Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Ask Slashdot: What's the Best Place To Relocate?

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the offworld-colonies-are-nice-this-time-of-year dept.

Politics 999

New submitter tsakas writes: "I am an IT researcher from southern Europe looking for a good place to relocate. Markets are pulling the teeth out of the strong European countries by destroying the south. The U.S. is in debt and there is no way of telling how long this can go on. China and India are on the rise. Brazil and Australia are looking good. The question: Which city would you choose to go and start a family if you were to stay there for a) 5, b) 10 and c) 20 years?"

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Mars (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986845)

Earth is screwed

Re:Mars (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987141)

Dude, I'm not saying Earth is all that, but post-industrial Mars is a wasteland. Until they get the manufacturing sector working again, you're better off at home.

Re:Mars (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987187)

Take you religious twaddle elsewhere. There are soft minds here who think that crap is serious.

Kansas (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986855)

Google Fiber

Re:Kansas (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987049)

Google Fiber

Kansas CITY.

Three quarters of which are in Missouri.

US (2, Informative)

keltor (99721) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986861)

The US - still the best place to live and the whole "debt" issue is really not a huge deal.

Re:US (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986897)

yes, they are simply going to print more money. no problem involved...they are doing it from a long time now...

Re:US (4, Insightful)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987213)

yes, they are simply going to print more money. no problem involved...they are doing it from a long time now...

But still...so far, we're still doing better than much of the EU which is going down the tubes...

And I can't imagine wanting to live in India or China...from the images I've seen of the general living conditions in each of those countries, I don't think I'd care to live there!! If nothing else, recent articles about India's problems with energy infrastructure.

I kinda go back to an old saying I hears..."...sure the US sucks, but it sucks a whole lot less than it sucks everywhere else in the world.

I'm quite pessimistic these days about the US economy...the printing of money and all as you've alluded to, but hell...I can't imagine it will be a lot better anywhere else in the world at the point in time.

I'm worried about the current administrations spending like a drunken sailor on shore leave....I hope it gets better next year, but I'm not sure of that. It would likely take a bunch of the politicians that cared about the US...to get in there, and not worry about re-election, and vote and do what has to be done.

Those steps would be unpopular with many, but to save the US economy in the long run, we're gonna have to cut a LOT of spending, and a lot of that is social programs, there's just no two ways about it. Medicare will likely go bankrupt in the near future if nothing is done.

And likely any thing seriously done to fix it...will not get you re-elected, but man...someone....actually a large group of folks need to get into office by whatever means....and sacrifice their political careers and fix things.

But, even with that diatribe....I can't see it being any better outside the US. Quality of life and all is still great here, better than what I've seen when I've been outside the country.

A true American (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986917)

Spoken like a true American: one who hasn't ever been outside the country, yet speaks as if he has.

Re:A true American (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987015)

Absolutely. I always get a giddy feeling in my stomach listening to American stereotypical chatter. It's so fun to hear such uninformed opinions.

Re:US (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986933)

Umm.. no. If you are going to North America, go to Canada. Specifically Western Canada. Crime is very very low compared to the US, the economy is very strong compared to everywhere else in the world, and we don't expect you to shed your culture.

Re:US (2)

JackieBrown (987087) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987111)

Come to San Antonio and see which culture is being shedded

Re:US (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987133)

Nah, the Canuks are shitting the bed as fast as the other western nations. They just have further to fall, so they look better right now.

They've let a bunch of ultra-conservative wingnuts get hold that are trying their damn hardest to turn the place in to the 52nd state. If you want to see Canada in 10 years, see Australia.

Re:US (3, Insightful)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986935)

Politically motivated "Ask Slashdot" is politically motivated.
FYI, signs of China's economy slowing down since last year.
Also FYI, be good at what you do and no financial crisis can hurt you.

Re:US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987095)

naive is good at being naive.

being good at what you do is never enough when you have to deal with the politics of the day in pretty much any circumstance. Just because I am the best and cheapest and fastest at what i do is only an insignificant part of the equation.

Re:US (4, Informative)

Jeng (926980) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987165)

Also FYI, be good at what you do and no financial crisis can hurt you.

History tells a different story.

Being good at what you do alone will not insulate you from financial crisis's, you also have to make good business decisions.

Re:US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986947)

"whole "debt" issue is really not a huge deal."

$16 Trillion in Federal Debt going to $21-21 Trillion by 2016? It is a huge Deal!
The US is just as insolvent as southern europe if not more. The US is headed for a breakup. The question is, where is the best state to live in the US when the break up occurs.

Re:US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986985)

All nations are headed for a breakup.

The question is whether the US is going to break up in the foreseeable future. And the answer to that question is "no".

Re:US (4, Insightful)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987039)

Sounds like someone who has never set foot inside the U.S. Our civil War settled this issue long ago, there is no getting out of the Union. If anything you will see solidarity and calls for war if our creditors decide to get uppity.

Re:US (4, Insightful)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987157)

The US's major creditor is also its biggest trading partner. China can't wreck the US economy without destroying their own. And if you think the US needs Chinese stuff, China needs US markets more. The debt is not a big deal other than as a political flamebait; if it was, institutional money wouldn't still be using dollars as a reserve currency and running up US equity markets.

Re:US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986963)

The US - still the best place to live and the whole "debt" issue is really not a huge deal.

In a debt-based society and economy, one must borrow and remain indebted to survive.

Re:US (1)

Spy Handler (822350) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987145)

only if you have/make good money. If you don't, there are whole bunch of places better to live than US.

Debt *is* an issue. If something can't go on forever -- for instance spending more money than you earn every month -- it won't. Reality will catch up eventually and the most probable outcome (judging by the current political climate and all the talk about "fairness" and "1%") is that US will adopt high tax rates like Europe. And then US will not be such a good place to live for people making lots of money.... it'll just become another Europe but with worse food and more crime.

I recommend New Zealand, if they'll take you... I've heard nice things about that place and they have hobbit villages there too.

Re:US (3, Insightful)

clarkkent09 (1104833) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987205)

Choose US if you are ambitious and good at what you do. There is no country on Earth that will offer you the same opportunity to succeed and the same liberty to pursue your goals without excessive interference from the government, while at the same time offering strong rule of law and minimum corruption. Ignore the impression you might have from Hollywood movies. Apart from some inner city ghettos, the quality of life in the US is amazing. Chose Canada or Scandinavia if you are insecure about your ability to maintain employment, have no ambition to start a business and need the reassurance of a strong safety net. China and India are still third world countries with extreme poverty and an enormous amount of corruption. Australia may be a good middle ground between the collectivist nanny states of Europe or Canada, with zero energy and innovation, and the US. Also, as far as I know, the immigration policy is relatively welcoming (like in Canada) compared to the US and Europe.

Oh Canada! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986867)

Canada is the place to be IMHO. With the stable economy, the speedy rise of the IT sector and easy Permanent Residence options, it should be your best bet, both in the short and the long run.

Re:Oh Canada! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986915)

Canada is the place to be IMHO. With the stable economy, the speedy rise of the IT sector and easy Permanent Residence options, it should be your best bet, both in the short and the long run.

You like the cold, right ?

Re:Oh Canada! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986955)

I don't live in Canada, but I'm loving life when it never gets above 60F.

Re:Oh Canada! (1)

Vlad_the_Inhaler (32958) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987035)

Look at the climate in Vancouver.
If I emigrated to N America that would be on my shortlist, hell - it would probably be my shortlist.

Re:Oh Canada! (2)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987081)

Look at the climate in Vancouver.

Look at the wages and house prices in Vancouver.

Re:Oh Canada! (5, Funny)

zill (1690130) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987209)

Seattle: 69 degrees
Vancouver: 19 degrees

Jesus! Didn't expect 100 miles to make that much of a difference. We sure drew that border at the right place.

Re:Oh Canada! (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987059)

easy Permanent Residence options

I believe you must be confusing Canada with somewhere else. The permanent resident visa program has been massively oversubscribed for years, so they're making the points system increasingly restrictive while throwing out large numbers of old applications from the queue.

Stay where you are (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986869)

Stay where you are. "I believe I have the nondisprovable ability to predict worldwide economic trends" is a terrible reason to move.

Check Out this place: (3, Informative)

networkconsultant (1224452) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986875)

http://www.openmint.net/masdar-city-green-living-experiment [openmint.net] Masdar is the worlds first attempt at a completely energy neutral city.

Re:Check Out this place: (4, Insightful)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986893)

What benefits would that provide to the submitter?

Re:Check Out this place: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986937)

Isn't the country of Tuvalu an entire country that's committed to that?

Dont belong anywhere (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986883)

As a person who was born in one country, brought up in a second, did college in a third, married a woman in a fourth, and when back to live in the country I did college in, I do not belong anywhere. I would move to any country that provided me with an opportunity I was interested in. There are stupid immigration hurdles and such you have to deal with, and those are artificial constructs that we have created to slow the movement of people like me.

There is a saying in my parent's tongue. I am a pigeon, I fly wherever the seeds are. You should do that too.

 

Re:Dont belong anywhere (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987057)

You're a pigeon, indeed - using the resources of generous countries and then crapping all over them on your way out. What are you, a Gypsy?

Re:Dont belong anywhere (0, Troll)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987089)

God forbid a sovereign nation get to decide who they do and dont let into their nation....... You are a child to be so dismissive of others' right to tell you that you are not welcome.

Too little info (4, Insightful)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986889)

China and India are on the rise. Brazil and Australia are looking good.

Can you speak the language? What are the immigration policies of these countries?

Re:Too little info (1)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987189)

China and India are on the rise. Brazil and Australia are looking good.

Can you speak the language? What are the immigration policies of these countries?

Given how Australian "Strine" is completely incomprehensible to those of us who don't live there, I think you have inadvertently made a good point about all 4 places with the language question. Note that Australia is pretty hostile to immigration and it can be tough even for white people to get in. India will let you in if you get sponsored and they are willing to work through the bureaucracy but in general foreigners just don't move to India. You would also need to understand that in general Indians are not known for being very open to the idea of cross-cultural marriages.

There are downsides to it for sure - small size and one party politics come to mind - but Singapore seems to have its act together in a lot of ways and if I was a younger person looking to move off somewhere, it might be my choice. English skills in Singapore are extremely high and it's actually a little difficult to find people who can't speak it reasonably well.

Re:Too little info (5, Informative)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987241)

China does not permit immigration. You can get a residence permit if you have a real job, but it is only 1 year and is renewed at the pleasure of your local government. I have seen respected businessmen denied for no reason. They have to leave the country and their business predictably fails soon thereafter. There is a China green card program that is granted to a very small number of people every year. You won't get one, don't bother. You can marry a Chinese and get a 1-year "visiting relative" visa that can be renewed as long as you stay married, but this visa class is the same as a tourist visa and you cannot work on this visa, at least not in China. You'd have to have a WWW business or something.

It's funny how people from Western countries with ridiculously lax immigration procedures go abroad, expecting every country to be just like their own. They are shocked, shocked to find out that a visa is a sovereign act of a nation and it is that country's choice to set the rules.

That's going to vary tremendously (5, Insightful)

mooingyak (720677) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986895)

It depends on what you value. You're from "Southern Europe". That's semi-specific. What sort of place are you looking for? Good schools? What kind of community do you want? What kind of language skills do you have and/or are willing to acquire? What sort of culture are you looking for?

Plus, your economic analysis is overly simplistic:

The U.S. is in debt and there is no way of telling how long this can go on.

If the US experiences a major economic collapse, there is no place in the world where you won't feel the effects of that. Or at least, no place in the world where you can hold a job as an "IT researcher".

Re:That's going to vary tremendously (1)

SecurityGuy (217807) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987139)

If the US experiences a major economic collapse, there is no place in the world where you won't feel the effects of that. Or at least, no place in the world where you can hold a job as an "IT researcher".

Yep. Pretty much this. If we get into a hole we can't get out of, we'll simply not pay back all that money we borrowed from the rest of you. That sounds really ugly until you look at the interest rates we're paying you. Really low, aren't they? That implies all of you think the likelihood of a US default is very, very low.

That's not to say we don't need to get our financial ship in order. We do. Not doing so is the path to being the next Greece or Spain. You can only borrow your way to temporary prosperity, and the cost is your children's poverty.

Only 20 years? (4, Insightful)

davidwr (791652) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986903)

But you said raising a family.

This means "where would you go so your kids will have the best opportunities in their lifetimes."

Unless money to travel and attend college abroad is no object, this requires a much longer time horizon than 20 years.

Unfortunately, any reasonably precise prediction of where the world - or any part of it - will be politically and socially 20+ years from now has a high margin of uncertainty.

The US. (3, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986905)

I don't think you actual understand the economic issue.
I suspect you don't understand the EU's issue on a big scale either.

What does this mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986909)

"Markets are pulling the teeth out of the strong European countries by destroying the south."

Guess they aren't that strong are they?

Jeez, go wherever you want. Move to Cuba, they have 100% free health insurance there.

Copenhagen... because of its aerospace sector ;P (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986911)

Go to Copenhagen. You get enterprising neigbours like Copenhagen Suborbitals and the anarchist hippies of Christiania. :P

Any place except Europe and Africa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986919)

Any inhabited continent has a future except Europe and Africa, and I'm not sure about Africa.

Re:Any place except Europe and Africa (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986997)

Any inhabited continent has a future except Europe and Africa, and I'm not sure about Africa.

You must be new here, you forgot to diss America in your post.

Texas (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986923)

Seriously. Texas. And don't believe the haters. It is a great place to raise a family and if you move to the major Urban centers you will find a good mix of conservative government and libertarian social values. Austin is my home and will remain my home for a long time to come.

Re:Texas (1)

JoeMerchant (803320) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987013)

Second for Austin, stay away from Houston unless you want to die young (cancer).

Economically, Texas has good employment, high pay, low cost of living, decent climate, etc.

Advice for anywhere you relocate: rent, for at least 3 years - it's much easier and cheaper to relocate again if you don't own real-estate.

Re:Texas (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987229)

Texas has... decent climate

East Texas is hot and humid, central is hot and arid, West is hot and desert. A central Texas summer weather forecast is typically "very hot with chance of scattered wild fires". I personally like Austin, but know many who have moved here and are disappointed. Know before you go.

go OR start a family (0)

tokul (682258) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986925)

You can choose to relocate or to start a family and accept jobs in local area. Long distance relocation does not work well with families, if you are not from nomad culture.

Brazil (1)

ventolinmono (1964972) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986931)

I live in Mexico doing interactive systems. I like Brazil. Agree there is opportunity there for IT. If moving to another country Brazil will be my first choice.

My picks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986941)

1: Most Canadian cities. Canada does not have the economic ups and downs that other countries have, crime is low (you don't need multiple firearms on you just to go get six-pack of beer), and the cities are safe to have families in, unlike US cities where people are always in a flight mode.

2: Scandinavian countries. They also don't have the boom cycles, but they are stable and very safe places to settle down in.

3: Some areas in the US. Unlike TV, the US isn't a place where you have to have eight machine guns on your SUV as you plod along into a Mad Max-like sunrise on your way to work. Vermont is an example of a place you can settle in, and not worry about safety, for example.

If I were forced to choose a country, I'd probably go Sweden or Canada. Germany is also good.

Emigration Sucks (1)

bobbutts (927504) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986945)

It's expensive and time consuming with unpredictable returns.

Re:Emigration Sucks (2)

fiannaFailMan (702447) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987079)

It's expensive and time consuming with unpredictable returns.

"Time consuming"? This isn't the ocean liner era, this is the jet age! Leave Heathrow and 13 hours later you're in San Francisco.

When I left England I was excited as all hell about moving to California. The excitement has never 100% worn off, and I've been here 12 years now.

Re:Emigration Sucks (3, Insightful)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987185)

Time consuming"? This isn't the ocean liner era, this is the jet age! Leave Heathrow and 13 hours later you're in San Francisco.

You seem to have skipped the part where you wait years for a residency visa/green card and then years more for citizenship so you can't be kicked out at any time. Some of my friends went to California on work permits in the late 90s and were back a few weeks later when their new employer laid them off.

I'm also looking for somewhere new (1)

bigjarom (950328) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986951)

I relocated from Calgary, Canada to Phoenix, Arizona about 5 years ago almost entirely for the AZ weather, which I love. I absolutely can't stand the backward politics and social attitudes here though. I too am looking for possible alternatives in the future. I would like to find somewhere with consistently warm weather, progressive social and political attitudes, and reasonable immigration policies for a Data Analyst with a Master's degree. Does such a place exist?

Re:I'm also looking for somewhere new (1)

KPexEA (1030982) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987019)

Australia?

Re:I'm also looking for somewhere new (1)

fiannaFailMan (702447) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987041)

Australia. See my post below.

Re:I'm also looking for somewhere new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987067)

Try Austin, TX. Similar weather, but not as dry. It is a progressive college town with lots of tech companies and also startups.

Re:I'm also looking for somewhere new (1)

Dan667 (564390) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987199)

Austin is an island of progressive in a sea of conservatives though.

Re:I'm also looking for somewhere new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987073)

Come back to Calgary dude. You can make enough here to just travel wherever and whenever you want.

Re:I'm also looking for somewhere new (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987105)

Southern Europe is the place for you.

The grass is not always greener.... (4, Insightful)

bleh-of-the-huns (17740) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986953)

No matter where you look, each location will have its own fair share of problems. Rather then picking a location based on economics and political issues, pick a location where you will be happy.

Now obviously, being happy is contingent on being employed and being able to live where you choose, but I guarantee you one thing, following the money does not always work.

Minnesota, USA (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986959)

Twin Cities (Minneapolis & Saint Paul) Minnesota. Hands down. Big IT market that is growing, middle of the continent, near the Canadian border, more fresh water lakes than any other place on the planet. Very progressive populace with excellent education and employment opportunities. Only real problem is a terrible fucking transportation system but we are trying to fix that.

Please tell NO ONE. ;)

Proximity to Slashdot (1)

ewg (158266) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986967)

Ann Arbor, 'cause that's where Slashdot be.

Re:Proximity to Slashdot (2)

21mhz (443080) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987233)

Aye. Imagine, being able to shave microseconds off your fr0st p1sst response times...

where, oh where (1, Informative)

macbeth66 (204889) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986969)

Regardless of what order you list the cities and/or countries today, you would have a completely different list in 5, again in 10 and yet another in 20. I'd say your pick should be based on the culture you're most comfortable with.

Personally, I'd stay the heck away from India and China. I would leave if I were in either place. Both countries have serious infrastructure issues. And I would not want to live in a slave state ( China ), regardless if they seem to be opening up. That is only for the well connected. The working slobs have it worse than anywhere else in the wolrd. Hong Kong is an exception, but that is slowly fading.

Yes, We are #1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986987)

If you are just concerned about the economy, then go to China. They only care about money, not about anything else.

If you just care about happiness, go to Northern Europe. Denmark has one of the happiest populations.

In general, Canada has 90% of the benefits of US, with the minor penalties of a worse current economy (but less problems on the horizon), colder weather, and less potential upside.

If you have the courage to take risks, then got o US. Pick the right state - the western ones (Alaska -> California) and Colorado all have major things going for them. Frankly while the downside is higher here in the USA, so is the upside, as it has always been.

Stay there. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986991)

Stay in Southern Europe!

Stay in Europe (1)

hernol (1402569) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987001)

I would say stay in a "first world" country to raise your children. Then travel the world from there. The other way around is impossible.

Australia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987007)

It always works when playing Risk. They speak English. I'm set.

Seriously, unless you're prepared for a radical culture shift, you need to stay close to home or move to a country that speaks the same language. I do not want to be stuck in Hong Kong trying to make sense out of some Asian-British hybrid laws with a PRC cherry on top. Singapore? I'd probably look at somebody the wrong way, get tossed in jail, and caned to death. No thanks. Rich bastards who move to places like that will probably get what they deserve.

You FAIl it (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987009)

Australia (4, Interesting)

fiannaFailMan (702447) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987017)

Good weather. Anglophone. Fun people. Healthy culture. Melbourne was just voted the most livable city in the world again. Economy booming because of natural resources being mined out of the ground and sent to China. All you really need to adapt to is driving on the left.

I hear what others say about Scandinavia, and those countries truly have their shit together, but I'd find the long dark winters to be very depressing.

"On the rise" (4, Insightful)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987029)

One thing you have to keep in mind that China and India "on the rise" are still far worse off than US and Europe. There's no guarantee they'll be better in 20 years even if they sustain that rise, which they won't necessarily do - China in particular has a pretty nasty bubble ready to burst.

I'd stick to developed countries for the simple reason that you get some basic guarantees there that you don't in the third world should things go very wrong. For the same reasons I'd avoid US long-term - it's a good place to earn money during the productive period of your career, but not so good to retire in. If you're already in Europe, it's probably easier to go for one of the better developed countries there as they're more likely to weather the storms - Germany or France are two obvious destinations. Then there's Scandinavia - Finland looks surprisingly decent on many counts if you're willing to live with the weather.

If you are really bent on seeking something outside of Europe, consider Canada - a saner version of US on so many counts, especially economy wise. And you still have US nearby, which is convenient for shopping and some other things. Very easy to immigrate to, as well. Australia is also a very decent option, and if you're a believer in China long-term, you should consider them for the simple reason that it's in the same region and China is their major trade partner.

Buffalo, NY, USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987045)

Relocate to the first ring suburbs around Buffalo, NY, USA. Many of the schools outside of the city are top-notch. communities have deep rooted residents that care about the town/village they live in.

The MOON (1)

Tony Isaac (1301187) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987061)

You listed very real problems with the economy in Europe and the US. China, India, and Brazil have real growing pains. It seems that wherever PEOPLE live, there are problems! So the thing to do is go live on the moon! No crime, no national debt, no housing crisis, no politics, no protests. Sounds ideal to me!

Re:The MOON (3, Funny)

bobbutts (927504) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987195)

You forgot the best part... 0 Air Quality problems

Not sure what an IT "researcher" is and if it... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987065)

...has actual real-world value but if you have bona fide IT infrastructure and/or development skills, the San Francisco Bay Area is probably the hottest IT job market in the US right and possibly the world. The economy is in the tank in the rest of the country but the Bay Area is doing pretty well and the VC investment market here is still hot with a lot of "sugar water" investments still going on robustly.

That said, the Bay Area is generally really, really expensive, especially in San Francisco so there will be considerable sticker-shock for rents. If you're single and can live with 2-3+ more people, you could save quite a bit though and you could ride mass transit which is quite good in the Bay (not as good as NYC and Chicago but compared to the rest of California it's very good). Lower Peninsula and South Bay/Silicon Valley is also expensive but not quite as bad as SF.

Other than that Seattle, NYC (more expensive - WAY more expensive than anywhere in the world, save perhaps London, Paris metro areas), Chicago, Dallas, Austin, Washington DC... all are decent job markets for IT.

Also not sure how hard it is to get visa sponsorship. Probably not so easy. Glad I'm a citizen and already live in the Bay Area.

US will never go broke (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987069)

It'll just go through a period of inflation, which will devalue the dollar and those who bought bonds in the US will be screwed.

It's knowing how the game is played.

Move to California, it's still a cool place and a lot is still being done here.

Kudos from Portugal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987071)

I have a strong feeling the submitter tsakas is from Greece ;)

I feel his pain, I am from Portugal and am thinking exactly the same - and raise the same question.

I can say that Brazil, although has a huge potential, has two major problems that don't seem to have a short/mid term solution:
- The major cities (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, ...), where most IT jobs are, are dangerous to live in due to the social-economic differences.
- There is still a lot of corruption.

On a personal note, from those choices i would not like to live in China or India generally due to the low standards they still have and government type (China).

What's ... (4, Funny)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987113)

What's the Best Place To Relocate?

That's a tough question. Most areas are heavily acclimated to their current location. Anything non-trivial would have to swapped with something else, rather than simply relocated. Swapping even geographic close regions like North and South Dakota could have drastic unforeseen consequences; certainly swapping larger areas like France and Spain are right out. Perhaps a building or ballpark would be a good candidate for relocation, but I'm not sure it's worth the effort.

Any ideas /. ?

good question is (4, Informative)

nimbius (983462) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987119)

why are you relocating? if you fear for the wellbeing of your family you should know the health insurance for american workers is generally inferior to that of many european nations especially when considering their family coverage. The public education is routinely inferior as well, and 40 hours per week for tech workers is conservative in many cases. You arent going to see much more than 1-2 weeks of vacation in the first year in the states, and several of the southern states are sadly virulently xenophobic.
can you clarify on what you mean by markets pulling the teeth out of strong european countries? You make it seem like you've simply become jaded by a spate of recent financial reforms. Strong Europeans are the backbone of strong European countries, so if you and others leave it simply leaves more room to turn the EU into a libertarian dystopia.

Finland (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987127)

Finland

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pN2ZJBh92SM

Prosperity + social democracy (1)

pr0nbot (313417) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987129)

I would choose somewhere with some combination of relative prosperity, underpopulation, and social democratic values: Scandinavia, Canada, New Zealand.

Developing countries, and to some extent the US, are like the Wild West - they're fantastic as long as you're wealthy to buy your way out of the inherent instability.

Re:Prosperity + social democracy (1)

Trepidity (597) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987171)

With regards to Scandinavia on that list, a plus is that tech jobs are increasingly English, not caring if you can speak Danish/Swedish/Norwegian at all. Different from, say, Germany, where most companies will want you to speak at least passable German.

Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987135)

A good balance of the lifestyles of US/Europe and the economy/growth of Australia/Brazil. And depending on which European country you are coming from immigration may be fairly easy (relatively speaking).

Our PM/Government is pretty fucked up at the moment, and when that happens we tend to kiss the USA's ass a lot, but Harper only has a few years left and then things should go back to normal again :)

If you can do it, try to live in one of the cities that is 30 to 60 minutes outside a major city (for Canada, that is pretty much the capitals of the ten provinces) and you'll have cheap living costs (buy a three bedroom house for under $100K US easy) but still have all the services/work of the nearby city. For most big cities in Europe and US the 30-60 minute rural (not packed like rats on the highway) commute is less than the in-city commute even! If you have time, check city/province/country statistics for things like quality of life, disposable income(more important than actual income), and quality of the environment. One trick however, becarful of the "best city in..." type stats, as they tend to not consider families important (so stats like "Number of off lease dog parks" is rated higher than "number of kid parks".

In any case, have fun, do your research and then enjoy the experience, I know my family and I did when we did it :)

One word.... (3, Informative)

Howard Beale (92386) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987137)

Singapore. I worked there for two weeks at the Marina Bay Sands project. English is the primary language, the area is beautiful and clean. Hated coming home. I'd still move my wife and kids there in a second.

Which City I would Choose (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987151)

The question: Which city would you choose to go and start a family

Not a damn one of them; Green Acres is the place for me.

IMO, living in close proximity to thousands (even hundreds, really) of other humans is not a desirable situation to be in, and a disaster waiting to happen.

Then again, I'm a born-and-bred 'country boy,' so of course YMMV.

that's quite ambitious (5, Funny)

bitt3n (941736) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987153)

here's how I would do it: first 5 years in US, which probably won't collapse before then, and if it gets close, we'll just hornswoggle the Chinese into buying a bunch of movie studios like we did with the Japanese. Next 10 years in China. Make sure you pick up Mandarin. Parlay your ability to quote verbatim the scripts of popular 80's action movies into a career as executive of a floundering movie studio. Walk out of the office one day saying "I'll be back." Never go back. Next 20 years in Brazil, where you'll leverage your Chinese connections to become a major wheeler dealer in a revival of the opium trade. The most important thing is to leave no trace as you proceed. You don't want families 1.0 or 2.0 paying you and Conchita an unexpected visit in your Sau Paulo hacienda.

Sweden (3, Informative)

Orphis (1356561) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987159)

The economy here isn't bad at all and it's quite peaceful, even in the capital Stockholm.
Sweden's definitely a great place to start a family as the society do a lot for the parents (compared to many countries).
I moved there a year ago and I have no regret at all :)

Oh, and Swedish isn't that difficult to learn at all, you'll be just fine speaking English until you learn it!

Bonus: if you haven't found a spouse yet, I can say that there are some really beautiful girls here too ;)

typical (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987161)

this is so typical of you neo-socialist euro-scum. jump ship when you have destroyed your own economy and now you are looking for a new healthy economy to destroy. better stay out of the USofA or i will second amendment your ass back to europe!

USA!1! USA!!! USA!!!

Telecommute? (1)

adlib24 (739952) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987175)

As an IT researcher, one would think living where ever you want, working from home, and telecommuting would be the ideal for family life. Let me put it another way. There is a telecommuting homomorphism between the set of the best places to live and the set of best place to live for an IT researcher.

Reading too much into the cover of The Economist (3, Interesting)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987207)

Sounds like you are basing your decisions on a glance at the financial section of a magazine rack...

"Trouble in Europe"? Oh no! Better get out of here!
"Trouble in The US"! Oh no! Better not move there!
"Indonesia at a crossroads" Hmm, sounds promising!

Try opening the thing up next time and actually read what's going on. Then take the "am I ready to live in am emerging market?" quiz:

Do you like to have to bribe your way around the local bureaucracy?
Do you like to live within a mile of crushing poverty?
Do you like to endure social, natural, and economic crises?

If you answered yes to all of these, then yes an emerging market is for you (i.e. Brazil, China, India, etc). If you answered no to any of them, stay in a Western country. Keep your skills current and if the place goes downhill, just relocate again. Hell, you did it once, right?

London (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987211)

Depending on how successful you've been and what kind of house you can afford, lifestyle, food, climate, industry rocks.

Simple plan (1)

metrometro (1092237) | more than 2 years ago | (#40987221)

I just move to wherever Slashdot puts inside of the string "Is"..."the next Silicon Valley?" I have a script set up to buy airline tickets and everything. Don't miss out!

Norway (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40987237)

Norway; no debt, high salaries, increasing oil production.

If you can land a job in the offshore sector (oil), you have basically made it. Make sure that you done your paperwork beforehand though. And be prepared for the living expenses, but with a good income that won't be a problem.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?