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The DARPA-Funded Power Strip That Will Hack Your Network

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the ok-but-how-is-it-powered? dept.

Security 176

An anonymous reader writes "The Power Pwn may look like a power strip, but it's actually a DARPA-funded hacking tool for launching remotely-activated Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Ethernet attacks. If you see one around the office, make a point to ask if it's supposed to be there. Pwnie Express, which developed the $1,295 tool, says it's 'a fully-integrated enterprise-class penetration testing platform.' That's great, but the company also notes its 'ingenious form-factor' (again, look at the above picture) and 'highly-integrated/modular hardware design,' which to me makes it look like the perfect gizmo for nefarious purposes."

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176 comments

O RLY (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40727949)

Omg Pwnies!

Re:O RLY (0)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728003)

mod funny, that made me pee a little.

Made in China ? (4, Interesting)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728087)

Hopefully this strip is not made in China
 
I'm crossing my fingers
 

Re:Made in China ? (4, Interesting)

Ashtead (654610) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728991)

Hopefully this strip is not made in China I'm crossing my fingers

According to the link from cryptome than an AC has provided further down here [cryptome.org], the hardware is indeed mostly made in China. What makes this US made to the satisfaction of the government is that the software that makes this thing what it is, is made in the US, replacing all the original code.

This document goes on at length about how that can be. As an EE, not a lawyer, I found the information that the "brain" is a SheevaPlug to be more interesting.

Licenses? (3, Interesting)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728993)

TFA says "Preloaded with Debian 6, Metasploit, SET, Fast-Track, w3af, Kismet, Aircrack, SSLstrip, nmap, Hydra, dsniff, Scapy, Ettercap, Bluetooth/VoIP/IPv6 tools, & more". Which leads us to a question, since they're distributing it: are they in compliance with relevant licenses (e.g. GPL) if they have they modified any of the FOSS packages ?

Re:Licenses? (1)

zidium (2550286) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729051)

I certainly hope they were smart and didn't include any FOSS at all, but stuck with truly free open source software w/o encumberance, instead.

Re:O RLY (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728767)

The developing company is called Pawnie Express...

pwnd f1rst (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40727955)

pwnd f1rst, eh?

Can't do everything... (1, Funny)

MiniMike (234881) | about a year and a half ago | (#40727957)

it's actually a DARPA-funded hacking tool for launching remotely-activated Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Ethernet attacks.
Might be somewhat impressive, but it can't get first post!

Re:Can't do everything... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40727967)

Only the first line was supposed to be in quotes. I know, the power strip wouldn't have screwed that up...

What About Armament? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40727977)

Does it come preloaded with assault riffles and explosives?

Re:What About Armament? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728439)

Or solitaire? Or Angry Birds at least???

Make it as a... (0)

Lisias (447563) | about a year and a half ago | (#40727989)

Make it as a dildo, and I'll be really worried at the work.

(They're screwing us big time int last months...)

Re:Make it as a... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728237)

Is that what people mean when they say it's an inside job?

Re:Make it as a... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728293)

No, the official term is "penetration test".

Re:Make it as a... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728315)

Well, with enough force anything is penetrable, right?

Re:Make it as a... (2)

sumdumass (711423) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728681)

sadly, ignorance and political bias seems to be the exception to that rule at times. All throughout history, people have been trying to pound some sense into both categories and generally failed.

There is a perfectly logical explanation (5, Insightful)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#40727997)

...for the appearance of this device.

Part of a penetration test should be, and I don't think I need to remind those who are active in the cybersecurity industry of this(!), creating hacking devices that look as if they're part of the furniture - like they're supposed to be there.

Discuss.

There is a perfectly trashy explanation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728203)

So future hacking devices should look like a wastebasket?

Re:There is a perfectly trashy explanation (2)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728221)

prior art: dumpster diving.

Hacking isn't all about dictionary files and bruteforce attacks, autodiallers and Ally Sheedy. :)

Re:There is a perfectly trashy explanation (1)

petermgreen (876956) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729081)

the problem with a wastebasket is that it's not generally supposed to have cables going to/from it. That means you will have to run off batteries (running off batteries long term is a MAJOR PITA) and you will be limited to wireless hacks.

OTOH power strips are expected to have power and ones with communication surge protection while relatively unusual are not unheard of. This means that you can have power and network going to the "hacking device disguised as a power strip" without it looking too suspicious.

Re:There is a perfectly logical explanation (3, Funny)

Kenja (541830) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728301)

Cause no one will ask "why does the power strip have USB host ports?".

Re:There is a perfectly logical explanation (5, Informative)

darkain (749283) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728345)

Why would they? Newer power strips have "USB Charging Ports" for cell phones and other gadgets, so you don't need to waste a normal outlet on them.

Re:There is a perfectly logical explanation (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728949)

Ethernet also passes as surge protection for telephone/network cables.

Re:There is a perfectly logical explanation (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729177)

To best honest, when I first saw that, I thought, "Hm, that's a strange looking UPS." Not that that would make it out of place in my office...

Re:There is a perfectly logical explanation (2)

MiniMike (234881) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729329)

Yes, but how how long until some manufacturer starts advertising "wi-fi surge protection" on their power strips?

Re:There is a perfectly logical explanation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40729005)

Many BOFH's have a common AM Radio in the comms room - where you are not supposed to go in with a mobile (or a can of Coke - not good around backup tapes). If this thing has an inbuilt phone I will hear the mobile cackle on my radio, and the jigs up.
But it has hope - don't think we have corporate asset numbers on power boards yet, so it may get swapped out for a $10 Bog*Mart
variety.

$1,295? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728011)

And how much more of my tax dollars went to developing it? I mean, I could buy a bigassed power strip like this and slap a RasPi and a 3g modem into it, and wire up the "surge protector" ports for USB and ethernet and do the same thing...for like $200...

Re:$1,295? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728165)

And it would look like a suspicious "homebrew" object, and would quickly be spotted in most offices. DARPA's version looks like a power-strip that you could buy from a store - yours probably wouldn't.

Re:$1,295? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728207)

You missed the part where he said he would buy a big powerstrip, gut it and put a raspberry pi inside. In other words, no it wouldn't look homebrew and it would blend right in with the work environment. He's pointing out that the government probably blew a hundred million to develop something that could be slapped together for a couple hundred in someone's garage.

Re:$1,295? (5, Insightful)

Fjandr (66656) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728291)

Minus the development of capital costs of mass production facilities and the engineering to make the internals readily production-capable.

There are actual issues involved in a production product which homebrew doesn't solve, but you'd never know that to read Slashdot.

Re:$1,295? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728455)

Not to mention, the thousands of dollars in FCC testing that none of the homebrew people do before they start selling products.

Re:$1,295? (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728705)

Its probably got the weight down to something reasonably comparable too. After reading through to specs, they seem to have a lot of hardware features with some power behind it too. If a power strip/ surge protector weighs as much as a battery backup, someone is going to ask some questions.

Re:$1,295? (2)

dontclapthrowmoney (1534613) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728849)

If a power strip/ surge protector weighs as much as a battery backup, someone is going to ask some questions.

I'd be surprised if they weren't making UPS versions of products like this also. If anything that is more likely something you'd connect to your network without questioning, for monitoring. The chance people would connect the RJ45 ports (I'm guessing these are supposed to protect against power surges) is a lot less in a corporate environment.

The first thing I thought when I saw this was how annoyed I'd be if I spend over $1000 and no-one plugged anything into any of the data ports. I'm guessing it could try to hack in wirelessly, but then they could have a put this into any device that had a constant power connection - shredder, radio, coffee maker - anything that gets left plugged in.

Re:$1,295? (4, Insightful)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728737)

Think about what you just said. Some cosmetic damage might make the hacked powerstrip more acceptable. Slap a shiny, new bit of equipment into an office, and it might raise a little curiosity.

Now, take a somewhat abused looking home-brew unit, and put it someplace in the same office. No curiosity, at all. Where I work, there is no shiny, pretty, new, or nice. Everything is beaten to hell and back!!

Re:$1,295? (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729241)

Where I work, there is no shiny, pretty, new, or nice. Everything is beaten to hell and back!!

So maybe you don't have anything hackers are interested in.

Re:$1,295? (2, Insightful)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728177)

and how much will the insurance cost to cover your 200$ shit homebrew shoebox power strip when it burns a multi-million dollar factory down.

development cost pennies, to prove you can produce the product in quantity with consistent results is what cost you genius

Re:$1,295? (3, Informative)

julesh (229690) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728457)

and how much will the insurance cost to cover your 200$ shit homebrew shoebox power strip when it burns a multi-million dollar factory down.

A recent quote from an EE company that I just happen to have on my desk right now puts cost of compliance with CE & similar electrical safety rules for a short-run product (a device my client is considering installing at a few hundred of their clients' sites) at about $70 per piece. I'm convinced that this "power strip" is being manufactured in much larger quantities than that, so costs should be reduced: so again, where is the money going? It doesn't do anything innovative, plus it's had government funding for its development, so it should have had lower development costs than if one of us were to make it.

Re:$1,295? (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728479)

failures go up when you make more, so tighter testing is required and thus cost more and use much more time

please come back when you have actually produced something in more than limited quantities, most limited quantities in the real world mean prototype samples

Re:$1,295? (5, Insightful)

Dodgy G33za (1669772) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728503)

I work for the government, and if I were ever to contract to the government to make something I would charge an arm and a leg for it because they burn a lot of time in pointless changes, process and administration. Plus they haven't got a clue and pay whatever you charge.

Re:$1,295? (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729243)

I work for the government, and if I

I commend you for having the courage to admit that in this crowd.

Re:$1,295? (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728747)

I know, hackers always get insurance before they embark on their activities. My local insurance agents all offer "Hacking Insurance". It even comes bundled with my homeowner's insurance, at State Farm!!

Re:$1,295? (3, Funny)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729255)

I know, hackers always get insurance before they embark on their activities. My local insurance agents all offer "Hacking Insurance".

It's listed under the "Homepwners Policies".

Re:$1,295? (5, Insightful)

The Master Control P (655590) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728367)

And yet while every single time someone does something interesting there's a snivelling asshole like you there to poo-pooh how "easy it would be to just...", we never, ever hear of your much cheaper yet equally effective copies of the thing in question for some reason which I just can't figure out.

Instead of being bitter and resentful towards those who actually create new things, why don't you go and invent some yourself?

Oh wait, that's like... real work and effort and thinking and shit. Back to the TeeVee it is!

That looks nothing like a power strip (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728063)

You couldn't possibly mistake it for a real power strip, like these. [wikipedia.org]

Re:That looks nothing like a power strip (4, Insightful)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728113)

Oh, really? Guess you've never seen a surge-suppressing power strip with sockets for phone and Ethernet to protect those lines as well?

Looks to me almost exactly like the one I used when I still lived in the States [newegg.com].

Re:That looks nothing like a power strip (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728189)

I use UPS bricks that come with suppressor circuits for ethernet/RJ11 and USB (they also supply power for USB). Very handy pieces of kit, and the batteries are fairly easily replaced as well. So no, the plethora of different connectors is nothing new for me (I used to sell the things as well).

Re:That looks nothing like a power strip (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728185)

it looks similar to the ones we have at my work, IE: not bought in a 4 pack for 9.99 at k-mart, which do dick shit nothing against surges

EMF interference (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728073)

This thing should be relatively easy to find even in "stealth mode." Grab an RF meter and go to town.

Re:EMF interference (4, Insightful)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728167)

Grab an RF meter and go to town.

Right.

And just how many network admins do you know who actually keep one of those around?

I'd ask ours where he keeps his (assuming he even has one), but he's on vacation until mid-August, and his stand-in works in a different building in another part of town.

I think even you can see where I'm going with this... :)

Re:EMF interference (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728191)

its 2012, wifi and bluetooth? What admin wouldnt want to have one around, they cost less than guessing where the dead zones are

Re:EMF interference (1)

julesh (229690) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728469)

I can find wifi dead zones by wandering around with my phone. Why would I need an expensive, dedicated piece of equipment to perform the same job as one I already own?

Re:EMF interference (2)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728319)

for wifi, I have a t-shirt [thinkgeek.com]. If I come across an unexpected signal (indicated by my chest lighting up) out comes the netbook and sixty seconds later if it's a WEP node I'm in. Sooner if it's an open node.
for Bluetooth I have a nifty little custom app on my netbook that beeps every so often and logs any and all Bluetooth activity that comes into range. Oh, to have something like that on an Android phone...

A good one-size-fits-all tool I've been using for years is a wideband RF meter. This gadget uses custom 802.1x receivers to scan from 1.5GHz, through the entire 2.4GHz ISM band up to around 6GHz for wifi, Bluetooth, domestic microwave leakage, satellite transmission cones, RADAR, pretty much anything that uses this range of frequencies. It can be attenuated for most situations with a simple turning of two dials.

Re:EMF interference (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728799)

Any company which have assessed that they are at-risk to this sort of attack will have this sort of equipment. I work for an aerospace company and we have a kit of tools which includes an RF and EMF meter, we even have a soldering iron, multimeter, SDR and a ton of other stuff even though we're only I.T. guys.

Re:EMF interference (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728381)

Not really, if it's in actual use -- do you realize how many wall-warts these days are switching PSUs? And of those, most have no EMI shielding whatsoever.

Parking Lots (5, Funny)

guttentag (313541) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728095)

I predict these will start showing up in corporate parking lots [slashdot.org]. "Ooh! Look, someone dropped a power strip! I've been telling my boss I need more outlets in my cubicle since he won't let me charge my phone by plugging it into the computer anymore... this will do nicely! And is that a USB stick on the ground? Oh, almost got me there. I know better than to plug that in."

Re:Parking Lots (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728181)

I predict that they've been showing up in all manner of places for years now. You think $INTELLIGENCE_AGENCY has to wait until September to get these?

Re:Parking Lots (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728349)

yeah, because 1200 dollar power strips have a lot in common with ~3usd USB flash drives.

Re:Parking Lots (1)

eWarz (610883) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728471)

Funny you mention that, while semi computer literate folks MIGHT bring it up with their IT dept, I've seen plenty of folks blindly do crazy stuff like stick random USB sticks in their computer. We often don't find out until it's too late.

Re:Parking Lots (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728825)

We had a virus ravage our network for months that we traced to an infected memory stick used to bring in pirate games. Disabling the virus was easy enough, but all the files it left on stations kept triggering antivirus alerts and thus disabling accounts. In the end we had to manually delete all the profiles from every station before we could be completly rid of it.

Aim higher than that (2)

swb (14022) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729275)

Showing up in corporate parking lots?

You should be considering how and where you are going to convincingly deliver 1,000 of these devices to the top 50 banks as if they were part of the normal office supply delivery.

I recommend branch offices rather than corporate HQ. Stuff like power strips are always in short supply, and at branch offices they'd happily accept (and without any questions) an accidental delivery of 3 from the office supply company via FedEx. And at branch offices I've done work in, there's always a little more do-it-yourself IT spirit, and I can see people happily plugging the Ethernet "surge suppressor" inline with their PC.

My question is -- how many are there like this out there already? Does anyone have the pockets deep enough to send out 10,000 like this to a focused group of targets? It starts to make even a successful activation rate of 0.05% look interesting.

deal extreme has a simpler one (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728249)

A mere $40 for a GSM audio bug disguised as a power strip: http://dx.com/p/quadband-world-gsm-spy-bug-audio-transmitter-disguised-as-working-ac-power-bar-22097

It has been around for a while, so this pwn thing just sort of builds on it.

They also have one disguised as a working USB mouse: http://dx.com/wireless-triband-gsm-spy-phone-surveillance-device-as-working-usb-mouse-850-900-1800mhz-39164

and various more of the same. This shit is evil.

Seriously, is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728261)

Hasn't the pwnie express wall wart version been around for well over a year now? I guess the news is that it now comes in a power strip too?

Translation (5, Interesting)

bashibazouk (582054) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728275)

The opposition (who ever they may be) has figured out that we were using this device. Word has gotten out. We no longer need it. You may now do with it as you wish...

Only in America... (0)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728289)

Only in the USA, because large parts of the world use other outlets and voltages....

Re:Only in America... (4, Insightful)

jamesh (87723) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728389)

Only in the USA, because large parts of the world use other outlets and voltages....

Yep. The development effort to retool for 240v and Australian power sockets would be prohibitive. I guess we don't need to worry about them over here.

Re:Only in America... (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728749)

It says 120 or 240 volt. I guess the selection is made during checkout.

Re:Only in America... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728871)

We have different pin configurations too.

Re:Only in America... (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729591)

You do realize that the US, EU, Japan, Brazil and several other countries also have different pin configurations too right?

It is probably just a matter of country specific housing covers that hold the outlets..

Re:Only in America... (2)

Osgeld (1900440) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728499)

it really doesn't matter, everything that plugs into this box uses switching power supplies which have a wide range of voltages

never mind the fact that commercial AC transmission standards was developed in the USA in serious scale, thus making every one else "wrong". on a side rant I never figured out why so many people outside the states stick to a 50Hz cycle rate, its just nonsense ... is there a metric second I was unaware of?

Re:Only in America... (2)

mirix (1649853) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728649)

Pro tip - one second / 60 = nothing. There's no unit that is a 60th of a second. If it was one hertz, and the euros were using 0.833Hz, you might have a point.

That's all besides the point anyway. NA started on DC, and when we first went to AC, it was 25Hz.

Not that any of that is related to the connector, in any way.

You poor bastards using 50/60Hz. I'm so much holier than you with my 25Hz. I AM THE ORIGINATOR OF ELECTRICS

Great for ad-hoc wifi (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728383)

Seems like this could be great for ad-hoc wifi. Hide enough tiny routers in power strips (or even light fixtures, etc) and you can spread your signal without anyone noticing.

Nasty piece of work (0)

kbw (524341) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728395)

It should be a dismissable offence it bring this thing any where near where you work. You probably couldn't even trust it if it were still boxed.

Re:Nasty piece of work (5, Insightful)

tftp (111690) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728611)

It should be a dismissable offence it bring this thing any where near where you work.

All you need is to ship with UPS a sealed carton of ten or twenty of these devices, each in its own professionally printed box, to the maintenance department of the target company. Lowly workers, just a notch above janitors, will not be asking their bosses about such a simple item, and power strips are always needed. You can do this even if you never set foot into the country where the target company resides.

Is it filled with helium? (3, Interesting)

evilviper (135110) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728467)

I don't know how attentive the average person is, but if I picked-up a power strip and it weighed twice as much as others, I'd be very suspiscious that something was off with it (maybe something fell in?)

It would strike me as much more effective to use a device that already has a lot more heft to it, so the weight difference wouldn't be noticed.

I know the Soviets discovered several CIA bugs because things like their copiers were just a few ounces heavier than a stock model.

Re:Is it filled with helium? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40729023)

I don't know how attentive the average person is, but if I picked-up a power strip and it weighed twice as much as others, I'd be very suspiscious that something was off with it (maybe something fell in?),

Or, you might think it's a high-quality well-made device, instead of the el-cheapo plastic stuff from the lowest bidder in China.

Re:Is it filled with helium? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729227)

I don't know how attentive the average person is, but if I picked-up a power strip and it weighed twice as much as others, I'd be very suspiscious that something was off with it (maybe something fell in?)

Well, I said this elsewhere, but when I saw the picture I thought it could pass for a UPS -- and who is going to question a heavy UPS? You can get even nastier with a UPS, since it normal for it to be connected to a USB port or to a LAN (if my power strip were connected to a LAN, I would be a bit curious).

Re:Is it filled with helium? (2)

Manfre (631065) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729339)

if my power strip were connected to a LAN, I would be a bit curious

Many power strips include surge suppression ports for RJ-11 and RJ-45.

Ah the $1295 toilet seat syndrome ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728489)

strikes again. Our tax dollars at work.

Includes external 3G/GSM adapter. (1)

Neil_Brown (1568845) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728511)

Subtle... unless it looks like a part of a power strip? A bit larger than average, fine. USB ports — getting common. USB modem sticking out of it — somewhat suspicious...

Re:Includes external 3G/GSM adapter. (1)

cdrudge (68377) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729217)

Just make the adapters look like wall warts plugged into the strip...

and it sucks (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728593)

no really it does
just like the usa

If I see one of these at work, I *will* be worried (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40728625)

Being in Britain and all, if a power strip like this shows up at work, the form factor should stand out nicely from all the rugged British stuff. It would be just about as inconspicuous as someone trying to spy on you wearing a full Ninja outfit. If you can actually see either, of course.

And for the home amateur on a budget ... (4, Interesting)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about a year and a half ago | (#40728729)

Get one of these: http://www.asus.com/Networks/Wireless_Routers/WL330N3G/ [asus.com]. Hack OpenWrt to fit you needs, and flash the router with that. It's small and discrete enough to go unnoticed when set up and left somewhere, like behind a curtain, plugged into a forgotten Ethernet port in a wall somewhere. Power it with one of these: http://www.philips.co.in/c/cell-phone-accessories/universal-dlm2262_97/prd/ [philips.co.in].

Who ya gonna call? (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year and a half ago | (#40729391)

Let's say I do see one of these things in the office and I take your advice that I should call somebody to find out if that thing is supposed to be there. This raises the important question of whom I should call. If it's not supposed to be there, that means that somebody, possibly one of my co-workers planted it. PROBABLY one of my co-workers planted it. Now my trust in all my coworkers is in question.

Not that it's not already in question. Maybe I should call Homeland Security. And maybe Homeland Security planted it without the knowledge of my management...

Re:Who ya gonna call? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#40729533)

How far do you want take this ?

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