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ESA Summer of Code In Space 2012

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the if-you-write-it-they-will-come dept.

Programming 21

phyr writes "The European Space Agency is looking for student coders to join the Summer of Code in Space. ESA will pay 4000 Euros to each student for contributing to a space related open source project for the summer. Accepted student applicants are paired with a mentor from the participating projects, thus gaining exposure to real-world software development scenarios. Mentor organizations have been selected. Students now have until July 27 to submit their applications. Check out the ideas pages of each project such as for the NEST SAR Toolbox"

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21 comments

WTF Apple (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40706241)

So I've been trying out the latest beta version of OS X Mountain Lion and here [imageshack.us] is a shot of my desktop. LOL how could anyone *really* work like this? Apple is clearly integrating the wrong aspects of iOS into OSX.

Modern slavery (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40706349)

Let the head hunting begin!

Re:Modern slavery (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40706443)

*BRAINZ*

What about this is "in space" ? (0, Flamebait)

Qubit (100461) | about 2 years ago | (#40706659)

ESA Summer of Code in Space 2012 (SOCIS 2012) is a program run by the European Space Agency. It aims at offering student developers stipends to write code for various space-related open source software projects. Through SOCIS, accepted student applicants are paired with a mentor or mentors from the participating projects, thus gaining exposure to real-world software development scenarios. In turn, the participating projects are able to more easily identify and bring in new developers.

Let's see...

Are the students in space? No.

Is someone in space communicating with the students? No.

Is the coding going on in space? No.

Is this just trying to capitalize on Google Summer of Code and tack on "in space"? No....I mean, yes.

Is the code going to end up in space? Not really... -- most of the projects are viewers [kde.org] for [helioviewer.org] data [sourceforge.net] here [gnu.org] on [unistra.fr] earth [kde.org]. I clicked on a bunch of them and I don't think any of them are trying to actually do dev work that will end up "In Space."

How about calling it "ESA Summer of Coding for Space Projects" or "ESA Summer of Code Destined for Space" (actually "Code for analyzing heavenly data" would be more accurate) or even go over the top and sound actually funny with "ESA Summer of Code: To Infinity and Beyond" ?

*shakes head*

Re:What about this is "in space" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40706849)

if you do not finish the project will you be shot into space : Yes

practical details (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40707541)

As a practical matter, for code that is going to "execute in space", the delay from "write code" to "execute code" is typically on the order of 6 months, given the verification and test required (except for trivial toys.. if an astronaut on ISS plays Angry Birds, I don't count that).

SO given the time, code in summer won't run in space til winter.

Re:practical details (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40707731)

Er, the definition of 'summer' in space is somewhat arbitrary.

Re:What about this is "in space" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40707553)

wow you're not cynical at all...

If you actually go to the page, they specifically say it was inspired by Google Summer of Code. so they give credit where credit is due.

In regards to the viewer comment, 99.9% of space launches put up satellites for practical purposes. So to say that viewers aren't necessary for those organizations in actually wrong. Being able to visualize where your satellite could impact given a worst case scenario is considered when developing these satellites. Additionally, visualizing the trajectories of 1000 other satellites is also important. There's a lot of space junk up there.

Finally, not everything is a viewer. Two of the three things you linked to are not viewers. Read their about page and you'd know that.

Octave sure as hell isn't a viewer (which you linked to). It's a MATLAB clone and a damn good one. You'd know that if you've ever used MATLAB. People make an occasional plot with it. It's a viewer just as much as Python is a program for visualization for having matplotlib.

GoGN is a mesh discritization tool, they use pictures to show off the capability. Most of engineering is making a mesh of something, applying loads, running an analysis, and looking at pretty pictures. Meshing is arguably the hardest step to do right.

The ESA funded engineering projects that they believe are useful, not general computer science projects. There's a huge difference. Engineering is all about understanding a problem and finding a way to solve it. Viewers are for understanding your data.

Re:What about this is "in space" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40707587)

To make it even more clear, the spectral tools are used for analyzing data that we receive. Why would you put this code on a satellite. You don't do analysis in space, you send it to the ground and do it here. You take data in space and that's it. These tools are useful in developing things that go into space and analyzing data that comes from space. That's worthwhile, not putting the code on the space station. That's dangerous.

I finally found the "in space" part... (1)

Qubit (100461) | about 2 years ago | (#40708301)

If you actually go to the page, they specifically say it was inspired by Google Summer of Code. so they give credit where credit is due.

What? You want me to RTFA? :-)

Anyhow, if they say that it was inspired by GSoC, doesn't that mean that they realize that they're capitalizing on the name?

In regards to the viewer comment, 99.9% of space launches put up satellites for practical purposes. So to say that viewers aren't necessary for those organizations in actually wrong.

Now you're just puting words in my mouth -- when did I say that viewers/data visualization tools aren't useful for the ESA? I think the ESA has a great idea here, and both a number of FOSS projects, the ESA, and a number of space-related organizations can benefit from the result. The whole point I was making is that the name portrays this as putting stuff (code?) up in space, and all of the links I clicked on didn't show that.

Being able to visualize where your satellite could impact given a worst case scenario is considered when developing these satellites. Additionally, visualizing the trajectories of 1000 other satellites is also important. There's a lot of space junk up there.

Sure, that's helpful, but it seems more of a "mission control" piece than an "in space" piece.

Finally, not everything is a viewer.

Perhaps I was too general in my depiction of the stated projects. It was my understanding, based on clicking on a half-dozen links, that the planned projects were to be used as either visualizers of data on the ground (not in any kind of active tracking, etc..), or as general mapping/modeling tools. Everything looked ground-based.

After reading through a bunch of the other links (the "Selected mentoring organizations [esa.int]" page is super-dense), it looks like there are actually a number of software projects will make it to space (or at least high altitudes). Some, like OpenCube [opencubeproject.org] nano-satellite hardware/software stack describe the project in plain English, but some are very technical from the get-go, e.g. pyNastran [google.com] with the tag line "Nastran BDF Reader/Writer, F06 Reader/Writer, OP2 Reader, OP4 Reader & GUI," but no description or link or About page giving us a hint about what 'Nastran [wikipedia.org]', 'BDF', 'F06', 'OP2', or 'OP4' means. It would be really great to have a blurb about each project on the mentoring organizations page, just so that we could see at a glance the purpose of each project, and what specific tasks they were aiming to complete for SoCiS

The ESA funded engineering projects that they believe are useful, not general computer science projects. There's a huge difference. Engineering is all about understanding a problem and finding a way to solve it. Viewers are for understanding your data.

The ESA funded a number of projects in various different areas. I just wish that they had chosen a more inclusive name so that both the projects that were going to space (hardware, software control, etc..) as well as the ground-based projects were both covered. "ESA Summer of Code" would have been short and descriptive. If they want to make it "in space," they should hire that sign painter from Kickstarter [kickstarter.com] to paint a nice sign with a bold offset section for the "In Space!" portion of the sign.

Re:I finally found the "in space" part... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40708869)

no one ever reads the article...flame wars are more interesting...i don't know why people would ever assume that :P

I guess I don't see it that way; very much an engineer. To be fair, I am somewhat biased b/c my open-source project is participating in SOCIS :) Thanks for the feedback on defining what Nastran is. No one ever thought of that...it's geared to people in the industry and I'm sure the people selecting it knew what it was. However, for people participating in SOCIS, it's hugely important...oops!

Cool Idea - I can relate (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40706805)

As a senior computer science student who is spending part of his time writing image analysis software for a Martian geological study, I think this seems like a pretty cool idea. It's neat to see ways to impact space exploration and discovery with software - my primary job is working as a programmer for software services at my university's IT department which, while a good work environment and a job that I'm thankful for, doesn't offer the kind of awe-inspiring discovery that doing work for space research can. My Mars work has been the most rewarding part of my summer, even though it doesn't offer any financial benefits (I wouldn't mind getting the equivalent of 4000 euros; I get co-authorship, though, which is pretty snazzy considering it's for a graduate level research project and I'm in undergrad). Hopefully the ESA's Summer of Code will help other CS students discover the same kind of wonder in developing software for space research that I have as a result of my work this summer. :-)

- C

Are there any age restrictions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40706887)

I'll look em up later, but if someone is in the know ... thanks in advance.

18 + student in europe/canada (2)

oneiros27 (46144) | about 2 years ago | (#40712611)

http://sophia.estec.esa.int/socis2012/?q=faq#socis_elig_restrictions [esa.int]

The age bit's been mentioned (18) ... but you must be a student at an accredited institution in a restricted list of countries (other than Canada, all are in Europe) ... which is what's going to knock out most of the readers on here.

(disclaimer: I was a mentor for a SOCIS 2011 project, and I just found out I'm listed on some 2012 projects, too, even though I don't have time to mentor this summer)

mod 0P (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40707281)

Our ability to maintained that too best. Individuals

mod dOwn (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40707437)

walk up to a play Had at lunchtime survival prospects and distraction faster, cheaper, non-fucking-existantl. series of internal

Work towards OSCOMAK and OpenVirgle? (3, Interesting)

Paul Fernhout (109597) | about 2 years ago | (#40720163)

From: http://www.kurtz-fernhout.com/oscomak/ [kurtz-fernhout.com]

The OSCOMAK project will foster a community in which many interested individuals will contribute to the creation of a distributed global repository of manufacturing knowledge about past, present and future processes, materials, and products.

The project's short-term benefits will include

        * technology education,
        * historical education,
        * collaboration,
        * sustainable technology development,
        * public science literacy, and
        * knowledge democratization.

The project's ultimate long-term goal will be to generate a repository of knowledge that will support the design and creation of space settlements. Three forces -- individual creativity, social collaboration, and technological tools -- will join to create a synergistic effort stronger than any of these forces could produce alone. We hope to use the internet to produce an effect somewhat like that described in "The Skills of Xanadu" by Theodore Sturgeon (available in his book The Golden Helix).

We will develop software tools to enable the creation of this knowledge repository: to collect, organize, and present information in a way that encourages collaboration and provides immediate benefit. Manufacturing "recipes" will form the core elements of the repository. We will also seed the repository, interact with participants, and oversee the evolution of the repository.

You can read a paper we presented on this project in the Proceedings of the Thirteenth SSI/Princeton Conference on Space Manufacturing May 7-9, 2001, which we have made available on the web: here.
http://www.kurtz-fernhout.com/oscomak/SSI_Fernhout2001_web.html [kurtz-fernhout.com]
The slides for the presentation are here.
http://www.kurtz-fernhout.com/oscomak/KFReviewPaperForSSIConference2001.pdf [kurtz-fernhout.com]

You can read an essay on how to to find the financing to create a "Star Trek" like society here.
http://www.kurtz-fernhout.com/oscomak/AchievingAStarTrekSociety.html [kurtz-fernhout.com] ...

It is the aim of this project to create an open-source community centered around applications and knowledge related to space settlement. To gain the broadest participation, the project will also include knowledge related to terrestrial settlements. The initial focus will be on collecting "manufacturing recipes" on how to make things: for example, how to make a 1930's style lathe. Information collected will range from historical interest (fabrication techniques of the stone age to make flint knives) to current (fabrication techniques to make stainless steel knives) to futuristic (fabrication techniques requiring nanotechnology to make diamond knives). This project will involve potentially hundreds of thousands of individuals across the globe. It is expected that ultimately millions of individuals (many in developing nations) will benefit from use of this database directly or indirectly.

====

Still working on it on and off, been about a quarter century...
"Self-Replicating Space Habitat graduate school purpose and plans from 1988"
http://www.pdfernhout.net/princeton-graduate-school-plans.html [pdfernhout.net]

I've been mostly working towards a social semantic desktop to support the creative, organizational, and analysis parts. And still not much to show for it. :-)

See also:
http://www.openvirgle.net/ [openvirgle.net]

Although I'd suggest looking hard at OpenLuna, TMP2, the Mars Society's efforts, Open Source Ecology, the Lifeboat Foundation, and similar projects for possible collaboration.

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