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Forget 6-Minute Abs: Learn To Code In a Day

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the which-day-is-the-question dept.

Education 306

whyloginwhysubscribe writes "The usually excellent BBC 'Click' programme has an article on 'Why computer code is the new language to learn' — which features a company in London who offer courses on learning to code in a day. The BBC clip has an interesting interview with a marketing director who, it seems to me, is going to go back and tell his programmers to speed up because otherwise he could do it himself! Decoded.co's testimonials page is particularly funny: 'I really feel like I could talk credibly to a coder, given we can now actually speak the same language.'"

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language != logic (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40985889)

Writing code has little to do with "grammar" and more to do with logic. I wonder, how do you teach that in a day?

Re:language != logic (2)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#40985923)

Maybe they teach LOGO. That can be learned in a day...

Re:language != logic (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40985979)

They teach HTML, CSS and Javascript. Only need an hour and definitely no logic.

Re:language != logic (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986349)

Same with .NET and C# weeeeeeeeee

Re:language != logic (5, Informative)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986227)

It's a course in HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Javascript is the only one of the three that is an actual programming language, they aren't teaching people how to program. They're teaching people how those three languages interact to create a web page. It actually seems like a pretty useful course for developers who work in any company that produces online products to send their marketing and sales teams to, so that those teams can at least get a glimpse about how these things work just so that they have a better understanding of what they're asking us to do. Or, so that they have more of an idea of what's possible. The #1 question I'm asked is "is it possible to..." Yes, it's possible, it's always possible, it's a question of time and money. I don't know how many times I have to answer that question before people realize they can just skip straight to the second question ("what does it take to do it"). A class like this may clue them in.

Re:language != logic (4, Insightful)

frank_adrian314159 (469671) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986407)

Yes, it's possible, it's always possible, it's a question of time and money.

Obviously, you've never had a marketing person ask for something that is so out of the ballpark that it would be an equivalent of solving "strong AI" problems (where you can't give an estimate) - it's not always "possible". The answer to which must be, "We can't do that, but we could do this," where "this" is at least a tractable problem and puts you back in the realm of your question #1.

Re:language != logic (2)

ewanm89 (1052822) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986585)

I was thinking about factorizing the product of two large primes. There are numerous problems in computer science that we can't do with current technology;

Re:language != logic (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986505)

Another code jockey complaining about clueless marketing and sales people. Well, dweeby, take a look in the mirror. You are most certainly at least as clueless about what THEY do as you think they are about what YOU do.

Get over yourself.

Re:language != logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986713)

If I give you infinite money, will you solve the halting problem for me?

Re:language != logic (3, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#40985935)

Studiously refraining from teaching somebody any of that boosts their confidence in a way that only years, or even decades, of advanced study can hope to equal!

Incidentally, why doing you programmers just prove that your algorithms will never hang before shipping code? Are you lazy or something?

Re:language != logic (5, Funny)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986025)

Incidentally, why doing you programmers just prove that your algorithms will never hang before shipping code? Are you lazy or something?

Few programmers are computer scientists, just as few slashdot users being grammarians.

Re:language != logic (4, Funny)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986045)

just as few slashdot users being grammarians.

I fail to see how religion enters into this.

Re:language != logic (4, Funny)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986123)

I fail to see how religion enters into this.

Emacs vs vi.

Re:language != logic (0)

chucklebutte (921447) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986153)

I fail to see how religion enters into this.

Emacs vs vi.

vi4lyfe!

Re:language != logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986157)

I believe he was referencing the Halting Problem, and pointing out that a cursory knowledge of coding is a dangerous thing.

Re:language != logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986299)

I think that's a mis-reference to the Halting Problem if so. It's not (always) hard to prove that a given algorithm will terminate. It's just not possible to do it generically, and that doesn't sound like what he was suggesting.

Re:language != logic (4, Funny)

kallisti (20737) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986377)

I think that's a mis-reference to the Halting Problem if so. It's not (always) hard to prove that a given algorithm will terminate. It's just not possible to do it generically, and that doesn't sound like what he was suggesting.

I think that's a misunderstanding of the Joking Problem. It's not (always) hard to prove that a given post was intended for humorous effect and thus could get away with not being exactly correct.

It often runs into the Pedant Problem, which is sort of the geek version of code refusing to run if it contains the slightest error.

Re:language != logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986439)

We prefer the term "grammateer".

Re:language != logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986465)

Wow. Or it might be that algorithms never hanging has incredibly little to do with real-world applications hanging. Or it might be that, whether or not anyone is qualified as a computer scientist has exceedingly little to do with whether a company would encourage or even allow time for proper testing, let alone engineering, let alone formal proof. Or it might simply be that, engineer and prove as you might try, it is not possible to control all dependencies in a normal business application or system.

Re:language != logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986559)

Ah yes, the "Halting Problem".

Guess, what? It's not possible in general, though it may be possible for some specific programs.

Re:language != logic (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986539)

"Incidentally, why doing you programmers just prove that your algorithms will never hang before shipping code? Are you lazy or something?"

Not sure if troll or not. If you are troll, color me an fool for biting.

As someone with formal comp sci training, and onward into graduate degree... let me give you a crude hint. Others can cite specifics if they want. But this is the answer:

In general, the problem you propose -- if solved, would immediately result in a million dollar reward for solving a millenium problem.

You could safely turn down this reward -- because you would have to publish your proof in an academic journal.

You'd probably also immediately get a fields medal and nobel prize.

A greedy person would take the process/result and encrypt it-- guarded very heavily as a trade secret. In fact, I'm pretty sure I'd try to hire mercs immediately and up front, and go into hiding. You would be able to use this to break virtually all modern encryption algorithms, most random number generators, and create the best compression system theoretically possible. Ever. In the known universe.

This problem is called solving L-Halt (halting problem). And if such a technique existed, and could be done in "reasonable" time -- such that it collapsed NP hard into NP into P ... it would be a breakthrough that truly redefines the meaning of "epic". The reasonable implications are truly earth shattering.

There *is* an algorithm to do it (not in reasoanble time or space). Sort of. The process actually grows faster than any computable number. I don't believe the answer is known (deterministically and in general) for any program with more than five instructions.

It's been an open problem since the 20's, and a decent group of scientists believe a proof of existence or non-existence is impossible. An even larger (possibly majority? Other experts can chip in) group believe if a proof is found, it will be that no such polynomial time algorithm can exist.

So... let's put it this way:

For specific pieces of code, such proofs may be done. I'm not an expert in it, but I've studied it very lightly. It's very nearly impossible for all but the most trivial softwares -- specifically, for anything but certain numeric algorithms. And if it isn't impossible... it takes a huge amount of time by hand. There's automated provers, but they are... basically infants.

The notion of "proof of correctness" is a formalism that would make modern software development practices very nearly impossible. And if it could be done, the costs would be so prohibitive that even hardware design would likely be cheaper -- because even chips don't have the same level of rigor in their analysis.

Are we lazy? Well frankly yes, a lot of us are lazy. But the proof you ask for... it's the holy grail of computer science.

And a real computer scientist would know that immediately. A real programmer -- they might dream of it.

Re:language != logic (1)

NFN_NLN (633283) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986351)

Writing code has little to do with "grammar" and more to do with logic. I wonder, how do you teach that in a day?

Pffft... "learning to code in a day"? During their lunch break they can take my new course: "learn how to become a marketing director in 10 easy minutes".

That guy sounds like dead weight. Maybe he should get his ass down there and start coding. He can start by fixing spelling errors in strings bundle :).

Re:language != logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986497)

During their lunch break they can take my new course: "learn how to become a marketing director in 10 easy minutes".

Or however long it takes them to down three drinks.

A little knowledge... (5, Insightful)

CadentOrange (2429626) | more than 2 years ago | (#40985897)

... is a dangerous thing! I can just see bosses putting more pressure on coders to "get the job done now!" and then failing to understand why code takes so long to be delivered.

Re:A little knowledge... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40985955)

Well, just tell the boss that the dwim feature of your compiler is broken, and you must work around it.

Re:A little knowledge... (3, Insightful)

knuthin (2255242) | more than 2 years ago | (#40985987)

If coding can be learned in a day, why do we have people who suck so badly at it?

And if it can be learned in a day, most of the companies are ready to pay 100,000$ per year or more to guys who do it, and involves B16B00B5, I don't know what's stopping the rest of the world from getting rich.

Re:A little knowledge... (5, Funny)

iamgnat (1015755) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986053)

If coding can be learned in a day, why do we have people who suck so badly at it?

Because they learned it in a day?

WARNING: Chess Analogy (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986317)

The whole point of the class appears to be able to help people relate to the technicians that run their infrastructure. In the broadcast, the students learn how to use a GPS Java API along with very rudimentary HTML, and CSS. I have done that in a single 2 hour class. That makes them about as qualified to program as this /. post makes me qualified to write a sequel to Lord of the Rings.

You can teach someone the rules of Chess in a day, yet it takes years to master the game. Programming is the same. I can teach the syntax of HTML, CSS, and basic Java in a day (just like the BBC broadcast depicted), but the student will not know how to properly utilize the logic for years. Good luck with recursion, overloading functions, vulnerability testing, and many other concepts.

Re:A little knowledge... (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986145)

Yes Mr. Boss I could code an entire program in just one day.
It just won't work.
THAT'S the hard part Testing the product & making it work bugfree. Even you know that testing takes a long, long time.

>>>B16B00B5

Some of us prefer 5/^\A11B00B5 thank you very much. Like two scoops of vanilla.

Re:A little knowledge... (4, Insightful)

TheCarp (96830) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986179)

Meh I could teach you to write basic code in a day. The difference is, nobody hires people because "they know how to write code". Its about being experienced and knwoledgeable.

I could teach you to drive a car in a day too.... but, being able to drive a car and being an expert, experienced driver are two very very different things. There is a huge difference between "I can step on the gas and make it go, and bring it to a stop" and "I have been in several skids, and am adept at steering out of them" (or rather into them, if you want to split that hair).

I think they are doing a real disservice to their students if they are really leaving them with the impression that they are going to be competent or even "speak the same language" as someone who has been doing it for years.

That said, I might believe in either the ability to teach some basic coding in a day or the ability to gain exposure to some concepts and learn to communicate better with coders in a day... but... to become a competent coder? That I would need to see to believe.

Re:A little knowledge... (1)

El_Muerte_TDS (592157) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986523)

Meh I could teach you to write basic code in a day. The difference is, nobody hires people because "they know how to write code".

Yes they do, a lot., because those people are much cheaper.

Re:A little knowledge... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986643)

...nobody hires people because "they know how to write code".

Not anymore, no.

Gahd, I miss the Dot Com Boom!

I can write that code! (4, Funny)

khasim (1285) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986071)

Hire me. Just pay me 10% more than the rest of your team combined but I will deliver the code you need within 24 hours.

And I only have 2 requirements.

1. It does not have to work.

2. I do not have to maintain it.

WRITING code is easy.

Re:I can write that code! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986327)

Writing code is easy.

Writing good code is harder.

Writing good code that solves the problem the business needs solved is what is really hard.

Mod parent up (4, Insightful)

PhrostyMcByte (589271) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986099)

Someone who thinks they can code is far more dangerous than someone who realizes they can't and defers to experts. Pity the devs who'll have to suffer a bad manager going worse because of this!

Re:Mod parent up (4, Funny)

Rei (128717) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986241)

Code monkey think maybe manager wanna write goddamn login page himself.
Code monkey don't say it out loud.
Code monkey not crazy, just proud.

Re:A little knowledge... (4, Insightful)

Kenja (541830) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986129)

Fast, cheap, good. Pick any two.

Problem is many managers pick fast & cheap and then complain when its not good.

Re:A little knowledge... (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986467)

Do good & cheap go together? If it's slow to develop, it wouldn't be cheap because of all the extra labor hours.

Re:A little knowledge... (1)

ynp7 (1786468) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986591)

Sure. Just do it yourself on the evenings and weekends without paying yourself a salary. It'll be extra slow if "you" are a manager without any experience developing anything.

Here's your response (4, Insightful)

Okian Warrior (537106) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986131)

Response to your boss:

Coding is like chess. it's easy to learn, but takes a lifetime to master.

You can learn the rules of chess in a day, and you can play your first three matches on that same day. It takes a lifetime of study to be any good at chess, to be better than others at chess, or to compete in any way at chess.

Another way to put it is like guitar, or piano.

How long does it take to earn money playing guitar? Basic guitar takes about a week of practice, but how long will it take to earn money from playing it?

As with anything, there are basics as well as subtle, underlying principles. Coding, chess, guitar, piano, or any other refined action takes years of practice, experimentation, and learning to master. About 10,000 hours [gladwell.com] all told.

Then ask: "How many hours does it take to become a manager?"

Re:A little knowledge... (1)

cowboy76Spain (815442) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986645)

On the other hand, know-it-all users are fun to talk to.

Just today I had a chat with someone who complained that he could not use our IE centric webmail with his private iPad. It was funny seeing his gears running about how to make me confess the secret trick to make his iPad work with our system (including the usual reference to another organization vaguely related to us where "they can do it").

Of course, the time lost with those wankers. Luckily today was a slow day.

What could possibly go wrong? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40985917)

Marketing in our company always says to us developers: 'Look, we already have all the new features, we are quicker than you.'.

They tell us it's a joke, but in the end, they believe it's true....

Sure you can (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40985933)

Just depends on the scope of what you are learning to code. Just like anything else, you can learn to weld in a day, you can learn to golf in a day, etc etc. But I don't know of any pro welders or golfers that got there after one day of learning. That one day may have opened them up to something that set them on their career patch, of course, but it wasn't enough in and of itself.

This is a complete non story.

Re:Sure you can (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40985961)

This is a complete slashvertisement.

ftfy

More accurate title for the training (5, Insightful)

bjdevil66 (583941) | more than 2 years ago | (#40985937)

Learn how to really piss off real developers in a day.

Re:More accurate title for the training (1)

schitso (2541028) | more than 2 years ago | (#40985993)

Where are my mod points when I need them? +1

bad news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40985953)

oh god, more ammunition for managers to ask programmers to make stupid changes.
Theres a reason why you woudln't hire someone who learned to code in a day ;)

Slashdotted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40985969)

Looks like they're dogfooding with their website (bad idea).

Seriously? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40985971)

Their website displays the testimonial of the co-founder. How in the world is that credible?

Easy chords for musicians (1)

istartedi (132515) | more than 2 years ago | (#40985981)

Yeah, just like easy chords. And then after a day of that, you step out your door and any random guy who's been playing guitar for a few years blows you away. Next!

"Hello World!!!" (3, Funny)

stevegee58 (1179505) | more than 2 years ago | (#40985995)

Yay! I'm a coder now!

Re:"Hello World!!!" (1)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986615)

Yeah but can you make it print backwards in Fortran and Cobol? The punch cards are waiting mister!

Darmok and Jalad, At Tanagra (0)

BMOC (2478408) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986011)

Picard and Dathon at El-Adrel

Re:Darmok and Jalad, At Tanagra (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986173)

...when the walls fell.

only three web languages (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986033)

I now have a full understanding of the three web languages and I now have the confidence to go ahead and work on my own projects. It will also really help me when working with designers and developers.
        Edward Sinclair
        Web Manager, Imagination

I don't think he learned anything.

Re:only three web languages (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986093)

HTML/JS/CSS which are THE three web langauges standarized by the W3C.

Is just like cooking (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986035)

but in just a day you will only learn to cook (or code) spaguetti.

Re:Is just like cooking (1)

0racle (667029) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986345)

Next up, learn written English in a day.

/spaghetti
//Yes, I had to look up the correct spelling

Onion article (1)

PFactor (135319) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986049)

At first glance I thought, "Hee, the Onion is funny". After reading TFA I thought, "Sheesh, I wish this was an Onion story".

Re:Onion article (1)

Rei (128717) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986269)

Sometimes, you wish things in life were. For example, the "I spent a couple hours reading blog posts from a TV weatherman in California, and now I'm an expert on climate science!" crowd.

Re:Onion article (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986541)

The summary started with:

The usually excellent BBC 'Click' programme

From this we can conclude that it was written by someone who either:

  • Is an employee of the BBC
  • Has never actually watched Click
  • Completely lacks any understanding of computers
  • Thinks 'excellent' is a synonym for 'cringeworthy and dumbed down to the point of inaccuracy'

After that, it's safe to ignore the rest of TFS and skip TFA entirely.

garbage (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986059)

Anything that says "learn to code in a day" is full of shit. You might pick up some barebones basics, but you will definitely not being doing anything of consequence.

Re:garbage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986683)

For the most part I agree with you. But there is the little catch (in most circumstances) and it's how they define one day. Having seen one of these type Shenanigans before... Learn xyz in one day. That one day is 24 hours. And then it gets spread over as1 hour a day actually making it 24 days. The amount of "instruction" supposedly takes 1 hour for that day, then you have projects / assignments that drag on beyond that. But it's on "your" time so does not count towards that hour. So your, "learn in one day", turns out to be a month or more in reality.

Just... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986061)

Just enough rope to hang oneself ?

Mandatory Code Monkey quote (5, Funny)

ashshy (40594) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986073)

Code Monkey think maybe manager want to write god damned login page himself
Code Monkey not say it out loud
Code Monkey not crazy, just proud

Re:Mandatory Code Monkey quote (1)

AwesomeMcgee (2437070) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986225)

I never learned how to use mod points but +1 for jonathon coulton reference, so true.

Re:Mandatory Code Monkey quote (3, Insightful)

Lissajous (989738) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986293)

I never learned how to use mod points but +1 for jonathon coulton reference, so true.

You don't use mod points, you program them. Apparently there's a site that can help you with this.

A day to learn the terms (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986081)

The next 20 years to learn how many wrong ways they can be put together.

Everyone starts somewhere (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986085)

Per my subject-line above, that's how it goes. Not a single person here (who actually codes that is) didn't have "small beginnings", not a single one.

* So before anyone here *tries* to play "the 'God of Coding'" (of which there is none, only better more focused & dedicated workers familiar with the data being manipulated)? Don't... there is NO such person/animal!

(It's easy to get arrogant about, especially if you've had years-to-decades under your belt doing it on many levels, but there's ALWAYS more to learn/something new - mainly because of all the change & language fads etc./et al!)

APK

P.S.=> This is a good thing, in a way, that more folks display interest in it... Personally, were I to state which language is the "BEST" to learn, overall?

Well - I'd recommend SQL more than anything actually!

(Since its has myriad uses as a "sub-language" beneath other languages/apps, especially in business (& it's NOT hard to learn, not really, w/ the 4 basic commands of INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, & SELECT (most used of all's the latter)))...

... apk

Re:Everyone starts somewhere (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986211)

Of course everyone starts somewhere. But to think that you can program after a one-day course is as ridiculous as thinking you know a foreign language after a one-day course. The problem is not in starting, the problem is in thinking you've reached the destination when in reality you are barely away from the starting point.

Agreed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986509)

"Of course everyone starts somewhere. But to think that you can program after a one-day course is as ridiculous as thinking you know a foreign language after a one-day course." - by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 14, @01:10PM (#40986211)

Oh, I agree on that account, 110% - see above & my last post on that note... &, you're right (& when you're right? You're RIGHT!).

I agree that You're not going to acquire what I call "a system of thought" right away, that's necessary, in a day (or a week, or month - takes time!)

Now - I've seen some folks that DO have it naturally with the innate ability to take a BIG problem, & busting it into smaller more manageable parts/segments, logically (for turning turn them later into language specific syntactically coded sections to solve said portion of the "big" problem, piece-by-piece).

I'd say MOST folks aren't put together that way "by default", but I'd have to make a larger sampleset than my life experience alone, admittedly.

E.G.-> I know I wasn't... I was SCARED when I first got into it (1982 + it continued actually till around 1990 almost when I really "got into it" more) - I had to acquire it.

My mom (who had done coding for years in PL1/PL2) told me:

"Just stay at it, it will come to you"

Eventually it did with a LOT of practice... and a lot of fear.

(After about a semester of BASIC, C, & PASCAL - my 1st 3 languages I took concurrently in fact during AAS work for the CSC degree - it wasn't even ABOUT languages to me then, it was more about picking up concepts, & design logic... I feel it helped in 1 aspect - I found that 1 language could do pretty much what the others could for my purposes in academia (except Visual BASIC with pointers lacking... direct pointers, not AddressOf in later models for callbacks...)).

Pressure's a great teacher though when your money + debt's on the line, lol, which IS where I was (like a lot of kids).

---

"The problem is not in starting, the problem is in thinking you've reached the destination when in reality you are barely away from the starting point." - by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 14, @01:10PM (#40986211)

* Once more: Agreed here... 110%!

Like I said in my 1st post you replied to, what you're stating's VERY EASY to do... too easy, thinking "Well, now? Heck 'I know it all'", & that's never going to happen.

(Additionally, on that very note - To quote one of my "heroes" from film, Chun (the Master of Sinanju): "Perfection is a road, not a destination... )

APK

P.S.=> In the end, we're all learning more & more... that's 1 part of this field, & others too of course, that's a 'problem' (never ending change makes it so)...

... apk

Excellent comparison with spoken language (5, Insightful)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986089)

The similarity with spoken language is uncanny.

Much as I can teach you "beer please?" and "where's the bathroom?" and "my /. UID is lower than yours" in spanish in about a day, I can probably teach you the crudest basics of any programming language in about a day.

I'm told that learning your 2nd 3rd 4th spoken language gets easier, every time you learn one you learn the next easier. Programming languages are certainly like that.

Even the epic overconfidence is similar. "I know how to ask for a beer in Spanish, I'm now fully qualified, lets book our flight to Spain!"

Also the teasing is similar. Sure kid, that "O(n^n^n) algorithm is perfectly scalable, you just roll that right out into production, testing in for wussies anyway" is the computer equivalent of teaching a noob that the foreign equivalent of "nice rack, wanna F" actually translates in English to "thank you"

Re:Excellent comparison with spoken language (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986139)

testing in for wussies anyway" is the computer equivalent of teaching a noob that the foreign equivalent of "nice rack, wanna F" actually translates in English to "thank you"

Please fondle my bum [wikipedia.org]

Re:Excellent comparison with spoken language (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986159)

Whoa I just thought of another crazy comparison.

I dropped out of spanish because by third year my fellow classmates were entirely English as a Second Language students who were native speakers only showing up for an easy A, and as one of the last anglos I was way out of my league.

In a similar way the 1st semester CS classes are oriented toward walking total noobs thru "hello_world" at a speed they can follow, but by junior year or so almost all my classmates were like me, doing this stuff since we were like 6 years old, already know most of what the class would teach, better software/hardware/network at home that at school, already have industry jobs, etc.

Re:Excellent comparison with spoken language (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986237)

Besides asking for beer and the bathroom, what else does anyone need to know about a language?

Re:Excellent comparison with spoken language (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986243)

nice rack, wanna F for this excellent demonstration

"In depth" ? (1)

careysb (566113) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986097)

HTML, CSS, and Javascript all in one day and "in depth". Why not add C++, c#, regular expressions, and others as well?

Re:"In depth" ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986245)

Because that would be two days.

Learn to write doggerel in a day (1)

Tough Love (215404) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986113)

Learn to write doggerel in a day. Have fun. Don't expect to earn a living as a poet.

Re:Learn to write doggerel in a day (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986189)

Bad example: Not even good poets should expect to earn a living as a poet.

Meanwhile (3, Funny)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986165)

Meanwhile, us programmers don't need to take a "Management in 1 day" training. We develop translators: http://www.atrixnet.com/bs-generator.html [atrixnet.com]

How to get free advertising dollars... (1)

GReaToaK_2000 (217386) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986183)

Make some insanely stupid comments of a technical nature and post it on /.

Sit back and watch your site get millions of hits.

You need to watch the programme first (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986201)

Ignore the summary and the article, watch the programme.

You'll see that it's not about learning the language well enough to do something, though they do get a working web page at the end, it's about knowing that you've got to write the code behind it. Too many managers don't get the concept of programing, thinking that it's just like learning how to use an application, and this course showed them that all those applications were actually written by people like the ones they employ.

Wait... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986267)

I cant just take this class from my home?

More like get scammed in a day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986287)

Cost per individual is something like $800 - $1100!

For content that is probably equivalent to a $25 "Design Your Own Webpage for Dummies" book?!

I'd rather go with the 6 minute abs. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986301)

Then i can just beat a nerd into programming for me.

Offering to teach coding in one day eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986307)

Let's invite that teacher to our local Geek Night.

Really? One day of HTML/JAVA/CSS? (1)

MiniMike (234881) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986313)

Most people would get more benefit from the Abs class. Even if they only remember how to do a plank [wikipedia.org] afterwards. What good does one day do? If you need to learn programming, you need to spend more time at it than this. It might make for a good intro to something, but it won't teach a newbie how to do anything useful as it seems to claim.

This is why most MBAs should be fired (3, Insightful)

s.petry (762400) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986331)

Look, you could sit anyone down in a day and teach them looping and conditional expressions. Most people already understand variables, but you may have to teach them arrays. So what? This does not mean a person knows how to program. What that PHB stated is the equivalent to saying "Because I know the alphabet I can speak any language and write any novel". It's pure idiocy!

I have seen people come out of 4 years of College for coding and still not know their ass from a hole in the ground. Give them a non Microsoft product for development and they are completely lost. CSV or git, forget it. Distributed make? Maybe, but probably not. Half the time they don't even know how to find includes that are not spoon fed to them. Granted, there are some good ones out there, but mostly we churn out people that are retarded without a GUI to know most of what they need to know to do their job.

I'm sure that the person making these claims thinks they are all that and a bag of chips, but let him design a real program and see how smart he is. Give him a project that would take a real programmer a week. By the end of the week, you would start hearing the asshole complain about how the systems are all broken, probably even providing faked statistics to show everyone how the compilers are at fault.

What they should be teaching (1)

AwesomeMcgee (2437070) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986335)

This obviously is a horrible idea, but I started thinking what could they do in a day instead that would actually be beneficial to an organization, and I came up with this:
Spend a day teaching CPU architecture, memory structure, and end with showing how to manually layout a formal data structure or 2 in memory (something simple like a binary search tree). All done in lecture format obviously to get through it all.

By the end of the day there would be tangible benefit in that: Some of the folks would be smart enough to come away from it with an actual increased understanding of how computers actually work and might recognize the strictness of logic and unambiguous instruction they need. But above all else, all of them would walk away with a heightened respect for developers and an understanding why when a developer says he thinks a timeline might slip, you probably can't change that fact just by ignoring the dev, because again, the computer is strict and logical and cares not for your timeline.

Alphabets and languages (1)

Todd Knarr (15451) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986447)

I know the Russian alphabet. That doesn't mean I speak or read Russian.

In one day, you're picking up the programming equivalent of the alphabet: what the letters in the language mean. Learning what the words mean, and how to string them together into coherent sentences, that takes a lot longer. Becoming fluent in it at the high-school level... that takes pretty much what it took for you to become fluent in whatever your native language is at the same level: 15 or so years of 24-hours-a-day immersion in it. Good luck cramming that into a single day.

They lost me at... (1)

mrjb (547783) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986469)

"Do you know your Java from your CSS and your HTML?" Whoever wrote this, doesn't.

Dick and Jane (1)

MNNorske (2651341) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986557)

Anyone can learn to code. Just as anyone can learn to write a Dick and Jane story. Eight hours will teach someone to write rudimentary code in the proper grammer of whichever programming language they're approaching, something approaching the complexity of a Dick and Jane story. Eight hours will not however teach someone how to read or comprehend Shakespeare let alone write a full fledged, useful, and marketable application.

Inexperienced programmers suck (1)

bobbutts (927504) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986601)

I'd rather they learn nothing than learn enough to fancy themselves ready to talk shop with a real programmer.

illogical (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986621)

It's illogical to post an article on Slashdot about "how to code in a day". Do you really think anybody who isn't already a coder will ever visit this site and see it? Good thing it's on BBC too!

I learned me dentistry and brain surgery in a day (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986627)

I have a Black & Decker Drill, a Leatherman, and a can of furniture repair spackle.

Do any of you want to save money on health care . . . ?

They sound great! (1)

TheTrueScotsman (1191887) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986635)

How do I give one of them my interview coding test?

monkeyshop.vn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#40986655)

Thanks you so much for your infomations http://monkeyshop.vn/ [monkeyshop.vn]

like the matrix (1)

dittbub (2425592) | more than 2 years ago | (#40986715)

i liked the testimonial comparing it to taking the blue pill from the matrix
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