

What you actually need is a phone developed for the most demanding and quality concious users at a given moment. When the iPhone came out that was the US market. Now the needs there have been largely satisfied. It's quite likely that China, with it's complex character set, limited fixed network and advanced mobile networks and rapidly changing economy is one of the best places now.

You've been moderated as a troll; and, in the sense that you are parroting MS talking points so I guess I understand that. Still, I think it's unfair and I that mods can mod us both up and encourage sensible debate.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 2 years ago | (#40668659)

Because they are 2 separate markets. Has there really been anything that has started in China and made it big in Europe/North America? I really can't think of anything. Sure, there's been stuff that's been Korean and Japanese and sold quite well, but the Japanese and Korean markets are much different than the Chinese market.

I don't think it's its an accident that we drive Toyotas and not Cherys. Nor why we go on Facebook and not Renren.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (3, Insightful)

alantus (882150) | about 2 years ago | (#40668897)

Has there really been anything that has started in China and made it big in Europe/North America? I really can't think of anything. Sure, there's been stuff that's been Korean and Japanese and sold quite well, but the Japanese and Korean markets are much different than the Chinese market.

They might not be as successful as their Japanese counterparts, but from the top of my head Huawei, Lenovo and Haier are chinese.

Some time ago Japan was today's China, they were just copying and improving upon others designs, and they were regarded as lower quality products. Now they are leading in the automobile industry, electronics, and pretty much everything.

I think the same kind of evolution is possible in China in the next few years. The only thing they are lacking is the ethics and values, but maybe its not necessary.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (2, Insightful)

dbIII (701233) | about 2 years ago | (#40669293)

Look back to the USA of Edison's day and you'll see how ethics and values were rarely allowed to get in the way of a sale.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (1)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40669521)

Lenovo was the division of a US company allowed to make the mistake - of national security - of selling to the Chinese government. That can't really be called Chinese.

I think the same kind of evolution is possible in China in the next few years. The only thing they are lacking is the ethics and values, but maybe its not necessary.

The only kind of evolution is in how they steal technology from the First World or to punish their own. Everything else is stolen.

Stolen techonology myth (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40670903)

China takes all open technology and gets the production costs lower and the volume up. This is not stealing, it is innovation in the production-part of the economy. Without the innovation at the plants producing stuff, there will be no ways of getting the volume up and the prices lower. That China makes stuff generic really fast, is really good for innovation. China is a part of an ecosystem. It's not only the heads of corporations, or the R&D departments that innovate. All the parts of the supplier-chain has to innovate, from the refining of raw-materials, marketing, production, finance and more. It's not stealing. It is called collaborating. Using open tech is not stealing.

Reality Check, please. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40670073)

... Has there really been anything that has started in China and made it big in Europe/North America?

OK, How about silk, paper, gun powder, fireworks and bazillion other things chinese had ages before west heard of them?

Re:Reality Check, please. (2)

fph il quozientatore (971015) | about 2 years ago | (#40670265)

... Has there really been anything that has started in China and made it big in Europe/North America?

OK, How about silk, paper, gun powder, fireworks and bazillion other things chinese had ages before west heard of them?

You gotta love the Chinese. They had gunpowder long before anyone else, and what did they do? Conquer the world? Nope, they invented fireworks and had lot of fun.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (2)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#40668989)

If you're a startup I don't see how it's a mistake. From TFA: "China was selected because it is the largest, most rapidly expanding smartphone market in the world, according to Jolla Chairman Antti Saarnio." This seems like a logical first step to me. Get established there first, then move on to more expensive markets once you are established.

Supplementary: if Nokia decides to use their patent war chest to attack it, they'll still have the Chinese market (which is also the producing one, thus wouldn't care too much about Nokia's patent). If they start in the Western world, they'd be hang high and dry in no time if a patent war is started against them.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (3, Insightful)

SurfsUp (11523) | about 2 years ago | (#40669893)

The China-first strategy seems brilliant to me. Far more price sensitive, which plays to their strength.

It's worse off as a China-based product. (1)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40679059)

Given that the patent & regulatory issues are already being accounted for, there's no blocking issue unique to the US.

This will end up being some sort of piece of relabeled junk with a poorly translated manual for being targeted to China first. With a First World focus, it would be a product more in line with the wants of the First World - the only market that matters.

Just to point out. This is the ex nokia N9 team (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40671739)

They know where the thing sold.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 2 years ago | (#40668697)

Exactly. The problem with Nokia is ever since they've been making decent phones there's no easy way to get them. When most people go shopping for a phone, they don't go online to buy a phone and then get the SIM card, they go to AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, or the T-Mobile store and get the phone there on contract. If your phone isn't in there, its not going to sell in the US plain and simple. The last time I was in one of those stores, I found exactly 1 Nokia phone and it was a Lumia.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (4, Informative)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40669585)

Apparently you have forgotten about how the N900 and N9 have sold, where the latter outdid the whorephones combined. Salespeople were complaining that they couldn't move the Lumia devices while they could move plenty of N9's if they could stock them

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (3, Insightful)

nzac (1822298) | about 2 years ago | (#40668729)

They don't have the patents to release it in the US or most of the rest of the First World.

Companies with key patents to smart phones can't even avoid import bans and I would bet they infringe on a lot Nokia patents that they developed.

The N9 did not get into the US because MS did not want it beating their OS.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (3, Insightful)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40668773)

Despite that, the N9 has outsold the entire Whorephone platform.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (1)

MrHanky (141717) | about 2 years ago | (#40673649)

There isn't any data to support that, so it's most likely untrue. Still, it's the kind of anti-MS bullshit that gets you a cheap +1, insightful from the fanboy mods around here.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | about 2 years ago | (#40670545)

The problem with Nokia in the US was they failed to engage the carriers, which, unfortunately, is a requirement to sell phones in the backwards US phone market.

Moreover, "improvement" for you, or for Jolla. They're in this to make money. If they can sell in the largest market in the world, why would they care about a monopolistic/oligopolistic market like the US?

They're trying to do new and cool stuff, not necessarily the same as what American Telephone & Telegraph wants.

Re:It makes the same "no First World" mistake as N (1)

GNious (953874) | about 2 years ago | (#40670683)

Not understanding your comment about the N9 - only place I know of anyone having bought it is the USA; What was the mistake you're refering to?

cutting edge HW (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40668409)

Hopefully they'll have a model with modern hardware specs, matching the the best Android and Apple phones.

If their best model sports some 320x400 resolution and 3 generation old graphics hardware, it'll be a non-starter with a lot of ppl. If it can compete toe to toe, then I'll consider buying one. Let's say something comparable to the Galaxy S3: 1280x720 pixel screen, one microSD slot, a modern GPU, multi-touch, good GPS, and so on. Be actually competitive, and I'll give it a shot. Ship 3 gen old hardware, and sorry, no dice.

Not likely given the Third World focus. (1)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40668609)

Unlike the First-World focused N900 and N9, hardware will be cut down to appease the Third World market - and be a non-starter with the real target market, the First World.

Re:Not likely given the Third World focus. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40668665)

China is the biggest market, so as long as they design it for that audience, it should do alright.

Only for junk. (1)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40668745)

Given the plethora of cut-down devices and knockoffs, quality will suffer if they target the low-quality market that doesn't matter.

Re:Only for junk. (4, Insightful)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 years ago | (#40668863)

Man, you feel strongly about this issue. Jolla doesn't have to care. They will make phones appropriate for the markets they can get into the most easily, and make some starter money, and build their business from there. They don't have to conquer the world on the first day.

Re:Only for junk. (1)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40669565)

While you feel strongly enough to defend the guy - as if you had a non-trivial interest - by using the "x doesn't have to y" handwave.
A device made in China will be a lower-end device that gets cloned or will use cloned hardware.

They don't have to conquer the world on the first day.

They just have to conquer the First World, which is relatively easy given the interest for such a device.

Re:Only for junk. (2)

Jesus_666 (702802) | about 2 years ago | (#40671097)

I don't see how their first device being made for the Chinese market precludes them from making deals with other manufacturers for devices that target the Western high-end market. I'd assume that it's sensible to accept a reasonable offer instead of telling everyone interested to go home if you don't consider their device to be prestigious enough. If D.Phone made the first reasonable offer then D.Phone is their first manufacturer.

And no, I'm not particularly interested in MeeGo. I don't spend enough money on my prepaid contract to justify more than ten bucks for a new phone and I doubt they'll cater to my market segment. I'm just intrigued by how you seem to think that them not coming out with an iPhone killer first somehow means that MeeGo is dead in your market forever. Shouldn't a deal with the Chinese give them the money and credentials to more aggressively market toward companies that are big in the Western markets?

"Junk" is the best that money can buy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40674453)

A device made in China will be a lower-end device that gets cloned or will use cloned hardware.

I hope so. Low-end clones are what saved the PC, so maybe it can save mobiles too. If China is the last bastion of technical progress and business, then we should all be grateful that we have a China to use.

The main problem with mobiles is that the OSes suck. The hardware that you buy, determines the shitty OS that you have to use, but is otherwise fairly generic and boring. And it's all soon going to cross the overkill boundary for most people, just like desktops did, if it hasn't already. (IMHO battery life is pretty much the only thing about smartphone hardware which is still really awful -- they haven't caught up to dumbphones just yet. Maybe some day.)

I understand if you are willing to pay more for the latest and greatest hardware, just as I know the Core i7 market has some damn good reasons for existing. I'm not even going to accuse you of compensating for a small dick, because I know some people really do ask their computers to work harder than others. If good hardware is available to you, though, it'll be because the same factories are churning out optimum-bang/buck devices in serious quantities.

BTW, low-end clones might also save us from our ISPs. There's little reason a ludicrously powerful (by 2010 standards) no contract smartphone shouldn't be available for under $100 at this point. Tablets are already there, and they're both more and less expensive to make (it's complicated). All those carriers who are "competing" by bundling their services with expensive phones -- oh, I can wait to see their asses handed to them. That is going to be glorious to behold. I hope every AT&T stockholder loses their shirt.

Re:Only for junk. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40668893)

They just have to make it competitive for the target market, whatever that market is.

At this point, China is probably the best market to start with, due to its relative lack of issue with the IP mess that the USA and Europe have gotten themselves into. It makes little sense to start anywhere BUT China. It's a huge market, and it hasn't tied itself in IP knots yet.

Re:Not likely given the Third World focus. (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 2 years ago | (#40670481)

I dunno. It seems that First World countries are hell-bent on becoming Third World countries, as fast as they can. All the stuff sold in First World countries is made in Third World countries anyway. All the crappy stuff made in Third World countries gets sold in Walmarts. Companies sell the same quality stuff in both First World and Third World countries . . . but they charge a lot more for it in First World countries, because the consumers there have more money and are willing to pay the higher price.

hardware will be cut down to appease the Third World market

I guess I'll just have to wait, and see what they actually come up with. But as an N9 owner, I'll be very interested and willing to wait.

Prepare to be underwhelmed - given precedent (1)

sethstorm (512897) | about 2 years ago | (#40679177)

As a N770, N810 Wimax, and N900 owner(twice over), this would be a step down from the N9. Even the N9 itself is a large step down from the do-everything-go-anywhere N900 that represented the peak of what Nokia did with that platform. Despite that, that is what you get when you have a First World focus on hardware design.

Given that there is an existing tablet that has gone down this road(Zenithink C71) and uses cut-down hardware, there is precedent. That is the class of hardware that Jolla will come up with when they do release a product - older generation, strictly low-end hardware wrapped around a shoddy frame.

Re:cutting edge HW (1)

aurasdoom (1279164) | about 2 years ago | (#40670581)

But... why? What would you do with that kind of hardware? There are almost NO APPS on that platform.

Have you ever seen an N9? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40671773)

http://www.gsmarena.com/nokia_n9-3398.php

Same guys. They know what they're doing.
 

Re:cutting edge HW (2)

CockMonster (886033) | about 2 years ago | (#40672929)

I can't see it happening this way. Nokia wouldn't have developed the graphics drivers itself but received them from the GPU manufacturer (due to the presence of HD protection keys these would have been delivered in binary form only), the baseband code is likely to be full of Nokia's IP and thus would have to be done by someone else (Nokia sold its modem team to Renesas before Symbian got axed) and will probably be of iffy quality. I'm not sure these Meego guys will have access to the radio testing rooms as they did under Nokia. Best of luck to them though

M$ Eflop... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40668427)

...fuck you

Nokia (3, Interesting)

WiiVault (1039946) | about 2 years ago | (#40668533)

I'm a little out of the loop on MeeGo development, but with the recent patent trolling and Microsoft loving from Nokia what makes Jolla think that even previous MeeGo agreements will be honored? If they are even enforceable Nokia has chosen a side in the free vs non-free, and just like any sinking ship honesty and goodwill are the first to go. It's not like a major corporation has ever crushed a smaller one just to be mean... Elop is did learn from the best on that one.

Re:Nokia (3, Funny)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#40668969)

I'm a little out of the loop on MeeGo development, but with the recent patent trolling and Microsoft loving from Nokia what makes Jolla think that even previous MeeGo agreements will be honored? If they are even enforceable Nokia has chosen a side in the free vs non-free, and just like any sinking ship honesty and goodwill are the first to go. It's not like a major corporation has ever crushed a smaller one just to be mean... Elop is did learn from the best on that one.

This would probably explain why they decided to go on the Chinese market at first.

deb v.s. rpm (2)

kc8tbe (772879) | about 2 years ago | (#40668701)

Now that Meego isn't beholden to corporate constraints on technology used, is there any plan to go back to the deb packaging system used in Maemo or are the developers sticking with rpm? It would probably be nice for developers if the phone ran a Meego user interface on top of a standard debian core.

Re:deb v.s. rpm (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40668921)

I'd love to hear your thoughts on why deb/apt is better than rpm/yum. Not trolling, I'm actually curious as I have a lot of experience with rpm/yum and none with deb/apt.

Re:deb v.s. rpm (1)

nzac (1822298) | about 2 years ago | (#40668925)

Assuming for a second you are not trolling: They would both do the job but in no measurable way are debs better than rpms.
No one is ever able to provide info on why debs are better than rpms as far as i tell what you want is the Debian repos which is good because of the effort that goes into them rather than the package format.

I would like it if it used what i currently has where the package management system is very similar to openSUSE's. Its yum not rpms that suck.

I know this is ancient and some of it has change but read this anyway:
http://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:RPM_sucks [opensuse.org]

Re:deb v.s. rpm (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40668959)

Currently, Jolla has stated plans [twitter.com] to use a MeeGo derivative called Mer Project (http://merproject.org/) which uses RPM [twitter.com] . This makes sense because MeeGo proper is still encumbered by an untold number of Nokia and Intel patents that have yet to be unraveled, and the former core MeeGo team has stated that the Harmattan user interface is all Nokia and can't form the basis for Jolla's MeeGo-based platform. It should be also be noted that MeeGo/Mer Project does not feature any user interface of its own, it's just a microkernel with modular support for hardware and support for any user interface desired, which Jolla is developing from the ground up.

As far as the previous assumption that Nokia handed over MeeGo patents, that was proven to be false and a result of a mistranslation from an interview. What is true at this point is that Nokia provided incubator support for Jolla via the Bridge incubator program within Nokia before officially incorporating last year. This is all of the extent of Nokia's involvement besides additional support that has yet to be specified, and there's no real evidence to suggest any remaining MeeGo patents will be handed over, at least without some sort of monetary exchange given Nokia's precarious position at the moment.

Mer's UX (2)

unixisc (2429386) | about 2 years ago | (#40669861)

While it may feature no user interface of its own, since Mer is Qt based and so is the KDE family of user interfaces, this phone could use Plasma Active or a mobile version of Razor-qt as its interface

Re:deb v.s. rpm (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | about 2 years ago | (#40669081)

Mer inherits its infrastructure from Meego, so is rpm based.

Being free software, nothing is stopping the community from repackaging the software, submitting them to the debian repositories and creating phone boot images.

Meego? (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | about 2 years ago | (#40669429)

Invented by Jar-Jar?

Re:Meego? (1)

SurfsUp (11523) | about 2 years ago | (#40669923)

Probably doesn't matter in China, but they need a better name all the same. I don't doubt one will land presently. Remember, the Meego name came from a bunch of Nokia and Intel marketdroids. I doubt they have any love for it, other than as a way to identify their particular technology base so people don't think they're totally whacked.

'Low Tech, High Life' (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40670479)

or was it 'High Tech, Low Life' ?

Good luck to them. (1)

Higgs Bosun (2676655) | about 2 years ago | (#40670823)

As an N9 owner it's been a shame to see a great phone not achieve it's potential. I wish them luck, but I can't get excited about this just yet. Without the N9's excellent swipe UI MeeGo could just turn out to be yet another plain phone. The swipe UI, which seems to be what a lot of people seem to be mistaking for "MeeGo" is actually Nokia's own proprietary UI. The N9 is not straight pure MeeGo, any future products are unlikely to resemble the N9.

Unfortunately I can't help but be reminded of the Amiga's dying days when it seemed to be getting passed from one owner to another with promises of future models and the community eagerly believing in that news...and then nothing ever showing up. I'd like to see some diversification of the Apple/Android split of the smartphone market, but I'll only believe it when I see it.

Can't take MeeGo seriously (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40671043)

Sorry, when I see the name MeeGo I immediately flash to an oriental driver, who you could blindfold with dental floss, getting behind the wheel with a bogus California drivers license, looking at a camera and shouting, "Watch me go!" They then procede to wreck the car, taking out a dozen innocent bystanders with it.

WATCH ME GO!

Take away their drivers licenses, please, in the name of all that's good and holy.

The world doesn't need another mobile OS (0)

Dynamoo (527749) | about 2 years ago | (#40671611)

The world doesn't need another mobile OS, it doesn't matter how good it is.. and by all account MeeGo is pretty good. iOS, Android, Windows Phone, BlackBerry OS, WebOS, Bada, Tizen, Symbian, OPhone, Firefox OS.. the list goes on and on. Apart from the Google/Apple duopoly, everyone else is jus fighting over scraps..

Re:The world doesn't need another mobile OS (1)

Higgs Bosun (2676655) | about 2 years ago | (#40672517)

The world doesn't need another mobile OS, it doesn't matter how good it is..

Why not? I've heard that statement before and I don't think I entirely go along with it. Is it because those other players don't stand a chance against the current evil empire? If a new mobile OS can do something better than the existing ones then why wouldn't you want it. The world benefits from someone introducing a disruptive new technology. That's true for more than just mobile phones.

Re:The world doesn't need another mobile OS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40673109)

Should had told that to Google when they were about to release Chrome

The world needs a good and open mobile OS (2)

hkultala (69204) | about 2 years ago | (#40673961)

WP has crappy multitasking, and all your data are belong to Microsoft.

With IOS all your data are belong to Apple. And everything is controller by Apple.

With Android all your data are belong to Google, and performance is bad.

With Symbian the user owns his data, but performance is bad, sw development is really pain, and UI is bad. RIP.

What is needed is operating system that allows the user to own his data, has good performance, and allows the user to use the device the way he wants.
Meego/Mer gives this.

Re:The world needs a good and open mobile OS (1)

Higgs Bosun (2676655) | about 2 years ago | (#40674243)

The Nokia N9 (MeeGo based) scores well on those points. That's why people are trying to give MeeGo a 2nd chance even though Nokia gave MeeGo a death sentence.

It'd be nice... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40675353)

When introducing names of products or companies in articles, if the pronunciation might be ambiguous... such as Jolla. Is that a hard "J" like 'judge', and an "ll" like the "ll" in 'ball'? Or is Spanish pronunciation supposed to be used, in which case it should be pronounced "hoy'ya". If you say something about "dg'all-a" will someone laugh and tell you, "no, it's "hoy'ya"? If you say "hoy'ya" will someone insist it's "dg'all-a"? I shouldn't have to dig around to figure out how to pronounce made-up names of things, just TELL ME!

A good example of someone who does it right is the Pur water filter folks. Everywhere their name is written, a bar indicating the "u" is long appears there between the P and the r, indicating it should be pronounced as though it is the word "pure". Why can't the Jolla people do that? WHICH IS IT!?!

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