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In Brazil, All Vehicles Must Have Radio IDs By 2014

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the cross-their-heart-and-hope-to-die dept.

Government 161

morcego writes "Brazil's National Traffic Council (CNT) published Friday a resolution that institutes the National System of Automatic Vehicle Identification (Siniav). According to the Q&A published (Google translation from Portuguese), only 'visible and public' information will be available (vehicle year or fabrication, make, model, combustible, engine power and license plate number), without any personal information about the owner or registration data. This system will be mandatory for all vehicles (cars, trucks, motorcycles, etc) and should cost vehicle owners approximately R$5 (less than US$3)."

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certainly much simpler than (5, Insightful)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955631)

certainly much simpler than spending gazillion dollars on cameras with ocr for the plates, like what's being rolled out in western world.

Re:certainly much simpler than (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955651)

certainly much simpler than spending gazillion dollars on cameras with ocr for the plates, like what's being rolled out in western world.

Not sure where you live... but you ever heard of lastpass? Been around for what? 15 years?

Re:certainly much simpler than (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956049)

Actually, I haven't. Tried to google it but it seems you are referring to a password manager while replying to a comment abount license plate detection. Care to elaborate or provide a link? Not sure where you live ..

Re:certainly much simpler than (4, Insightful)

gtirloni (1531285) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955721)

I don't want to disappoint you but Brazil is pretty much in the "western world" too. And it has lots of cameras with license plate reading tech for speeding tickets, etc.

Re:certainly much simpler than (-1, Troll)

Kergan (780543) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955815)

If Brazil is part of the western world, so are Gabon, Botswana, Dominica, and Iran. Can't be right...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP)_per_capita [wikipedia.org]

Re:certainly much simpler than (2)

cheesybagel (670288) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955831)

Brazil has high income disparity. They manufacture airplanes (Embraer) but a lot of people live in slums next to the rich people's fenced mansions with high security guards who have to leave their houses in bullet proof cars.

Re:certainly much simpler than (3, Interesting)

FunkDup (995643) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955951)

a lot of people live in slums next to the rich people's fenced mansions

Sounds a little bit like South Africa, or to some extent the USA.

This [wikipedia.org] article says:

There is no agreed upon definition about what all these nations have in common apart from having a significant population of European descent.

Re:certainly much simpler than (2)

murdocj (543661) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956769)

don't recall the last time I saw any of my neighbors in a bullet proof car in the USA... care to elaborate?

Re:certainly much simpler than (0)

Shavano (2541114) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956855)

Do you live in a slum?

Re:certainly much simpler than (1)

murdocj (543661) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956929)

Do you live in a slum?

I had no idea the people in slums could afford bullet proof cars.

Re:certainly much simpler than (1)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955977)

>> high security guards

This is South America after all: "Dude, halt or I'll...um..hey..wow, man, did you ever look at your hand, man?"

Re:certainly much simpler than (1)

mister2au (1707664) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956521)

I know you're being funny and I got a chuckle out of it ... but just fyi:

South American has the lowest levels of opiates use of any region in the world, cocaine at about half the rate of first-world countries and cannabis lower that all areas except SE Asia.

Re:certainly much simpler than (4, Informative)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956779)

I know you're being funny and I got a chuckle out of it ... but just fyi:

South American has the lowest levels of opiates use of any region in the world, cocaine at about half the rate of first-world countries and cannabis lower that all areas except SE Asia.

http://geocurrents.info/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Per-Capita-Opiate-Use-Map.jpg [geocurrents.info]
It would seem Africa and East Asia use less opiates on average, thanks to Brazil.
Perhaps even Australia may use less opiates on average.

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_prevalence_of_opiates_use [wikipedia.org] , I looked up my own country, the Netherlands, where laws on opiate usage is somewhat more lenient than most countries in the world; about halfway down and much less than highly anti-drug countries such as the US. What does that tell you? Either enforcement is less in the US (22% of inmates will tell you otherwise; http://www.hrw.org/legacy/backgrounder/usa/incarceration/ [hrw.org] ) or legalizing drugs actually lessens drug use (taking drugs is not rebelious and anti-establishment if you can legally do so).

Re:certainly much simpler than (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955899)

If Brazil is part of the western world, so are Gabon, Botswana, Dominica, and Iran.

Why? And why did you link to a list of countries by GDP - you can't seriously think that oil revenues make Qatar "western"?

Re:certainly much simpler than (1)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956077)

I think he was implying that those countries aren't "western."

On the other hand, I think they have cities that at least appear that "appear western [wikimedia.org] ."

Re:certainly much simpler than (3, Insightful)

Shavano (2541114) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956885)

By any reasonable definition Brazil is western. European language, Christian major religions, colonized from the east by people from Europe. IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE. Western does not mean "wealthy."

Re:certainly much simpler than (2)

mister2au (1707664) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955921)

I see your Wikipedia and raise you 1 Wikipedia ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_world [wikipedia.org]

In the contemporary cultural meaning, the Western world includes many countries of Europe as well as many countries of European colonial origin in the Americas and Oceania, such as the United States of America, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, etc.

Re:certainly much simpler than (3, Informative)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956011)

I have bad news for you, Iran is a modern country, regardless to what you're shown on TV. Their government may be oppressive and backwards, but the country itself is very modern. I travelled 2000 miles by bus through Brazil, and many parts of Brazil are still richer than America's Gulf Coast (Biloxi, Gulfport, etc). The GDP says one thing, but wondering through the capital cities at night tells another. The rural parts of many countries do need to catch up though.

Re:certainly much simpler than (2)

Vladius (2577555) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956401)

The Mississippi Gulf Coast was ignored in the aftermath of Katrina because of New Orleans, even though Bay St Louis is where the eye came ashore.

Re:certainly much simpler than (0)

Shavano (2541114) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956917)

I have bad news for you, Iran is a modern country, regardless to what you're shown on TV. Their government may be oppressive and backwards, but the country itself is very modern.

How is that be news, other than the part where they're governed by power hungry theocrats who are hostile to freedom?

Re:certainly much simpler than (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956081)

> If Brazil is part of the western world, so are Gabon, Botswana, Dominica, and Iran. Can't be right...

> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP)_per_capita [wikipedia.org]

Tsk, give an economist a hammer and everything becomes a nail...

Dude, FYI, western is based on the number of gays in a country; so, the most western country is England, followed closely by Canada and USA (actually, there is a dispute for the second place) and, so that you know, Brazil is on an excellent placing in the Western Countries List (probably around the 7th).

GDP... Ha! So 2011...

Re:certainly much simpler than (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956143)

And by your definition, Japan and Korea are part of the west...

Re:certainly much simpler than (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955725)

Agreed. In the UK, this information is already written on the tax disc on the front of every car. A radio chip would be much cheaper as you'd only need one for the life of the car, plus all of the information is linked to the central database anyway making tax discs mostly worthless.

Re:certainly much simpler than (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956225)

I believe the point of a tax disk is to serve as a visual excuse for police to pull you over - "why did you stop the car", "no tax disk" - it's a robust indisputable reason, whereas "we decided to search the database just to see if they had a valid disk" looks more like a fishing trip.

Re:certainly much simpler than (2)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956419)

You have to be pretty close to see that a car has no tax disk. They make them a different colour every year, so it's about as easy to see if one has expired too (although, there's some significant overlap, so the colour just means that you need a closer look). If you're close enough to see the tax disk, you're almost certainly close enough to wave an RFID reader at the car.

Re:certainly much simpler than (5, Insightful)

SourceFrog (627014) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955733)

Why yes, I'm all for more efficient methods for re-creating 1984.

Re:certainly much simpler than (4, Funny)

zill (1690130) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956169)

Why yes, I'm all for more efficient methods for re-creating Brazil [imdb.com] .

FTFY

let's hope it helps the public (1)

poetmatt (793785) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956023)

let's hope they do things like let people store medical information on these radio ID's, not just things that make it easier to collect money.
If someone were to get in an accident but be able to indicate they're a hemophiliac, for example.

Re:certainly much simpler than (2)

craigminah (1885846) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956083)

...and it will improve the accuracy of drone strikes as well.

Voluntary... when the chip breaks. (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955635)

Hm. An RFID chip to be installed on the windshield in Brazilian heat? Surely, nothing could go wrong.

Re:Voluntary... when the chip breaks. (3, Informative)

jamesh (87723) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955961)

we have tollway rfid devices in Australia that sit pretty much in the hottest part of the cabin, and they do just fine for the lifetime of the battery (~5-10 years). Are you seriously suggesting that they haven't thought of this??

Re:Voluntary... when the chip breaks. (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956057)

We're not talk about the "hottest part of the cabin". From the TFA, the requirements are that all cars must have an rfid in the windshield. We are not talking also about tollway devices where one can simply replace it if it malfunctions. The purpose of these devices are to track stolen cars and unclaimed loads. Making this mandatory is to assume that the chip will never malfunction. And yes, I'm seriously suggesting they haven't thoroughly thought out the repercussions fully just as they have not thoroughly thought out the mandate... else this wouldn't warrant discussion.

Re:Voluntary... when the chip breaks. (1)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956193)

The purpose of these devices are to track stolen cars and unclaimed loads

And there was I thinking the purpose was to facilitate Mafia hits on rival drug lords. My bad.

Re:Voluntary... when the chip breaks. (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956241)

The purpose of these devices are to track stolen cars and unclaimed loads

And there was I thinking the purpose was to facilitate Mafia hits on rival drug lords. My bad.

In Brazil, those two statements are redundant. ;)

Re:Voluntary... when the chip breaks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956079)

Hate to burst your bubble, but RFID chips have already been installed on the windshields of many cars over here in Brazil, for several years. They are automated toll charging chips that allow you to cross tollbooths without stopping. AND THEY WORK JUST FINE.

The difference is that the existing system is optional. This new one will be mandatory.

Re:Voluntary... when the chip breaks. (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956097)

Hate to burst your bubble, but RFID chips have already been installed on the windshields of many cars over here in Brazil, for several years. They are automated toll charging chips that allow you to cross tollbooths without stopping. AND THEY WORK JUST FINE.

The difference is that the existing system is optional. This new one will be mandatory.

Have they ever malfunctioned?

Re:Voluntary... when the chip breaks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956133)

Give up.

You posted a worthless comment, as though the folks implementing this couldn't have possible thought about the heat, but you've been shot down.

Now you're just looking more like a retard than you did in the first place.

Re:Voluntary... when the chip breaks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956201)

Give up.

You posted a worthless comment, as though the folks implementing this couldn't have possible thought about the heat, but you've been shot down.

Now you're just looking more like a retard than you did in the first place.

Google EZ-Pass [malfunction]... Retard.
Then post informatively.

I am retard. (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956297)

I am the retard who is telling you to invest in Kapsch who creates the infallible E-Z Pass.

for what purpose? (4, Interesting)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955653)

Why would you want such a thing? Humans can't read it and it sounds like criminals can easily swap tags or fake tags if they want to disguise themselves. License plates at least gave you the option to report a driver that caused an accident. At best, this is useful for statistics about vehicle usage, not for individual tracking, taxing or that sort of thing.

Re:for what purpose? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955659)

A national toll road system can be setup now. Tolls can be made billable to the vehicle OWNER since they have the license plate number..

Re:for what purpose? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955737)

A national toll road system with tags that could be easily swapped or faked (as suggested by dutchwhizzman)??? That would be akin to a 50 meter radius wireless credit card with no authentication code. Bad idea.

Re:for what purpose? (3, Funny)

Havenwar (867124) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955801)

This is a government project we're talking about here. Don't expect them to hand you the lube.

Re:for what purpose? (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955811)

A national toll road system with tags that could be easily swapped or faked (as suggested by dutchwhizzman)??? That would be akin to a 50 meter radius wireless credit card with no authentication code. Bad idea.

well, if you're willing to drive around with fake plates. I suppose plenty of people in brazil are doing just that though..

Re:for what purpose? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955837)

Sure, but is there any toll system based on plate optical recognition? This is the whole point.

Re:for what purpose? (2)

bky1701 (979071) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956037)

The wonderful state of NC (sarcasm) opened a plate-recognition toll road here about a year ago.

Re:for what purpose? (1)

cowboy76Spain (815442) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956537)

A national toll road system with tags that could be easily swapped or faked (as suggested by dutchwhizzman)??? That would be akin to a 50 meter radius wireless credit card with no authentication code. Bad idea.

well, if you're willing to drive around with fake plates. I suppose plenty of people in brazil are doing just that though..

Could you provide some explanation of your comment? Maybe it was just me, but it sounded a lot like "they are poor so most of them must be criminals" (or maybe it was "they live south of the border".

I mean, do you have any data (reports, statistics, even some news article or even anecdotal evidence) to support your sentence? Any explanation of why "plenty of people" are willing to take the effort of swapping plates and risk of getting caught?

Re:for what purpose? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956351)

A national toll road system can be setup now. Tolls can be made billable to the vehicle OWNER since they have the license plate number..

If you're going to put tolls on the entire country, just do it in a much cheaper fashion - put a tax on gas. Far cheaper to implement, and doesn't have the privacy implications.

Re:for what purpose? (1)

Tom (822) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956181)

Why would you want such a thing?

Maybe you should have read TFA? It contains a section conveniently titled "What are the uses of the system?"

license plate number (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955655)

The license plate number is not considered registration data?

License plate /= registration data? (5, Insightful)

LaZZaR (216092) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955679)

This means you are trackable.

Re:License plate /= registration data? (4, Insightful)

gtirloni (1531285) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955697)

Not exactly 100% efficient since the _car_ is trackable but I get the point. Same thing with your cellphone though.

Re:License plate /= registration data? (3, Insightful)

Cornwallis (1188489) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955703)

Bingo. All the previous posters are wrong. This is the *only* purpose.

Re:License plate /= registration data? (1)

Some Guy (21271) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956439)

I'm confused.

      License plate /= registration data

How do you divide a license plate by registration data? (And you're missing a semicolon, so it won't compile anyways.)

Re:License plate /= registration data? (2)

cowboy76Spain (815442) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956481)

It means that if someone sets a private "listening" station, they will get no more data that they could have get just looking at the car.

Only the people with access to the vehicles registration database(i.e. the state) could make a match with additional info (owner, address, and so on).

For people (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955699)

I think it will not be long before it will be mandatory for persons as well here (Netherlands).
They are now putting fingerprints and other biometric parameters in your passport and identity card, and it is mandatory to carry it whenever you are outdoors.
The next step will be to implant the RFID chip.
It is now being tested with pet animals, next will probably be farm animals, and when this does not cause any obvious health problems you will be required to have a chip implanted with your identifying information.

All for the sake of the war on terrorism.

Re:For people (1)

cheesybagel (670288) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955871)

I doubt implants will be common. While it is common to brand cattle you do not see people getting branded even in more autocratic or totalitarian regimes. Same thing applies to these sorts of implants.

Re:For people (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955883)

You better let a government agency pick up your kids for you. Because damn if you go pick them up at the kindergarten yourself!

Re:For people (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955937)

(Netherlands). They are now putting fingerprints and other biometric parameters in your passport and identity card, and it is mandatory to carry it whenever you are outdoors.

Wot? Really?

Re:For people (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956717)

"Europe requires it" is of course the excuse.
(as always when the politicians have to defend a new rule that seems ridiculous)

Re:For people (1)

volmtech (769154) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956017)

Have you seen the amount of hardware most young people have implanted in various and tender parts of their bodies? If you can stick a stud in your tongue or navel a small RFID in your forearm will be nothing.

Re:For people (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956033)

Seems kind of stupid to require people to carry their fingerprint information with them at all times. Don't they do that already? That would be like legalizing pot, but requiring registration first so your health insurance and employer would know about it. Oh wait ...

Required? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955709)

What a CNT of a requirement.

Johnny Mnemonic was right in one area (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955715)

Johnny Mnemonic: Yeah, the Black Shakes. What causes it?
Spider: What causes it?
[points to various pieces of equipment throughout the room]
Spider: This causes it! This causes it! This causes it! Information overload! All the electronics around you poisoning the airwaves. Technological fucking civilization. But we still have all this shit, because we can't live without it. Let me do my work.
- http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0113481/quotes [imdb.com]

Re:Johnny Mnemonic was right in one area (1)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956153)

I don't think I've ever seen anyone seriously quote that film before.

Suspicious Timing for TFA release (2)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955741)

Bloomberg just released an article relating to car theft in Brazil: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-08-10/brazil-wonders-why-its-rich-kids-are-so-good-at-stealing-cars.html [bloomberg.com] So who's the manufacturer?

Re:Suspicious Timing for TFA release (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955799)

Oh, this has everything to do with it: http://www.bloomberg.com/pressroom/bloomberg-hosts-latin-america-investing-conference/ [bloomberg.com] Form your own opinions or continue to connect the dots. Brazil is, however, seeing an influx of foreign investments that are unadulterated and entirely unregulated. This is another unnecessary piece of legislation that infringes upon people's privacy just to sell an investor's product to the masses.

Kapsch it is. (2)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956309)

Three or four articles and press releases have been released in the past twelve hours. I deduct that Kapsch (the same producer of the failed E-Z Pass) is going to be producing these devices for the Brazilian government. ( See: http://www.kapsch.net/en/KapschGroup/press/articles/files/2012/PR_KTC_First_order_for_delivery_of_on-board_units_from_Brazil_EN.pdf [kapsch.net] posted 13 hours ago ). Their stock is down in case anyone is interested. Articles are being simultaneously released by Bloomberg. All articles released within a four hour difference.

Most people don't care (5, Informative)

tmcb (2136918) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955753)

Well, car thefts are quite frequent in some Brazilian cities, so it's not surprise that most people won't see anything wrong on that apart from paying 5 bucks for the thing themselves. Some people will even see this as a good thing; well, it's an extremely cheap car tracking service!

There were really few contrary opinions to the resolution. Mr. Raul Jungmann, national representative, filed a request for its suspension [google.com] , alluding to privacy concerns, but no final solution was given to the matter since 2007. It had no big repercussion on media, too. That's how things work in Brazil: these stuff get approved with enough antecedence, but become news just over the deadline. I can't say if it's intentional, but it really seems so.

Re:Most people don't care (2)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955767)

Of course the car thieves will have no way to just remove that chip on stolen cars ...

Re:Most people don't care (2)

tmcb (2136918) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955809)

Oh, of course they can't do that in any way! It would be a crime!

Re:Most people don't care (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955867)

The police cars will have receivers for those trackers, so, if a policeman sees a car that doesnt emit rf sinal or wich emits the wrong plate number, "bingo, this is a stealed car, lets stop it".

Re:Most people don't care (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955879)

The police cars will have receivers for those trackers, so, if a policeman sees a car that doesnt emit rf sinal or wich emits the wrong plate number, "bingo, this is a stealed car, lets stop it".

My passport is supposed to give of an rf signal too. That was until my fat ass sat on it.

Re:Most people don't care (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955939)

The police cars will have receivers for those trackers, so, if a policeman sees a car that doesnt emit rf sinal or wich emits the wrong plate number, "bingo, this is a stealed car, lets stop it".

My passport is supposed to give of an rf signal too. That was until my fat ass sat on it.

This is Brazil, no fat asses!

(Also, it's in a car, they're usually more durable than a passport.)

Re:Most people don't care (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956089)

The police cars will have receivers for those trackers, so, if a policeman sees a car that doesnt emit rf sinal or wich emits the wrong plate number, "bingo, this is a stealed car, lets stop it".

My passport is supposed to give of an rf signal too. That was until my fat ass sat on it.

This is Brazil, no fat asses!

(Also, it's in a car, they're usually more durable than a passport.)

I thought Brazil was famous for fat asses.

Re:Most people don't care (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956101)

The police cars will have receivers for those trackers, so, if a policeman sees a car that doesnt emit rf sinal or wich emits the wrong plate number, "bingo, this is a stealed car, lets stop it".

My passport is supposed to give of an rf signal too. That was until my fat ass sat on it.

This is Brazil, no fat asses!

(Also, it's in a car, they're usually more durable than a passport.)

I thought Brazil was famous for fat asses.

The police cars will have receivers for those trackers, so, if a policeman sees a car that doesnt emit rf sinal or wich emits the wrong plate number, "bingo, this is a stealed car, lets stop it".

My passport is supposed to give of an rf signal too. That was until my fat ass sat on it.

This is Brazil, no fat asses!

(Also, it's in a car, they're usually more durable than a passport.)

I thought Brazil was famous for fat asses.

Plump, not fat. See People of Walmart if you're not clear on the distinction.

Re:Most people don't care (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956109)

The police cars will have receivers for those trackers, so, if a policeman sees a car that doesnt emit rf sinal or wich emits the wrong plate number, "bingo, this is a stealed car, lets stop it".

My passport is supposed to give of an rf signal too. That was until my fat ass sat on it.

This is Brazil, no fat asses!

(Also, it's in a car, they're usually more durable than a passport.)

I thought Brazil was famous for fat asses.

The police cars will have receivers for those trackers, so, if a policeman sees a car that doesnt emit rf sinal or wich emits the wrong plate number, "bingo, this is a stealed car, lets stop it".

My passport is supposed to give of an rf signal too. That was until my fat ass sat on it.

This is Brazil, no fat asses!

(Also, it's in a car, they're usually more durable than a passport.)

I thought Brazil was famous for fat asses.

Plump, not fat. See People of Walmart if you're not clear on the distinction.

Can I find it on youporn.com?

Re:Most people don't care (1)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956213)

it's in a car, they're usually more durable than a passport

You obviously have not seen an American sit on a car!

Re:Most people don't care (1)

volmtech (769154) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956055)

Sensor and camera at every intersection. Car pulls into warehouse, identical car with unregistered chip pulls out, cops pull it over before it goes ten blocks. If a $400 phone can lead police to the robbers house a $20000 car should be able to.

let me say (1)

Errtu76 (776778) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955761)

Boa sorte!

It's a tax and a power grab (0)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955931)

It's a tax and a power grab. You are going to be taxed, whatever the cost of installation will be (5 bucks? I don't think so) and it's a power grab by the government, that will use the device you'll be paying for to track your ass.

Financial trickery (1)

goldgin (1218596) | more than 2 years ago | (#40955941)

I bet a cousin of a curtain politician has a company with thousands of those devices preordered and in stock. I also bet that there are only a few brands of these devices allowed in the brasilian market, those brands already exclusive to curtain cousins of active politicians. And the show must go on...

Re:Financial trickery (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956041)

Absolutely true, but is there really such a big difference between company-owned-by-the-cousin-of-politician (Brasil) and company-that-promised-cushy-consulting-job-to-politician-after-he-retires (USA)?

Don't kid yourself. Democracy today is totally corrupt everywhere, it's just that the corruption in the US is on much larger, more industrial scale than the family-oriented nepotism of Latin America.

Re:Financial trickery (2)

goldgin (1218596) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956209)

Hmm it seems Brasil needs to upgrade their Corruption v1.1 software to USA's model, Corruption v2.0. It's funny that so few people spot the trick... and so much more want into the deal when they find out about it. It so seems that the only solution for mankind is in evolution, a new breed of mankind that is lacking the ability to lie and cheat their way to success. Thankfully this is already happening, with statistics showing a new generation of humans with Aspergers syndrome and similar disorders on the rise, people that make decisions using common sense and logic. This is of course debatable and fictionary but that's all hope I have left for humanity.

Re:Financial trickery (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956357)

The company is Kapsch.

u r an fag (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955971)

cars are slaverie

Like Mobile Phones (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40955999)

They can now track where and when your car has been in real time with radio tags all they need to do is set up radio towers in a grid like pattern, even if they only do it in cites that's useful information to them.

Re:Like Mobile Phones (1)

cheros (223479) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956007)

They do this already with ANR (Automatic Number plate Recognition)..

Are you idiots aware there is some news (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956021)

happening right now?

Romney/Ryan. A great pair to kick Obama's ass.

And you leftist free software hippies and still asleep after a long night playing D&D I guess.

Wake up and smell the budget cuts, losers. You might all have to go out and get jobs. Ooes Noes!

Re:Are you idiots aware there is some news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956053)

Ryan basically guarantees only idiots and fascists will vote Romney. I am afraid you're a member of both groups. Obama just won reelection.

Re:Are you idiots aware there is some news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956321)

Such a well reasoned argument. /sarc-of-course "idiots and fascists".

What, did you miss your DNC talking points memo this morning? Ryan will energize the right - both the Tea Party and the House, leaves the Senate in easier reach and is a damn good pick. You leftists are sooooo predictable.

See you in November.

We will keep the House, take the Senate and the executive.

Learn the Constitution chump because it's going to be re-instituted starting in 162 days.

Re:Are you idiots aware there is some news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956911)

I find it funny how right wingers love to complain about people needing to get jobs and the like, yet they seem to have more time to ramble incoherently online than anyone else.

Re:Are you idiots aware there is some news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956059)

an athiest free marketeer like Paul Ryan would be better off running for vice president of China! that's just what america needs, some fucking mormon cultist and and a freaky randist pushing jesus out of our nation!

Re:Are you idiots aware there is some news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40956371)

Gee, you attack religion, throw in some profanity, attack Ayn Rand and Ryan together, make a nonsensical comparison to China and the free market (are you still high from last night perhaps?) and for all that not a *single* substantive argument or point whatsoever. Pretty impressive for a libtard free software hippie. Isn't this shower day hippie?

It's going to be so much fun in November to watch you losers cry into your bong water.

Romney/Ryan/Constitution 2012!

So it's RFID then. (2)

cheros (223479) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956031)

I can see RFID work in such an application, as long as they are write-once. Otherwise I'd give it a week before everyone is Spartacus :).

RFIDs are actually more practical than ANR - less horsepower required to read, and no games with "accidentally" leaving mud on the plates (however, if they cannot be read very quickly there may be an issue). However, I can only see this work with vehicle attached RFID - license RFID should be separate or you'll have to leave the chip open to reprogramming, which is IMHO where the problems hide here (as above :).

I was actually waiting for something like this to happen - vehicle ID hasn't seen progress since VINs. However, as always I'd be worried about privacy implications - with ANR there is already enough discussion.

Re:So it's RFID then. (1)

cowboy76Spain (815442) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956497)

You only have to provide the cops with a reader. At any police control, check if the data from the radio checks the one you can see (after all, all the data will be public/visible, according to TFS). If it does not match, fine/inmovilize the vehicle/whatever.

Workaround. (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956389)

Clone it, zap the original, leave hidden clone in car for daily tracking.

Spoof different RFID and keep in Faraday wrap.

Swap as desired.

Destined for Problems (3, Informative)

betterprimate (2679747) | more than 2 years ago | (#40956623)

The chips will be supplied by Kapsch ( http://www.kapsch.net/en/KapschGroup/press/articles/Pages/ktc_120810_pr.aspx [kapsch.net] ). These chips/devices are similar to the E-Z Pass in the NorthEast U.S. They are notorious for malfunctioning... http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-05-17/toll-poaching-ezpass/55038948/1 [usatoday.com] http://www.newstribune.com/news/2012/jun/28/e-z-pass-not-always-so-easy/ [newstribune.com] http://www.wkbw.com/news/local/49044786.html [wkbw.com] http://consumerist.com/2007/07/e-zpass-charge-you-fee-when-it-malfunctions.html [consumerist.com] The difference is that these are mandatory. If they do malfunction, how would it affect an innocent individual?
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