Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

'Wi-Fi Police' Stalk Olympic Games

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the you-may-only-reflect-light-of-permitted-frequencies dept.

Censorship 268

schwit1 writes with news from London that Olympic venues are being patrolled by so-called "Wi-Fi police," who seek out and shut down unauthorized access points and hotspots. BT is the "official communications services provider" for the Games, so access points other than the ones they set up or approve have been disallowed. A picture tweeted from the Olympics shows a gentleman carrying a portable direction antenna that can localize sources of transmission and interference. "One possible aim of shutting down such WiFi access points is to cut down on interference with essential wireless communications being used by those refereeing, reporting on and working at the sporting events. ... The news of the WiFi crackdown has angered many of those following the Games online, who were already upset at Olympic authorities' attempts to limit the use of social networking tools at the Games at certain times. The London Olympics had been billed as the first 'social media Games,' but organizers have been accused of bungling the effort to seamlessly integrate popular technologies like Twitter and Facebook into the event."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Fox hunt? (5, Interesting)

Ksevio (865461) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867413)

If I were in the area, I'd be tempted to set up a few of the old linksys routers that cut out now and then in strange places (just powered, not networked).

Make it a little more challenging for them to find the real "WiFi Offenders"

Re:Fox hunt? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867497)

If I were in the area, I'd be tempted to set up a few of the old linksys routers that cut out now and then in strange places (just powered, not networked).

Make it a little more challenging for them to find the real "WiFi Offenders"

Or put your phone in Hotspot mode then put it in your wasteband of your pants. When he comes by and points that ridiculous thing at your crotch, just say "yep, guilty as charged, your hunk detector worked like a charm" and then dare him to get close enough to stop your wifi signal.

Re:Fox hunt? (4, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867609)

...wasteband of your pants.

Wasteband...you mean a diaper? Wouldn't the phone get dirty?

Re:Fox hunt? (1, Interesting)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867657)

... and wouldn't the "hunk" become sterile from the nearby radiation and heat [thelancet.com] ...

Re:Fox hunt? (4, Funny)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867739)

or maybe it'd grow to mutant proportions.... a thousand comic books can't all be wrong, can they?

Re:Fox hunt? (1)

JSBiff (87824) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867627)

Well, if you're phone is getting service from BT, your phone in hotspot mode may possibly qualify as a sanctioned wifi hotspot. Interesting question, that.

Re:Fox hunt? (1)

jimicus (737525) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868115)

Except BT don't have a mobile phone network any more. They sold BT Cellnet to Telefonica some years ago.

Re:Fox hunt? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867643)

Come and get it, officer. Yeah, get down in there.

Re:Fox hunt? (1)

bob zee (701656) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867667)

i like your style, kid

Re:Fox hunt? (2)

heneon (570292) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867751)

Or put your phone in Hotspot mode then put it in your wasteband of your pants.

Yes, the mass may have accumulated to the central area of my body but I still find your choice of word offending. You insensitive clod.

Re:Fox hunt? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868121)

Then the officer would throw you to the ground.

Crunch!

"Oh, it looks like the outlawed wifi signal is gone. By the way, you should talk to a doctor about that broken arm."

What would Roger Moore do? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867415)

Fake his own death?!?!!?

They can complain all they want (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867423)

The only issue being heard is about sales, ratings, etc. The rest is a bunch of buzzing mosquitoes, nothing more.

I don't see the problem. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867433)

They're trying to cut down on interference, with the large volume of people at these things, is this not reasonable?

Re:I don't see the problem. (4, Interesting)

geogob (569250) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867705)

It may be so, but I have serious doupt about the legallity of this action in light of RF frequency allocation and usage rules. If it is an open and unregulated band for wifi, BT has not right what so ever to ask someone to turn of an access point. If they claim the said access point causes interference on their equipement, which is unlikely for certified devices, they can fill a claim through the proper channels. I doupt running, chansing access points, is the proper channel.

Re:I don't see the problem. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868113)

except this is inside olympic venues and it is stated in the tems and conditions of ticketed entry that you will not run a wifi hotspot, it says they will allow in devices capable of it through security as long as you agree to turn off that feature.

Re:I don't see the problem. (3, Insightful)

bws111 (1216812) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868137)

They are chasing down the devices in the venues. Why wouldn't that be legal? You can be restricted from doing all sorts of things in the venues (or any other private property) that are perfectly legal elsewhere.

Re:I don't see the problem. (4, Informative)

Neil_Brown (1568845) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868261)

I have serious doupt about the legallity of this action in light of RF frequency allocation and usage rules. If it is an open and unregulated band for wifi, BT has not right what so ever to ask someone to turn of an access point.

Ofcom was certainly interested in this. In it's 2009 publication "The Spectrum Plan for the London 2012 Games," Ofcom said:

4.91 Certain equipment may be exempted in the UK from the requirement to be licensed under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 2006 because its use is not likely to cause harmful interference. Experience from past Games has shown, however, that the unusual concentration of such equipment in particular venues can create the potential for localised harmful interference.

4.92 We are exploring with LOCOG how such use can best be controlled and/or coordinated to avoid any disruption to the smooth running of the London 2012 Games. Practical measures (e.g. preventing certain types of equipment from being brought into London 2012 Games venues or actively coordinating use between users) have proved successful at past Games.

4.93 The Met Office raised concerns in its response about the need to protect the use of its radars and the importance of the information provided by these radars to the London 2012 Games. Ofcom will carry out a detailed study of the protection of meteorological radars from WLANs and will consider how WLAN use can best be controlled and/or coordinated to avoid any disruption to the meteorological radars.

It also appears, from the same document that the Vancouver Games took a slightly different approach:

4.95 During the Vancouver Games, VANOC will be providing both wired and, in certain high-traffic locations such as the Olympic and Paralympic Villages, the MPC and the Media Centre, WLAN Internet services. Within Olympic Net Zone wireless hotspots, use of personal WLAN routers will not be permitted. Use of WLAN routers will be permitted in designated locations outside these Zones. Anyone bringing in their own WLAN services will have to use the 5000 MHz band and the 802.11a networking standard. They will not be able to use the 2400 MHz band (802.11 b/g/n) or selected channels at 5000 MHz (802.11 a/n). VANOC will stipulate the SIDH and channel assignment.

The Wireless Telegraphy (Control of Interference from Apparatus) (The London Olympic Games and Paralympic Games) Regulations 2012 [legislation.gov.uk] were certainly part of the legal basis for tackling interference, but these regulations are limited to interference with wireless communications for public safety purposes:

Regulation 5(1):

The requirement is that between 26th July 2012 and 10th September 2012 apparatus must when in use operate at a sufficiently low intensity of electromagnetic energy such that it does not cause undue interference with wireless telegraphy used for public safety purposes within a protection area.

I've yet to find the basis on which Wi-Fi interference is verboten, but I would have thought there's a document out there somewhere...

Re:I don't see the problem. (1)

Neil_Brown (1568845) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868295)

In it's

Oop's*

*intentional, this time...

Food cops also deployed (4, Funny)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867445)

Anyone not eating official McDonalds food--prepare for an ass whipping!

--
This post brought to you by Carl's, Jr. Fuck you, I'm eating!

Re:Food cops also deployed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867635)

I saw no McD's at the ExCeL Olympic venue.

Re:Food cops also deployed (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867747)

It's a US-only thing. We're required to eat only McDonald's food while watching the Olympics on any NBC partnering Pay TV provider.

Re:Food cops also deployed (4, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867713)

Anyone eating official Taco Bell food--prepare for an ass wiping!

Re:Food cops also deployed (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868131)

Poor donkey. Guess it works similar to the "if you don't buy this magazine, we'll kill this dog" magazine cover.

Re:Food cops also deployed (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868051)

Anyone not eating official McDonalds food--prepare for an ass whipping!

It's all about the Olympic Games - a nearly ancient past-time that we all value dearly. We're honoring the games by policing stupid shit!

We do nothing but good.

</snark>

BT Wifi Fees (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867455)

BT offers paid hotspots, through BT WiFi (£5.99 for 90 minutes, £9.99 for 24 hours, £26.99 for five days), except for BT home customers and customers of mobile carriers which have sharing agreements with BT (O2 and Tesco Mobile). For anyone else, vouchers can be bought from kiosks at Olympic parks, BT told GigaOM.

Re:BT Wifi Fees (1)

Pax681 (1002592) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867543)

BT offers paid hotspots, through BT WiFi (£5.99 for 90 minutes, £9.99 for 24 hours, £26.99 for five days), except for BT home customers and customers of mobile carriers which have sharing agreements with BT (O2 and Tesco Mobile). For anyone else, vouchers can be bought from kiosks at Olympic parks, BT told GigaOM.

and Vodafone too ;)

Re:BT Wifi Fees (1)

CimmerianX (2478270) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868069)

They are worried that free hotspots would interfere with their Wifi Monopoly inside the stadium.

Nothing to see here.... The police are protecting the interests of the powers that be. Please pay us the 5.99 and only post how totally awesome and great the venue is today.

Re:BT Wifi Fees (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868245)

Wow... Really? "The police" are in no way whatsoever involved with this. And it's not exactly like it's all that weird or unreasonable for a business not to allow unauthorized hotspots. It's not a free market to "monopolize", it's an event that they're the contractual provider of this service for. Your tinfoil hat is a little too tight.

Short translation (5, Insightful)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867467)

"We want more money."

Actually, a good portion of human activity can be explained by that simple phrase. In this case, it's about enforcing rules guaranteeing BT certain amounts of money.

Re:Short translation (5, Informative)

gbjbaanb (229885) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867675)

yup, so true. One of our more respected news shows interviewed Coe (the olympic head organiser) and asked awkward questions like "so if someone turns up wearing a Pepsi tshirt, will they be allowed entry?" eventually [politics.co.uk] they got an answer of "yes but only if its not obviously organised" - ie no crowdsourcing some non-coke advertising.

Reminds me of the Bavaria Babes (where brewer Bavaria gave bright orange dresses to a few ladies to go to a football match that was officially sponsored by rival Heineken), and the ban on Heineken's response of a helmet. [www.rnw.nl]

Frankly, its getting a bit silly when you have to ask if you can wear what you want to an event, and equally silly when the marketing people hijack that with a publicity stunt. But the most stupid is when a group of select sponsors get to take over the entire event in the first place.

Re:Short translation (3, Insightful)

jimbolauski (882977) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867807)

"We want more money."

Actually, a good portion of human activity can be explained by that simple phrase. In this case, it's about enforcing rules guaranteeing BT certain amounts of money.

BT paid to be the sole wifi provider of the Olympic games and at Olympic Venues, if the Venues are private property they have done nothing wrong, just as a home owner has the right throw someone off their property they have the right to do the same. Now if you were directly across the street you can do what ever you please as long at it is within the the Ofcom regulations. They are not saying you can't set up a wifi hub in London they are saying you can't set up a wifi hub at an Olympic venue on private property. If the venues are on public property then they have no ground to stand on as they don't have the authority to remove people from public property.

"We want more money" (4, Insightful)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867829)

1. by working hard and providing attractive product: ok

2. by embedding yourself as an oligopolisitc rent seeking parasite on the political landscape: not ok *

* but by #2 cloaking itself falsely as a capitalist force like #1, and spreading propaganda to that effect, riling up fools who believe that nonsense, such as with healthcare insurance, we can remain embedded in the body politic, and siphon off cash in a noncapitalistic way, all the while protected by idiots who think they are championing capitalism

Re:"We want more money" (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868027)

Gee based on that you I expect will be voting Romney right?

Romneyt - earned his millions in the private sector, created many jobs and gave opportunites to untold thousands of people.

Obama - Spen nearly his whole career in public service, accomplishing very little unless you count ruining the economy, destroying the healthcare system, growing the government as good things. Unemployment has been over 8% (its really 15 or more) for the longest stretch in recorded history. A lot of his money comes from two phony books he probably didn't even write, otherwise he has been sucking at the taxpayers teat the whole time and recieving bribes from unions, crony capitalists and on and on.

So who will you vote for then? Who has the better product?

Re:Short translation (3, Funny)

crazyjj (2598719) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867965)

The Olympics--where everyone gets paid except the athletes who actually do the work.

Re:Short translation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868281)

"We want more money."

Actually, a good portion of human activity can be explained by that simple phrase.

The rest can be explained by the phrases "We're hungry." and "I'm so lonely."

The Olympic Park is Private Property (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867477)

Locog doesn't want your Wifi hotspot on their property, so they forbid it and enforce the policy. If you're not put off by the commercial nature of the Olympic Games, why are you offended by this? Besides, if you were offering Wifi on your property with that many visitors, would you allow anyone to shit all over the scarce spectrum? Didn't think so.

Re:The Olympic Park is Private Property (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867563)

Owning property does not grant you a license to control the spectrum within it's perimeter under any jurisdiction I'm aware of.

Re:The Olympic Park is Private Property (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867621)

They're not controlling the spectrum, they're controlling what people do on their property. You can stand next to the Olympic Park and send Wifi in their direction all day long and there's nothing they can do about it. Set foot on their property and they get to tell you to leave if you violate their rules. They're being nice about it though and will only tell you to shut down your access point.

Re:The Olympic Park is Private Property (1)

atisss (1661313) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867901)

The question is - was this written and presented when you bought ticket. They shouldn't be able make up rules after selling the ticket.

Re:The Olympic Park is Private Property (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867959)

Really? You need the rules of 'get off my property if I say so' to be written up for you?

Re:The Olympic Park is Private Property (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867969)

The next time you invite me to your house, I'm going to start screaming as loud as I can. You shouldn't be able to kick me out, because you didn't have the foresight to tell me not to scream before inviting me in.

Re:The Olympic Park is Private Property (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867997)

19. Spectator Policy

        * 19.1
        * Personal property
        * 19.1.1
        * There will be no storage available at the Venues, save for limited space afforded to children’s buggies, prams and wheelchairs.
        * 19.1.2
        * LOCOG has the exclusive right to determine what objects may be brought into a Venue by a Ticket Holder. LOCOG will not store confiscated and/or unauthorised material at a Venue and a Ticket Holder will have no right for the item to be returned.
        * 19.2
        * Prohibited and restricted items
        * 19.2.1
        * Ticket Holders are prohibited from transporting into a Venue any firearm, ammunition, dangerous weapon or object, explosive, chemicals or incendiary device. Any Ticket Holder who is found to be in possession of any of the above items will have the items seized, shall be removed from a Venue and may be subject to arrest and/or prosecution by the relevant authorities.
        * 19.2.2
        * No objects that may cause damage to Persons and/or property, or cause disturbance to the regular and orderly execution of a Session (as determined by LOCOG in its sole discretion), may be brought into a Venue.
        * 19.2.3
        * The following is a non-exhaustive list of restricted items which may not be taken into a Venue (LOCOG reserves the right to amend this list, generally, or in respect of any Venue or Session): food (save for baby food), alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages (save for baby milk and other valid medical reasons), liquids in containers of greater than 100ml in size, needles (save as required for valid medical reasons), animals (save for assistance or guide dogs), weapons (including knives), illegal drugs, other illegal substances, fireworks, firecrackers, poles, flagpoles, sticks, large photographic equipment (including tripods), bats, large umbrellas and other blunt instruments, motorcycles, bicycles, roller-skates, skateboards, or other types of skates, electronic transmitting equipment, flags of countries not participating in the Games, large flags or banners, horns, whistles, drums, rattles, musical instruments, lasers or any other devices that in the opinion of LOCOG may disturb a Session, objects bearing trademarks or other kinds of promotional signs or messages (such as hats, T-shirts, bags, etc) which LOCOG believes are for promotional purposes, counterfeit products, balls, rackets, frisbees or similar objects, large quantities of coins, lighters, advertising or promotional material of any kind, printed matter bearing religious, political or offensive content or content contrary to public order and/or morality, bottles or containers made of glass or other material, flasks, thermoses, refrigerators, large objects such as suitcases or bags, and in general any material that LOCOG may deem dangerous or that may cause damage or disruption to a Session.
        * 19.3
        * Forbidden behaviour
        * 19.3.1
        * Any behaviour by a Ticket Holder that, in LOCOG’s view, creates a dangerous situation, puts at risk an individual’s personal security, is against public order, interferes in any way with the orderly execution of a Session or disrupts the enjoyment of a Session is forbidden and may result in a refusal of admission to or removal from the Venue without refund.
        * 19.3.2
        * The following is an illustrative list of prohibited and restricted behaviour within any Venue: fighting, public drunkenness, smoking, gambling, unauthorised money collection, any activity related to marketing or advertising (including, for the avoidance of doubt individual or group ambush marketing), activity or protest related to unions, political or religious subjects, sale of goods by unauthorised individuals or in unauthorised places (booths, mobile fast food restaurants, refreshment areas, etc), unauthorised Ticket sales, unauthorised transmissions and/or recording through mobile telephones or other instruments (video cameras, tape recorders, etc), entry of unauthorised journalists/reporters with taping or recording equipment and/or video cameras, flash photography, attempting to access restricted areas, requesting money or other goods without authorisation (for example, musicians or singers at the entrance or in the Venue, charity collectors, beggars), standing on Ticketed seats, interfering with the operation of a Session (including, for certain Sessions, the use of mobile telephones), disturbing other Ticket Holders' enjoyment of a Session, disrupting the comfort or safety of other Ticket Holders and any other activity that LOCOG deems dangerous or inappropriate.
        * 19.4
        * Security inspections
        * 19.4.1
        * LOCOG may conduct security searches to ensure safety at a Session.
        * 19.4.2
        * A Ticket Holder who rejects a security search or refuses to comply with rules and security notices published by LOCOG will be required immediately to leave the Venue without refund to the Ticket Holder or Purchaser.
        * 19.5
        * Prompt attendance
        *
        * Ticket Holders should allow sufficient time before the commencement of a Session to access the Venue. Ticket Holders arriving after the commencement of a Session may be required to wait for an appropriate break in a Session before being granted access to his or her Ticketed seat.
        * 19.6
        * Filming, photography and taping
        * 19.6.1
        * Ticket Holders consent to being photographed, filmed or taped, by LOCOG, by the IOC, by the IPC, or by third parties appointed and/or authorised by them.
        * 19.6.2
        * LOCOG, the IOC, the IPC or third parties appointed and/or authorised by them shall, without requirement of the payment of money or other form of consideration, have the right to broadcast, publish, license and use any such photographs, films, recordings or images of a Ticket Holder in perpetuity.
        * 19.6.3
        * Images, video and sound recordings of the Games taken by a Ticket Holder cannot be used for any purpose other than for private and domestic purposes and a Ticket Holder may not license, broadcast or publish video and/or sound recordings, including on social networking websites and the internet more generally, and may not exploit images, video and/or sound recordings for commercial purposes under any circumstances, whether on the internet or otherwise, or make them available to third parties for commercial purposes.

Re:The Olympic Park is Private Property (3, Insightful)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868293)

And no wonder that the businesses in London complains of the lack of customers when the restrictions for the olympic venues are hard enough to make you feel like a suspect.

Re:The Olympic Park is Private Property (1)

jimicus (737525) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868159)

It does, however, grant you the right to say "Follow the policy or leave my property. Your call."

Re:The Olympic Park is Private Property (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867727)

Well, the UK isn't the US (obviously), but if they tried that here, they would run afoul of the Telecommunications Act of 1934 [wikipedia.org] . Basically, you are forbidden to interfere with another's radio broadcast regardless if it's private property or not. You may own the property, but you don't own the airwaves.

Re:The Olympic Park is Private Property (1)

bws111 (1216812) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868297)

Uh, no. You can't interfere with their transmissions, but you CAN prevent them from using a device on your property. If someone is not on your property there is nothing you can do about it.

Time to call in the FAT-POLICE! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867479)

Yeah, thats right. I said it!

Other Olympic blackouts (5, Informative)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867487)

The IOC has a lot more shutdowns to its credit.

Every single online stream for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, for instace, i snow a endless loop saying "During the London 2012 Olympics, we are unable to bring you regular ABC programming in your location. This is due to the Olympic Broadcast Agreement."

Try any of the streams at http://www.abc.net.au/radio/listenlive.htm#directlinks [abc.net.au] All blocked if you're outside Australia.

Assholes. Not just sport. EVERYTHING from Australia's main broadcaster is off the air for weeks because of the fucking Olympics.

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (0)

metrix007 (200091) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867571)

ABC is far from the main broadcaster in Oz.

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (1)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867689)

ABC is far from the main broadcaster in Oz.

Really? The context of "broadcasting" I was talking about was Internet radio streams. Not local over-the-air TV.

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867619)

Is there anything about the Olympics that isn't corrupt and disgusting?

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (4, Funny)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867687)

Is there anything about the Olympics that isn't corrupt and disgusting?

Maybe (slightly...) less doping than in the Tour de France?

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (2)

arth1 (260657) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867943)

Maybe (slightly...) less doping than in the Tour de France?

No, Tour de France has far fewer participants.
There are mainly two types of competitors in the olympics: Those who get caught, and those who don't. If you think that [insert 2012 Olympic Hero] is clean, you're deluding yourself.

In the past, we had an occasional Eddie the Eagle who was clean, funny and doesn't stand a breadcrumb's chance in Picadilly Circus of winning anything. But now they've banned those so only top dopers, sorry, I mean athletes, can compete.

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (1)

Yoda222 (943886) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868187)

Less doping or worse enforcing policy ?

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867911)

Is there anything about the Olympics that isn't corrupt and disgusting?

It is not corruption if they are open and honest about their greed.

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (2)

qwe4rty (2599703) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868003)

Is there anything about the Olympics that isn't corrupt and disgusting?

I think the Olympics committee did a good job revamping their appeals process to appear more legit and transparent.

Oh wait...

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868047)

Is there anything about the Olympics that isn't corrupt and disgusting?

No.

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (1)

jslaff (881873) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867881)

Same thing with the BBC, especially BBC London radio. Offline internationally until the middle of September!

Re:Other Olympic blackouts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867889)

Head on down to the Bay if you want to watch something other than the Olympics.

The 30th Corporate Games (4, Insightful)

MickyTheIdiot (1032226) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867505)

You have to wonder when the hell they will just sell naming rights and be done with it.

And rename to Professional Wrestling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867655)

C'mon Bring on the Rock! What happened to that whole 'amateur' thing .....

Really, these WIFI people should know better than to p*ss off the Ministry Of Information.

Re:The 30th Corporate Games (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868037)

Welcome to the Games of the 30th Skoalympics!

Re:The 30th Corporate Games (1)

rfrenzob (163001) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868123)

Remember back during the 2004 games when we were discussing the "clean venue" policy and monitoring for "advertising terrorism" [slashdot.org] ?

bad move (4, Funny)

Trepidity (597) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867531)

These "wi-fi police" are clearly infringing on the exclusive intellectual property rights of the Metropolitan Police Service, The Official Police Force of the Olympic Games®.

Re:bad move (2)

Xest (935314) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867791)

Actually I think the British Army is now the official police force of the olympic games. Previously it was G4S, but they failed miserably.

fakeap (4, Funny)

KDN (3283) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867533)

What we need are a few people to run the 'fakeap' program to create thousands of "access points" for them to chase :-).

Re:fakeap (1)

Abstergo (2677619) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867849)

Is there such a thing as an EM Interference Throwie (I'm thinking something you could make dozens of for super cheap)? Maybe calibrate it to work at Wi-Fi frequencies...

Re:fakeap (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868001)

A substantial percentage of the world's cheap-ass 'wireless' tat is 2.4GHz, because it is generally usable without a license and the silicon needed to implement it is heavily commodified. I don't know of anything specifically designed for the purpose; but a Goodwill's worth of nasty old cordless phones and ghastly analog video blasters would probably fit the bill...

two methods of defeating such methods (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867577)

1. using a directional antenna that rotates 360 degrees randomly ... pretty hard to pin-point
2. using a hotspot in the sky floating in the air

Re:two methods of defeating such methods (3, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867649)

They didn't ban personal portable EMP devices. Stand next to the guy with the silly antenna and press the button. Bang...no more detecting, mister!

Re:two methods of defeating such methods (1)

oPless (63249) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868209)

Actually they did.

Patrolling unlicensed spectrum, seriously? (1)

fufufang (2603203) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867585)

I guess it is about the time to take out the magnetron out of the microwave oven, and power them using car batteries, distribute them around Olympic venues. That will teach those police a lesson.

On a serious note, has Ofcom officially sold those unlicensed band to the IOC?

Wait what? (1, Interesting)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867623)

So the Olympic committee and BT can get together and prevent YOU from using the FREE portion of the spectrum that is allocated for public use, which is why everyone can use wifi routers in the first place? Nice. How can I do that? I have a price in mind for air.

Re:Wait what? (3, Insightful)

JSBiff (87824) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867795)

As someone else pointed out - you are free to use Wifi [em]outside the Olympic Park[/em] which is private property. You are only allowed on the grounds according to the rules by which they setup and you agree to when you purchase a ticket? Don't like the rules - then you become a trespasser and they eject you from the Park.

It sucks, but it would seem to be quite legal. They aren't regulating wireless spectrum, per se, they are regulating access to their property.

Re:Wait what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867907)

Clearly, property rights are only good when they're extended to decent, torrent-downloading people.

Welcome To The Planet (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867809)

So the Olympic committee and BT can get together and prevent YOU from using the FREE portion of the spectrum that is allocated for public use, which is why everyone can use wifi routers in the first place? Nice. How can I do that? I have a price in mind for air.

Yea, that's how it works. The property is under the jurisdiction of a particular group, similar to how a corporation controls what happens in their buildings or you control what happens in your house. When "rogue" APs are discovered, they are located and shut down by whomever controls the facility, as you would do if your neighbour setup an AP in your home or driveway or a corporation would do if an empolyee plugged a Linksys into the network. This protects the quality of the "official" WiFi service. It also protects the revenue of the official(paid for the rights) WiFi provider within the facility.

The fish and chips shop across the street is free to blast the venue with WiFi and the so called "cops" in this case can do nothing more than politely ask that the fish and chips shop turn down the volume(signal strength). But, since the fish and chips shop has jurisdiction over their own facility, they are free to blast WiFi, right up to the legal transmission limit, if they choose. Effectively degrading the SNR for them and those in the venue where their signal overlaps. It's all pretty standard WiFi stuff.

Welcom to the planet.

Re:Wait what? (1)

Meneth (872868) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867833)

Normally there ought to be laws against that kind of prevention. None of the articles I've found says anything about that.

The London Olympics have been corrupted... (4, Funny)

BigBadBus (653823) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867639)

...by greed and commercialism. Lord Seb Coe, the head of Locog who oversee our Olympic effort, said in an interview that you wouldn't be allowed in to the Olympic park if you wore a T-shirt with the Pepsi logo on it. Of course, Coke is one of the official sponsors.

Soon after, Coe backpedalled so rapidly that if he was seated backwards on a bike he'd win a gold medal in cycling.

Re:The London Olympics have been corrupted... (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868179)

Not just the London Olympics. In fact, not new at all. The Olympics have been corrupted beyond belief for decades now.

Cool! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867677)

I love the Olympics! I can watch people do amazing things like... swim... and run. Wow! Totally amazing! About as amazing as watching people kick balls around!

Good thing no one cares about that whole science thing...

bluetooth hotspot? infra red (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867691)

Hmmmm...bluetooth is 2.4ghz so I wonder if they would detect and shut you down?

I already stopped following this circus (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867709)

I was watching and following this Olympics for two days but when I learned about the gymnast who had suffered head injury but was back in games, I started thinking that there will many more such athletes who are not back after suffering injury. I realized that countless young people are sacrificing their careers and dreams and has to live with the consequences of "not being able to make it to the Olympics" for rest of their lives and there is no "sports" in these games. Its all a big advertising event. I stopped watching or following it. Have not bothered to tune to ABS since Sunday.
Just my feelings, worth Windows 8 Mobiles market share.

Wifi police? (1)

DarkFencer (260473) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867721)

So we have WiFi Police, and Brand Police (to protect what is really important, sponsors and their branding, even from those ungrateful unpaid athletes).

But there was a shortage in real security. Nice to see what the priorities really were for the IOC.

How are you getting an internet connection? (4, Informative)

JSBiff (87824) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867729)

So, uhh, I'm a bit confused how anyone would provision outside internet access to their WiFi hotspot in the olympic park? The only answer which comes to mind is phones with built-in WiFi hotspots - but in Britain, if you're getting your phone data connection from BT (which you've paid for), why would they be able to stop you from using it?

It is, after all, a BT wifi hotspot which they have been paid for.

Re:How are you getting an internet connection? (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867883)

You'd use your phone to provide wifi access to your mobile provider, so if you were on, for example, Orange, and you were lucky enough to actually get a connection, and your phone was working, you could provide wifi access to that shitty Orange connection.

Theory (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867867)

What if they are buffering and heavily monitoring all data traffic originating in the area? Shutting down alterna-wifi will force people to use the Carnivore Connection or go without their social media. As we know, social media have been a popular way to organize and coordinate rioting and the Brits have some pretty ugly incidents in their recent memory about how out of hand things can get in a hurry.

Now certainly monitoring isn't going to stop an efficient, one word/phrase message from getting out such as a well trained organization might use. But it would let you see a bunch of amateurs aggregating and setting up. Inevitably you get clueless people posting "Hey is this where we find out what time the riot starts?" and you might just get a shot at stopping it from happening.

Besides, while police would love to have you think they can prevent crime, ultimately the nature of the tools at hand leads them to be more punishers of crimes that have already happened. Having a firm grip on the datastreams in the locality of the Games could be exactly the kind of investigative treasure trove you'd want when trying to track down who triggered the riot that resulted in the death of (insert name of country)'s Olympic delegation, for example.

I might just be crazy, but then again we have reports of men with antennae roaming the Games. I for one welcome our new alien overlords.

And I thought I hated the NFL and MLB (0)

jollyreaper (513215) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867871)

It seems like there's a threshold for human organizations beyond which the probability of turning into complete fucking assholes approaches 1. Grow a religion big enough and it becomes assholes in funny hats, just like the Catholics. Grow a software company big enough and it's chair-throwing assholes with buggy operating systems. Grow a sport big enough and they take something that's supposed to be about having a good time and ruin everyone else's time.

Put the IOC on the terrorism watch list.

Re:And I thought I hated the NFL and MLB (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40867919)

Put the IOC on the terrorism watch list.

Hire Golgo 13, he never misses the mark.

Re:And I thought I hated the NFL and MLB (4, Interesting)

Applekid (993327) | more than 2 years ago | (#40868125)

I think it's even worse than religion. At least the goal of religious organization (ideally, without the greed and corruption) is about people as a group trying to find a spiritual part of themselves. We could argue whether such a part exists or not, but sports organizations really aren't about anything positive for the individual, only idolatry towards freaks of nature, those within the top 0.1% of humans with such levels of athletic ability made possible by genetics, and distracting people from doing things like work or caring about politics and their future or education or gaining skills or even taking a moment to be introspective.

IOC is SUCK (1, Insightful)

TemplePilot (2035400) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867877)

This practice actually raises my hackles. Alarm bells and klaxxons go off. Really they have NO BUSINESS doing this dystopian crap. This is exactly the very sort of thing that makes people angry. I for one wouldn't pay those mofo's one bluidy red cent. My wifi my business not theirs. Its not a crime. And they can't make it one just because. SCREW YOU, you damn'd IOC & your lame limpicks. DIAF and all that!

Finally a reason to go to the 'limpics (1)

IchBinEinPenguin (589252) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867915)

Fire up an AP and get ready to debate the meaning of "unlicensed spectrum" :-)

Social Media is a euphemism for Empty Seats (2)

Picass0 (147474) | more than 2 years ago | (#40867935)

Maybe the next Olympic games they'll actually let common people buy tickets again instead of selling huge blocks to corporate sponsors who don't show up.

Naaa...

They can stop others from selling WiFi service (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868055)

that would protect BT from other service providers.

Hopefully, the IOC wasn't dumb enough to make the administration of the games dependent on a clean WiFi environment.
    They don't own the unlicensed WiFi spectrum. (Unless maybe on private property, they do?)

If someone has the right to use their cell to access the Internet, they should have the right to privately use the same connection for their laptop with a person WiFi link protected with a private password.

One protest strategy is legally buying sponser's logo and the wearing it in unflattering ways.
      (Like an upside down.)

Maybe that would get the IOC to be reasonable.

It would be interesting if everybody turned on their WiFi gear in AdHoc mode for a 5 minute protest perhaps at the start of each hour.

Standard Operating Procedure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868083)

There are very good technical reasons why this is standard operating procedure for a very large venue. While it is true that this is unlicensed spectrum, it is also shared. The collisions from rogue access points destroys usability for both the rogues and the sanctioned APs. This may not be something that you have ever had to deal with your SOHO system (although you probably did by trying to select a channel that didn't conflict with your neighbors) but it is a real problem for a large venue. You have to do this or no one will have service. (This still does not discount the greed/business reasons for BT to do this, however.)

So who's pretending to be the official hub? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868153)

Nobody.

And the WiFi frequencies are publicly available.

What a load of bollocks this is.

a good wi-fi (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868185)

this wi-fi police stalk olympic games if very good!!!
read http://howto-hsk.blogspot.com/2012/07/download-office-apps-for-galaxy-s3.html

Licenses? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868199)

So they want you to turn off your unlicensed Wifi Hotspot?

Wifi is an unlicensed band therefore un-licensable and therefore can only be shut down if it is:

a) Interfering with licensed transmissions
b) On private property where the person is the owner or their proxy and they ask you to leave, taking your property with you or forfeit its ownership.

So because of above their own hotspot network is un-licensed so a) is out provided I am not interferring with something else. Also if you are on public property b) is out, as this includes potentially all places between venues.

So good luck with that, prepare mr Wifi-sniffer to be sued if you prevent my use of a wifi hotspot or cause to prevent by improperly calling the authorities.

what full on facism looks like (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40868309)

In case anyone didn't realize this will be the future of the whole world if the marriage of corporations and government isn't somehow stopped.

The government has too much power, the corporations are too tightly intertwined with that power.

Individual freedom is never a benefit to those with power so will be crushed at every opportunity.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?