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Ecuador To Grant Assange Political Asylum

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the thought-that-only-happened-on-star-trek dept.

News 432

NSN A392-99-964-5927 writes with news that Ecaudor will grant Julian Assange's request for political asylum. An Ecuador official told The Guardian that the country's president, who earlier indicated his decision would arrive after the Olympic Games, will approve the request Assange made in June. "Government sources in Quito confirmed that despite the outstanding legal issues Correa would grant Assange asylum – a move which would annoy Britain, the US and Sweden. They added that the offer was made to Assange several months ago, well before he sought refuge in the embassy, and following confidential negotiations with senior London embassy staff. The official with knowledge of the discussions said the embassy had discussed Assange's asylum request. The British government, however, 'discouraged the idea,' the offical said. The Swedish government was also 'not very collaborative,' the official said. The official added: 'We see Assange's request as a humanitarian issue. The contact between the Ecuadorean government and WikiLeaks goes back to May 2011, when we became the first country to see the leaked US embassy cables completely declassified ... It is clear that when Julian entered the embassy there was already some sort of deal. We see in his work a parallel with our struggle for national sovereignty and the democratisation of international relations.'"

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Good (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#40989183)

Good for Assange and good for Ecuador.

Re:Good (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989215)

Yep, sure glad they went with a country without very good diplomatic ties to the US, and one which the US won't miss if an imperial fuckton of bombs happened to vaporize it! That makes things so much easier than all this "diplomacy" bullshit we've been wasting our time on with our "allies"!

Re:Good (1, Interesting)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 2 years ago | (#40989469)

and one which the US won't miss if an imperial fuckton of bombs happened to vaporize it!

Such statements have no relationship to reality and only serve to make pro-Assenge folks look like perseverating nut-jobs.

It is, however, a great day for Assenge and his cause, and a sad sad day for all those countries that COULD have stood up and made statement to the US and Sweeden.

Re:Good (4, Insightful)

moeinvt (851793) | about 2 years ago | (#40989651)

"Such statements have no relationship to reality..."

Interesting perspective. I think there is very real evidence to demonstrate that the USA has a habit of bombing other countries and actively overthrowing governments (even elected ones) which refuse to toe the USA line. I wonder how many governments in Central and South America alone have been targeted for "regime change" because the USA didn't like their behavior?

I think the OP has a good point. Ecuador should be watching out for armed rebel groups even if they don't need to be dodging hellfire missiles and smart bombs at the moment.

Re:Good (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989503)

and one which the US won't miss if an imperial fuckton of bombs happened to vaporize it!

Re-read what you just wrote, and ask yourself if you are on the good side or the bad side.

Re:Good (-1, Flamebait)

sycodon (149926) | about 2 years ago | (#40989221)

Exiled to Ecuador.

Pathetic.

Re:Good (2)

Trepidity (597) | about 2 years ago | (#40989243)

Hey, it beats the Singapore exile that Facebook cofounder drew the short straw on.

Re:Good (1, Insightful)

sycodon (149926) | about 2 years ago | (#40989415)

Well, with all that money, doesn't matter where you are exiled.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989589)

I'd much rather live in Singapore than Ecuador.

Re:Good (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989701)

I wouldn't; I like chewing gum and having room to swing a cat.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989859)

I hate gum and I am used to living in large cities.

Re:Good (5, Insightful)

moeinvt (851793) | about 2 years ago | (#40989671)

It beats GITMO or some secret CIA prison in the Middle East.

Re:Good (5, Interesting)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 2 years ago | (#40989225)

Ya but if I Assange I'd be absurdly paranoid for the rest of my life. Drone strikes are so easy to do and for the USA to deploy a military asset to Ecuador cannot be that difficult.

Re:Good (5, Insightful)

crawling_chaos (23007) | about 2 years ago | (#40989273)

Drones? More like hand over some unmarked Benjamins for a quick car accident and some planted cocaine.

Re:Good (2)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 2 years ago | (#40989317)

You're right if he was going to get killed by a professional group it would not be something so obvious as a drone strike.

Re:Good (5, Interesting)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#40989777)

You're right if he was going to get killed by a professional group it would not be something so obvious as a drone strike.

Agreed. They'd probably start by framing the guy in some kind of sex scandal, as is traditional for the US. Oh wait...

Re:Good (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989293)

I dont think Assange is afraid of dying.

I think he is more afraid of languishing in American prisons like those guys who get 70yrs in prisons for stealing a loaf of bread.

Re:Good (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#40989367)

Then he shouldn't go to Ecaudor. Kidnappings are rampant and it wouldn't be hard to pay off a taxi driver to kidnap him.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989379)

source?

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989595)

some american is confusing ecuador and el salvador. pay no attention.

Re:Good (4, Informative)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about 2 years ago | (#40989697)

source?

http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/travel-and-living-abroad/travel-advice-by-country/south-america/ecuador/ [fco.gov.uk]

Express kidnappings are a common crime in Ecuador and are on the increase, particularly in Quito and Guayaquil. Both Ecuadorians and foreign visitors are targets. The kidnappings involve short-term opportunistic abductions aimed at extracting cash from victims who are selected at random. They are held while criminals empty their bank accounts using the victims bank cards. Once the money has been taken the victim is usually released in an isolated area. However, criminals have started to force victims to take them to their homes once they have withdrawn the cash, and violence is becoming more common. This type of crime can involve illegitimate taxis and complicit taxi drivers. In some recent cases in January, March and April 2012, the passengers were pepper sprayed. In 2009 a British tourist was express-kidnapped from a hotel in the north of Quito.

Re:Good (1)

kaatochacha (651922) | about 2 years ago | (#40989815)

wait, the loaf of bread guy doesn't get called on source, but the kidnappings in a South America country does?

Re:Good (-1, Flamebait)

sycodon (149926) | about 2 years ago | (#40989477)

Armed Robbery: Strike 1
Assault :Strike 2
Steal loaf of bread: Strike 3 and we are fucking done with you. Goodby for the rest of your miserable life.

I see nothing wrong with this.

Re:Good (3, Insightful)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#40989673)

Armed Robbery: Strike 1 Assault :Strike 2 Steal loaf of bread: Strike 3 and we are fucking done with you. Goodby for the rest of your miserable life.

I see nothing wrong with this.

Right, because every theft of leavened baked goods involves armed criminal action and assault, without exception.

Jackass.

Re:Good (-1, Troll)

sycodon (149926) | about 2 years ago | (#40989857)

Because Three Strike laws require felonies.

Moron.

Re:Good (2)

cynop (2023642) | about 2 years ago | (#40989323)

Killing him would only make him a martyr. They need to discredit him first. Then they can organise an operation to snatch him, and bring him in front of a US judge

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989351)

Go put your tinfoil hat back on.

Re:Good (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989359)

thats ridiculous.
we are not going to assassinate assange.
the american public would have the president's head for such an outrage.

Re:Good (4, Insightful)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#40989421)

You confuse 'the American public' with 'internet nerds'. The American public is overwhelmingly anti-Wikileaks. [mcclatchydc.com]

Re:Good (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989653)

You confuse "the American public" with "a handful of people who took some poll".

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989751)

thats ridiculous.
we are not going to assassinate assange.
the american public would have the president's head for such an outrage.

Right, did the american public have the president's head for the executive order that enables him to decide who to assassinate and who not ? And this includes american citizens living abroad.
So yeah, american public counts for nothing. Less than zero. Put them in front of some reality show and the deal is done. Bread and circuses. What else can you expect from a population that is married to their couches ?

Re:Good (5, Insightful)

pnot (96038) | about 2 years ago | (#40989499)

Quite apart from any supposed CIA attacks, Assange had better make sure he only says nice things about President Correa. From the Human Rights Watch Report [hrw.org] :

Those involved in protests in which there are outbreaks of violence may be prosecuted on inflated and inappropriate terrorism charges. Criminal defamation laws that restrict freedom of expression remain in force and Correa has used them repeatedly against his critics... Impunity for police abuses is widespread... Ecuador’s Criminal Code still has provisions criminalizing desacato (“lack of respect”), under which anyone who offends a government official may receive a prison sentence up to three months and up to two years for offending the president... journalists face prison sentences and crippling damages for this offense... In a draft decree announced in December 2010, domestic NGOs, including those working on human rights, would have to re-register and submit to continuous government monitoring. The decree would give the government broad powers to dissolve groups for “political activism,”

Then again, Assange also said that Sweden was a great place where he felt totally safe, right up until the whole rape thing happened, at which point Sweden was suddenly declared a notorious US lackey...

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989933)

This is in a way good. Maybe Assange will learn something from it.

captcha: riddance

Re:Good (1)

Sir_Sri (199544) | about 2 years ago | (#40989529)

No, but assassinating him in Ecuador would pose massive regional problems, and would be blatantly illegal (as would kidnapping him, which again, while not that hard, is not legal).

I'd be more worried about a change in government having a change of mind in Ecuador, and suddenly assange finding himself without a friendly government to protect him.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989689)

You've been watching too many movies. Get out and breathe some fresh air.

Re:Good (2)

ackthpt (218170) | about 2 years ago | (#40989327)

South American non-aligned flexing its muscle.

At least it's not Venezuela, which would be putting him on parade to rub US noses in it.

Re:Good (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#40989337)

It's great for the US, too. Ecaudor is notorious for its high incidence of kidnapping. He'll have to watch his back perpetually.

Re:Good (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989459)

you should move to Ecuador and join him. Please! We don't want you here.

Here come the drones! (-1)

s.petry (762400) | about 2 years ago | (#40989185)

While I am glad they are trying to make a stand, I'm wondering if the punishment will make them cave in shortly. Funny how a plane crash can change their perspective.

For those ignorant to the reference, see Poland and their reluctance to join the EU and what happened to their president for starters.

Re:Here come the drones! (1)

Columcille (88542) | about 2 years ago | (#40989257)

Because every time there's a plane crash, a conspiracy is somewhere behind it.

Re:Here come the drones! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989271)

While there are certainly many mysteries surrounding polish president's death, it was well after Poland joined EU in 2004.

Re:Here come the drones! (2)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 2 years ago | (#40989425)

What's really so mysterious about controlled flight into terrain under bad weather/visibility conditions? It's not like it's the first time that sort of thing happens.

Re:Here come the drones! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989635)

You're a DUPE. The NSA killed the Pole, and EVERYONE knows it. You're a capatalist dupe.

Re:Here come the drones! (1)

srussia (884021) | about 2 years ago | (#40989863)

What's really so mysterious about controlled flight into terrain under bad weather/visibility conditions? It's not like it's the first time that sort of thing happens.

Funny how often CFIT happens when the US Govt. sees [greatdreams.com] fit [speakfreeforum.com]

Re:Here come the drones! (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 2 years ago | (#40989927)

Why would the US govt see fit to assassinate the rabidly pro-US Polish leadership?

Re:Here come the drones! (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 2 years ago | (#40989509)

Poland has been one of the more enthusiastic new EU members.

Re:Here come the drones! (2)

Teun (17872) | about 2 years ago | (#40989721)

At least three things in that last sentence don't correlate, Poland was and is overwhelmingly for the EU, they were already a member by the time the plane crash happened and the crash was on Russian soil, a country that is not so happy with Poland getting cosier with the West.

sure (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989191)

I bet they'd be just as welcoming if it was their own internal governmental communications that were leaked...

He's in big trouble (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989239)

First, he'll have to learn to drive on the other side of the road. Then a crash course in Spanish won't hurt.

Here's a starter:
Alto! = Stop!
Tus papeles por favor = Your papers please

Re:He's in big trouble (0)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 2 years ago | (#40989715)

In Assange's case, I'm thinking the most often used phrase will be "Dónde puedo encontrar las prostitutas pervertidos?" followed by "Puedes encontrar a mi abogado?"

Re:He's in big trouble (5, Funny)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#40989719)

First, he'll have to learn to drive on the other side of the road. Then a crash course in Spanish won't hurt.

Here's a starter: Alto! = Stop! Tus papeles por favor = Your papers please

He's going to Ecuador, not Texas...

What a turning point in American History (4, Interesting)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 2 years ago | (#40989249)

A Latin American country is providing safe harbor for a journalist who dared to expose top-secret documents on the military. Someone needs to rework the "In Soviet Russia..." meme for juntas.

Re:What a turning point in American History (5, Funny)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#40989319)

Someone needs to rework the "In Soviet Russia..." meme for juntas.

In Ecuador ... asylum seeks you, senor.

Re:What a turning point in American History (5, Insightful)

gagol (583737) | about 2 years ago | (#40989383)

In Democratic Ecuador the government saves you???

Re:What a turning point in American History (1)

iplayfast (166447) | about 2 years ago | (#40989481)

Wish I had moderator points. THAT was insightful!

Re:What a turning point in American History (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989603)

A Latin American country is providing safe harbor for a journalist who dared to expose top-secret documents on the military. Someone needs to rework the "In Soviet Russia..." meme for juntas.

Well, it seems to me you suggest that US is led by a junta - except for not being an anglo-saxon term, I think you may be right.

Re:What a turning point in American History (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989607)

A Latin American country is providing safe harbor for a journalist who dared to expose top-secret documents on the military.

Who may have raped two women. Presumably that's a bad thing.

OK, this is senseless (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989253)

I can understand giving him asylum from political persecution. He may indeed be faced with that someday. But this case is an accusation of rape. How about granting him asylum after he is exonerated (or after he serves his time if he is found guilty)? I know it is popular to be all tin-foil hat and say that this is all some grand conspiracy by the USA - but damn, you'd have to be an idiot to believe that is really true. Let the man stand trial in Sweden and then - pending the outcome - offer him asylum.

Re:OK, this is senseless (5, Insightful)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 2 years ago | (#40989361)

Ya because no covert intelligence agency anywhere has ever used a Honey trap.....

Re:OK, this is senseless (4, Insightful)

pla (258480) | about 2 years ago | (#40989601)

Ya because no covert intelligence agency anywhere has ever used a Honey trap...

And not at all suspicious that we have a known CIA operative - And a close friend of hers - as the women involved here.

That doesn't mean he didn't do it, but when it comes to "benefit of the doubt", he definitely gets it in this case.

Re:OK, this is senseless (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989619)

logic fail. you converted "there exists a" to "for all".

Re:OK, this is senseless (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989411)

so... you are saying to grant him asylum after he has turned himself over to the people he is afraid of being imprisoned by? that makes no sense

Re:OK, this is senseless (4, Insightful)

mmell (832646) | about 2 years ago | (#40989455)

The overriding issue is that once incarcerated in Britain (or even Sweden), it would be a simple thing for the US to extradite him to face charges of espionage for leaking confidential US information via Wikileaks. And of course the government here would never bring the death penalty into such conversations (at least, not until we had him safely and cozily wrapped up in our own grubby meat-beaters), so those countries would blithely hand him over to our custody to suffer "death by bunda", despite the fact that both countries should refuse extradition on precisely those grounds.

Ecuador is taking a startlingly appropriate and laudable position here, IMHO.

Re:OK, this is senseless (1)

cynop (2023642) | about 2 years ago | (#40989473)

If he has been exonerated (or has served his time), why would he need asylum?

Re:OK, this is senseless (1)

RajivSLK (398494) | about 2 years ago | (#40989489)

Offering someone asylum doesn't magically transport them out of jail and into Ecuador. Once the Swedish authorities have their hands on him I would imagine that it would be difficult to give him asylum. Even if he is found not guilty of the charges in Sweden they may very well hand him straight to the US without releasing him.

Re:OK, this is senseless (1)

Fned (43219) | about 2 years ago | (#40989527)

Let the man stand trial in Sweden and then - pending the outcome - offer him asylum.

Asylum from what, exactly?

Re:OK, this is senseless (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40989545)

Because anyone in their right mind recognized it was a bogus charge and an obvious setup from the get-go.

Re:OK, this is senseless (4, Insightful)

Znork (31774) | about 2 years ago | (#40989633)

Sweden assisted the US in extrajudicial rendition and had police turn over two egyptian guys straight to the CIA for transport to torture. The Swedish minister of 'Justice' at the time, Thomas Bodström, who most likely knew about and ok'd the illegal rendition at the time coincidentally runs a law firm together with the representative of the women who brought the allegations.

Not to say that it's a conspiracy, but one can understand why there's a certain reluctance to trust Sweden. It's become a banana republic complicit in torture run by a frat club of criminals.

Re:OK, this is senseless (4, Informative)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#40989637)

This is a trumped up accusation of rape, disclaimed by the victims, dropped by the proscutor, and only reopened under political pressure from the US. He can't expect a fair trial any more than he could expect a fair indictment.

Re:OK, this is senseless (3, Interesting)

Sprouticus (1503545) | about 2 years ago | (#40989663)

I am not very tin foil hat-ish (Im abig believer is stupidity and selishness being the root of most issues), but even I think he is being setup. Maybe not setup in the traditional sense, but the US is pressuing Sweden to nial him to the cross if they can on any charge they can when the oppurtunity arose (thus the charge being reduced then reinstated).

I cannot speak to the veracity, but I found several sources on Google that indicated that the 'rape' was having sex without a condom. That the sex was completely consensual (if foolish). Again, I dont have stats, but how many men go to jail is sweeden every year for doing a woman (or in this case 2 women) bareback. With their concent.

It is possible I suppose that they withdrew consent as some sources claim, but that becomes a he-said she-said thing. Add to that the fact that neither woman seemed phased by the encounters until they talked to each other and it becomes even more fishy and sounds like sour grapes.

Add to THAT the pressure the US government is surely putting on the Swedes, and you have a nice little setup.

The entire thing has oddity written all over it, and frnakly as much as I think the guy is an arrogant douchebag, I would do the same thing in his situation.

Re:OK, this is senseless (1)

kaatochacha (651922) | about 2 years ago | (#40989893)

wow, Google. Bravo!
I also found some sources on Google. They indicated I could increase my penis size by five inches! Tripling it!

Re:OK, this is senseless (1)

cdrudge (68377) | about 2 years ago | (#40989691)

If it was you or I, then generally I would agree with you. However when you're considered the enemy he is by the US, Sweden, et al, you need to not only think of your next step but your next several as well as your exits. Regardless of if he might be exonerated in Sweden, I don't think the likelihood of him continuing to live a life of freedom would exist as he'd promptly be handed over to US authorities.

It's also worth noting that he hasn't even been charged with a crime in Sweden. He's only wanted for questioning. If anyone else raped/molested/sexually assaulted multiple people, I'm sure the police would like to question the accuse but I don't think it's going to hold up their case if the accused doesn't say anything or refuses to come in. They are either going to charge em, or not.

Re:OK, this is senseless (1)

sjames (1099) | about 2 years ago | (#40989703)

If it was what the rest of the world considers rape and there weren't so many questions surrounding the 'victim''s apparent reluctance to cooperate with the prosecution, I might agree.

What he is charged with is what most of the world would call 'turning out to be a douche the morning after'.

Re:OK, this is senseless (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 2 years ago | (#40989735)

He can only be granted asylum if he can get to or is on Ecaudor and likely the last chance he had to do so was before he was taken into custody.

Oh, darn, U.S.! (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40989289)

You almost had him!

Re:Oh, darn, U.S.! (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#40989391)

All they have to do is pay a taxi cab driver to kidnap him. No fuss. No muss. He's only made it easier for himself to be nabbed.

Re:Oh, darn, U.S.! (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#40989795)

All they have to do is pay a taxi cab driver to kidnap him. No fuss. No muss. He's only made it easier for himself to be nabbed.

Considering that you yourself have thought of such a situation, one would think Assange has already taken such matters into consideration.

I mean, c'mon, if he was dumb enough to have not thought of something so obviously obvious, he'd already be in Gitmo.

Re:Oh, darn, U.S.! (0)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 2 years ago | (#40989549)

We have but to extend our hand if we really wanted to put out Assange's light. Hes really not worth the effort. Hes neutered, and will be the rest of his life.

Re:Oh, darn, U.S.! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989845)

dead man's switch is hardly neutered.

And..."I suppose it was only a matter of time." (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 2 years ago | (#40989305)

Still waiting for my own country, the US, to put up or shut up as to whether he bribed the leaker or not, the only legimitate criminal charge it could levy.

Regarding free speech, "I will not compromise. Not even in the face of Armageddon."

Re:And..."I suppose it was only a matter of time." (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#40989445)

"I will not compromise. Not even in the face of Armageddon."

Even if they threatened to make you watch that animal crackers scene over and over again?

Re:And..."I suppose it was only a matter of time." (1)

Monkey-Man2000 (603495) | about 2 years ago | (#40989585)

As myself an American expat, we both know that at Guantanamo, you don't need a legitimate criminal charge to be extradited there or imprisoned indefinitely by us. Besides the way Obama's dealt with this Wikileaks issue I otherwise like him, but this situation had nearly turned me. But the lesser of two evils you know because a Republican president would have rattled a few more sabers as loudly as they could I think. Consequently, I really believe Congress would have enacted some new law (that retroactively is legal) where foreigners who smear the reputation of the US in some way can be tried for something analogous to treason in the US -- death penalty and all...

Re:And..."I suppose it was only a matter of time." (4, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#40989843)

Besides the way Obama's dealt with this Wikileaks issue I otherwise like him

So this bothers you, but his treatment of Thomas Drake doesn't? Or the fact that he considers legal medical marijuana dispensaries in California to be a higher priority target than the investment bankers who crashed the economy in 2008? Or his continued use of unconstitutional warrantless wiretaps? Or that he signed the blatantly unconstitutional 2012 NDAA? Or his unilateral assassination of American citizens abroad?

The chief of the ACLU is "disgusted" [politico.com] with Obama. You should be too.

Re:And..."I suppose it was only a matter of time." (1)

flaming error (1041742) | about 2 years ago | (#40989791)

Maybe that's a "legitimate criminal charge," but the US government does exactly the same, quite regularly and quite without remorse.

Unless we have double-standards, allowing POTUS to do it to others makes it nonsensical to condemn when others do it to POTUS.

To all of you going on about drone strikes (2)

killmenow (184444) | about 2 years ago | (#40989307)

As easy as it may be to pull off logistically, it's not nearly as simple politically. Which is why this dog & pony show has gone on so long. If it were as simple as a plane crash or a fuckton of missles or a drone strike, he'd already be dead.

Of course, Ecuador can expect to be brought before some trumped up UN committee and sanctioned for this soon.

Drinking the kool-aid (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989311)

While I would expect the comments to consist primarily of the usual conspiracy fantasies, can we at least keep them out of the summary? The claim that this decision would or should "annoy" the United States has no basis in reality.

And to think... (4, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 2 years ago | (#40989369)

And to think most in the US view South America as some backwards "third world" with no freedom and the US is the freest country in the world.

Interesting how quickly things change.

Re:And to think... (3, Insightful)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#40989451)

Considering the long history of dictators and military juntas they would be correct. Go to Venezuela and start some demonstrations to speak out against Hugo Chavez and see how much 'freedom' he affords you.

Re:And to think... (1, Insightful)

roberto.moraes (985212) | about 2 years ago | (#40989563)

Consider also the US being the dictator of the world, since the second world war ..

Re:And to think... (5, Insightful)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#40989625)

Great. How does that make Chavez any less of a dictator that jails people for speaking out against him?

Re:And to think... (4, Interesting)

Dunbal (464142) | about 2 years ago | (#40989623)

Yeah. I live in Latin America. I've lived in the US. Have you traveled outside your country? You would be surprised [youtube.com] at the non universality of your "freedom".

Re:And to think... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989553)

Things haven't changed, just see how people vote with their feet, and the flow of people is decidedly south to north.

BOOM!! I just fuckin destroyed your idiotic nonsense with facts.

Re:And to think... (2, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 2 years ago | (#40989759)

Says someone completely ignorant of the facts. Just look at this: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/for-first-time-since-depression-more-mexicans-leave-us-than-enter/2012/04/23/gIQApyiDdT_story.html [washingtonpost.com] for example.

To begin with, a lot of those entering the US from Mexico and other central American countries were poor, unskilled workers who benefited from the socialist nature of American "capitalism" (things such as the minimum wage, free medical care at any hospital, etc.) which naturally would appeal to them. Or people where the lack of free markets in the US create a benefit for them (for example, doctors and hospitals are very competitive in South America, they act more like monopolies in the US). There are a whole lot of people who would rather have comfort than freedom, when given the choice between a completely free life with no government handouts and a life filled with rules, regulations and restrictions with government handouts a lot of them are going to pick the latter option.

I can see the US having "entrepreneur drain" as young people quickly realize that there is an entire world out there to explore and many places where it is easier and more profitable (not just in dollars but in quality of life) to run a business outside of the USA. Just look at Eduardo Saverin who left the US for greener pastures in Asia.

Re:And to think... (5, Insightful)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 2 years ago | (#40989741)

America? Free?

In the US, you are free to:

Work a drudgy job
Pay taxes, deducted weekly from your pay, and levied higher if they think you didn't pay enough over the course of the year.
Pay taxes at the fuel pump
Pay taxes at the grocery store
Pay taxes when you buy alcohol or tobacco
Pay taxes when you somehow manage to buy a luxury item
Pay taxes on your property anually
Pay taxes on your vehicle
Pay levies for public scools
Be assaulted by police, who illegally confiscate any recording devices you have.
Speak publicly and exercise your right to assemble and address grievances in authorised "free speech zones"
Be subjected to brutal beatings if you exercise those rights anywere else
Be subjected to brutal beatings if you exercise those rights in the designated areas, if the message is controvertial or inconvenient
Be innundated in outright lies and yellow journalism 24/7 during election years
Choose which political dick you want up your ass for the next 4, 8, or 10 years (depending on level of govt)
Buy legal immunity if you are wealthy enough
Get totally shafted in the legal system if you aren't
Get enjoined as a spurrious "john doe" in a copyright case with flimsy evidence
Have your internet unplugged through mere allegations.
Get presumed guilty until proven innocent in matters involving copyright via the DMCA
Be arrested for spurrious offences only tangentally related to interstate commerce
Be detained indefinately without evidence or council if even suspected of engaging in terrorism

And so much more!

Just look at all those freedoms! The USA is a GREAT place to live!

Political refugee (5, Interesting)

roman_mir (125474) | about 2 years ago | (#40989433)

Assange is a political refugee, he needs a hide out because a large and a very powerful organisation (and more than one) are after him for disseminating information that those powerful organisations want to keep quiet.

If Assange falls in the hands of American government, he is going to be made an example of, and it's going to be worse than Vietnam for him, sort of like what they did to Bradley Manning but maybe times 10.

Isn't it amazing, 60 years ago people wouldn't have believed if somebody told them, that America could become this....

Re:Political refugee (1)

Desler (1608317) | about 2 years ago | (#40989487)

Then they must have never read much US history or even followed contemporary news.

Re:Political refugee (2)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 2 years ago | (#40989569)

Become what? These are not new tricks, we jsut see more now.

Re:Political refugee (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989913)

Wasn't it about 60 years ago that America executed Julius and Ethel Rosenberg [wikipedia.org] for espionage? Obviously the facts of the case are different, but I don't see how this could indicate that America has changed in the past 60 years.

dom

Olympics (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989645)

Do you think he could have snook out of the Ecuadorean embassy with the Olympians? I mean, what was the purpose of wait for the Olympics to finish?

He could be in Ecuador already.

WMDs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#40989781)

So, I heard Ecuador is chock full of weapons of mass destruction...

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