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Ask Slashdot: Storing Items In a Sealed Chest For 25 Years?

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the termites-not-encouraged dept.

Data Storage 434

New submitter accet87 writes "We are celebrating the Silver Jubilee of our graduation next month and have come up with an idea where we will build an air-tight chest in which each of us will deposit something and will open the chest only on our Golden Jubilee, i.e. after another 25 years. I want to understand what kind of items can be safely stored for 25 years and what kind of precautions are required to be taken. I am sure things like paper, non-ferrous metallic objects, wood, etc., will hold up well. What about data storage electronically? I don't think CD/DVDs, etc., will be usable. Even if the data is retained, reading it in 2037 may be a challenge."

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Romney - VOTE FOR YOUR FUTURE (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40723911)

A vote for Mitt is a vote for less government regulation, lower taxes on our job creators, and curtailing of entitlements for those among us who do not work for them. Are you sick of seeing the family down the street sit home all day, eating McDonalds and waiting for the mailman to come with the precious government check containing your money? Or, when the government runs a defecit because they're sending out too many of those checks, watching it print print print more? Do you believe health care should be earned and payed for and not given away to the dregs of society who abuse their bodies daily and expect us to foot the bill for them? Get real. This country has turned into a Goodwill store, and needs to return to the ideals of the founders and reward those who have ambition, and punish or drive out those who do not.

Mitt health plan is death camps for pre existing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40723961)

Mitt health plan is death camps for per-existing conditions where you are better off in lock up.

Re:Mitt health plan is death camps for pre existin (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724031)

Pure Darwinian natural selection.

Re:Mitt health plan is death camps for pre existin (-1, Offtopic)

ZankerH (1401751) | about 2 years ago | (#40724125)

But republicans don't believe in atheist darwinian nazi communism!

Re:Romney - VOTE FOR YOUR FUTURE (-1, Offtopic)

busyqth (2566075) | about 2 years ago | (#40724017)

Are you sick of seeing the family down the street sit home all day, eating McDonalds and waiting for the mailman to come with the precious government check containing your money?

Hey, it's not that bad. They're go to Captain D's more than McDonalds.

Do you believe health care should be earned and payed for and not given away to the dregs of society who abuse their bodies daily and expect us to foot the bill for them?

Absolutely! And If you don't have a cool $1 million in the bank to cover expenses after a car wreck or heart attack, well that's just cause you're a lazy bum and you deserve to die, or better yet, live in constant excruciating pain for another miserable 20 years.

This country has turned into a Goodwill store, and needs to return to the ideals of the founders and reward those who have ambition, and punish or drive out those who do not.

Let's not just drive them out. Let's just toss them into the sea! That way no one has to deal with the scum.

Re:Romney - VOTE FOR YOUR FUTURE (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724227)

You know one thing I don't understand. You listen to people like Neal Boortz or Sean Hannity or Glenn Beck and you constantly hear about how hard business owners and executives work, how they work so hard they have earned their keep, etc.

I don't doubt they work hard. I wouldn't be surprised if it's mostly workaholics with shitty home lives (due to no real work-life balance) who make it that far up the corporate ladder. Fine. I think hard work should be rewarded. I think working harder than you means I should make more than you. No problem. However, one part of this never made any sense to me.

Let's imagine a business owner who makes $10 million per year. He employs people. Cool. He creates jobs. Good. He had to take risks to get where he is today. Understood. He really does put in some long hours. I don't doubt it. Maybe his average employee who also works hard makes (let's be generous) $50,000 a year. Cool.

Now, here's the part I don't understand. Somebody explain this to me. It's the one and only thing that makes me sympathetic to the contempt many Leftists have for those who are successful in business. The employee at $50,000 works hard and so does the owner at $10 mil/year. Does the owner work 200 times harder than the employee? If the employee works 40 hours a week, does the owner work 8,000 hours a week to justify his 200x salary? Of course not, that would be impossible. There are only 168 hours in a week.

Why, it's almost as if the math doesn't add up. It's as though the owner is actually exploiting his labor force by paying them only a small fraction of the wealth that their work is producing. Somebody please tell me what the business owner does that is inherently 200x more valuable than the rank-and-file worker? Somehow I doubt he could afford to fire 200 of them and do that work himself. So explain to me what is so magical about his position?

So far as I can tell, this will always happen until and unless the corporation is replaced by some kind of employee-owned system.

Re:Romney - VOTE FOR YOUR FUTURE (-1, Offtopic)

shokk (187512) | about 2 years ago | (#40724317)

There are plenty of employee-owner businesses. Support them by either going to work for one to help their success or start your own.

The owner has invested capital in committing to the business. The employee is just there til the next better paying job comes around the corner. The day to day tasks are not all there is to making a business succeed. The fact you think about dividing day to day effort to measure their worth shows that you don't see the long commitment to success.

Granted, there are a lot of owners that don't take the business seriously and end up driving it into the ground, taking people's livelihoods down with it, that should be shot. But this socialist shpiel is just too broadly painted across every corporation.

Re:Romney - VOTE FOR YOUR FUTURE (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724205)

A vote for Mitt is a vote for less government regulation, lower taxes on our job creators, and curtailing of entitlements for those among us who do not work for them. Are you sick of seeing the family down the street sit home all day, eating McDonalds and waiting for the mailman to come with the precious government check containing your money? Or, when the government runs a defecit because they're sending out too many of those checks, watching it print print print more? Do you believe health care should be earned and payed for and not given away to the dregs of society who abuse their bodies daily and expect us to foot the bill for them? Get real. This country has turned into a Goodwill store, and needs to return to the ideals of the founders and reward those who have ambition, and punish or drive out those who do not.

Sure, if you're rich. If you make under $250,000 a year, voting for Mitt is a suicide pact.

Re:Romney - VOTE FOR YOUR FUTURE (-1, Offtopic)

Exitar (809068) | about 2 years ago | (#40724209)

Are you sick of seeing the family down the street sit home all day, eating McDonalds and waiting for the mailman to come with the precious government check containing your money?

...

Do you believe health care should be earned and payed for and not given away to the dregs of society who abuse their bodies daily and expect us to foot the bill for them

No, I sit home all day eating McDonalds, abusing my body and waiting for the mailman to come with the precious government check containing your money, so I'm fine with that.
Thank you for your money!

Lesson from school (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40723937)

On my first day of class of Junior High school, my Mother packed a lunch for me, which include a Thermos full of milk.

I promptly threw it in my locker and forgot about it.

On my last day of class, I was cleaning out the locker and found the abandoned Thermos. I brought it home unopened.

My Mother made me take it out to the far end of the lot and open and empty it out there, which I did.

The moral of the story: Don't put milk in your sealed chest!

Re:Lesson from school (0, Offtopic)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#40724295)

I had a tiny tupperware container (about 1/4 cup) that I had brought milk to school for some science thing (circa 4th grade). I never took it home and never cleaned it out, but it came in handy for giving people a big olfactory surprise. Kept it in my school bag for about two years, by which time the odor had faded quite a bit.

Put stuff in sealed plastic cases? (3, Informative)

mlts (1038732) | about 2 years ago | (#40723945)

If I were storing stuff for a long time, I would consider using an airtight sealed case, oxygen absorber and a dessicant, making sure that if any liquid came out, it could not touch the protected device. I would separate out items just to be safe.

Some items, like SD media, I'd also consider using anti-static packaging just for peace of mind as well.

Re:Put stuff in sealed plastic cases? (4, Insightful)

similar_name (1164087) | about 2 years ago | (#40724113)

What should you put in a time capsule? Anything non-perishable that might mean something to you. Consider people recovering their time-capsules from 25 years ago. There might be a 5.25 floppy in there with someone's favorite childhood game. It may be difficult to play the game but the floppy disk's texture, smell, and label will bring back the memories. If you're going to store media you may find that in 25 years the data on it may be a pain in the ass to retrieve but the object itself will mean something. I also suggest media that you've used a lot. For example if you've been using a particular usb drive for the last year and it's time to upgrade put the old one in the capsule. 25 years from now the memories of using it are likely to bring you back more than the data that's on it.

Re:Put stuff in sealed plastic cases? (5, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40724221)

You don't have a 5 and 1/4 inch drive? :-o Put in the whole PC. I recently uncovered an old laptop at work with Windows 3.1 and it was fun playing with it again. (Mainly reinforcing what I already knew: Microsoft Windows prior to 95 and NT4 was complete garbage.)

It will be fun to look at the old Windows XP or Vista OS and say, "Man things were primitive back then. Only 2 gig of RAM? How did they ever manage to run with so little?"

Re:Put stuff in sealed plastic cases? (3, Insightful)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#40724321)

A ten year old laptop with a CD drive (or a five year old one with DVD) is pretty cheap to include. I still have one computer with a 5.25"/3.5" combo drive and two more with just a 5.25" drive (no HDD). They last in storage excellent - I only use them a few times a year.

Re:Put stuff in sealed plastic cases? (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724141)

Acid-free archival paper should be good, even for photos. Look at what the manufacturer says - they mean serious business when they make these papers, real art will be put up in museums reproduced on them.

As far as data goes, the fastest way is to yenc encode (like MIME/base64) it and print it out on said archival paper. It is possible you can get it transferred to microfilm but that's hard to OCR even nowadays. In 25 years, the yenc algorithms will still be around, and you can OCR and decode the data from the paper; if it consists of an executable it will probably not be a problem to run since we have x86 emulators as we are now, but you never know. libjpeg will still be around, libz, libpng, etc; if all else fails, describe the algorithm and data structure and print THAT out, it is much smaller than an executable. Then you can re-code the lost libz and decompress your data.

If more data is that important to you, you have a few routes:

You can make cassette tapes full of data like old computers used to do. Don't laugh. Just put a player in the "time capsule" too.

You can store multiple redundant archival DVDs including QuickPAR files *along with a DVD drive using USB 3.0*. It may die due to permanent magnet weakening but other than that it'll almost definitely survive. It's true that they degrade with time but that is also usually with usage. It is likely that, if you can read them, they will retain enough information, along with the surviving QuickPAR chunks, to reconstitute one. Even better, since there is a push to archive things on DVD discs, it is possible that in 2037 there may be drives in some public center for people to come in and read their old archived discs.

A small faraday cage will do miracles with other magnetic materials.

But if you're going to all the trouble, why not just keep all this stuff with you for the next 25 years? :-D

Re:Put stuff in sealed plastic cases? (2)

Z00L00K (682162) | about 2 years ago | (#40724255)

Storing data on some devices may be more reliable than others. E.g. on EPROMS may work, just provide information about how the data is stored.

And if you look back - 25 years isn't that bad. But it's bad enough to see that we did change physical storage media formats and interface types a few times. Mid 80's saw 8" hard disks, 5.25" floppies, ST506/ST412 hard disk interfaces and CD-ROM:s. Those were replaced by 5.25" hard disks with IDE interfaces and 3.5" floppies. Then the USB bus appeared and we could see all kinds of memory modules - like USB sticks, SD cards etc with a lot more capacity than the floppies and early hard disks. And the IDE interface is now replaced by the SATA interface.

But even though media has increased in size the last few years I suspect that the rate of change when it comes to hardware interfaces is going to slow down a bit - people will get irritated when old media can't be read. (That's why I still have an old 386sx with a 5.25" floppy drive just in case.) This means that storing data on a memory stick supporting USB3.0 may be possible to recover after 25 years. But don't count on data stored on hard drives since the interface and protocol may change again to improve performance. The SD cards have changed over time a bit, but a micro-SD card may still be readable. However I don't know how well flash memories actually can retain data in the long term.

Considering the number of devices today that uses the old MS-DOS filesystem (ok, not exactly, but FAT-32 at least) it may be possible that it will still be around by then. Other filesystem formats are less likely to survive that well, but NTFS may survive, and the Linux ext2-4 filesystem formats as well as the ISO 9660 (used by CD-ROM:s)

During the next 25 years it is possible that the Linux kernel may fork, but I suspect that it will still be around - it has spread to an amazing number of devices even though it isn't on the desktop for a number of reasons. (Except for the more dedicated users)

Re:Put stuff in sealed plastic cases? (2)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#40724343)

I see internal connectors (IDE/SATA) being easier to come up with than external connectors (USB/firewire) after that much time. There's still plenty of motherboards with a single IDE connector on them, but eventually they may start breaking compatibility with older versions of USB. By 2037, we might be on USB 8.0 that's only backwards compatible with 5.0 and later and you won't be able to find anything that will connect with 3.0. However, they still might stick a single SATA-II compatible connector on some motherboards for backwards compatibility. Of course, this is just assuming current trends for providing older interfaces holds up - hard to say where computers will be in 25 years. We might be standardized on some totally new technology not yet on the drawing boards or we might just have thin clients with no extra ports at all and do everything in the cloud.

Re:Put stuff in sealed plastic cases? (1)

shokk (187512) | about 2 years ago | (#40724331)

So no tuna fish sandwiches?

Macbook Pro (retina) (5, Funny)

busyqth (2566075) | about 2 years ago | (#40723949)

Just load all of your photos, videos, data, etc onto a retina macbook pro and toss it in the case.
Maybe by 2037 someone will have figured out how to change the battery.
If so, you've got your data and you're good to go.

Re:Macbook Pro (retina) (1)

JoeMerchant (803320) | about 2 years ago | (#40724019)

Best to remove the battery now - if you can't figure out how to do that, buy something that can be serviced instead.

Re:Macbook Pro (retina) (4, Insightful)

iamhassi (659463) | about 2 years ago | (#40724235)

Best to remove the battery now - if you can't figure out how to do that, buy something that can be serviced instead.

why not use a device with a removable battery and include a charger? I'm sure we'll still be using the same power outlets in 2037, US AC plugs have not changed since electricity became common. At least if the battery explodes or leaks it doesn't corrupt the device and the charger should provide power even with a completely dead or missing battery.

If including a charger is not possible, use any device that uses AA batteries. AA batteries have gone unchanged since they became a standard in 1947 [wikipedia.org] and they were in use long before becoming a standard. The also account for half of all battery sales, and with that many devices using AA batteries you can be sure standard AA batteries will be around for a long, long time.

Re:Macbook Pro (retina) (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40724101)

Maybe by 2037 the Macbook will look like my remote after the batteries leaked all over the place. White corrosion everywhere.

Re:Macbook Pro (retina) (3, Insightful)

AngryDeuce (2205124) | about 2 years ago | (#40724111)

Or, for a cheaper alternative, one of those digital photo frames that can play video as well as display pictures. Most of them plug in and take standard memory cards. A tablet would probably also suffice, but I would opt for something that can take removable media independently and isn't limited to internal storage. Not sure it would work for the data archival, but it should work for the media at least...

Nitrogen (1, Informative)

heptapod (243146) | about 2 years ago | (#40723991)

Get a container which is airtight and watertight. Pump it full of nitrogen.

I disagree with CDs and DVDs not being readable. Compact discs are a mature technology. As long as they're kept someplace cool, dark and dry they should be fine and readable when the container is opened in twenty five years. No idea if memory sticks or hard drives would survive.

Re:Nitrogen (1)

busyqth (2566075) | about 2 years ago | (#40724129)

I disagree with CDs and DVDs not being readable. Compact discs are a mature technology. As long as they're kept someplace cool, dark and dry they should be fine and readable when the container is opened in twenty five years. No idea if memory sticks or hard drives would survive.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disc_rot [wikipedia.org]

Re:Nitrogen (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724219)

Archival media [creativepl...etwork.com] . It's more expensive, but if their claims are true, it may be worth it. I'd recommend storing the data in multiple forms, and in formats with redundancy. I'd probably get a CD, DVD, Blu-Ray and USB flash drive. If you were feeling adventurous, I might also distribute a highly encrypted file all over the internet (usenet, ftp, gmail, web, etc) and then put the password in the container.

Re:Nitrogen (2)

AngryDeuce (2205124) | about 2 years ago | (#40724281)

Yeah, I've got hundreds of self-burned DVD's from the early 2000's that I had to trash because they're unreadable now. I wouldn't consider that being a real long-term solution. Flash memory (in some form) will probably be okay, though. Even the oldest flash drives I have (32-64 whole MB's of storage! WOW!!) are still readable today. They're useless due to their size, of course, but they still work and the data is still on them.

Now, if the USB interface disappears in the next 25 years you could be screwed, but I somehow doubt they will be entirely gone in 25 years, considering the availability of serial ports still in place today that predate USB by decades themselves.

Re:Nitrogen (1)

mk1004 (2488060) | about 2 years ago | (#40724333)

I disagree with CDs and DVDs not being readable. Compact discs are a mature technology. As long as they're kept someplace cool, dark and dry they should be fine and readable when the container is opened in twenty five years. No idea if memory sticks or hard drives would survive.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disc_rot [wikipedia.org]

I started buying CDs in 1984. They're still playable today. I also have some still-readable CD-R disks that are pretty old, but of course not as old as the pressed disks. So is is possible that optical media could be readable after 25 years--assuming there are working players available? Yes. Guaranteed? Not so much.

Re:Nitrogen (1)

axlr8or (889713) | about 2 years ago | (#40724133)

typical retention on E data is around 40 years.

Re:Nitrogen (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724193)

As long as they're kept someplace cool, dark and dry they should be fine and readable when the container is opened in twenty five years.

I think my wife has a place like that ready to go...

Re:Nitrogen (2)

iamhassi (659463) | about 2 years ago | (#40724335)

Get a container which is airtight and watertight. Pump it full of nitrogen.

I disagree with CDs and DVDs not being readable. Compact discs are a mature technology. As long as they're kept someplace cool, dark and dry they should be fine and readable when the container is opened in twenty five years. No idea if memory sticks or hard drives would survive.

Cheaper, better option: any container, filled with large ziplock bags. I have bought 2.5 gallon bags at Walmart so they're easy to find, and they're very cheap, pennies per bag. I bought some to hold a 1 gallon gas can where I did not want the gas to possibly leak out and was hoping to prevent any gas fumes. It worked, the bags are completely air-tight. And you can always double or triple bag your items. However ziplock bags are not puncture proof, so you will want a container outside the bags if you're concerned about something possibly cutting through the bag.

But I would recommend you include whatever player you need within the chest along with an AC charger. US AC plugs have not changed since electricity became standard. Media player does not need to be high-tech, any old laptop will do as long as you can remove the battery and store it separately or remove from chest completely so if it does corrode or possibly explode it won't damage the laptop. I would put the data on the laptop hard drive and also on SD cards or thumbdrives since they should be fine with no moving parts and costing about 50 cents a gigabyte they're very cheap.

"reading it in 2037 may be a challenge." (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40723993)

No worries man, end of epoch isn't until 2038.

The CD format has been around a long time (2, Informative)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40723997)

It's been over 30 years now, and as long as DVD or Bluray players still exist, the CD will still be readable. CDs aren't going anywhere. (Note I said CD not CD-R or CD-RW which are self-erasing when the dye fades.)

VHS video will still be readable too (if necessary you can buy a used VCR from ebay in 2037). It's analog so even if it degrades it will still be watchable..... I know this from personal experience with 25-30 year old tapes.

That's about it. I wouldn't trust hard drives or flash drives to still work 25 years from now. I have an HD that I left sit for just 2 years, and already it's sluggish as if it doesn't want to start spinning.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

JoeMerchant (803320) | about 2 years ago | (#40724041)

I'd think that a USB memory stick is a good bet for 25 years... kinda like RS232 ports, even if USB is passe', there will be conversion dongles for it for quite awhile.

Flash memory 25 year longevity prognosis: good, spinning hard drives: not so much.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40724273)

>>>Flash memory 25 year longevity prognosis: good,

Then how come I keep reading articles about flash drives dying after only 2-3 years of use. Not just minor failures, but complete and utter loss of all data w/ no warning.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

Guppy (12314) | about 2 years ago | (#40724347)

Flash memory 25 year longevity prognosis: good, spinning hard drives: not so much.

Flash memory storage relies on trapped charges which eventually dissipate over time (if not refreshed). While older flash memory might be ok, as cell sizes have shrunk (and the number of bits per cell increased), retention times have plummeted -- I've heard that manufacturer's quoted retention times for modern flash usually run in the 5 to 10 year range.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 2 years ago | (#40724095)

There is actually a CD format that is just called CD? I know for DVD you only get DVD+R, -R, RW, RAM, probably a few others.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

vux984 (928602) | about 2 years ago | (#40724245)

There is actually a CD format that is just called CD?

He's referring to a standard non-writeable pressed CD.

There's also these things...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millenniata [wikipedia.org]

The discs at least appear to live a long time. The only question is whether the technology will catch on enough.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (4, Informative)

oxdas (2447598) | about 2 years ago | (#40724325)

It is not a format. CD's (and DVD's) you buy in the store are not made the same way as CD's you burn at home. Professionally made CD's have the disk image physically pressed into the media, whereas with home burning a laser is discoloring a dye to produce the same effect. Unfortunately, the dye will eventually fade and the disk will become unreadable. So, CD's are not the same as CD-R or CD-RW and the same holds true for DVD's.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#40724337)

>>>There is actually a CD format that is just called CD?

Yes the ones you buy in stores and are already *pressed* with music data. The keyword there is press, because they won't fade over time. Like records the recording is permanently etched in the disc.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 2 years ago | (#40724099)

That's about it. I wouldn't trust hard drives or flash drives to still work 25 years from now. I have an HD that I left sit for just 2 years, and already it's sluggish as if it doesn't want to start spinning.

SD cards are solid state. They include no capacitors (the USB interfaces on flash drives, I can't say the same for). To my knowledge, semiconductors don't degrade. They're made out of sand, more or less. As long as the container is properly sealed with an oxygen-eating packet and is airtight... problem solved.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

ShooterNeo (555040) | about 2 years ago | (#40724231)

SD cards store the data in electric charge trapped in special types of transistors. This charge does leak over time at a very slow rate. The cheaper flash chips are only rated for a limited number of years without the data being accessed and recopied. These effects are temperature dependent, and I think 25 years isn't too long of a time period, but it isn't forever.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (2)

TemplePilot (2035400) | about 2 years ago | (#40724315)

And this is one of the reasons I fear eBooks moving to eFormats Only. One day there will be no libraries. A single EMP could take out the entire collected knowledge of a certain time period in one go. (theoretically). Archaeologists of the future will wonder where all the 'amazing knowledge of the ancients vanished to.'

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 2 years ago | (#40724241)

SD cards are solid state. They include no capacitors

If they don't include *any* capacitors, how do their memory cells retain their charge, huh?

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724251)

That's about it. I wouldn't trust hard drives or flash drives to still work 25 years from now. I have an HD that I left sit for just 2 years, and already it's sluggish as if it doesn't want to start spinning.

SD cards are solid state. They include no capacitors (the USB interfaces on flash drives, I can't say the same for). To my knowledge, semiconductors don't degrade. They're made out of sand, more or less. As long as the container is properly sealed with an oxygen-eating packet and is airtight... problem solved.

Then why do SSD drives only allow recovering your data after a year? http://techon.nikkeibp.co.jp/article/HONSHI/20090528/170920/

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 2 years ago | (#40724299)

Any data you put into a black box for 25 years has a significant chance of being gone when you open it. There are no off the shelf solutions for this. My best advice is encode the info and drop it on a Golden Record, or something else that is as 'permanent'. Only that kind of hard encoding will ensure the data is readable in 25 years.

Re:The CD format has been around a long time (1)

91degrees (207121) | about 2 years ago | (#40724257)

VHS video will still be readable too (if necessary you can buy a used VCR from ebay in 2037).

True, but it's quite a lot just to watch one video for a few minutes of amusement. I doubt the prices for the players are going to go anywhere but up from now.

Hermetic Seals (5, Informative)

iamscottevil (714259) | about 2 years ago | (#40723999)

Be careful about your hermetic seals, water leakage has turned many time capsules into a soggy brown liquid. I suggest some silica gel (the kind you shouldn't eat) to absorb any latent water in the air when you seal it so you don't get condesation. Anything you seal inside should either be readable by normal human means or include the reader. Avoid batteries or other volatile chemicals as they will leak. Burned CDs are really just like polaroid photographs and fade in about 15 years on the outset depending on the burn speed and qualities of the dyes. Include black and white photos or 3 color separations so that it is easy to put back together. Same goes for 3d photos, the future is likely to use more stereo photography so take a picture with 2 cameras next to each other of the same type. I use two iphones and tap the shutters simultanously a few times to see if I can get a match. Make sure you deposit the item in a place unlikely to face future development or it will just be shoveled up onto a trash pile. There's a start, but think long term. A lot can happen in a quarter century. LONGNOW DOT ORG

beer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724003)

Some cans of beer, so you have something to celebrate with.

Just make sure they are properly chilled first.

waste of money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724007)

World is ending in December!

Meh -- I can read stuff on a 1987 floppy. (1)

ip_freely_2000 (577249) | about 2 years ago | (#40724013)

Just for kicks, I pulled out a floppy with some files on it from 1987 ( My resume was short back then! ). I had no problems reading the files. However, I could not run any 16 bit programs ( I found a copy of Norton SI -- I was wondering what the speed index on my Core i7 would be ).

Re:Meh -- I can read stuff on a 1987 floppy. (1)

causality (777677) | about 2 years ago | (#40724345)

Just for kicks, I pulled out a floppy with some files on it from 1987 ( My resume was short back then! ). I had no problems reading the files. However, I could not run any 16 bit programs ( I found a copy of Norton SI -- I was wondering what the speed index on my Core i7 would be ).

Try using DosBox [dosbox.com] . It's an emulator so it'll work on modern hardware.

If you can't think of what to put in it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724033)

do something else. How weak minded do you have to be to be unable to to think what should go in a box.

Your special beer. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724045)

Brew your own beer. Make sure there's anough alcohol in it and let yourself be surprised that in 25 years the taste will certainly be different but if brewed good it will still have a chance to taste good.

cap, vacuum seal, filll chamber w/gas (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724055)

make sure any connectors have caps on them and are in a vacuum sealed bag - wary of rust here. rusting requires oxygen, so remove the oxygen. and maybe fill the whole capsule w/some non-toxic gas to push out the oxygen. nitrogen? or a flouro-inert? a noble gas? just make sure it's something safe to breath. also a usb key might be a connector that will last. 25 years though? not sure.

Re:cap, vacuum seal, filll chamber w/gas (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724087)

nitrogen or argon: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inert_gas will help preserve _everything_ in there.

Media will last longer than you think (2)

crow (16139) | about 2 years ago | (#40724057)

I have some 5.25" floppy disks that are over 30 years old, and I can still read them. I also have some that don't work, but most are fine. We're just hitting the point where it's hard to find PCs that will read 25-year-old 3.5" floppies (but good luck with an 800K Mac floppy).

In an air-tight container with no light exposure, I would expect a CD or DVD to be just fine after 25 years, and I would expect that you would still be able to find older computers that could read them.

Your best be for electronic data would probably be a USB flash stick. While the USB standard will evolve, if it goes to something incompatible, there will be plenty of conversion dongles.

Also, a USB flash stick would be a good representation of portable storage.

Or just put the data in "the cloud" and write the URL down on a piece of paper. I'm sure that will work. :)

Re:Media will last longer than you think (1)

axlr8or (889713) | about 2 years ago | (#40724151)

You can read those disks? Wow. I need a drive to do that.

Re:Media will last longer than you think (1)

busyqth (2566075) | about 2 years ago | (#40724157)

good luck with an 800K Mac floppy

I've got an original Macintosh II here. Works great.

Re:Media will last longer than you think (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 2 years ago | (#40724329)

USB sticks are NOT FOR LONG TERM STORAGE. They are vessels to carry data short term. In no way are they considered archival.

Re:Media will last longer than you think (5, Insightful)

DarkOx (621550) | about 2 years ago | (#40724339)

Why store the data in only one format? Why not put one copy on USB Flash, one copy on DVD-R and possibly one copy on some other flash with a different interface like SD?

Unless its allot of data this should be fairly cheap and odds are good that at least one of the three mediums will survive and you will have tools to read it easily. Watch your file formats too, i'd stick with lowest common denominator very standard stuff like jpg images, mpeg2video (main mode) with either ac3 or mp2 audio for videos, and mp3 for just audio.

Twinkie Bytes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724059)

Digital data can be stored for hundreds of years as a collage where marshmallows represent a 0 and twinkies are a 1. Decoders are sold as a kit from Adafruit Industries.

Floppydisk! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724063)

Those fuckers are going to hang around forever. You'll always be able to get ahold of one.

Seriously tho. usb keys will still be readable and supported most likely. they're tiny, cheap, and convienent.

What a gas (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724065)

If you want all your junk to last you need a durable, airtight vessel wherein you have replaced the ambient air with a dry inert gas like nitrogen. And you need to make sure the contents are secured from abrading each other as well as securing the vessel itself in a protected space, like Yucca Mt.

Once you have everything in place and secured, then you have only to remember to pay the bills on space, hope you picked a politically secure country and a geologically stable location and avoid the temptation to open it ahead of time.

If you're religious you can pray that no meteors or asteroids strike the general area or that the storage facility or other ownership entity is well managed.

Readability of media (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 2 years ago | (#40724069)

Perhaps now would be a good time to point out that solid-state media can hold many times that of optical media for equivalent or lower costs. A 32 GB flash drive costs around $1 per GB these days. For another $30, you can buy a pico computer capable of HDMI output. The display may be a problem; You will need to bury your capsule to a depth of about 8 feet (if memory serves) to prevent it from freezing. It will then maintain a temperature of about 50 degrees.

Electricity hasn't changed at all in the last 50 years... you should be able to just plug it in and go. Total cost: Less than $150. And anyone can drop a pen drive in the box then with hours of video footage and recordings. Although, you'll have to wait longer than 25 years for it to be legal to play it back... A lot longer. -_-

Use a tiny PC (1)

Nemilar (173603) | about 2 years ago | (#40724077)

Even if no one uses the same physical media as we do now, and even if no one uses the same file formats, storing an entire PC is likely to solve the problem. You can get a small, inexpensive PC for cheap - a couple hundred dollar atom-based machine should do the trick - and throw a large amount of storage in it. I'm fairly certain that standard power connectors will still be available 30 years from now. VGA connectors may not be, so think about storing a small monitor in there as well (someone else can speak to the chances that a monitor will turn on after 30 years).

Going this route gives you practically unlimited storage for photos, music, text, etc.. with very high chances that it will be recoverable.

Re:Use a tiny PC (1)

axlr8or (889713) | about 2 years ago | (#40724171)

Just be sure to get one that doesn't have a cmos battery or one that has electrolytic capacitors (almost all do). That said, I've got a Toshiba laptop that has operated since its inception in the mid 80s. It still worlds.

Two suggestions: (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724079)

1) In 25 years any foam rubber will have turned to goo.

2) Obvious but easily forgotten: remove batteries from electronic devices.

i helped with 50 year capsule in 1986 (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724081)

I helped setup a "time capsule" back in 1985 for my college's centennial celebration, we expect to open the capsule in 2035. I hope to be alive when it happens, because I put some items in there. We placed lots of plastic, wood, paper, and metal objects in the capsule. For paper products,we treated each piece of paper with a mild basic solution that neutralizes the sulfur compounds used in the paper production so that the paper doesn't yellow and deteriorate. For wood, we only allowed solid pieces, and only "natural' wood, without lead or "weird" paints. Plastic was a wild card.. we didn't really know how they would react, so we decided to only allow "hard" plastic items, and no styrenes or lightweights. Metals had to be brass, iron, or "slightly" reactive metals. We wrapped each and every item in a anti-static bag, and then evacuated the bags before boxing them up. We used normal cardboard boxes for boxing.

So.. stay away from color printer output (they degrade very fast) and any pseudo-soft plastics like polycarbonate (CD/DVD) because they'll break down too. Black and white prints are the safest picture types. You might spray your paper products with a baking-soda bicarbonate solution and then dry out.

good luck!

Oil Barrel (5, Funny)

BlackPignouf (1017012) | about 2 years ago | (#40724127)

What about an oil barrel?
You'll need it in 2037!
Plus, you could sell it for a few thousand dollars and buy vintage stuff from 2012 :D

Paper (3, Insightful)

houghi (78078) | about 2 years ago | (#40724135)

paper has been around for a LONG time. There is even paper that is made to last long. Bit more expensive, but it will last much longer.
For 25, just use normal paper. Write whatever you want. e.g. how you feel about people, politics, the future, your state of mind. Write about your dreams and your thoughts of now.

Once you have printed it, seal it in plastic. You can put a LOT of information on it and it will be very personal as well.

Iron packs (1)

EmperorOfCanada (1332175) | about 2 years ago | (#40724139)

People who store food for long periods either often put nitrogen in, co2 in, or throw iron sachets in that eat the oxygen. The CO2 might join any moisture to make a weak acid and the iron can eat so much oxygen as to create a small vacuum that just pulls in air anyway. So a toot of nitrogen is probably best. Compared to oxygen nitrogen is basically inert. But an iron sachet wouldn't hurt on top of the nitrogen as it will eat any oxygen that leaks in.

The other key will be variety. If you use a technology that you could be certain of can you be certain of the longevity of the materials. I have 10 year old burnable CDs where the data layer just flaked off. I also have a very old external HD where the rubber feet turned to liquid goo. So even if you decided that a USB memory stick would be the way to go I would suggest buying 2 or three very different brands.

As to worrying about how to read the format just throw in an old laptop (minus its battery) which might last and be ready to read your data.

Also separate the different storage media into different ziplocks or containers so that if one melts into a corrosive goo that the rest might be spared.

If you throw in some silica gel packs to eat any moisture be aware that if moisture is getting in regularly over time those packets can start pooling moisture around them. Thus put it at the bottom with the good stuff propped above to keep it safe. Also the iron packs can become warm if exposed to a blast of air (like the handwarmers) so keep that away from the important bits that you don't want cooked.

Lastly keep the temperature cool and stable as entropy is slower when cold.

Apple II elephant disks (1)

Steve1952 (651150) | about 2 years ago | (#40724155)

From personal experience, I can vouch that Apple II floppy disks hold up over 25 years!

Tell someone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724159)

Make sure someone else knows about the case, in case whoever buries it doesn't live another 25 years.

Storage (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724161)

How about Twinkies and a Happy Meal. They should have no problem surviving.

scotch (1)

KernelMuncher (989766) | about 2 years ago | (#40724167)

I'd add a bottle of good scotch. It will be even better in 25 years (and something to toast your discovery with).

Re:scotch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724197)

whisky doesn't age once it has left the barrel. put in a bottle of wine instead.

Well, this 1995 CD-r seems OK (1)

prestwich (123353) | about 2 years ago | (#40724173)

/me takes dusty 1995 Linux CD-R that we wrote off shelf, and puts it in:

dg@major:/media/CDROM$ ls -l
total 575
dr-xr-sr-x 3 dg dg 69632 Jul 12 1995 bitmaps
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 2048 Jul 5 1995 ddd
-r--r--r-- 1 dg dg 441397 Jul 18 1995 DirList.180795
dr-xr-sr-x 13 dg dg 6144 Jul 18 1995 documentation
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 4096 Jul 10 1995 ELF-GCC
dr-xr-sr-x 10 dg dg 2048 Jul 11 1995 emulators
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 2048 Jul 5 1995 fvwm
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 18432 Jul 10 1995 gnu
dr-xr-sr-x 11 dg dg 2048 Jul 10 1995 kernel-source
dr-xr-sr-x 3 dg dg 2048 Jul 11 1995 languages
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 6144 Jul 18 1995 leftovers
-r--r-xr-- 1 dg dg 99 Jul 13 1995 Leftovers_dir_list
dr-xr-sr-x 7 dg dg 4096 Jul 12 1995 logos
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 2048 Jul 11 1995 Networking
dr-xr-sr-x 6 dg dg 2048 Jul 18 1995 pgp
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 2048 Jul 11 1995 Printing
-r--r-xr-- 1 dg dg 5814 Jul 18 1995 README.html
dr-xr-sr-x 11 dg dg 4096 Jul 10 1995 slakware
dr-xr-sr-x 4 dg dg 2048 Jul 18 1995 sunsite.unc.edu
-r--r--r-- 1 dg dg 1015 Jul 18 1995 TRANS.TBL
dr-xr-sr-x 5 dg dg 2048 Jul 10 1995 www
dr-xr-sr-x 3 dg dg 4096 Jul 11 1995 X
dr-xr-sr-x 2 dg dg 2048 Jul 5 1995 xemacs

Looks ok :-) That's been stored on a dusty shelf in my room for the last ~17 years (in jewel
case) having said that it was a good quality kodak blank, and your mileage may vary.

IMHO store multiple copies written on multiple vendors media written on multiple drives;
use a few types of storage (CD, USB-flash from a good vendor), and something like
laser printed (not-ink jet) QR code on good paper; I'd wrap each separately (hmm what in?)

Oh, and in 25 years come back and tell us how much data is visible.

Re:Well, this 1995 CD-r seems OK (2)

fa2k (881632) | about 2 years ago | (#40724301)

Check for read errors, .. .

find /media/CDROM -type f -exec cat \; >/dev/null

or something. CDs have a large amount of redundancy, but maybe it's degraded sufficiently

Storage tips (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724175)

Leave a gap at the bottom for stuff to drip into safely if anything can leak (think a tiny pallet).
Put dry cloth between surfaces that might stick to each other.
No Polaroid photos unless the chemical packet isn't present).
Oxygen getter and desiccant.
Store it somewhere cool - preferably with a non-varying temperature.
Don't make it look like a valuables container like a safe.
Put data on at least 2 types of media (duplicate copies).
No food or liquids unless very very stable.
Nothing with batteries.
---------
Finally, no kittens. They'll just turn into cats.

Seal the reader along with data. (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 2 years ago | (#40724185)

Whatever format you choose to use, CD, DVD, blue-ray, harddisk, VHS tape... Seal a playback device along with it. Remove the batteries, even the tiny button cells packed inside the circuit boards, if possible. They might corrode and leak and damage the circuits. Record what all you have taken out and the specs in good quality paper, so that you could restore them. 25 years from now, either the 110 V electricity supply and a service industry to restore the play back devices will still be available, May be store two play back devices so that one can be cannibalized for parts.

Talking about cannibalism, if the electricity supply has gone, or if a suitable transformer is not available, not the society has already fallen apart and the roving bands of hungry feral humans have already killed you and eaten your corpses so it would not matter.

Re:Seal the reader along with data. (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 2 years ago | (#40724191)

Typo: meant to type now ended up typing not, confusing the last sentence. Not that my English was great to begin with, this is too stupid even for me.

Put it in the CLOUD! (1)

toygeek (473120) | about 2 years ago | (#40724189)

That'll never go down or anything- just password protect the file and then don't open it until then. It'll be the worlds first Cloud based Time Capsule! Epic!!! Duuude!! EPIC!!!

Keys in the box... (2)

John.P.Jones (601028) | about 2 years ago | (#40724199)

Instead of storing data in the box directly, where you then rely on media retaining viability over 25 years you could always strongly encrypt the data you would like to logically store in the box and then write (or etch in stone, whatever) the decryption key and store that human readable quantity of data in the box and then maintain the cipher-text outside the box in a redundant distributed fashion over multiple generations of media. Of course I fail to see what the advantage of keeping the data secret over the time period would obtain, and it prevents transcoding to new file formats, so I'd just suggest keeping copies of the data as you would any data you want to have in 25 years (not locked in a box).

You see, physical objects are placed into a time capsule because they would normally deteriorate and not be archived properly if they weren't removed from the harsh existence of everyday life. Data however doesn't work like that, neglect is the biggest problem and hence a time capsule is not a good means of preserving data the way it is for preserving objects.

A chest is big enough for a laptop too... (1)

Meleschi (4399) | about 2 years ago | (#40724203)

I'd get a cheap laptop that has the ability to read all of the media you're putting into the chest, into the chest as well. I'm sure you can find something cheap on ebay. Make sure to remove the battery and DO NOT put it in the chest. If the battery blows, there goes all of your data... You can run most laptops just from the power cord without an attached battery.

You may even have an old laptop laying around that you can donate to the cause. Just remember. Remove the battery. Don't even think about putting it in the chest. throw it away so someone else doesn't throw it in there "just because there is room". =)

CD-Rs and DVD-R's tend to loose their 'readability' due to heat and light. If they are stored properly, the data on them should be readable in 25+ years. That being said, if that's your media of choice make sure to make duplicate copies of your data, and store it on different brand's / types of media.

32GB of data, whether it's on DVD, USB hard drives, or SD cards, is extremely affordable nowadays. I think SD cards may loose their charge after 10 years or so but hard drives will always be readable as long as they spin up. For Hard Drives, 25 years ago from today, SCSI/IDE drives were the standard, and I know I can still read them today using a cheap USB interface.

I guess what i'm trying to say here is you have options. Depending on how important this data is, use multiple options to ensure the data is readable. If you include a reader in your chest (the laptop sans battery) you increase your chances of easily being able to read the data.

Oh, and if you do put a laptop in the chest? Don't forget the power cord. ;-)

Apply a little food science (1)

cvtan (752695) | about 2 years ago | (#40724217)

Throw in a couple of Twinkies and the aura will keep everything fresh for 100 years.

Metal platters don't degrade unless... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724233)

They are constantly used or exposed to varying or pretty hot temperatures, or fluctuating EM fields.

Easy mode:
For ultimate peace of mind, get an old hard drive and write the data 50 times. (any sub-250 drive should do)
Larger sector drives have larger write areas which will lessen the loss of data even in those conditions mentioned above.
If you write that data so much that it is ensured to be almost all over the sector within the boundaries of the random fluctuations in head position, you'd be almost guaranteed the ability to read it.
Now to read it? Just slap a Raspberry Pi in there with a USB hard drive adapter. Simple.

Medium mode.
You could also print out binary data on to sheets and scan them in later in the future.
There are many programs out there for printing archives of binary data out.
Bonus points if you print on to solid sheet plates using a laser.

Hardcore elite super turbo pro mode:
Equally try modding a CD drive to have an actual laser that burns. Get some plastic disc frames and literally burn your data in to the plastic.
Since you only need to care about 25 years, that plastic should be completely fine. Just make sure to get a tough plastic and not something that is biodegradable!
If you were aiming for 2500 years, then you'd need to use something a little tougher.
I'm sure there is a bunch of guides out there to do this. Or at the least some heavy discussion on the methods to do it.
Reading this? That's sure problem to solve.
One method I can think of would be to fill all the pits with another colored material, then making the hardware look for that for the 1s.
To make this easier, blast holes right through the actual disc material so you can easily smooth out excess material to prevent read errors.

Don't depend on optical discs. It is too risky to figure out which discs are good and which will degrade horribly.
Same too with flash. They are just too unpredictable.
And with all of these methods, encode all the information with high redundancy.
Better to be overly careful than to lose precious memories.

All of the above. (4, Insightful)

Nationless (2123580) | about 2 years ago | (#40724237)

Make it a science project.

Put identical data on one of every type of storage technology and see which survives. In 25 years you will have a very interesting case study while being nostalgic about the data storage media used back when you were young.

If they all fail then laugh at how silly you were all those years ago and how you should have done x instead.

Freeze everything in carbonite (2)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 2 years ago | (#40724243)

I use it for everything I need to store; backups of tax returns, keeps veggies crisp for decades, and turns incompetent employees into wonderful conversation pieces.

Paper (1)

bstrobl (1805978) | about 2 years ago | (#40724261)

Forget Flash memory, the data retention of 10 years won't be enough even if usb ports remain viable in 25 years.

My tip: print your digital data out in hex along with documentation on how to read it out. Be sure to include redundancy among multiple stacks of paper. Oh and make sure the shipping container you use keeps out moisture...

Good grief (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724267)

metal box, dry nitrogen flush, wax seal. Put a cd-rom drive in there. ta dah!

Crazy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724271)

I can't imagine wanting to see any of the retards I went to school with after 15 years. Much less after 25 or 50. Finished school. Got the fuck out. Moved the fuck on with my life. Re-uniting with school chums is like re-uniting with people who were a POW with. Why would you want to inflict that on yourself?

Outgassing Can Ruin Everything (3, Insightful)

BoRegardless (721219) | about 2 years ago | (#40724275)

It is not a trivial request to ask how to make things survive a 25 year isolated containment, even if you solder or weld the outer container shut and it stays sealed.

Batteries, capacitors, wood, paint, plastics, bugs in the wood, polymer coatings can all outgas. Some plastics naturally keep changing very slowly as their molecular cross linking changes and plasticizers move to the surface.

Those outgassing chemicals can wind up interacting, or corroding if you wish, the other item's materials and you don't get what you think you will in 25 years.

If you actually put a battery in their you can get other reactions occurring very slowly as the battery discharges. Don't forget that many electronics use a milliamp or so to keep some functions ON all the time, even though the devices is supposed to be turned off. Batteries are notorious for having their liquids eventually leaking out.

When you handle all the items, getting ready to load the time capsule, there are going to be all sorts of finger oils and millions of bacteria that are on each piece you put in the container, plus what is on the inside of the container and its seal materials. Some bacteria are anaerobic, so just because there is no Oxygen (if you load the capsule with Nitrogen), doesn't mean there won't be live bacteria in there.

Lastly, if your container is totally sealed and outgassing raised the internal pressure, then chemical reactions can occur more rapidly.

No rubber or elastic (2)

trasgu (603018) | about 2 years ago | (#40724289)

I did some temp work at a document storage warehouse repacking some damaged file boxes. One thing I learned is that rubber bands have a useful life of about two years. After about five years, all rubber and elastic bands had failed, and worst of all, after about eight years, the remnants of rubber bands had all turned into a permanent solid glue. Lesson learned: no rubber bands allowed for long-term storage.

Lard (1)

he-sk (103163) | about 2 years ago | (#40724297)

You know, in case the apocalypse happens in the next 25 years, you'll have something to eat when you open your time capsule.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-16852830 [bbc.co.uk]

McDonald's hamburger (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724303)

Then when they open the box in 25 years, at least they'll have something to eat. [seriouseats.com]

Don't Do It! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724309)

Don't get back together in 25 years... 95% of those high-school hotties will be fat middle-aged chicks.

Milleniata DVDs last thousands of years... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724313)

Supposedly. Even in hot and humid conditions.

http://millenniata.com/

I'd probably save the files, and make sure I can read them on any old DVD drive BEFORE putting them in the airtight chest. Also, make sure the DVD drive supports the M-Disc format, supposedly only some LG drives do that). For that matter, throw the entire DVD drive in there, power supply and all, and hopefully there will be still ways to connect to and read from a USB mass storage device.

25 years isn't that long (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40724323)

I have toys older than that and they weren't stored in airtight chests.

Everybody's NES still works, and they're older than 25 years.

This is the dumbest discussion.

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