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One Tablet Per Child Program Begins In Thailand

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the have-a-tablet dept.

Education 90

societyofrobots writes "Thailand has now put the first 50,000 of a planned 800,000 tablets into the hands of elementary students. Each tablet costs only $80/unit, runs Android ICS, and was manufactured in China. Opponents claim it to be a very expensive populist policy to 'buy votes', while proponents argue it could bypass the root causes of poor education in the country: outdated books and unskilled teachers."

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90 comments

Good. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695005)

Teach them, young, to be CONSUMERS of content; not creators of it!

... just like the Joe Sixpacks ? (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about 2 years ago | (#40695025)

Teach them, young, to be CONSUMERS of content; not creators of it!

 
You mean, just like the Joe Sixpacks ?
 

Re:Good. (0, Flamebait)

Jobless Fellatio (2686337) | about 2 years ago | (#40695331)

Thailand is a country of services, not content creators. Thai's usually are somewhat less creative, but they do great service. Gogo girls, bar girls, soapy girls, live music, great people.

Re:Good. (2)

Jobless Fellatio (2686337) | about 2 years ago | (#40695535)

How is this flamebait? I've done many holidays to thailand.

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696031)

Honestly having had a friend in the navy visit once or twice on shore leave, parent's quote is dead on.

Re:Good. (1)

cmdr_tofu (826352) | about 2 years ago | (#40701351)

So your tourist view of a country gives you the authority to generalize an entire population (69 million). Do you speak any Thai languages? Have you read any indigenous poetry? Have you employed scientific social research methods?

I'm sorry, but it is flamebait, offensive and racist to call an entire country a population of uncreative service-people.

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696825)

Their ladyboys are also top notch. If you're a newbie to Thailand you will definitely get fooled until the point he pulls out his little baby cock after you take him back to your hotel room.

Also a word of warning, the ladyboys tend to carry STDs so make sure to wear a condom!

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40697935)

The first warning should prevent the second one from being necessary.

Re:Good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696925)

The future ladyboys need to be taught how to consume cock from somewhere. At least on their tablet in the classroom is a relatively safe environment.

Can't you create content on a tablet? (2)

qbzzt (11136) | about 2 years ago | (#40697049)

Tablets can run programming languages, drawing programs, word processing, etc. Why can't they create content on it?

Re:Can't you create content on a tablet? (1)

steveha (103154) | about 2 years ago | (#40702345)

Tablets can run programming languages, drawing programs, word processing, etc. Why can't they create content on it?

Of course they can create content on a tablet. It's not as good as a Mac Pro, but that was never an option anyway.

And the better question is: How much content can you create using paper textbooks? Because that's the option really, inexpensive tablets or paper textbooks.

steveha

Tablet without proper teacher training = chaos (2)

ozduo (2043408) | about 2 years ago | (#40695039)

I hope they have thought about infrastructre and proper teacher training before they spend this amount of money

Re:Tablet without proper teacher training = chaos (1)

hackula (2596247) | about 2 years ago | (#40697583)

The amount is about the same they would spend on a new history textbook or two for each student...

Teachers are the problem. (4, Insightful)

GhigoRenzulli (1687590) | about 2 years ago | (#40695067)

Even a powerful and flexible tool is useless if teachers don't know how to use it. I had the same experience with Multimedia Interactive Whiteboards at my daughter school: great potential, but teachers ignore the features and have no practice.

Re:Teachers are the problem. (4, Insightful)

mirix (1649853) | about 2 years ago | (#40695503)

How much tools do they really need for elementary school anyway?

We had chalkboards, and 20 year old books (usually had to share them, also)... I thought the schooling quality was fine on average. Some teachers weren't as good as others.

It's all about the teachers and curriculum, everything else is just fluff. Extras can be nice, but they aren't going to make bad teachers and bad mandatory material magically effective and interesting/fun/whatever.

Re:Teachers are the problem. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695595)

I guess that people will act as education was a buissnes not as investment for future generation but as a way to get richer. I my school I had a bad luck. Politicians were experimenting how they could f*** up educational system soo I was in the middle of 2-3 big reforms. For three year we were learning some pretty boring stuf like Pythagorean theorem...

Tables sounds fine but this will not rise educational level but it will help kids learn how to use google and chat of facebook with other school mates...

Re:Teachers are the problem. (1)

qbzzt (11136) | about 2 years ago | (#40697069)

Using google to find information is a lot of what they need to learn.

Re:Teachers are the problem. (1)

symbolset (646467) | about 2 years ago | (#40699439)

They should learn to hunt the wild evergreen and pulp it like their forebears did. With an onion on their belt, as was the fashion in the day.

Re:Teachers are the problem. (1)

mirix (1649853) | about 2 years ago | (#40695957)

Maybe 'how much tools' is a product of my elementary education. 'Tools' felt uncountable for some reason, but obviously isn't... :-p

Re:Teachers are the problem. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40697033)

Maybe 'how much tools' is a product of my elementary education. 'Tools' felt uncountable for some reason, but obviously isn't... :-p

Teachers aren't the problems. Parents and american society are the problems, school is'nt a fucking prime time television show, nor is a fucking choice. Interesting and fun? that's a fucking movie, not school. But douchebag losers push this theory that "good teachers" should make school entertaining and effective.

Solution: Let the douchebag losers and their spawn learn trades(advanced fry-o-lator maintenance, and automotive lubrication engineers)

And you were looking for "many" not "much".

Re:Teachers are the problem. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695901)

yeh.....same experience here.....dangle the smartboards + laptops (Intel Classmate) in front of parents and then do exactly nothing with them.....would've been better off spending the dosh on a box of Lego

Re:Teachers are the problem. (1)

BevanFindlay (1636473) | about 2 years ago | (#40696093)

You make a good point: an often-missed reality with any humanitarian project is making it holistic - covering all the bases. Throwing money at a problem fixes nothing, and usually makes things worse, unless you do it in a way that fits with the culture, has required infrastructure, training, follow-up, etc.

So here, the tools are great... as long as there's someone who knows how to use them, and the necessary resources available to support them, and the software for them to use, and the power and internet infrastructure, and making it available in their language, and educating them how to use them, and someone to fix them (maybe - they are tablets, after all), etc, etc.

But, I know first-hand that teaching yourself can be more effective than a standard classroom scenario (I was homeschooled), so it may well let the students bypass the useless teachers.

Re:Teachers are the problem. (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 2 years ago | (#40696501)

Man, you ever spend a day at your kid's school to see what teachers are up against? You think the school is going to give them the time and training to make best use of that technology?

Blaming teachers for what's going on in schools is so off-the-mark.

Maybe ask yourself why the principal and assistant principal of a struggling high school in a poor neighborhood are both driving six month old CL-class Mercedes, while teachers have to buy their own teaching materials?

Those teachers are driving '95 Mazdas and making "wage concessions" which means their pay is going down and having to deal with parents who don't like their kids learning about evolution.

Teachers are not the problem.

Re:Teachers are the problem. (1)

blind biker (1066130) | about 2 years ago | (#40697187)

Even a powerful and flexible tool is useless if teachers don't know how to use it. I had the same experience with Multimedia Interactive Whiteboards at my daughter school: great potential, but teachers ignore the features and have no practice.

I agree, in principle, very strongly. However, I don't feel like criticizing this move very much, given the relatively low price of the device. I find it more laughable the initiative of some US schools to give iPad 2's to highschool pupils.

A great step (3, Interesting)

MindPrison (864299) | about 2 years ago | (#40695113)

for humanity.

Even if 80% of the teachers lack knowledge, with this gear, at least the kids stand a chance of growing up with technology, and can get online somehow, and get access to vast amounts of information, the young minds so heartily crave.

Sure, a bunch of them will be sold off by poor families, and a lot will not know what to do with them, but it's a start. This is VERY forward thinking from the Thai gov. and very promising, never mind the votes, this will be great for their people. This will give the kids a taste of technology, and who knows? Maybe that's exactly what's needed to get just ONE kid off to become that great engineer in the future, if so - it's already a success.

Re:A great step (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695165)

64 Million ? you may as well skip the middle steps and just give one kid a 64 Million golden parachute.

Re:A great step (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695725)

So give them only money and no education at all?

Great plan - I can see you really care to give a great independent future for those kids.

Re:A great step (2)

rtfa-troll (1340807) | about 2 years ago | (#40695405)

for humanity.

Even if 80% of the teachers lack knowledge, / Sure, a bunch of them will be sold / a lot will not know what to do with them / Maybe that's exactly what's needed to get just ONE kid off to become that great engineer in the future...

It's a simple cost benefit analysis. The OLPC project has had problems in some areas and successes in others. The project started out with a wholistic set of ideas to block theft; to ensure teaching materials were available; to make the systems useful. The project the followed up with volunteers who went out, realised what problems there were and reacted to them. It still gets lots of criticism. It's an interesting balance but it looks like, on average, it has done good. If this project comes in without proper planning, without proper materials and without a worldwide volunteer group to bring lessons back then the most likely outcome is that it will end up causing twenty alternative better projects to be blocked. I'm sure there will be one engineer created, but if that's at the cost of directing 10,000 other kids to a life of worthless video games the overall project will end up with fewer engineers in Thailand.

The ministry is developing learning content for Grade 2-4 students in digital form. This will be made available online for downloading by students and teachers once it is completed.

At least it's clear that they understand they have to do something with the content. I hope this statement is a misunderstanding and they already have at least some content ready before they start to deliver devices.

Re:A great step (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40698469)

for humanity.

Even if 80% of the teachers lack knowledge, with this gear, at least the kids stand a chance of growing up with technology, and can get online somehow, and get access to vast amounts of information, the young minds so heartily crave.

Sure, a bunch of them will be sold off by poor families, and a lot will not know what to do with them, but it's a start. This is VERY forward thinking from the Thai gov. and very promising, never mind the votes, this will be great for their people. This will give the kids a taste of technology, and who knows? Maybe that's exactly what's needed to get just ONE kid off to become that great engineer in the future, if so - it's already a success.

Well well well. Nice to meet you mr or mrs well to do person. That was a very nice generic, mindless and thoughtless pretty little speech you gave there. Sounds like it came off a note card for a political candidate needing to sound like he is smart and savvy. Honestly, is it possible to make anymore of a generic and knee jerk sounding response?

Only people that have every thing they need talk like that because the only thing they dont have is the self esteem required to keep them from making smug and vacous comments like that on the internet to complete strangers in order to ease back in their chair and grin at just how progressive, caring and open minded they are (or think they are).

Education, my azz (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695159)

Woo hoo, sez the pornographers! 800,000 new horny young minds for us to be purveyors of fine porn to!! What a bonanza!!!

Can we get one of the things to raffle, winner being whomever guesses how many minutes or seconds it took for them to be jailbroken?

Re:Education, my azz (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695521)

Damn right. Better not give them pens and paper either. The little fsckers will use em to pass notes in class.

50k more kids playing Angry Birds and Cut The Rope (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695169)

Yes, that will vault them into an educational wonderland.

Ahh the fetish of computers ..... (2)

kotku (249450) | about 2 years ago | (#40695181)

The assumption with little evidence that putting computers in classrooms at great expense is better than spending the money elsewhere is astounding. Just because alpha geeks enjoy "learning" with computers most people use them as a passive tool. This is not that such tools are good or bad as general consumer items but it is hard to claim that they are a miracle cure for an education system. It is about as a ludicrous claim as "Jesus Saves"

Ironic Comment (1)

arcite (661011) | about 2 years ago | (#40696269)

Considering you are typing this on a computer, connected to the internet. Face it Luddite, ebooks, internet, computers, tablets, are the FUTURE, and the future is now.

Re:Ironic Comment (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40697003)

And yet the actual evidence from classrooms back him up. Also there is nothing 'ironic' about pointing out when just throwing computers at kids doesn't just basically make them learn better even if it is on the Internet.

Re:Ironic Comment (1)

serveto (1028028) | about 2 years ago | (#40697027)

Considering you are typing this on a computer, connected to the internet. Face it Luddite, ebooks, internet, computers, tablets, are the FUTURE, and the future is now.

None of which addresses the point that spending money on computers might not be good value in this case. P.S. Look up irony, you might learn something.

Re:Ahh the fetish of computers ..... (1)

hackula (2596247) | about 2 years ago | (#40697723)

Think about this. One of these tablets cost about the same amount as 1 or 2 textbooks. Textbooks have to be updated anyway. Put the content of all of the 8 or 9 books the average kid has on to their tablet and you just got the best deal of books of all time. Throw in Wikipedia and the rest of the entire internet and these kids now have access to nearly limitless information...all for ~$100. We need to start doing this in the US, where we spend ~5-10k per year on each kid, but still have 4 of them huddled over one shared book that happens to be 30 years old. Cheap content readers are the future of education.

Re:Ahh the fetish of computers ..... (1)

Bert64 (520050) | about 2 years ago | (#40702599)

Geeks enjoy learning with computers because somewhere along the lines we were encouraged to do so at a young age...

Kids are naturally inquisitive, and when given the opportunity to explore what something is capable of that's exactly what they will do.

The problem is when people are exposed at the wrong age, or to devices which are too limited, or to devices which discourage people from taking them apart and experimenting (either with dire warnings, or too easily breaking and too difficult to repair)... In that respect, compare windows which is easily broken and contains warnings scaring people away from system files etc, to the C64 where BASIC was in rom and was easily restored to a working default state by hitting the power.

On the C64 you were encouraged to experiment with BASIC both by the literature supplied with the system and magazines of the time, safe in the knowledge that you couldn't break it... Windows makes no such encouragement, and has users fearful of breaking it, especially if the machine is shared with others who would be angry if the box were rendered unbootable.

Give kids the right start, and many will become geeks.

Unskilled Teachers? (3, Insightful)

Alworx (885008) | about 2 years ago | (#40695195)

If the issue is unskilled teachers, I don't think tablets can make miracles.

Rather, invest in long-distance video conferencing gear!

Re:Unskilled Teachers? (1)

cmdr_tofu (826352) | about 2 years ago | (#40701517)

Internet access via tablets can enable distance education of this sort:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VRtujwa_b8 [youtube.com]

I can't seem to find the specs, but I doubt they come with 3G. How is free WIFI in populous parts of Thailand? rural parts? Devices are a good thing, but without Internet access or some infrastructure for getting educational content to students they will not be useful.

So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695223)

"...proponents argue it could bypass the root causes of poor education in the country: outdated books and unskilled teachers."

Let me get this right: Outdated books and unskilled teachers won't matter if we give the children tablets?
That's like saying lack of food and water won't matter, as long as we have internet access and air conditioning.

Tablets won't solve a problem with teachers (1)

Svartormr (692822) | about 2 years ago | (#40695239)

At any age only a small fraction of students can truly learn well on their own. And any student has a better chance with a good teacher. To quote Isaac Asimov (from a differrent matter) this is like trying to cure diarrhoea by modifying the plumbing; it's not dealing with the real problems.

instant access to "free" information... (3, Insightful)

acidfast7 (551610) | about 2 years ago | (#40695287)

...that's what the children will have, for better or worse.

wikipedia does quite nicely replace either outdated/beat-up textbooks or overcomes a text book shortage.

even if the teachers are not replaced, those who can and want to learn, can do so with the tablets :D

Re:instant access to "free" information... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40698191)

even if the teachers are not replaced, those who can and want to learn, can do so with the tablets :D

Those who want to learn have always had options open to them. In some populations, the cost of learning is higher than the cost of joining the F average crowd, but the option of learning is still present.

Replacing 40lbs (18kg) of mostly unopenned textbooks with something that's actually convenient is a very good move. I doubt misuse of this tech will result in noticably worse results than the things kids can distract themselves doing with paper, a pencil, two paperclips and a hair-tie. Conversly, I don't expect any significant improvement in education either.

Wrong sequence (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695325)

Tablets and other IT stuff are merely tools. Just by giving kids a tablet won't change anything.

Give some random stranger who never played music in his life a Stradivari and he won't be any better.

1. Educate your teachers and make them good. (or fire them)
THEN 2. You can educate your kids using tablets.

Bangkok Post (1)

jginspace (678908) | about 2 years ago | (#40695337)

The caption in the Bangkok Post article reads 'A worker loads boxes labelled "One Tablet Per Child" on to a truck at the Education Ministry in Bangkok. The ministry sent off trucks on Wednesday to deliver the first batch of 55,000 tablet computers to primary schools in eight provinces.'.

Are they saying that all 55,000 boxes are currently sitting at the Education Ministry in Bangkok? Such logistical half-assedness would add at least a dollar a unit to the final cost I should imagine. Or more likely it was just a photo op and the Bangkok Post didn't properly attribute it as such. This being Thailand, and this being the Bangkok Post (establishment ring kissers), we can never be sure.

Sounds good to me (4, Informative)

steveha (103154) | about 2 years ago | (#40695347)

This isn't a magical silver bullet; nothing is. But these tablets cost $80 and are planned to last for three years; that's less than $30 per year, and then the student gets to keep the 3-year-old tablet. The tablet can serve as a textbook, or can run interactive lessons, and the article says the Thai education ministry is developing tutorial content that will run on the tablets.

Like the OLTP XO computers, these tablets will have no moving parts, and no cooling fan. If they are well-made, they should be reliable even in Thailand's climate; and they may be more cost-effective than paper textbooks.

P.S. It's amazing to me how so many people here can speed-read a summary and go straight to the dismissive comments about how this won't solve anything, etc. Presumably the Thai education ministry studied the problem and came to the conclusion that these tablets would be worth buying. Maybe you really are that much smarter than the Thai education ministry... or, maybe you shouldn't be so quick to make a snap judgement.

steveha

Re:Sounds good to me (2)

jginspace (678908) | about 2 years ago | (#40695373)

Presumably the Thai education ministry studied the problem and came to the conclusion that these tablets would be worth buying. Maybe you really are that much smarter than the Thai education ministry... or, maybe you shouldn't be so quick to make a snap judgement.

For starters, read this:

BANGKOK (AFP) — High school test results in Thailand have revealed a failure rate of more than 80 percent in mathematics, biology and computer studies — among the teachers. The failure rates for teachers who took exams in their own subjects were about 88 percent for computer studies, 84 percent for mathematics, 86 percent in biology and 71 percent in physics, the education ministry said. And almost 95 percent of about 37,500 secondary school directors did not score a pass mark in English and technology, according to the ministry. The poor results have ignited controversy in Thailand about educational standards. “Even teachers fail, so how can we raise the quality of students?” Education Minister Chinnaworn Boonyakiat was quoted as saying by the Bangkok Post newspaper. More than 84,000 teachers and school directors took the exams, the first of their kind.

Re:Sounds good to me (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 2 years ago | (#40695569)

Presumably the Thai education ministry studied the problem and came to the conclusion that these tablets would be worth buying. Maybe you really are that much smarter than the Thai education ministry...

Smarter? Probably not. Less prone to grandstanding? Probably. Less corrupt? Certainly.

Re:Sounds good to me (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696123)

I live in Thailand. For those who don't the tablets were one of Prime Minister Yingluck's election promises. There is at least an element of grandstanding to it. It's the Shinawatra clans basic modus operandi for winning elections - high visibility populism.

That doesn't necessarily mean it's not a good idea.

Re:Sounds good to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40697157)

I guess it's better than the Politicians here in the US who make promises like that during the election process, but after they are elected forget they even mentioned whatever they promised.

Re:Sounds good to me (1)

arcite (661011) | about 2 years ago | (#40696185)

Once the tablets are deployed, the power to instantly update the curriculum via internet updates is powerful. The ability to add additional content, provide supplemental materials, tutorials, videos. The possibilities are endless. Tablets are indeed just a tool, but they are also a key to the world. They will enable millions of students to experience the wider world and do and learn things that were not possible before.

Re:Sounds good to me (1)

bsdewhurst (986863) | about 2 years ago | (#40697819)

Once the tablets are deployed, the power to instantly update the curriculum via internet updates is powerful.

Unfortunately there are a large number of schools in Thailand, mostly those in rural areas that don't even have power let alone the internet. For example the school closest to me has bathrooms and storage inside but the two classrooms only have a roof and one wall with a blackboard on it.

Also if you read the specs these tablets have a battery life of 2-3 hours, if there is no power at the school you better hope the students have it at home and remembered to charge their tablet. In a way this is one thing OLPC got right with the XO1 include a hand crank.

But once the schools all have basic infrastructure then you are right the tablets could be a very powerful tool

Re:Sounds good to me (1)

steveha (103154) | about 2 years ago | (#40702295)

Also if you read the specs these tablets have a battery life of 2-3 hours, if there is no power at the school you better hope the students have it at home and remembered to charge their tablet. In a way this is one thing OLPC got right with the XO1 include a hand crank.

Actually, the hand crank thing was just an idea and never implemented.

Instead of a hand crank, they decided to go with a "yo-yo" charger, not attached to the laptop at all. The "yo-yo" would allow kids to use leg muscles, rather than (weaker) arm muscles, to charge the laptop.

But the "yo-yo" was never implemented either.

http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Peripherals/YoYo [laptop.org]

And, speaking as someone who bought an XO, I think a 2-3 hour battery life is pretty comparable. (I suppose that OLPC might have modified the system software and stretched the battery life later, after I gave away my XO. But the XO is still an x86 chip instead of an ARM, and the battery life is not likely to be that much better than an Android tablet.)

Overall, I think the Android tablet is going to be at least as good for education as an XO. The Android tablet doesn't have the cool feature of a screen that works in bright sunlight as a black-and-white, and probably doesn't have a camera, but I think neither deficiency is a deal-breaker. And Android 4.0 ICS is a much better environment than Sugar, IMHO.

steveha

last 3 years? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696375)

half of them won't last 3 months between theft, selling, or damage

Re:Sounds good to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696477)

How can you be sure the tablets will last 3 yrs. Noone's made a tablet that last 3 yrs excpet Apple since iPad was introduced less than 3 yrs ago. So no proof tablets will last that long, and this is made by noname Chinese manufacturer unlike iPad which is made by big Chinese company with better q/c.

Re:Sounds good to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40697197)

There were "tablets" well before the iPad you do realize, right?

They were just more $$ and setup more for business/medical use and either ran a proprietary OS or Windows typically.

Anecdotal evidence (3, Informative)

k(wi)r(kipedia) (2648849) | about 2 years ago | (#40697107)

Anecdotal evidence [itproportal.com] from Africa that such a program MIGHT work:

[A team from the One Laptop Per Child Project] left boxed tablets in a village and within three hours the children had opened the boxes and worked out how to turn the tablets on. After just a couple of weeks of unassisted use, the children were seen competing with each when reciting the alphabet, which they learned from one of the many pre-installed apps.

Re:Sounds good to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40697119)

P.S. It's amazing to me how so many people here can speed-read a summary and go straight to the dismissive comments about how this won't solve anything, etc. Presumably the Thai education ministry studied the problem and came to the conclusion that these tablets would be worth buying. Maybe you really are that much smarter than the Thai education ministry... or, maybe you shouldn't be so quick to make a snap judgement.

That's some of the dumbest logic ever and is a fallacious argument from authority. This reads like what the idiots were saying when people were calling bullshit on Dubya over his original reasons for attacking Iraq (they have mobile weapons labs and he has ties to Al Qaeda!!!). Do you have any actual evidence that this guy knows more than anyone else rather than this just being grandstanding on possibly someone getting a kick back?

Yeah, i agree with you. (-1, Offtopic)

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A computer hacker in thailand (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695771)

I live in thailand and in the last 2 years. 2 things have got done.
#1 3G acesss.
#2 Tablets in the hands of kids.
That is a hell of a improvement.

The previous military goverments parlament. Keep in mind thailand is still not a democracy.
They met twice.
#1 1 time was to give themselves a raise.
#2 Start a war with cambodia.

For the record these tablets where supposed to be in the hands of the kids over 2 years ago. Before current goverment was in place.

Nuff said.

Re:A computer hacker in thailand (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696099)

"still not a democracy"

And you want to see a democracy why?

Re:A computer hacker in thailand (1)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | about 2 years ago | (#40698481)

To paraphrase the old saying: democracy sucks, but it beats every other system we've tried.

Re:A computer hacker in thailand (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40709747)

A democracy is three convicted serial rapists and a you nubile teenager deciding evening activities.

'Old sayings' have no standing other than anecdotal. Facts do.

Re:A computer hacker in thailand (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40697137)

And as of a few days ago we've got a dozen HD channels. Doesn't affect the kids, I know, but it makes us old geezers happy.

Back on topic, two years ago useful $80 tablets were impossible.

Let's talk about ladyboys (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695805)

I'm still waiting for a ladyboy comment.

How about "one child per tablet"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40695917)

A free slave with each tablet? I'm fairly sure that some economic analysis would value human life in certain countries cheaply enough.

How is poor education solved with computers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696091)

Computers are just tools, like a hammer or a gun. All tools require responsibility and skills to use properly. When used improperly they can be destructive.

"outdated books and unskilled teachers"

There is the problem, and I take it these conditions are completely ignored? So we pass out computers?

Great, more facebook users and youtube cellphone videos of flash mob rioting.

Riiiiight. /Dr. Evil

Re:How is poor education solved with computers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696391)

You seem to be confusing capitalism with social democracy, or something else with a conscience.

The question you should be asking is, "How can we profit from selling to a poor country?" (As respresented by its corrupt government.)

Re:How is poor education solved with computers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40709843)

"confusing capitalism with social democracy"

You got me there buddy, I have no idea what you are talking about. I am speaking to the effectiveness of educational efforts.

"How can we profit from selling to a poor country?"

Support that statement.

Now if you were asking ""How can we profit?", I have no problem with that. But that doesn't seem to apply here does it?

Geez (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 2 years ago | (#40696419)

I'm so old that when I read "One Tablet Per Child Program" I thought it meant there was a shortage of some medication.

I'm going back to bed.

perspective (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696433)

in rural thailand 80 usd is roughly what it costs to rent a small house for a month

the saga continues (1)

Alomex (148003) | about 2 years ago | (#40696549)

....and thus another billion dollar wasted gets added to the long tally of Nicholas Negroponte, formerly of the MIT Media Hype Lab.

Re:the saga continues (1)

k(wi)r(kipedia) (2648849) | about 2 years ago | (#40697483)

Read my post below. Rereading the summary, I now have serious doubts Negroponte is behind this deployment. The Thai tablets will supposedly be running Android ICS. Negroponte's tablet deployment would have run a more conventional GNU/Linux install underneath what would most probably be the Sugar [laptop.org] interface (Fedora-based).

Re:the saga continues (1)

Alomex (148003) | about 2 years ago | (#40697531)

Even if he wasn't directly behind it, he's the father of the OLPC idea, which has been nothing but a waste of resources in regions than can ill afford it.

In the USA.. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696563)

The USA is also moving towards one tablet per child except here it is called Ritalin.

The tablets cannot access the Internet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40696719)

I live in Thailand and have followed this development for the past few months. The tablets cannot access the Internet and the contents in the tablets are atrocious. I don't think it will work as an effective educational tool.

Is this an official OLPC project? (1)

k(wi)r(kipedia) (2648849) | about 2 years ago | (#40697383)

Can somebody confirm if this is an official project of the same organization behind the XO laptop (One Laptop Per Child) or a local (Thai) project with a similar sounding name? I cannot find any mention of any Thai deployment in the official OLPC web site, laptop.org (Google keywords, "site:laptop.org" "thailand"). There is mention of an official One Tablet Per Child (OTPC), but the links invariably point to pilot projects in Africa (i.e. the project is still being "trial"-ed). From a blog entry [laptop.org] dated May 2012:

Can tablets make a difference to a child learning to read for the first time, without a teacher or traditional classroom structure? That's the question we are exploring with our reading project, currently underway in Ethiopia.

Re:Is this an official OLPC project? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40733231)

This isn't an project from One Laptop per Child (laptop.org), this a program that use a similar name OTPC but doesn't have any relation to OLPC

Lesson in slow responses (1)

Air-conditioned cowh (552882) | about 2 years ago | (#40697587)

This is an excellent training tool to prepare students for later life and situations like:

1) Waiting for a train that is cancelled
2) Watching paint dry
3) Racing snails with chronic fatigue syndrome through molasses

That's what Chinese tablets running ICS are like.

Missing the point (2)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about 2 years ago | (#40699225)

I don't know if anyone has been keeping track, but there's this thing called the internet where you can get a really good education for free. Tablets will give children access to this internet.

We currently have four major players in this arena:

  • Khan academy [khanacademy.org], for high-school up through 1st year college
  • Coursera [coursera.org], college level
  • MITx/edx [mit.edu], college level
  • Udacity [udacity.com], college level

This is in addition to all the universities which are putting lecture videos online, along with course materials and (in a few cases) the textbook content. Oh, and youtube videos of lectures, and the zillion-and-one websites explaining whichever subject you're interested in. Google "relativity" or "tensors" sometime - see if you can find an explanation that works for you.

An experiment in India has shown that when you give uneducated, poor children access to an internet-connected computer they figure things out on their own. Complex, interesting, and difficult things that you might not expect an ignorant user to manage. (Such as typing a thank-you note without access to a keyboard.)

This is all you need, kids will figure things out for themselves. Having a teacher to nudge them in the right direction, or help them over a difficult part is just gravy.

Kids are voracious learners, and have always been. Abe Lincoln used to sit at home practicing his "ciphering" (arithmetic) by drawing numbers on a shovel with charcoal. Over and over, until he got comfortable with the math. All kids do this - it's in the nature of growing up.

Just giving kids access to material will be a huge leap over the current situation. Schools and teachers are extra.

Is It Me (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40699775)

Is it me, or are the only people who really believe tablets are useful in a professional business/school environment people who don't really understand technology? We were issued iPads at my work and I've used it exactly ZERO times in the last year. It takes longer to take notes on the iPad and it's slower than writing on a pad. Then there's the problem of synchronizing email between the iPad and the desktop. Most of the time the boss, who had the bright iPad idea, has to be guided through the most simple of tasks on the iPad by IT staff. The only reason it was a "good idea" is because the boss thinks they're cool, but hasn't actually managed to find any real use for them.

To illustrate the depths of the stupidity, the boss proclaimed the iPads as a step towards the paperless future. So what happens when she gets an email on her iPad? She prints it and brings me the paper copy. "Forward? What's that?"

Unnecessary redundant additional extra word. (1)

AAWood (918613) | about 2 years ago | (#40700703)

"Each tablet costs only $80/unit"

Umm, does the summary really need to say "$80/unit" rather than just "$80", seeing as it already states at the start of the sentence that this is the cost of "each tablet"? Unless each single tablet can be a variable number of units...

Pad as a teaching device (1)

SlashDev (627697) | about 2 years ago | (#40705299)

Tablets as they are today are not and will never be reaching devices, they are media devices, period. A true teaching devices is one that has a monochrome screen and a blinking cursor.

tablets are terrible as a teaching tool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40706699)

They have internet access but they are incredibly slow, the keyboard is non-existent and annoying, the resolution is horrendous, and the fact that it's not even compatible with PC's is a huge set-back. Unless these kids are getting a windows 8 tablet that comes with a keyboard and mouse, then i don't see a point to it.

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