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Pills With Digestible Microchips Approved By US Drug Agency

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the tastes-like-chicken dept.

Biotech 163

ananyo writes "Digestible microchips embedded in drugs may soon tell doctors whether a patient is taking their medications as prescribed. The 'digital pills' are the first ingestible devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The pills contain a sand-particle sized sensor, consisting of a minute silicon chip containing trace amounts of magnesium and copper. When swallowed, it generates a slight voltage in response to digestive juices, which conveys a signal to the surface of a person's skin where a patch then relays the information to a mobile phone belonging to a healthcare-provider. Currently, the FDA, and the analogous regulatory agency in Europe have only approved the device based on studies showing its safety and efficacy when implanted in placebo pills. But Proteus Digital Health, the manufacturer, hopes to have the device approved within other drugs in the near future."

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163 comments

Science Marches On (0)

Bananatree3 (872975) | about 2 years ago | (#40829983)

first we have eye implants powered by lasers [slashdot.org] , and now this. Science Marches On, tricorders are inevitable.

Mom! I Swallowed A Microchip! (5, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 2 years ago | (#40830239)

I used to have a stomach virus, but now I have a COMPUTER VIRUS! :-)

Re:Mom! I Swallowed A Microchip! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40831121)

-- No problem, kid! Here, take that and put on your shirt...
-- Mom! "Linux inside" ?!?

Re:Science Marches On (2)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#40831345)

I have an eye implant powered by my eye's focusing muscles. I'm 60 and have better than 20/20 vision at all distances! Science (and technology) do indeed march on. BTW, my implant is the favorite of all devices I own; I used to be 20/400 before the implant.

And the tricorders are coming closer and closer as welll. Now if they'd invent a matter replicator...

Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (5, Insightful)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40829999)

“About half of all people don’t take medications like they’re supposed to,” says Eric Topol, director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla,California. “This device could be a solution to that problem, so that doctors can know when to rev up a patient’s medication adherence.”

You know, I kind of like the idea of deciding for myself what medication I take and when. The idea of my doctor trying to make me ingest a sensor like I'm some sort of medical prisoner is more than a little creepy to me. What's next, is he going to give me forced ball-shock treatments if I refuse to eat healthy?

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830063)

It definitely makes it a lot easier to force-sedate a populous, as well. That's something we should be afraid of.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830305)

That's profoundly stupid, even by tinfoil-hat standards. If you were going to forcibly medicate everyone, you'd just go around and do it or treat the air/water/food. You wouldn't spend money on microchip-laced pills, trust people to take them on their own (daily, most likely), and then have them come back in regularly to confirm that they did. Just about any delivery system you can imagine is more practical and effective than giving everyone a bottle of pills and saying "You better take all of these and come back in a month, or else!"

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (4, Insightful)

Kenja (541830) | about 2 years ago | (#40830067)

The issue is that a doctor cant treat you if you dont take your meds and patients often dont know if they have or not due to mental condition or as part of drugs side effects. This can be a major issue when you cant remember if you took the yellow pill today or not and taking another could kill you while skipping a day could cause a relapse of your condition. If on the other hand you dont want your doctor to treat you (as you indicate), then simply dont go to one.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (4, Interesting)

ganjadude (952775) | about 2 years ago | (#40830163)

I see this as more of a way to check if people are abusing drugs under the disguise of being good for the patient. take 2 pain killers instead of one? cops knock on your door. /tinfoil

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1, Interesting)

Kenja (541830) | about 2 years ago | (#40830181)

Well, to expand on that it could be used to make sure that they are actually taking their pain killers rather then reselling them. Right now this is done through a serial number on the pill being linked to the patients finger print.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 2 years ago | (#40830357)

They also make the patients take a urine test. If there are no pain meds in your urine, you can't get more pills.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (2)

daenris (892027) | about 2 years ago | (#40831879)

I wish there was a mod crazy option. You really think that any and every pharmacy that a person might get their prescription filled at -- most of which are commercial entities without ties to a hospital -- are going to individually put serial numbers on pills that link them to the person getting the prescription filled? I'll give you a hint, I've worked at a pharmacy and they definitely do not do this. Let alone track fingerprints. There is a bottle filled with pain killers on the shelf. When a prescription comes in, the pharmacist or pharmacy tech grabs that bottle, and counts out the number of pills prescribed into a new bottle, which is given to the customer.

Now the pills might contain a serial number that ties them back to a specific batch, which would tie them to a pharmacy and they could pull up a log of customers who had prescriptions filled from that batch and narrow it down reasonably well (even to 1 person if that person was the only one who got a prescription filled from that batch) but there is no guarantee that it can be narrowed down to 1 specific person as there is no individual tracking information on the pills.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (5, Insightful)

NFN_NLN (633283) | about 2 years ago | (#40830079)

You know, I kind of like the idea of deciding for myself what medication I take and when. The idea of my doctor trying to make me ingest a sensor like I'm some sort of medical prisoner is more than a little creepy to me. What's next, is he going to give me forced ball-shock treatments if I refuse to eat healthy?

You are exactly the reason we need devices like this. Either take the medication as prescribed OR don't take any medication. But stop selectively breeding resistant bacteria that impact EVERYONE else.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830203)

An interesting theory, but most medication isn't to fight bacteria, and this medication doesn't solve that problem at all.

This medication will be useful for oldsters who need medication but aren't under the direct supervision of a nurse or other care giver.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

Sir_Sri (199544) | about 2 years ago | (#40830767)

but aren't under the direct supervision of a nurse or other care giver.

or who are, and they need to make sure that the next shift doesn't accidentally double dose, or miss a dose.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830213)

i doubt they are interested in relatively cheap antibiotics. what they're really after is another narcotic pain reliever patent.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (3, Insightful)

Dunbal (464142) | about 2 years ago | (#40830345)

Yeah, vets have absolutely nothing to do with bacterial resistance. I mean, those chickens need to be treated with vancomycin - absolutely all of them, as a preventative measure. Surely that has much less impact on bacterial resistance than Grand-pa who forgot to complete his pills for pseudo-membranous colitis because he felt better after a day.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#40830557)

Totally unrelated. One does not effect the other. Just because feeding livestock antibiotics is a problem doesn't mean half-finished antibiotic courses are not.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830673)

Is that a chicken and the egg analogy??

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#40831053)

Nope. Straw Man perhaps, but I'm no expert at naming the fallacy. I just know that there's one there.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 2 years ago | (#40831253)

Not unrelated at all. In fact there have been many articles published on the topic.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#40830365)

You know, I kind of like the idea of deciding for myself what medication I take and when. The idea of my doctor trying to make me ingest a sensor like I'm some sort of medical prisoner is more than a little creepy to me. What's next, is he going to give me forced ball-shock treatments if I refuse to eat healthy?

You are exactly the reason we need devices like this. Either take the medication as prescribed OR don't take any medication. But stop selectively breeding resistant bacteria that impact EVERYONE else.

Yes, out patients choosing their own drug schedule for narcotics explains why the vast majority of antibiotic resistant strains originate from within medical facilities...

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830397)

Have children if you want to be a parent, you totalitarian thinking do-gooder !

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830729)

Fuck your strawman argument!

PROTIP: Your doctor does NOT know you better than yourself. Unless you're retarded. In fact, 99% of the time I've seen doctors make horrible decisions (mostly giving symptom ignorers instead of fixing or even finding the actual cause), and when they do correct ones, they are obvious to everyone with half a brain. (Like antibiotics against bacteria. Which every idiot knows you take until the end. [Apparently except for the retards around you.])

Doctors are strongly encouraged to overdose like crazy. And give what the pharma companies make the most money with. Not what's effective. Nobody gives a fuck about that.
I've seen the bullshit they gave to my grandma. She just got more sick from that shit. The diagnose was just idiotic. Until she chose her own dosage, and her own medication, and *then* got better!

That's an observed fact. It's you who's the delusional blindly believing idiot.

I'm sorry, but even though you doctors have a extreme god complex, you are not even remotely gods. Hell, most of the time, you're only barely competent at all.

And I know why: Because your education is based on memorizing thousands of pages of information, and stuffing yourselves with that so much, that you got no time to think or even understand the whole stuff. And sadly, you're also graded on what is basically your capability to be a walking USB stick.

Of course you're assuming everyone is completely retarded, (except apparently the doctors), and so you advocate blind belief for everyone.

Sorry. We're not a church.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (2)

Lurker2288 (995635) | about 2 years ago | (#40831099)

To be fair, there are plenty of medications a person might choose not to take as prescribed apart from antibiotics, but on the whole I agree with you. If there is some reason why you can't or aren't willing to take your medication as prescribed, then you should speak to your doctor about that and identify a course of treatment you are willing to comply with. Nonadherence to prescriptions is a major source of reduction in patient well-being and a drive of increased healthcare costs. If a simple technological solution to that is available, why not use it?

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (2)

Penurious Penguin (2687307) | about 2 years ago | (#40831793)

So then, I hope you are only advocating the use of these chips exclusively in antibiotics, no? I might be able to remain civil if that's the case, but otherwise, you're mad. I'm just so sure that every Doctor who's ever prescribed Prozac or Ritalin to a child chose the perfect, ideal dose! Your methods should work great with pain-killers too. Yeah. Well, I sincerely hope you get a prescription for a strong laxative someday, someday when fascism has finally overtaken America and meds are no longer optional.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830227)

Don't forget that they can already arrest tuberculosis patient for not taking their meds [google.com]

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830291)

A correct application of the delicate balance between the rights of the individual and of society. If you choose not to take medication then you must submit to quarantine.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 2 years ago | (#40830273)

Note that your physician is not behind this, it's the drug companies. Why? Because the more you "comply" with your medication, the more pills they sell. Good physicians have long ago given up the paternalistic doctor model, and now we recognize that patients are autonomous and have the right to not comply with treatment if that is their wish. Of course we have to make sure they understand the consequences of not taking the pills, as well as the consequences of taking the pills. But we cannot actually "force" a patient to take medication. It's not our decision.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830275)

You should talk to your doctor instead of being passive-aggressive like that.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

MightyYar (622222) | about 2 years ago | (#40830331)

You will still have the option of using a doctor that doesn't use this method, if you can find one.

The simple fact is that this can give a doctor better data, and better data is usually not a bad thing. Doctors can and should fire patients, just as patients can find a new doctor. In Pain Management practice, they make people pee into a cup to prove that they are taking - rather than selling - their pain meds.

In addition to helping doctors treat their patients who think they have an MD, I could see this helping with the mentally ill. Prior to Carter, the mentally ill were basically tucked away out of sight in asylums. Then they invented effective anti-psychotic medication, and so it became possible to treat the mentally ill. Of course, a treated mentally ill person does not need to be tucked away in an asylum anymore, so they were released... and a significant portion stopped taking their medication. A tool like this would be a good way to balance society's interests in not having a bunch of untreated psychotics living on the city streets with the individual rights of the mentally ill.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (4, Informative)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40830339)

I would love this. Not taking my medicine leaves me in a state where I forget to take my medicine. I have my phone set to alert me to take it. This would be a big help.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#40830613)

Why not just set up a recurring to-do list? Alarm goes off, take your pill and check the box. Then, if you forget you took it an hour later, you can look for your checkmark.

Whether you do this all with your phone or with a good old fashioned clipboard and watch, is up to you.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40830653)

This is what I do. Having the checklist part automated would be handy.

Who in the hell is going to carry around a clipboard and watch? How would a watch even help here? Unless it has multiple alarms, I won't even know to look at the damn thing.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#40831033)

Well, some people have so many meds they can't well carry them around, so the clipboard would stay with the meds. The watch you would presumably wear.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

geminidomino (614729) | about 2 years ago | (#40831241)

Who in the hell is going to carry around a clipboard and watch?

What is this, 1912? The electronic gagetry to replace the "clipboard and watch" has been around so long that you get them for $20 at the checkout isle in the goddamn grocery store, FFS.

And considering that we're talking about a friggin' dial-home pill here, one can't really play the luddite card.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40831839)

I just use my smartphone, costs a little more than $20, but it works.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#40830451)

so that doctors can... rev up a patient’s medication adherence.

Edited to emphasize the truly frightening part of this statement...

So, my health decision are no longer my decisions to make? Yea, just try and force feed me some of Big Pharma's dope, you'll be pulling back bloody stumps...

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40830551)

Sure they are, but then that DR may not want you as a patient anymore.

This is going to be used for the elderly and those who have medicine without which is it hard or impossible to remember to take or why to take your medicine. Think those on drugs that impact concentration, memory or anti-psychotics.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#40830643)

You went to the doctor, and he prescribed the fix. TAKE THE FUCKING MEDICINE OR DONT GO AT ALL.

We don't need assholes like you deciding they know better than a PhD. Half-course antibiotics breed shit like MRSI.

Pain meds are different, I'll admit that... but you didn't specify what you're talking about and if you ahve that kind of attitude for one medication, you likely have it for another.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

Aphonia (1315785) | about 2 years ago | (#40831785)

Most medical doctors are MD's (or something similar), not PhD's. If your local PhD in philosophy is prescribing you pills, chances are you shouldn't take them.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830483)

Do it or you will lose your Obama Care, why should the rest of us pay for your medical when you can't get better as prescribed? Moron!

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (2)

Flaming Babies (904475) | about 2 years ago | (#40830523)

“About half of all people don’t take medications like they’re supposed to,” says Eric Topol, director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla,California. “This device could be a solution to that problem, so that doctors can know when to rev up a patient’s medication adherence.”

You know, I kind of like the idea of deciding for myself what medication I take and when. The idea of my doctor trying to make me ingest a sensor like I'm some sort of medical prisoner is more than a little creepy to me. What's next, is he going to give me forced ball-shock treatments if I refuse to eat healthy?

Trust your doctor or don't. I pay mine because I value his knowledge. The dosage he recommends is what I take. (It's not uncommon for that recommendation to be 'as needed') I think this is a silly idea...and based more on preventing the sharing/selling of medication, but I don't think there's anything creepy medically about it.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | about 2 years ago | (#40831111)

It's not a silly idea, in the right context. Companies running drug trials will be all over this. Noncompliance is a huge problem and, worse, it's currently a nearly unmeasureable problem.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (0)

Sir_Sri (199544) | about 2 years ago | (#40830751)

You know, I kind of like the idea of deciding for myself what medication I take and when

Anyone who knows anything about evolution disagrees with you. Or medicine for that matter. If you were qualified to safely decide what drugs you could stick in your body, in what doses, and for how long we wouldn't need pharmacists, or doctors.

People with your attitude have been deciding they feel better and no longer need to take medications have been breeding drug resistant diseases. Thanks. Just what we needed.

But that takes us to your second point.

some sort of medical prisoner

This is, believe it or not, both a very serious problem and one of the two drivers behind something like this. If you're bipolar, or schizophrenic or any of a slew of various psychiatric conditions you could very well pose a serious danger to yourself or the general public when off your meds. Good thing those people have the freedom to decide when to take medication and when not to just like you right? There are lots of people who, as a condition of release from various legal proceedings have to take meds, but how do you verify? That means they're an expensive burden to monitor, the cheaper you can make that monitoring the better it is for everyone. Being able to verify for less money, and eventually remotely gives them much more capacity for normal function in society and independence.

The second one, is for people who have either lost some of their minds and can't remember if they've taken their medications, or if they're being monitored by staff, and you don't want a mixup. Usually the same group of people say in old folks homes of varying degrees. This is a serious problem, because people in that situation could have very serious complications if they double dose, or miss a dose. In the routine of caring for someone 365 days a year, for years, even a 0.1% chance of making a mistake can be very serious.

What's next, is he going to give me forced ball-shock treatments

No, if only ball-shock treatments cured stupid. Though this would help your insurer (including the government as an insurer in civilized countries) track when you're not taking your drugs, and if they might have a street value they can arrest you for deciding you wanted cash in your pocket more than you wanted to finish the medications prescribed, that they paid for. It means they can stop prescribing certain drugs (e.g. painkillers) if you aren't using them, and it means they can monitor your behaviour and stop you being an idiot and trying to breed drug resistant diseases.

The Wikipedia article on Compliance medicine [wikipedia.org] even has this helpful blurb:
The failure to complete treatment regimens as prescribed has significant negative health impacts worldwide.[1] Examples of the rate and consequences of non-compliance for selected medical disorders is as follows:
Diabetes non-compliance (98% in US) is the principal cause of complications related to diabetes including nerve damage and kidney failure
Hypertension non-compliance (93% in US, 70% in UK) is the main cause of uncontrolled hypertension-associated heart attack and stroke
Asthma non-compliance (28-70% worldwide) increase the risk of severe asthma attacks requiring hospitalization

And two of those are conditions where you directly and immediately impact the state of your condition on a regular basis. With Diabetes of course it comes down to what you eat, and Asthma the air you're breathing (which you may not have control over, but if you drive into a smoggy area for example you should be reasonably aware that it's going to immediately aggravate your condition).

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (2)

fm6 (162816) | about 2 years ago | (#40830863)

I think your doctor needs to know whether you're taking your pills. When he asks, "Are you taking your pills?" do you answer "none of your business"? If you don't trust your doctor with that level of information, why even see him?

And for many patients, it's not even a privacy issue. Older patients with memory problems, for example.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (2)

Jawnn (445279) | about 2 years ago | (#40831027)

You know, I kind of like the idea of deciding for myself what medication I take and when. The idea of my doctor trying to make me ingest a sensor like I'm some sort of medical prisoner is more than a little creepy to me.

You should wish that it was only your doctor keeping tabs on your compliance with his prescribed regimen. The real consumer for this data will be your insurance carrier. "Failure to comply" with prescribed treatment is grounds for termination of benefits.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | about 2 years ago | (#40831047)

That's great. From a public health perspective, if you want to decide for yourself that you've had enough of your antibiotics, perhaps you shouldn't get them next time. Or if you have TB and aren't following the treatment schedule you should probably be quarantined. Or if you've agreed to the terms of a clinical trial and aren't following the medication schedule you should be bounced out of it.

If you don't want to take your heart medication, nobody cares.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

jklovanc (1603149) | about 2 years ago | (#40831281)

There are a few issues with your tin foil hat attitude;
1. The system only works if there is an external sensor and it is turned on. If you don't want to have your Doctor monitor you then turn the sensor off.
2. There are many people who forget to take their meds some times. Having an alarm go off every time I am supposed to take my meds is annoying if I have already done it. To me it would be useful to remind me when I forget.
3. You "what's next" scenario is another invalid slippery slope [wikipedia.org] argument. Sensors in pills have nothing to do with shock treatment; one definitely does not lead to the other
4. It's not all about you. There are people in this world who need reminders, me for one, to take their medications. These people should not have a valuable tool denied them just because you don't like it. If you don't like it then don't use it.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

dullblade (1040450) | about 2 years ago | (#40831321)

Actually, you will probably either pay more for medical insurance, or have it cancelled. As people (below) have pointed out, sometimes this tech could be a boon, like for those who are too sick or lack the ability to keep track of medications. On the other hand, given your rationality, you are the only one who can judge the cost / benefit on taking a drug which is causing side effects.

Re:Am I the only one that finds this creepy? (1)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | about 2 years ago | (#40831437)

Reminds me of this [youtube.com] .

I kind of don't like (1)

publiclurker (952615) | about 2 years ago | (#40831863)

having to deal with mental patients who are off their meds and drug resistant bacteria created by self important morons who feel that their self-serving opinions are better than the lives of everyone around them.

Circumventable? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830001)

Er, would dipping said chip in a pool of saliva accomplish the same feat?

Re:Circumventable? (1)

ananyo (2519492) | about 2 years ago | (#40830057)

Er, would dipping said chip in a pool of saliva accomplish the same feat?

No. Sounds like you need stomach acid to activate.

Re:Circumventable? (1)

Bananatree3 (872975) | about 2 years ago | (#40830077)

a bit of lemon juice and a swish in the mouth should take care of it.

Re:Circumventable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830137)

If you're trying to avoid taking the pill, then I doubt you'd want to let it dissolve in your mouth either.

Re:Circumventable? (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#40830161)

At that point, the effort to fool it exceeds the effort to take the pills. There will always be people who will work harder to avoid work than to just do the work in the first place but I think most of these people just don't want to be bothered to remember to take the pill more than anything else.

Re:Circumventable? (1)

jklovanc (1603149) | about 2 years ago | (#40831457)

This is not designed to force people to take drugs but to see how people are actually taking their drugs. People forget things for different reasons and it is great to have a solid reminder when to take meds. Sure, one could use multiple alarms but they get annoying when one has already taken that dose. I would much prefer an alarm that went off only when I forget and this technology will facilitate that. Pill boxes are great but one must still remember to take the pills.

False Negative? (5, Interesting)

NFN_NLN (633283) | about 2 years ago | (#40830003)

So what happens when there is a false negative?

Dr: Did you take your pill?
P: Yes
Dr: The pill didn't register; are you sure you didn't forget? You better take another one.

Re:False Negative? (2)

Antony T Curtis (89990) | about 2 years ago | (#40830109)

I can see you're really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill and think things over.

Re:False Negative? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830415)

Failure to do so may result in prosecution for criminal drug evasion.

Re:False Negative? (1)

Hentes (2461350) | about 2 years ago | (#40830271)

Which is why their efficacy was tested before approval.

Re:False Negative? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830787)

Re:False Negative? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40830993)

If that was the standard then you would be complaining people died because drugs were not approved fast enough.

Re:False Negative? (0)

tomhath (637240) | about 2 years ago | (#40830327)

Probably more like "I see you didn't take the anti-psychotic medication that's part of your parole conditions..."

Re:False Negative? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40830515)

Then don't end up on parole?
Parole is instead of being in jail, right now for that sort of thing they use urine or blood tests. I fail to see how this is any different.

Re:False Negative? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830721)

But we're not ALL on parole...

Re:False Negative? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830803)

But we're not ALL on parole...

then you won't have to take a medication as part of your parole so tomhath's comment doesn't apply to you.
it's called thinking. do it.

Re:False Negative? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#40830923)

So then don't take the medicine?

I fail to see how this matters on bit then.
This is just another option for testing compliance for medicine. Paroles are already piss tested to ensure they are not taking illegal drugs and can also be tested for required ones.

Re:False Negative? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830869)

I'm a professional, and: PROTIP: Anti-psychotic medication will by its very definition NEVER EVER fix anything. It will only hide away the symptoms, so a fucking company can make profit on what will basically be an addiction for life. Actual healing would require very intense input resulting in positive associations (neural bonds [=learning]) forming with the right things (and negative ones with the wrong ones). But nobody got the balls to do that. Everybody just scratches the surface, gives up when it changes nothing (What a surprise!) , and then prescribes these symptom hiders. Fuckin' losers. And besides: Who decides what's right or wrong anyway? I know most people are incredibly egocentric and assume there must (Notice the wish to irrationally force it, no matter what?) be some global common set of morale rules.. which of course are aways theirs... or their social group's. Hint: You have no right to enforce your beliefs on anybody. Yes, that includes murder and rape. If the "victim" agrees with it, it's none of your business. And unless you are grown up enough, that you can accept that, just shut the fuck up.

Re:False Negative? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830615)

Wow. Between this and your other post in this thread, you really come off as an alarmist. You do realize this is currently only allowed in placebos, right?

Try this:

Dr: Did you take your pill?
P: Yes.
Dr: Oh, it must not have registered.

Now, if it is regularly not registering the doctor will know you haven't taken your pills. But generally speaking missing a single pill isn't cause for concern whether you are lying or not. And if it's pain relief, the only person you are hurting is yourself...

Re:False Negative? (1)

jklovanc (1603149) | about 2 years ago | (#40831313)

That is not a problem with the doctor and not the pill. If my doctor did not believe what I told him I would find another doctor.

Micro chips or RFID tags? (2)

Kenja (541830) | about 2 years ago | (#40830005)

Doesn't sound like they're talking about microchips in the manor many of us would assume when hearing the phrase ""digestible microchips". These sound more like RFID chips that derive their power from stomach acid rather then radio signals.

Prior Art ( Score: +5, Perposterous ) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830071)

    iPill [apple.com] .

Yours In Freedumb,
K. Trout

P.S. M-I-Double-Tizzle For Prezeedent

HMO cellphones that can track what you eat? (1)

o_ferguson (836655) | about 2 years ago | (#40830087)

"Q: Is Control controlled by its need to control? A: Yes." -Burroughs. http://cscs.umich.edu/~crshalizi/weblog/777.html [umich.edu] Prescient and informative. Upvotes, plz.

Re:HMO cellphones that can track what you eat? (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#40830731)

Totally unrelated to any of this.

"Downvotes, plz"

Re:HMO cellphones that can track what you eat? (1)

o_ferguson (836655) | about 2 years ago | (#40831113)

I bow to your slightly lesser UID. Downvote away.

Uh oh (3, Insightful)

Antipater (2053064) | about 2 years ago | (#40830093)

Next they'll be creating "parent-friendly" vegetables that tell you when your kid is slipping them to the dog under the table.

Re:Uh oh (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 2 years ago | (#40830185)

I'm not a parent yet, but I'm hoping by the time I am they come up with a pill that will turn your skin bright purple if you don't eat enough vegetables.

Re:Uh oh (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 2 years ago | (#40830369)

If you rely on a pill for that then you are probably a terrible parent.

Re:Uh oh (1)

Sir_Sri (199544) | about 2 years ago | (#40830849)

That would make for an interesting 2020 or 2030 US census. Race: Purple 95%. Blue: 5% (people who are Red Green colourblind)

Re:Uh oh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830921)

You'll know when the vegetables come back out one end or the other of the dog.

free works (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830255)

what Marcus implied I'm in shock that a mom able to profit $9362 in one month on the computer. have you read this web link http://www.makecash16.com

Definitely can be helpful under right conditions (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830285)

As someone who has an elderly parent who does not take her medication properly and then fibs to the doctor, this would be very helpful. Also, for patients with memory issues, also very helpful. As long as it is an optional item, I don't see anything wrong with this. If you don't wish for the medication to be monitored, then that's something that should be your choice. I would also think the more delicate or severe the problem being addressed, the more it should be suggested and used. My grandmother would forget her medication and take it too much, causing extremely low blood pressure, and this could have helped.

intellectual property (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830337)

I heard qualcomm pushing this a few years ago. The guy was candid that the big win for this was to extend the IP protections on drugs. 2 immediate impacts - the code transmitted is copyrighted and protectable longer than patent. No more patent cliff issues. Secondly, this is meant to fight fake drugs / illegal copies ... think Indian pharma.

This is not for wellness or drug efficacy. That's a canard.

Re:intellectual property (1)

Belial6 (794905) | about 2 years ago | (#40830781)

I don't see how this would extend the protection on the drug itself. If my doctor presents me with the choice of $1500 for a cycle of name brand medicine with chips embedded or $50 for generic that will cure the disease but won't let me monitor how often I take the pill with my cell phone, the choice becomes pretty obvious.

Do not want.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830431)

Hey, if there's some doctor that prescribes something that I decide isn't a good idea and ignore the prescription, then screw off... I'm not taking it for a reason.

Re:Do not want.... (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 2 years ago | (#40830791)

The reason? The reason is you think you know better than a professional?

If your not going to listen, why did you go in the first place?

Re:Do not want.... (1)

MitchDev (2526834) | about 2 years ago | (#40830991)

Some doctors are good, others are just profit-centers for Big Pharma... Why find a cure, there's no profit on that. Getting them stuck on your meds for the rest of their lives on the other hand...

Correct me if I am wrong... (1)

gagol (583737) | about 2 years ago | (#40830901)

The pill sends a signal to a patch that then transmit a wireless signal to your smartphone who then sends the info to your doctor. Cheating this system would be laughably easy, one only need to replicate the patch signal... Also, dont we have more urgent problems to solve than this? It reflects the trend of controlling each and every aspect of our lives more and more. That trend is much more scarier than the tracking technologies such as this one.

Imagine (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40830935)

What's to stop someone from extracting the "sand grain-sized" chip from the pill and slipping it into someone's food, and then using the signal to track them? Or use a chip from a controlled substance to frame someone for illicit drug use?

Diverticulitis (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 2 years ago | (#40831009)

How do these little wonders not end up in all our Western World intestinal pouches and stay there permanently? Or for that matter, take a right at the appendix?

Wi-Fi (2)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 2 years ago | (#40831109)

Take enough of these, and we finally will be susceptable to Wi-Fi fields!

Re:Wi-Fi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40831569)

Take enough of these, and we finally will be susceptable to Wi-Fi fields!

I was just hoping for FM radio but to be able to be a WiFi repeater for my tablet!?! If only! I'm gonna see if I can get them to prescribe me the LTE variant so I can be a hotspot!

As Mr. Mackey says "Drugs are bad, mkay?" (1)

BetaDays (2355424) | about 2 years ago | (#40831191)

As Mr. Mackey says "Drugs are bad, mkay?"

http://youtu.be/2JWDmnWjsvo [youtu.be]

Is this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40831211)

... just to make sure mental hospital patients stay under "drug-induced lobotomy" forever? I never got over the paranoia I got from watching One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.

Harder to pretend to take medicine (1)

brickmack (2537604) | about 2 years ago | (#40831425)

This will probably be used by parents and mental hospitals to make sure people take their medicine, instead of spittin it back out when they look away. Wonderful.

Like, wow, man . . . this is so THX-1138 . . . (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 2 years ago | (#40831427)

Where George Lucas made a non-cutie, non-family "film" (not "moive") about Robert Duval getting busted for "Criminal Drug Evasion" for not taking his happy pill calm the masses downers: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/THX-1138 [wikipedia.org]

"If you feel you are not properly sedated, call 348-844 immediately. Failure to do so may result in prosecution for criminal drug evasion."

"You are a true believer. Blessings of the state, blessings of the masses. Thou art a subject of the divine. Created in the image of man, by the masses, for the masses."

"Let us be thankful we have an occupation to fill. Work hard; increase production, prevent accidents, and be happy."

"Let us be thankful we have commerce. Buy more. Buy more now. Buy more and be happy."

Unintended Consequences (1)

datsa (1951424) | about 2 years ago | (#40831445)

Am I the only one here who remembers the scene in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest where the hero pretends to swallow his daily sedative and then slyly spits it out? The movie would have been a lot shorter if this technology was around then...

This idea makes some sense with antibiotics, but once you get into psychiatric medicine it's downright scary.

Mmmmmmm (1)

cstacy (534252) | about 2 years ago | (#40831449)

Mmmmmm.....pork...chips
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