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Rootbeer GPU Compiler Lets Almost Any Java Code Run On the GPU

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the also-it's-delicious dept.

Java 304

An anonymous reader writes "Today the source code to the Rootbeer GPU Compiler was released as open source on github. This work allows for a developer to use almost any Java code on the GPU. It is free, open source and highly tested. Rootbeer is the most full featured translator to convert Java Bytecode to CUDA. It allows arbitrary graphs of objects to be serialized to the GPU and the GPU kernel to be written in Java." Rootbeer is the work of Syracuse University instructor Phil Pratt-Szeliga.

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304 comments

First Post (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961737)

Not posted using Java because it's too slow to get First Post

Re:First Post (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962051)

Um, 'scuse me, you got a license for the use of the word Java in that first post?

-- Oracle lawweasel

Re:First Post (2, Funny)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 2 years ago | (#40962063)

He means it would be too slow to fly to java before posting from an internet cafe.

Got any that can run on OpenCL ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962375)

Unfortunately I do not use Nvidia GPU
 

Any code? (5, Funny)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | about 2 years ago | (#40961759)

This work allows for a developer to use almost any Java code on the GPU.

Except for the code my students write. :rolleyes:

Re:Any code? (4, Funny)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | about 2 years ago | (#40961765)

By the way, this comment is not an indictment of my teaching...

Re:Any code? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961771)

There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

Re:Any code? (4, Insightful)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | about 2 years ago | (#40961779)

There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

Trust me, there's plenty of bad students. They're only in class to collect their "No Worker Left Behind" check. Thankfully that program has run its course.

Re:Any code? (1, Redundant)

morcego (260031) | about 2 years ago | (#40961807)

There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

Trust me, there's plenty of bad students. They're only in class to collect their "No Worker Left Behind" check. Thankfully that program has run its course.

Lemme fix that saying: No one becomes a bad student without, at some point, having a bad teacher.

(Note: both my parents are teachers)

Re:Any code? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961855)

What if they were born as psychotic murderers?

Re:Any code? (1, Interesting)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | about 2 years ago | (#40961917)

The problem with No Worker Left behind is it tried to wedge non-techinically inclined stampers and tool & dye operators into technical classes because "there's jobs in computers." The day after my one of my Winter courses finished, one of my less than stellar students started a job as a welder. He told me he was just waiting for a job to come along, he had no intention in going into programming. I have another one just like that this semester.

"Thinking is hard work, which is why so few people do it." - Henry Ford

Re:Any code? (3, Interesting)

danbuter (2019760) | about 2 years ago | (#40962129)

He'll make far more money welding than most IT guys will. And he'll get a great pension, as long as he joins a welders union (which he probably will, unless you are way out in the boonies).

Re:Any code? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962155)

Sorry, but what you said is false. As proof, I farted out of my own asshole upon reading your comment.

To make me go to such lengths... the audacity!

Re:Any code? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962369)

...tool & dye....

"Thinking is hard work, which is why so few people do it." - Henry Ford

Tool and die. I can understand not knowing how to spell it, bit quoting Henry Ford and not realizing that die work and tooling are technical jobs is abhorrent.

Tech support is to computer science as die setters are to mechanical engineers.

Tool and die makers are the software developers of the hardware world.

Captcha is pompous. How relevant.

Re:Any code? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961979)

Speaking as someone who has had the experience of being both a good and a bad student, I will tell you it has very little to do with the teacher. It's all about student attitude. I failed several undergrad classes quite convincingly and it was pretty much my own fault, even though I would have liked to have blamed it on some of the horrible teachers I had. I excelled in grad school because I approached it with a completely different attitude and no teacher, no matter how bad, was going to get in my way and prevent me from doing well.

I control my attitude. While I admit that no one is impervious to external influences, how a student reacts to a bad teacher is largely up to them. If you allow a bad teacher to turn you into a bad student, that's entirely your own fault. It's not like they've tied you down, cracked open your skull and deliberately rewired things to turn you into that asshole who never shows up or does the work.

Re:Any code? (2)

fredgiblet (1063752) | about 2 years ago | (#40962433)

+1

I got a 2.8 GPA in High school because I didn't care and I never did homework. In college I got a 3.9 because college actaully matters so I started caring.

Amusingly enough my teachers in high school loved me (one of them hugged me and cried when I left), despite the fact that I almost never turned in homework.

Re:Any code? (5, Insightful)

ThePeices (635180) | about 2 years ago | (#40962247)

No, you are quite wrong indeed.

There are bad students out there, we do not live in a perfect happy smiley little world where every human has limitless potential and can do *anything* if only they tried and had good teachers. That nonsense view comes out of what political correctness has done to modern western society.

There are students who truly are unwilling to learn, dont want to be there, and are only in class because they have to.

There are actually students out there who will never be able to pass certain exams, no matter how good the teachers are and no matter how much they try. Some things are just beyond some people.

The *real world* is not perfect, humans are not perfect.

If you think that is a cynical view, well then that is utterly irrelevant to my point. Facts are facts, no matter how much we dont or do like that fact.

Re:Any code? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962363)

But the USA is *way* more real than the rest! ... Oh, wait!

Re:Any code? (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 2 years ago | (#40962415)

One might say that a good teacher is one who motivates he/her students to want to learn. Certainly I have found such teachers in my learning career.

Re:Any code? (2, Insightful)

fredgiblet (1063752) | about 2 years ago | (#40962443)

Some people can't be motivated, some teachers may be able to motivate tons of students, but not be able to motivate that particular one.

Re:Any code? (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 2 years ago | (#40962459)

Oh? Where did you meet this mythical student who can't be motivated? Who is he?

Re:Any code? (5, Funny)

sydneyfong (410107) | about 2 years ago | (#40962565)

I'm here. Hi.

Re:Any code? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962477)

But have you ever been a student who didn't want to learn?

I mean, I've certainly been inspired by teachers. And I've had teachers bring subjects alive when I was sure I would be bored. But I've always wanted to learn. What about those who don't? And I don't mean the cultural issues, like in Stand and Deliver where a teacher walks in and turns a school or class around. I mean an average learning environment where one or a few kids just don't GAF.

And there are people who simply can't learn some things. I have a dear friend, who is quite intelligent and a gifted writer and poet, and she works terribly, terribly hard at math and does okay grade wise*, but some concepts she simply cannot understand.

*We are both quite a bit older than the average college student, but are persueing degrees.

Re:Any code? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962001)

I used to think that too, until I started teaching at a state college. The only effective way to teach them is triage. There're the ones who will get it no matter what, the ones who will never learn a thing no matter how well you teach, but there's not much to be done there, short of encouraging the former to explore and helping the latter make it to the pass line. The bulk of the resources need to go to the middle group, where your efforts can make the difference between getting it and not.

Re:Any code? (2)

oakgrove (845019) | about 2 years ago | (#40962111)

There are no bad students, only bad teachers.

Incorrect! Here, let me FTFY:

There are no bad students, just children who have not been provided the proper frequency and dosage of amphetamines [wikipedia.org] yet.

Dope: it's what's for breakfast!

Re:Any code? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961783)

Don't worry. Every teacher understand exactly what you mean.

Re:Any code? (0)

JosephTX (2521572) | about 2 years ago | (#40962121)

if so many of your students are apparently such bad programmers, I'm guessing it's due to a mutual problem they share (you), even though you clearly seem enthusiastic about your job.

Re:Any code? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#40962399)

if so many of your students are apparently such bad programmers, I'm guessing it's due to a mutual problem they share (you), even though you clearly seem enthusiastic about your job.

You'd really have to know more about the selection criteria for his class to make any useful statements about what properties they share...

Re:Any code? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962337)

If you stopped sleeping with the female students they might stand a better chance ;-) Here let me show you a repeat until loop...

x264 (4, Interesting)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 2 years ago | (#40961773)

Maybe now the x264 developers will add GPU support and we'll finally have a solution for video encoding that uses the processor and GPUs in parallel. Here's to hoping... :\

Re:x264 (2)

phizi0n (1237812) | about 2 years ago | (#40961925)

That would be quite difficult for a C/assembly project to use a Java compiler.

Re:x264 (2, Interesting)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 2 years ago | (#40962303)

That would be quite difficult for a C/assembly project to use a Java compiler.

*shrug* They've been dragging their heels for years, claiming that there's no practical way to do it, that the quality is inferior, etc., etc. And now there's a way to generate bytecode that can be executed on the GPU and return predictable results. I'm sure someone who knows assembler can figure out a simple FIFO or IPC / shared memory arrangement... At this point, they can't hide behind technical hurdles: It's clear GPUs can be used, they just don't want to because they're stuck up.

Re:x264 (2)

Miletos (1289588) | about 2 years ago | (#40961939)

But x264 is coded in C and Assembly, not Java.

How about getting java code to run on java (-1, Troll)

silas_moeckel (234313) | about 2 years ago | (#40961781)

Last I checked java was the biggest pita in things not running unless they were using the specific version of java they were coded for. Now your telling me you can have arbitrary java code compiled to cuda seems far fetched when it can hardly handle going from x.y.z to x.y.z+1 without breaking

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (1, Insightful)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 years ago | (#40961817)

Pretty much. Now, instead of having to bundle your blessed version of java and libraries with the app, you have to bundle those, AND a graphics card that speaks CUDA and has a specific driver version.

That whole "write once, run anywhere" was never true, and not only because it's stretching the word "run". Now it gets even less true.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (2)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#40961887)

The WORA aspects of Java work flawlessly these days.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (0)

TPoise (799382) | about 2 years ago | (#40961901)

Except after you get pestered every hour to update your Java runtime, you actually do update it and it breaks compatibility with all existing apps. Other than that, yea WORA is great stuff.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#40961927)

You don't have to update and if you do, it doesn't break compatibility with existing apps.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (2, Insightful)

silas_moeckel (234313) | about 2 years ago | (#40962029)

You must run some VERY different apps than I do. Every management app I've used seems to be tied to different versions of java everything for ui glitches though plain just not working.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (2)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#40962141)

Yeah I guess I do. I tend to use good software.

Java doesn't have a monopoly on shitty software.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962189)

Except that it lowers the bar so much that shitty programmers ended up using it.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (5, Informative)

SplashMyBandit (1543257) | about 2 years ago | (#40961995)

Usually there is only a problem when your application server (I'm looking at you, stinky Websphere) relies on a particular vendor's implementation of Java (eg. IBM JDK). With recent Sun/Oracle Java Runtime Environments (that is: Java 6, which is around 5 years old; and Java 7) applications usually run flawlessly (at least, mine do - and I'm doing all the usual Java funky stuff: radar, roadsign and head tracking hardware device control, networking, web, 3D graphics, rich clients, etc).

As a current practitioner in the field I wonder whether your experience is from a long time ago (and polluted by the experience of using software that was based on Microsoft's awful [and deliberately incompatible - which they lost the famous lawsuit over] Java implementation from a long time ago).

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (2)

silas_moeckel (234313) | about 2 years ago | (#40962053)

Primarily with those java management apps related to networking kit. You know those things that are embedded in firmware and sometimes the only way to do more than get an IP on the box to get to said java nightmare. I've had the issues as recent as a few weeks ago when a java update stopped some dialog boxes from working on a supermicro ipkvm java app. Same update killed all my ASDM java apps for working with CIsco ASA's (though it still works as a web app for whatever reasons)

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#40962425)

We have some (too expensive to justify replacing) facilities control modules at work whose 'web interface' consists of a java applet that won't run on anything more recent than J2SE 1.4(early 2002, for those keeping score).

Given the relative costs of replacing the module(the closest thing to a firmware update that the vendor offers) and just maintaining a VM snapshot of a decade-old java setup, we obviously went with the latter.

I have no particular reason to believe that java itself is to blame, rather than merely being the instrument of somebody's apathy and/or incompetence; but there are definitely some special applications floating around.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (5, Insightful)

LodCrappo (705968) | about 2 years ago | (#40961919)

2004 called, they want their blind hate for Java back.

Used intelligently by a skilled programmer, Java can deliver great results and provide exactly the sort of cross platform capabilities it was designed for. Used by idiots and/or kids who just earned that undergrad CS degree, it tends to provide less.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961951)

2004 called, they want their blind hate for Java back.

Used intelligently by a skilled programmer, Java can deliver great results and provide exactly the sort of cross platform capabilities it was designed for. Used by idiots and/or kids who just earned that undergrad CS degree, it tends to provide less.

Just like any other programming language?

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962175)

Just like any other programming language?

Um, essentially yes. Java is just like every other language which was the point of the comment. Read the contrarian comment it was in reply to for refreshment on what the GP was arguing against. You and whoever modded you "underrated" need to keep up.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (1)

Khyber (864651) | about 2 years ago | (#40962039)

"Used intelligently by a skilled programmer"

2010 called. What you ask for is in extremely short stock and will be as long as the educational systems go to shit.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962227)

2012 called and would like to know where to get some ganj

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962501)

2020 called and said "they grow it EVERYWERE, man and it's awesome, man." Then it forgot to hang up the phone.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (0)

sockman (133264) | about 2 years ago | (#40962289)

Because people are incapable of learning without the government, right?

There will always be good programmers, regardless of what the government institutions churn out.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (1, Informative)

silas_moeckel (234313) | about 2 years ago | (#40962077)

Guess what I'm not coding for it just using apps from major corps. Those fun management apps that on some kit you must use as the cli will only setup basic ip settings, any real config requires some java monstrosity. Just a few weeks back a java update broke some buttons on the latest supermicro ipkvm java app and the cisco asdm launcher (though the web launched versions works). I would not call cisco some fly by night company.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962217)

Guess what I'm not coding for it just using apps from major corps. Those fun management apps that on some kit you must use as the cli will only setup basic ip settings, any real config requires some java monstrosity. Just a few weeks back a java update broke some buttons on the latest supermicro ipkvm java app and the cisco asdm launcher (though the web launched versions works). I would not call cisco some fly by night company.

So can I suggest you just not update Java on your machines until you're sure your applications are compatible? That seems like a good idea to me. You can also just keep multiple versions on the machines and start the application with a fully qualified path name to the particular java you want.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962251)

2004, try 2000. Java is well known to be deficient in modern language features and has stagnated to the point where it doesn't look like it will ever catch up. Even good old C++ has been updated recently. Not all languages need to have all features but I never find anything in Java to make up for everything it misses.

A skill programmer is smart enough to avoid Java if possible. So while it might need a skilled programmer to get good results from it, we will never know since they are all using something that doesn't suck.

You are definately not a skilled programmer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962405)

Because a skill programmer would know that Java has evolved and that the language has many features that it didn't have in v1.0

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (5, Interesting)

SplashMyBandit (1543257) | about 2 years ago | (#40961959)

This is simply not true for code written by a professional and competent Java developer (note: part of my consulting gig means I code Java on a professional basis).

If you write only to the public APIs then Java truly is Write-Once-Run-Anywhere (although some bad Java developers use internal functionality that can change between Java versions - I'm guessing that perhaps these folks are used to coding to the Undocumented APIs of Win32 that you used to have to use to get things done). In Java you shouldn't do this. IIRC, Sun created around ten thousand unit tests to ensure Java worked correctly on each platform (wonderful, they did all the porting and port testing effort so Java developers don't have to).

Aside from my professional coding (where Java written on a Mac works flawlessly when deployed to Linux and Windows servers) in my spare time I'm working on modern jet air combat simulator in Java. The same Java+JoGL code works flawlessly on Mac, Linux and Windows. Any differences are in capabilities/performance of individual graphics cards (AMD/ATI vs NVidia).

This article about being able to write Java for the GPU is very interesting, since writing shaders via OpenGL is a little bit of a PITA (there is an impedance mismatch between the conventions of Java, OpenGL and GLSL - it would be fabulous to just write in Java [akin to how I can do this on the Web using Google Web Toolkit]).

So I don't think your statement is really true - except for buggy software written by developers who have bad simple-platform habits.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (1)

silas_moeckel (234313) | about 2 years ago | (#40962115)

From my experience those developers are the majority of business java dev's it would seem. Honestly the platform is broken by the fact the super secret only work here bits existed in the first place. Functionally the java apps should know what versions and extensions they require to run and have the launcher use them or go download the required version.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962237)

Honestly the platform is broken by the fact the super secret only work here bits existed in the first place.

No, it used to be broken. You don't have to use those APIs anymore so now it's the developers and project managers at Cisco working on the application that are broken. Got it?

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962143)

Would be nice to actually see this great quality java code in the wild.

We have a ton of server-side java *crap*. It is all crap. I have never seen a java server app that did proper logging-- seems all server-side java coders think uncaught exceptions leading to stack traces are "super cool".

On the client side, things like the java app to manage Brocade FC switches will sometimes show 90% of the zones missing! Oh, you kill all java instances and re-run it, and all is cool. Yeah, java is great.

In the early 90s I was a believer, but too many crappy experiences with java-- now, when I hear java, I just assume total piece of shit until proven otherwise (which is _super rare_; being generous-- I can't think of anything great written in java off the top of my head)

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (3, Interesting)

eWarz (610883) | about 2 years ago | (#40962347)

This is simply not true for code written by a professional and competent Java developer (note: part of my consulting gig means I code Java on a professional basis).

If you write only to the public APIs then Java truly is Write-Once-Run-Anywhere (although some bad Java developers use internal functionality that can change between Java versions - I'm guessing that perhaps these folks are used to coding to the Undocumented APIs of Win32 that you used to have to use to get things done). In Java you shouldn't do this. IIRC, Sun created around ten thousand unit tests to ensure Java worked correctly on each platform (wonderful, they did all the porting and port testing effort so Java developers don't have to).

Aside from my professional coding (where Java written on a Mac works flawlessly when deployed to Linux and Windows servers) in my spare time I'm working on modern jet air combat simulator in Java. The same Java+JoGL code works flawlessly on Mac, Linux and Windows. Any differences are in capabilities/performance of individual graphics cards (AMD/ATI vs NVidia).

This article about being able to write Java for the GPU is very interesting, since writing shaders via OpenGL is a little bit of a PITA (there is an impedance mismatch between the conventions of Java, OpenGL and GLSL - it would be fabulous to just write in Java [akin to how I can do this on the Web using Google Web Toolkit]).

So I don't think your statement is really true - except for buggy software written by developers who have bad simple-platform habits.

I would tend to disagree. Why? Because companies like cisco, ibm, etc. all only certify certain versions of java for use in their applications. The cisco apps are cross platform but do NOT play well with different versions of java. I'm not a java expert (I'm a C#/RoR guy) but if fortune 500 companies can't get it right, can you really say that java is cross version compatible?

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962427)

Shit Cisco wont support anything outside of IE 7. Talk about some innovative and modern tech company.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | about 2 years ago | (#40962439)

With the caveat that you only do things the underlying OS can handle(though this is hardly unique to Java). If you use a garbage OS(read Windows) then what works perfectly on real OSs can often fail(shit like soft links and anything that opens more than a handful of TCP/IP sockets comes to mind). But then again if you are doing server side Windows you probably aren't a good coder to start with....

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962105)

So last you checked was 2001?
This hasn't been the case for quite some time, it's pretty easy for any competent programmer to write code that runs on any runtime environment from Java 5 and up. Any mediocre programmer can support Java 6 and up run times without trying.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (2)

Miamicanes (730264) | about 2 years ago | (#40962243)

I rarely see problems involving new releases of Java... with one specific exception: 64-bit Java. I've seen more than a few apps that die horrible deaths with 64-bit Java... and almost exactly the same number that specifically *require* 64-bit Java when running under 64-bit Windows.

I'm still trying to figure out what, exactly, causes some random Java app to specifically require one or the other when running under Win7/64. I suspect it has something to do with changes Microsoft made to 64-bit Windows that forced (or at least induced) Sun, then Oracle, to change something major with 64-bit Java... but I've never seen any white paper or article that identifies and explores the specific reasons why this might be so. I'm sure the mass layoffs and exodus of Sun's employees right around the time 64-bit Java became relevant, and 64-bit Windows became mainstream, didn't help.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962267)

It was either Java 6u10 or 6u14 that changed their wsimport tool, which made breaking changes.

Going between a major release I can accept breaking changes with enough notice, but breaking changes to a common compilation tool in a random update is ridiculous. It wasn't too terrible to fix the issue, but it is not an issue that most developers will know how to fix without breaking things elsewhere, without figuring out a tool that should have just worked.

Beyond that, I have seen very few issues with Java compilation/being cross platform, and I say that as someone that regularly writes web applications along with my full time job programming against a 3D application written completely in Java.

Re:How about getting java code to run on java (1)

ADRA (37398) | about 2 years ago | (#40962309)

64 bit java works just fine for me. The only issue I could see is in JNI applications which were only compiled for 32 or 64.
The think that performs like death has been with random bugs in Java7 and OpenJDK (reliably dies on many commonly used programs...)

Super (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 2 years ago | (#40961815)

Why?

Re:Super (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961863)

because it's possible.
making sense is not an obligation.
If this guy didn't make it, others would have :-/

On second thought, it could be a good excuse for asking your boss to buy you a CUDA-capable card, so your "code can compile faster" :-P

Re:Super (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961885)

"because it's possible."

so is cutting off your own dick, please let us know how that works out for you

Re:Super (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961981)

For the record, I prefer to do stupid stuff in JavaScript.
It's much more fun than Java and it runs everywhere
(modulo a few rednecks who insist on using a non-standards-compliant exploder).
But I have to work a lot more to reach THAT level of madness
http://bellard.org/jslinux/

Re:Super (3, Insightful)

fm6 (162816) | about 2 years ago | (#40962065)

Why is any hack done? Because it can be.

Re:Super (1)

oakgrove (845019) | about 2 years ago | (#40962093)

Why?

I don't know how close the current state of the project is to this scenario but I'd want it because my netbook slows to a crawl everytime eclipse recompiles a module I'm working on and I don't want to turn off the auto-compile due to preference for not losing some other features that come along with it. And my netbook sits beside the couch always ready to go when I'm lounging with whatever recreational project I happen to be working on sitting in Dropbox. Nothing better in a quiet house on a Saturday morning than a big bowl of fruit loops and a fresh set of ideas to work on.

Re:Super (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 2 years ago | (#40962145)

Warming tea would be one obvious application. I don't know if they've got to the point where it can roast coffee yet, I suspect they'd have to make Eclipse run there in its entirety for that.

GPL (-1, Troll)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#40961873)

Unfortunately, Rootbeer is licensed under the GPL.

So you won't be seeing wide adoption of it or use in any commercial products.

The GPL has it's place but in a library like this a more permissive license would be better.

Re:GPL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961933)

Unfortunately, people don't work for free.
Or if they do, you can't exploit it.
Damn communists, they don't respect other's greed.

Re:GPL (-1, Troll)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#40961949)

I'm just saying, GPL limits your freedom quite a bit.

Thanks for down modding me and then posting anonymously though.

Re:GPL (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962047)

Whose freedom is limited ?
The only limit I know is enforced by Microsoft who forbids its employees to read xGPL'd source code.
My opinion is that the GPL is a license that tells the user to be responsible and respectful of the authors's work.

For the record, I don't have an account here. How could I mod you in any way ?

OK, I return to my JavaScript stupidities, licensed under AGPLv3 :-D

Re:GPL (-1, Troll)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#40962159)

The GPL doesn't just cover the authors work when you use it.

You have to GPL all of your code, not just the part of the codebase that directly uses the GPL library. Essentially the author then gets to dictate the license of your software.

It's somewhat of a Faustian deal (that said I'm not against it in all case, just cases like Rootbeer).

Re:GPL (4, Insightful)

ThePeices (635180) | about 2 years ago | (#40962277)

No, *you* get to dictate the licence of your software. It is *you* who chooses to use a GPL library in your code.

The Author of the GPL code did not put a gun to your head and forced you to choose their code.

Re:GPL (-1, Troll)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#40962373)

Right but if you make the deal, they own your code.

Not exactly freedom.

Re:GPL (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962561)

Hi,

Right but if you make the deal, they own your code.

Not exactly freedom.

Please check your sources : the GPL does not claim ownership of code written by others.
No license can legally do that in the current international copyright framework.

Now, you have the freedom to believe all the FUD^Wmisleading affirmations that you want. Just make sure to be informed and to read the texts to clear any misconceptions or prejudices.

Back to my JS madness now.

Re:GPL (1)

pcpratts (2706123) | about 2 years ago | (#40962387)

I would be interested in publishing this under different licenses, such as Apache.

Re:GPL (1)

quantumphaze (1245466) | about 2 years ago | (#40961943)

Summary says it's a compiler. It should not force GPL on it's output any more than GCC would.

If I write proprietary code with gedit, is it forced to be GPL?

Re:GPL (0)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#40961985)

Rootbeer appears to have some kind of runtime component that you need to use with your generated code.

I don't see an exception regarding that, so you'd need to GPL your code to comply with the license.

Re:GPL (2)

pcpratts (2706123) | about 2 years ago | (#40962423)

Hello, I am thinking maybe I will use the Apache license...

Re:GPL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40961963)

Agreed, he should have licensed it under the MSPL.

Re:GPL (1)

fm6 (162816) | about 2 years ago | (#40962089)

Let's see, the Linux kernel uses the GPL. There must be millions of products with Linux embedded in them.

Re:GPL (-1, Troll)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#40962163)

Totally different thing, short stuff.

Re:GPL (1)

fm6 (162816) | about 2 years ago | (#40962539)

Different how, sparrow bean?

Blah its CUDA (5, Interesting)

zixxt (1547061) | about 2 years ago | (#40962015)

It's CUDA only, meaning it does not support any open standards. Call me when when I can target OpenCL.

Re:Blah its CUDA (1)

pcpratts (2706123) | about 2 years ago | (#40962379)

OpenCL does not support recursive methods the last time I checked. If it does, it is very simple to switch in OpenCL.

There's hope yet! (4, Insightful)

oakgrove (845019) | about 2 years ago | (#40962017)

Damn, Slashdot, I almost had a freaking heart attack when I moused over (you don't think I actually clicked do you? New here?) the link in the summary and it was to the actual github page rather than some crappy 10 page blog post based on something pulled off the reuters wire from last week.

I'm impressed!

Re:There's hope yet! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962397)

Rape a person long enough, and he will be impressed when you *don’t* rape him for a day...

I think (y)our definition of "impressive" is way off...

Very nice. (3, Informative)

Animats (122034) | about 2 years ago | (#40962127)

Here, from GitHub, is the short presentation. [github.com] This is very impressive. It finds parallelism automatically, at least for simple cases. Over 50x performance improvement on matrix multiply and naive Fourier transform (not FFT), both of which have very simple inner loops. Not clear how it does on less obvious problems.

Re:Very nice. (1)

pcpratts (2706123) | about 2 years ago | (#40962365)

Actually, rootbeer does not find parallelism automatically. You must encode parallelism into your program. But it does get good speedups.

I only have one question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962349)

Will it make Minecraft look better?

Here's A Real Programming Language, Boy (1)

frankgerlach11 (2657679) | about 2 years ago | (#40962361)

Java does indeed provide some benefits, such as memory safety. Unfortunately this comes at the cost of

-Garbage Collection, which kills User Experience due to unpredictable freezing of the whole program
-no way to allocate more than just primitive variables on the stack. That eliminates the fastest allocation method of all.
-being forced to use Arrays Of Pointers, when an array of objects would be perfectly sufficient
-being forced to use a pointer when object agggregation would be perfectly sufficient
-being forced to use the GC even if an object tree is in no way cyclic
-not having Destructors

I've create a programming language called Sappeur which has the same memory safety assurances as Java, but does not have all the downsides as listed above. It is still a bit rough around the edges, but it clearly works and demonstrates that the Java inefficiency is not a god-given thing. Sappeur programs start up as fast as any C or C++ program and terminate equally fast. They are nearly as efficient as C++ programs, which means they are much superior to anything you can do in Java or C#

Here it is:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/sappeurcompiler/ [sourceforge.net]

Legal Problems. (3, Insightful)

softcoder (252233) | about 2 years ago | (#40962435)

Considering the approach that Oracle is taking of trying to copyright and charge license fees just for using the Java API's (see Oracle vs Google) I cant see any sane person developing on a non-Oracle provided Java platform. If they can sue Google for Dalvik they can certainly sue whoever deploys Rootbeer if they feel like it.
pgmer6809

Java is dead! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40962499)

At least that's what all those Node.js people keep saying.

Does it... (1)

malv (882285) | about 2 years ago | (#40962551)

also automagically turn all serial algorithms into massively parallel as well?

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