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Ecuador Grants Asylum To Julian Assange

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the must-be-nice-this-time-of-year dept.

The Courts 923

Several readers have submitted news that as expected, Ecuador is formally accepting Julian Assange's request for political asylum. paulmac84 writes "The Guardian are live blogging the Ecuadorian Foreign Minister's announcement that Ecuador is to grant asylum to Julian Assange. In the announcement Minister Patino said, 'We can state that there is a risk that he will be persecuted politically... We trust the UK will offer the necessary guarantees so that both governments can act adequately and properly respect international rights and the right of asylum. We also trust the excellent relationship the two countries have will continue.' The Guardian also carries a translated copy of the letter the UK sent to Ecuador regarding the threat to 'storm' the Ecuadorian embassy." Also at Reuters.

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923 comments

Oh, the delicious irony! (-1, Troll)

daveschroeder (516195) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009547)

Ecuador's free speech record at odds with Julian Assange's bid for openness
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jun/19/ecuador-free-speech-julian-assange [guardian.co.uk]

Ecuador, a country with a tenuous respect for international human rights law, is counter-intuitive refuge for the free speech and transparency crusader.

Ecuador's justice system and record on free speech have been called into question by Human Rights Watch, Reporters Without Borders, the Committee to Protect Journalists, and Amnesty International.

"I think this is ironic that you have a journalist, or an activist, seeking political asylum from a government that has – after Cuba – the poorest record of free speech in the region, and the practice of persecuting local journalists when the government is upset by their opinions or their research," José Miguel Vivanco, director of Human Rights Watch's Americas division, told the Guardian.

Vivanco points out that in April of 2011, Ecuador expelled the US ambassador Heather Hodges over diplomatic cables published by WikiLeaks alleging widespread corruption within the Ecuadorian police.

Ecuador’s Assault on Free Speech
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/22/opinion/ecuadors-assault-on-free-speech.html [nytimes.com]

Ecuador’s highest court has delivered a staggering, shameful blow to the country’s democracy, siding with President Rafael Correa’s campaign to silence and bankrupt El Universo, Ecuador’s largest newspaper.

Ecuador's Rafael Correa under fire for media laws
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-16806224 [bbc.co.uk]

[...] the president ought to be known for "the most comprehensive and ruthless assault on free media under way in the Western Hemisphere".

According to various international rights organisations, 2011 was a bad year for freedom of speech in Ecuador, and 2012 does not bode well.

Following a change to the current electoral law, which comes into effect on 4 February, journalists will face restrictions when reporting on the forthcoming campaign for the 2013 presidential election.

The new article prohibits media from "either directly or indirectly promoting any given candidate, proposal, options, electoral preferences or political thesis, through articles, specials or any other form of message".

Also, to preempt this ridiculousness:

The UK didn't say it was going to "storm" Ecuador's embassy. (The origin of that claim? None other than Ecuador.) What the UK said is that Ecuador's embassy may be stripped of its diplomatic status [guardian.co.uk] (a move which would have serious diplomatic fallout), and police may arrest Assange.

People who think this is "good news" for Assange and/or Ecuador and/or the world at large are certainly showing their true colors: not only a disregard and lack of respect for freedom (including that of speech), but a celebration of anything that attacks the US and the West -- institutions which, for all their many imperfections, actually promote ideals of freedom and liberal democracy. Indeed, as Steven Aftergood, veteran crusader against excessive US government secrecy and director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy: "WikiLeaks must be counted among the enemies of open society because it does not respect the rule of law nor does it honor the rights of individuals."

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009683)

How much do they pay you, shameless shill?

It's true that Ecuador isn't one of the most democratic countries on the planet. But still nowhere near USA's level of hypocrisy and plain disrespect for anything but the almighty buck.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (-1, Offtopic)

sed quid in infernos (1167989) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009851)

Is that the best you've got? To accuse someone who disagrees with you of being a paid, "shameless" shill?

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (2)

Black Parrot (19622) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009901)

Is that the best you've got? To accuse someone who disagrees with you of being a paid, "shameless" shill?

Unfortunately, it happens. Though it's usually impossible to tell whether it is actually happening in a particular case, such as this.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009997)

How can I tell you're not a shill? Because that's what this comes down to: someone calling someone who puts forth a position they disagree with a paid shill.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (5, Informative)

Lehk228 (705449) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009961)

Retrieved 20120816 9:45AM from http://das.doit.wisc.edu/ [wisc.edu]

Dave Schroeder
About Me

I am located at the University of Wisconsinâ"Madison in Madison, Wisconsin. I work in the University's Division of Information Technology (DoIT) in Systems Engineering and Operations as a senior systems engineer. My work involves assessing services in enterprise IT environments at the University.

I am the Continuity of Operations (COOP) Architect, which is responsible for the technical efforts that drive business continuity, disaster recovery, and continuity of operations analysis and planning for critical IT infrastructure at the University of Wisconsinâ"Madison, a major state government agency.

I also serve as an Information Warfare Officer in the United States Navy Fleet Cyber Command/US Tenth Fleet. I have a master's degree in Information Warfare, and am currently in the graduate Space Systems program at the Naval Postgraduate School. For contact information, see the left sidebar.

technically not a shill, but he is a US operative that is unquestionable.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (4, Informative)

jkflying (2190798) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010071)

Check out his homepage. On it he says:

"... I also serve as an Information Warfare Officer in the United States Navy Fleet Cyber Command/US Tenth Fleet. I have a master's degree in Information Warfare...."
http://das.doit.wisc.edu/ [wisc.edu]

If you think he isn't biased, and possibly being paid for his post, you are crazy.
Now, please, get off my lawn!

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009919)

How much did wikileacks pay you, shameless shill?

The hypocrisy is on Assange's part. Here is this supposed champion of free speech and shit and when things get tough, he runs to what is pretty much an authoritarian government.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

Hatta (162192) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010001)

Assange has a choice between an authoritarian government that is actively persecuting him, and an authoritarian government that is not. Which would you choose? There are no free countries to escape to.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1, Insightful)

toddmbloom (1625689) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010021)

Assange is a champion of his own massive ego.. and that's all.

Seriously, why everyone fawns over the douchebag is beyond me.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (5, Insightful)

canadiannomad (1745008) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009687)

What scares me most is the willingness the world seems to have to allow first the violation of Assange's human rights, then to threaten the 10+ international treaties (acts of hostility against a friendly nation) that the world has in place to protect people from such a situation. In the end we are left looking to a third world country, with a somewhat poor record itself, for those rights that should be universal. Australia should be ashamed of itself that he has to resort to Ecuador and not his home nation.

What violation of his rights? (3, Insightful)

Viol8 (599362) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009761)

"world seems to have to allow first the violation of Assange's human rights,"

Care to elaborate? Are you saying the UK justice system is a patsy for the UK government and every judge and juror was knobbled?

And what about the human rights or the women in sweden who may (or may not) have been raped. Assange may (or may not) have done it but this isn't the sort of thing decided in the court of public opinion my friend. THIS is why the law exists. If you dont' like that tough , but don't pretend Assange is making some grand jesture against "The Man". He's not. He's saving his own arse and the fact that he's willing to give live in a fleepit 3rd world country to get away from justice tells me all I need to know about how he sees his guilt.

Re:What violation of his rights? (5, Interesting)

pointyhat (2649443) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009817)

He stated that he would go to Stockholm to face his allegations, but only if they guaranteed that they would not extradite him to the US. The Swedish government confirmed that they couldn't promise that.

That is the human rights violation - it's effectively a one stop trip to Guantanamo for him without a rape trial.

Assange is being very reasonable, but only if International Treaties such as the Vienna Convention are adhered to.

Re:What violation of his rights? (2, Insightful)

Viol8 (599362) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009939)

"That is the human rights violation"

No it isn't. No country should make deals with a criminal to get him to face justice.

"Assange is being very reasonable,"

Funny how only a 3rd world dictatorship sees it that way.

Re:What violation of his rights? (3, Insightful)

pointyhat (2649443) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010033)

They aren't making deals. He's trying to get a fair unbiased trial for one **allegation** which he has not been charged for.

I'd rather go t oa 3rd world dictatorship than face this 1st world tyranny...

Re:What violation of his rights? (1)

Glarimore (1795666) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009913)

If I were wanted for extradition to go on trial for rape and I was confident that I would not receive a fair trial, you can bet your ass I wouldn't go.

Re:What violation of his rights? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009929)

don't pretend Assange is making some grand jesture

No, that's Leslie Nielsen and he's dead.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1, Insightful)

DeathToBill (601486) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009799)

Hi right not to be questioned over sexual assault? Hmmm. Which democracy are you from? I'm fine with my governments (Australian living in the UK) handing him over.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (2)

darjen (879890) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009865)

I wouldn't be surprised if the charges against him were completely politically motivated. I mean, how often is this law actually used against people? When was the last time someone was thrown in jail over failing to use a condom? Come on.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (4, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010063)

If anyone wants to question Assange, they know exactly where he is. Drop by and ask some questions, or give him a phone call. That they haven't done this is proof that they are not really interested in asking questions, but getting Assange into custody.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009697)

The new article prohibits media from "either directly or indirectly promoting any given candidate, proposal, options, electoral preferences or political thesis, through articles, specials or any other form of message".

Given the recent swings in the way the corporate media is bought up by the mega rich in both the UK and the US this policy doesn't seem that extreme ...

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009779)

"the way the corporate media is bought up by the mega rich in both the UK and the US"

Shouldn't you be at an OWS rally somewhere breaking windows of Starbucks?

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1, Offtopic)

Dan Dankleton (1898312) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009883)

You don't think that the media is bought up by the mega rich? Seriously? It is and it has been for hundreds of years.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009899)

So sorry to intrude on your right to put your head in the sand. Please enjoy your latte.

(inb4 you're the one serving it hurrrrr durrrrrr)

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009991)

He's so blinded by his irrational hate towards anything other than OWS fealty that he couldn't find a Starbucks if you pitched him through it's window.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

pointyhat (2649443) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009703)

Channel 4 stated that the UK government were going to storm the Ecuadorian embassy this morning on television.

Let's not forget this fuck up: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iranian_Embassy_siege [wikipedia.org]

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (2)

DeathToBill (601486) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009825)

The foreign office sent a letter pointing out they have a legal route to arresting Julian in the embassy. It's not quite the same as threatening to sent the paratroopers in.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

pointyhat (2649443) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009885)

Yes I was clarifying the source of the comment as requested by the OP.

However, the paratroopers or at least armed police WILL be sent in the moment they revoke the diplomatic immunity of the Ecuadorian Embassy which IS their legal route to arresting him.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009747)

"The UK didn't say it was going to "storm" Ecuador's embassy. (The origin of that claim? None other than Ecuador.) What the UK said is that Ecuador's embassy may be stripped of its diplomatic status [guardian.co.uk] (a move which would have serious diplomatic fallout), and police may arrest Assange."

Diplomacy meets Politics at its finest: A thinly veiled threat to skirt the rules using a technicality.

"People who think this is "good news" for Assange and/or Ecuador and/or the world at large are certainly showing their true colors: not only a disregard and lack of respect for freedom (including that of speech), but a celebration of anything that attacks the US and the West -- institutions which, for all their many imperfections, actually promote ideals of freedom and liberal democracy. Indeed, as Steven Aftergood, veteran crusader against excessive US government secrecy and director of the Federation of American Scientists Project on Government Secrecy: "WikiLeaks must be counted among the enemies of open society because it does not respect the rule of law nor does it honor the rights of individuals.""

Pull up your trousers, your own "true colours" are showing.

And you are showing your true colors (5, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009753)

You question Ecuador's record on human rights. Well, how about the US and the UK and for that matter Sweden? The US routinely tortures civilians with no right to process or a legal representative. And that is just the most blatant example.

The UK has a very long history of violent repression and total disregard for human rights. The only reason it has improved is because its power to abuse has been greatly reduced.

Sweden has shown itself to be a puppet state in the last ten years.

Nobody claims Ecuador is a saint but in the fight against evil you sometimes have to make strange bed fellows.

And good job quoting a guy working for a rightwing think tank. This was funded by the people who made the atom bomb. I want their opinion on human rights?

Willfull slaves such as you quake in their boots at the idea of anyone daring to rebel. You do not believe in the system that represents the status quo, you just are desperately afraid of any change whatsoever. You rather continue to be raped up the ass then risk any change because it might cause just the tiniest upset and then all hell will break lose.

Wikileaks was the only response possible in a world where western governments from administration to adminstration have sought to keep ever more hidden from fact in the name of national security. That this was a complete and utter lie is simply proven to anyone who isn't a sniffeling coward like the parent poster, NOT A FUCKING THING HAPPENED after the wikileaks. All that happened is that it became clear how much we had been lied to and how many of the rumors were true. People lost faces but no bases were attacked, no wars were lost. Just the powerful ended up with eggs on their faces.

And that frighens little dave shroeder, Wikileaks upset his world view. He believed Bush was protecting little dave and not at in it for himself. Poor dave is upset. Wikileaks must be shutdown so dave can put his head under the blanket again.

Well, fuck that.

Re:And you are showing your true colors (0)

kh31d4r (2591021) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009949)

Sweden has shown itself to be a puppet state in the last ten years.

[Citation Needed]

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009759)

Your reasoning has a serious flaw, common among thinkers of your kind (if i could call you a thinker).

The problem is that you confuse Free Speech with Press Freedom. They are only the same thing if you talk from the elite class point of view.

Ideology is the discourse of the elite class reified to the status of truth. Its simple : When I talk its free speech (The big press) when you talk its not.

Confusing free speech with press freedom has the clear result of giving voice only to those with the largest, costlier, megafone.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009911)

Freedom of the press is an obligate subset of free speech, you idiot.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010061)

No it isn't.

I can say what I want but I can't publish what I want in your newspaper.

Everyone may have freedom of speech. The freedom of the press belongs to the owners of the presses.

Try again.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

DaBookshah (1234170) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009777)

I don't know where you get off pretending this is some kind of ringing endorsement of Ecuador as a country - It's ironic, nothing more, nothing less. If I had the US government after me (A country which is acknowledged to have created secret CIA-run prisons and tortured people) I'd take help anywhere I could find it too.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (3, Informative)

joelsanda (619660) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009785)

While you are correct in citing the examples you did about Ecuador, many of those same organizations have slammed the UK and US for their abuses of power against journalists, protestors and dissidents. If you were an Ecuadoran citizen and read this [amnesty.org] about the United States or this [amnesty.org] about the UK you'd probably feel safer staying put.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009791)

This.

Also, I'm so tired of people describing this as a free speech issue. It is not. Freedom of speech doesn't imply that one has carte blanch to actively mine and publish state secrets. To support Assange is to support the idea that a democratic people have no right to determine that there are valid reasons to classify data.

And I don't care if he is an American or not. He is actively working against America. If North Korea, rather than Assange, had published secret military data stolen from the US no one would claim it was just a free speech issue, or that America has no right to retaliate, or that Brady Manning was just a misunderstood hero for sending the data to them.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009983)

Because everyone in the world, no matter where he lives must follow all American laws and always support America in everything it does. No one has a right to criticize America or show that America did something a little bit bad or lied.

If anyone ever do something that is not inherently good for America, he should be hunted down and putted to the trial. Of course, those who are not Americans will have no constitutional or other rights except those granted by the judge. He will be also responsible for paying for his lawyers, but of course America will freeze all his accounts and it will be his problem to find those money elsewhere.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009805)

You set aside the main subject of this story. Julian Assange would get eventually into the hands of the USA and possibly face a death penalty just for revealing government emails for the benefit of the whole world if Ecuador would not have granted political assylum to him.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009819)

Also, to preempt this ridiculousness:

The UK didn't say it was going to "storm" Ecuador's embassy. (The origin of that claim? None other than Ecuador.) What the UK said is that Ecuador's embassy may be stripped of its diplomatic status [guardian.co.uk] (a move which would have serious diplomatic fallout), and police may arrest Assange.

Here it is:

"You should be aware that there is a legal basis in the U.K. the Diplomatic and Consular Premises Act which would allow us to take action to arrest Mr. Assange in the current premises of the Embassy."

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009837)

The thing about this case is that the arguments are not particularly complicated or convoluted. The US wants to punish Assange like they have been Manning. The difference is that Assange isn't part of our military so he isn't subject to military discipline like Manning. He's now found a country that will take him in and protect him from that revenge.

Assange and Wikileaks played the role of the traditional newspaper in this case, except online. Are you mad at the newspapers that published some of these cables? Do you think the owners or editors or journalists of The Guardian should be extradited to the US and put on trial? Then why Assange?

We don't like to see our government becoming like we used to view the USSR by manipulating other countries to exact revenge on someone who offended us. This is not playing out in a "Justice Must Be Served" way it's playing out in a "Nail The Bastard To The Wall" way. Everything about it screams Malicious Prosecution.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (5, Interesting)

Xest (935314) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009845)

Oh dear, Dave Schroeder the self-confessed "Information Warfare Officer in the United States Navy Fleet Cyber Command/US Tenth Fleet." from his own homepage was just waiting to pounce on first post for this one.

Well, anyway, I actually listened to the statement by Ecuador's spokesman live today and it was pretty interesting. The reason Ecuador took so long over this decision is that they have been trying to avoid it. What this involved was trying to find out whether Assange really was under some kind of threat. As such they:

- Asked Britain to guarantee that there was no possibility of Assange being extradited to the US. Britain refused to give this guarantee.

- Asked Sweden to guarantee that Assange would not be further extradited to the US after the rape case was dealt with. Sweden refused to give this guarantee.

- Asked Sweden if they would be willing to interview Assange in the Ecuardorian embassy over the accusations, noting that contrary to much FUD posted on Slashdot, this is in fact something Sweden can do, and has done in the past hence debunking the argument that Sweden's legal system does not allow this.

- Asked the US whether there was any existing or planned legal proceedings ongoing against Assange, and any current or potential future plans to extradite him over Wikileaks. The US refused to respond to this.

Given these 3 points, Ecuador decided that on the balance of probabilities, Assange was indeed at risk because they could not get any kind of guarantee from any of the parties involved that this was nothing to do with Wikileaks. As such they granted him asylum.

Or if you cut away the bullshit, the responses, or lack of, from Britain, Sweden, and America when Ecuador tried to resolve this without having to give Assange asylum and hence now deal with the tricky situation of how to get him the hell out of the UK all but confirm that this whole thing is indeed about Wikileaks.

Still, keep on trying to just slag off Ecuador as a bit of misdirection from the actual story here Dave if that's what makes you a happy guy.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

prakslash (681585) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009907)


Meh... The pinnacles of free speech in the West are only for it as long as it is in their own interest. They are not much better than Ecuador.

In this case, Sweden could simply give an assurance: "We are only bringing in Assange for questioning around the rape charge and we will NOT extradite him to the US. We will let him go after the Swedish legal proceedings are over". Given the gravity of the situation, they could do that and it would eliminate all the hoopla. But, no, despite repeated requests for such an assurance from the Ecuadorians themselves, Sweden will NOT give such a guarantee [democracyinaction.org]. Why not?

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

Hatta (162192) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009909)

You're absolutely right that Ecuador has a poor record on free speech. But when you're being actively persecuted by the supposedly freest country in the world for acts of speech, what are you supposed to do?

The only ones showing their true colors in this debacle are the Americans. They are showing how much they truly value free speech (only when it's speech they like) and the rule of law (our law even applies to foreign journalists). Them, and sycophantic authoritarians like yourself. You're really showing your true colors too.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41010027)

Media in Ecuador is (was) essentially a tool in the hands of the extreme right. The *democratic* govt has tried to break that monopoly resorting to Law.
To put things in perpective, in Mexico, which apparently is flawlessly democratic since it is seldom criticized in US media, hostile reporters are just killed. By the dozens.

Ecuador has been praised by the UN for its human rights record regarding refugees -- did you hear about that in your free media?

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

rajeev_king (467107) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010059)

Does this matter ?
The governments of US and UK went to war in Iraq over a bunch of lies and responsible for thousands of deaths.
I assume Ecuador hasn't done something similar .

Vetting Ecuador 's human rights standards at this point is nothing but a deep rooted western hypocrisy.
Let me tell you , you are not superior.
 

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41010091)

You've spent a lot of time with your post. So lets get to the point.
Assange, love him or hate him, is a smart guy.

Knowing he is a potential victim of a political witch hunt, he knew perfectly well that he would NOT BE SAFE anywhere near a so called sovereign nation with a "Yes Sir!, anything you say Sir!" policy regarding the great United States of America.

He chose an Embassy that would give him THE BEST CHANCE of asylum. Hell, if Iran would give him asylum - anything will do thank you very much!
But showing up at any other Embassy let alone the Australian Embassy (same on australia) was not an option and that is a damn disgrace.

This guy is in survival mode and everybody including him especially know exactly whats going on here.

The UK, Australia, Sweden and especially USA.
Should be bloody well ashamed of themselves.

Re:Oh, the delicious irony! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41010095)

How is this propagandist shit modded +5? Fuck, you actually believe the US and the West "promote ideals of freedom and liberal democracy".

Idiot. Brainwashed idiot.

Dave Schroeder
About Me

I also serve as an Information Warfare Officer in the United States Navy Fleet Cyber Command/US Tenth Fleet.

Ah, makes sense now.
 

They are too generous (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009555)

"We trust the UK will offer the necessary guarantees so that both governments can act adequately and properly respect international rights and the right of asylum."

I don't trust them at all.

Re:They are too generous (1)

Zeromous (668365) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009589)

Who the Brits, or the Ecuadorians?

Why is Assange basically moving next door to his enemies?

Re:They are too generous (0)

d3ac0n (715594) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009637)

"Keep your friends close and your enemies closer"?

Otherwise, i can't think of a sane reason beyond that which the first poster has already elaborated on; that Assange and Wikileaks are no friends of freedom and democracy, and in fact are mere haters of the west and unwitting (or perhaps witting) tools of despots and dictators the world over.

Re:They are too generous (1)

Zeromous (668365) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009659)

This wisdom is not literal, I have trouble believing that Assange also interprets this literally, as unwitting as he may be.

Re:They are too generous (5, Insightful)

Alwin Henseler (640539) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009967)

Well if it pisses off governments that aren't working the way they're supposed to work, then it can't be that bad what he's done.

In my book he's a hero. As a private person he might be an a**hole, but that doesn't change the service he's done the public (which is the more important thing anyway).

Re:They are too generous (1)

stiggle (649614) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009917)

The British will likely say that will uphold the rule of law without making any guarantees to anyone.
Then they'll put a no-fly zone over the district and then stop & search any vehicles leaving the building.

What are the odds in Vegas (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009569)

On how long until this guys imminent case of lead poisoning?

And now, the long wait (5, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009571)

The UK has stated it will storm the embassy by force, violating the Vienna Conventions. Equador has shown remarkable courage, doing something many in the international community doubted it could: It has stood up to tyranny. It has stated it will now bow under the threat of terrorism. It does not negotiate with terrorists.

Your move, Britain.

Re:And now, the long wait (3, Informative)

ledow (319597) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009647)

The UK has stated it will storm the embassy by force, violating the Vienna Conventions.

1) Where did the UK state that? (i.e. you HAVEN'T read the letter, which was published in the same newspaper linked to above - there is no mention of storming or even entering ANYTHING, ANYWHERE in the entire letter).

2) It doesn't violate the Vienna convention to dissolve the embassy or even expel all the diplomatic staff. Go read it. It's quite clear that the UK can do that "at any time, and for any reason". Assange isn't covered by that, no matter what.

Rather than take Assange out of the embassy, they have threatened (indirectly and politely) to take the embassy away from Assange. Which is perfectly legitimate. Not one person subject to diplomatic special treatment will have any rule of their violated or come to any harm. No breach of the Vienna Convention will occur whatsoever. But equally, at the same time, Assange finds himself sitting in an office, not an embassy, and the police can walk in and arrest him without *anyone's* permission being necessary.

It's just a bit messier than normal, but it's totally, 100% legitimate and any country, at any time, anywhere could do exactly the same too. The Ecuadorian ambassador would not be affected in any way whatsoever, merely expelled as per the law for "persona non grata" in diplomatic positions. But he could have avoided it at any point by saying "Nothing to do with me, come in, officer, and arrest this man if you need to".

Re:And now, the long wait (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009835)

Re entering the embassy:

You should be aware that there is a legal basis in the U.K. the Diplomatic and Consular Premises Act which would allow us to take action to arrest Mr. Assange in the current premises of the Embassy.
We very much hope not to get this point, but if you cannot resolve the issue of Mr. Assange's presence on your premises, this route is open to us.

So yes, they are saying as openly as diplomatic-speak goes, that they are prepared to enter Ecuador embassy even by force and take Assange.

Re:And now, the long wait (5, Informative)

Alkonaut (604183) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010097)

Stripping the embassy privileges would mean they could go in and fetch him. This would be in accordance with conventions, but would cause serious diplomatic fallout.

The next option is to claim that the embassy is already in violation of the conventions, since it harbors criminals. You just can't do that forever and still follow the conventions. What the UK would do here is then to throw out an ambassador or like the above, strip the diplomatic privileges alltogether from the embassy. This too would cause serious diplomatic fallout.

The simplest option is to simply wait until he leaves the embassy, and just stop the car. The Vienna convention is quite clear on the fact that you can stop/search a diplomatic vehicle if there is a suspected crime. So the whole "sneak assange out to the airport in an embassy car" does not seem like a watertight plan. Even simpler, you could just block any way a car could leave the embassy, forcing people to walk from the embassy thereby letting him be arrested without having to search a car. In any case, I bet he will be extradited to sweden sooner or later. I'm also quite sure that once there, he will be questioned and released quickly (so quickly that the swedish authorities can claim not to know his whereabouts when the US asks, thereby avoiding a diplomatic problem between sweden and the US). There was a political scandal with the CIA smuggling suspected terrorists from Sweden to an egyptian CIA run prison where they were tortured, and no politician in Sweden will want to be involved in anything related to extradictions and the US again. At this point it is merely a question of prestige for the swedish legal authorities.

Re:And now, the long wait (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010103)

Yes, because the semantics really make a big difference. Everyone watching will know what happened and why, so they might as well just storm it.

Re:And now, the long wait (2)

91degrees (207121) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009651)

The UK has stated it will storm the embassy by force

Ecuador's Foreign Minister said that the UK has stated it will storm the embassy by force. The UK has said no such thing without an awful lot of reading between the lines. But I'm sure he'll be happy to know that you've fallen for the blatant spin.

There's no need for the UK to do this. They can eliminate the Ecuador embassy entirely by diplomatic means.

America. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009573)

The United States of America will be declaring Ecuador an enemy state for harboring known terrorists.

Re:America. (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009707)

How much news about US involvement about Assange from reliable sources are you getting? Other then the crazy comments our Representatives and Senators spew out every once in a while (But they say something stupid, or threatening every freaking day).

If Assange steps foot in America, I am sure he will be arrested. But that is the same for a lot of countries. But I don't see a massive man hunt for him. Or even labeling him as a terrorists.

the moral to the story (5, Funny)

Pirulo (621010) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009577)

Having sex in Sweden can get complicated

Re:the moral to the story (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009609)

it must be all the meatballs

the moral to the story (1)

jampola (1994582) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009673)

Having sex in Sweden with an someone who was connected with the CIA [rawstory.com] can get complicated!

Regardless to say, breaking international treaties for not wearing a condom makes no sense me to!

Re:the moral to the story (0)

firex726 (1188453) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009767)

Also of note...

Even if he did do what is being alleged, it only carries a fine as punishment, like a speeding ticket. And he's not even been charged, just a person of interest they want to ask questions to, which they normally do over the phone.

Re:the moral to the story (4, Insightful)

bayankaran (446245) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009959)

Having sex in Sweden can get complicated

Yes, but the moral of the story is "mistakes destroy you, whether Assange or United States of America."

Generally we wonder "how can such an evil (corporation | government | politician | dictator) survive". They survive and do well only until they make a mistake. Being evil and survival has no connection. Luckily the evil are prone to make mistakes...so the world more or less works.

Assange made a mistake...he should have controlled his emotions. If he is innocent he might have fallen for a honey trap - a classic n00b mistake. If he is not innocent he made a bloody epic mistake.

Nobody Seems To Notice and Nobody Seems To Care (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009581)

Nobody Seems To Notice and Nobody Seems To Care - Government & Stealth Malware

In Response To Slashdot Article: Former Pentagon Analyst: China Has Backdoors To 80% of Telecoms 87

How many rootkits does the US[2] use officially or unofficially?

How much of the free but proprietary software in the US spies on you?

Which software would that be?

Visit any of the top freeware sites in the US, count the number of thousands or millions of downloads of free but proprietary software, much of it works, again on a proprietary Operating System, with files stored or in transit.

How many free but proprietary programs have you downloaded and scanned entire hard drives, flash drives, and other media? Do you realize you are giving these types of proprietary programs complete access to all of your computer's files on the basis of faith alone?

If you are an atheist, the comparison is that you believe in code you cannot see to detect and contain malware on the basis of faith! So you do believe in something invisible to you, don't you?

I'm now going to touch on a subject most anti-malware, commercial or free, developers will DELETE on most of their forums or mailing lists:

APT malware infecting and remaining in BIOS, on PCI and AGP devices, in firmware, your router (many routers are forced to place backdoors in their firmware for their government) your NIC, and many other devices.

Where are the commercial or free anti-malware organizations and individual's products which hash and compare in the cloud and scan for malware for these vectors? If you post on mailing lists or forums of most anti-malware organizations about this threat, one of the following actions will apply: your post will be deleted and/or moved to a hard to find or 'deleted/junk posts' forum section, someone or a team of individuals will mock you in various forms 'tin foil hat', 'conspiracy nut', and my favorite, 'where is the proof of these infections?' One only needs to search Google for these threats and they will open your malware world view to a much larger arena of malware on devices not scanned/supported by the scanners from these freeware sites. This point assumed you're using the proprietary Microsoft Windows OS. Now, let's move on to Linux.

The rootkit scanners for Linux are few and poor. If you're lucky, you'll know how to use chkrootkit (but you can use strings and other tools for analysis) and show the strings of binaries on your installation, but the results are dependent on your capability of deciphering the output and performing further analysis with various tools or in an environment such as Remnux Linux. None of these free scanners scan the earlier mentioned areas of your PC, either! Nor do they detect many of the hundreds of trojans and rootkits easily available on popular websites and the dark/deep web.

Compromised defenders of Linux will look down their nose at you (unless they are into reverse engineering malware/bad binaries, Google for this and Linux and begin a valuable education!) and respond with a similar tone, if they don't call you a noob or point to verifying/downloading packages in a signed repo/original/secure source or checking hashes, they will jump to conspiracy type labels, ignore you, lock and/or shuffle the thread, or otherwise lead you astray from learning how to examine bad binaries. The world of Linux is funny in this way, and I've been a part of it for many years. The majority of Linux users, like the Windows users, will go out of their way to lead you and say anything other than pointing you to information readily available on detailed binary file analysis.

Don't let them get you down, the information is plenty and out there, some from some well known publishers of Linux/Unix books. Search, learn, and share the information on detecting and picking through bad binaries. But this still will not touch the void of the APT malware described above which will survive any wipe of r/w media. I'm convinced, on both *nix and Windows, these pieces of APT malware are government in origin. Maybe not from the US, but most of the 'curious' malware I've come across in poisoned binaries, were written by someone with a good knowledge in English, some, I found, functioned similar to the now well known Flame malware. From my experience, either many forum/mailing list mods and malware developers/defenders are 'on the take', compromised themselves, and/or working for a government entity.

Search enough, and you'll arrive at some lone individuals who cry out their system is compromised and nothing in their attempts can shake it of some 'strange infection'. These posts receive the same behavior as I said above, but often they are lone posts which receive no answer at all, AT ALL! While other posts are quickly and kindly replied to and the 'strange infection' posts are left to age and end up in a lost pile of old threads.

If you're persistent, the usual challenge is to, "prove it or STFU" and if the thread is not attacked or locked/shuffled and you're lucky to reference some actual data, they will usually attack or ridicule you and further drive the discussion away from actual proof of APT infections.

The market is ripe for an ambitious company or individual to begin demanding companies and organizations who release firmware and design hardware to release signed and hashed packages and pour this information into the cloud, so everyone's BIOS is checked, all firmware on routers, NICs, and other devices are checked, and malware identified and knowledge reported and shared openly.

But even this will do nothing to stop backdoored firmware (often on commercial routers and other networked devices of real importance for government use - which again opens the possibility of hackers discovering these backdoors) people continue to use instead of refusing to buy hardware with proprietary firmware/software.

Many people will say, "the only safe computer is the one disconnected from any network, wireless, wired, LAN, internet, intranet" but I have seen and you can search yourself for and read about satellite, RF, temperature, TEMPEST (is it illegal in your part of the world to SHIELD your system against some of these APT attacks, especially TEMPEST? And no, it's not simply a CRT issue), power line and many other attacks which can and do strike computers which have no active network connection, some which have never had any network connection. Some individuals have complained they receive APT attacks throughout their disconnected systems and they are ridiculed and labeled as a nutter. The information exists, some people have gone so far as to scream from the rooftops online about it, but they are nutters who must have some serious problems and this technology with our systems could not be possible.

I believe most modern computer hardware is more powerful than many of us imagine, and a lot of these systems swept from above via satellite and other attacks. Some exploits take advantage of packet radio and some of your proprietary hardware. Some exploits piggyback and unless you really know what you're doing, and even then... you won't notice it.

Back to the Windows users, a lot of them will dismiss any strange activity to, "that's just Windows!" and ignore it or format again and again only to see the same APT infected activity continue. Using older versions of sysinternals, I've observed very bizarre behavior on a few non networked systems, a mysterious chat program running which doesn't exist on the system, all communication methods monitored (bluetooth, your hard/software modems, and more), disk mirroring software running[1], scans running on different but specific file types, command line versions of popular Windows freeware installed on the system rather than the use of the graphical component, and more.

[1] In one anonymous post on pastebin, claiming to be from an intel org, it blasted the group Anonymous, with a bunch of threats and information, including that their systems are all mirrored in some remote location anyway.

[2] Or other government, US used in this case due to the article source and speculation vs. China. This is not to defend China, which is one messed up hell hole on several levels and we all need to push for human rights and freedom for China's people. For other, freer countries, however, the concentration camps exist but you wouldn't notice them, they originate from media, mostly your TV, and you don't even know it. As George Carlin railed about "Our Owners", "nobody seems to notice and nobody seems to care".

[3] http://www.stallman.org/ [stallman.org]

Try this yourself on a wide variety of internet forums and mailing lists, push for malware scanners to scan more than files, but firmware/BIOS. See what happens, I can guarantee it won't be pleasant, especially with APT cases.

So scan away, or blissfully ignore it, but we need more people like RMS[3] in the world. Such individuals tend to be eccentric but their words ring true and clear about electronics and freedom.

I believe we're mostly pwned, whether we would like to admit it or not, blind and pwned, yet fiercely holding to misinformation, often due to lack of self discovery and education, and "nobody seems to notice and nobody seems to care".

##

Schneier has covered it before: power line fluctuations (differences on the wire in keys pressed).

There's thermal attacks against cpus and temp, also:

ENF (google it)

A treat (ENF Collector in Java):

sourceforge dot net fwdslash projects fwdslash nfienfcollector

No single antimalware scanner exists which offers the ability to scan (mostly proprietary) firmware on AGP/PCI devices (sound cards, graphics cards, usb novelty devices excluding thumb drives), BIOS/CMOS.

If you boot into ultimate boot cd you can use an archane text interface to dump BIOS/CMOS and examine/checksum.

The real attacks which survive disk formats and wipes target your PCI devices and any firmware which may be altered/overwritten with something special. It is not enough to scan your hard drive(s) and thumb drives, the real dangers with teeth infect your hardware devices.

When is the last time you:

Audited your sound card for malware?
Audited your graphics card for malware?
Audited your network card for malware?

Google for:

* AGP and PCI rootkit(s)
* Network card rootkit(s)
* BIOS/CMOS rootkit(s)

Our modern PC hardware is capable of much more than many can imagine.

Do you:

* Know your router's firmware may easily be replaced on a hacker's whim?
* Shield all cables against leakage and attacks
* Still use an old CRT monitor and beg for TEMPEST attacks?
* Use TEMPEST resistant fonts in all of your applications including your OS?
* Know whether or not your wired keyboard has keypresses encrypted as they pass to your PC from the keyboard?
* Use your PC on the grid and expose yourself to possible keypress attacks?
* Know your network card is VERY exploitable when plugged into the net and attacked by a hard core blackhat or any vicious geek with the know how?
* Search out informative papers on these subjects and educate your friends and family about these attacks?
* Contact antimalware companies and urge them to protect against many or all these attacks?

Do you trust your neighbors? Are they all really stupid when it comes to computing or is there a geek or two without a conscience looking to exploit these areas?

The overlooked threat are the potential civilian rogues stationed around you, especially in large apartment blocks who feed on unsecured wifi to do their dirty work.

With the recent news of Russian spies, whether or not this news was real or a psyop, educate yourself on the present threats which all antimalware scanners fail to protect against and remove any smug mask you may wear, be it Linux or OpenBSD, or the proprietary Windows and Mac OS you feel are properly secured and not vulnerable to any outside attacks because you either don't need an antivirus scanner (all are inept to serious attacks) or use one or several (many being proprietary mystery machines sending data to and from your machine for many reasons, one is to share your information with a group or set database to help aid in threats), the threats often come in mysterious ways.

Maybe the ancients had it right: stone tablets and their own unique language(s) rooted in symbolism.

#

I'm more concerned about new rootkits which target PCI devices, such as the graphics card and the optical drives, also, BIOS. Where are the malware scanners which scan PCI devices and BIOS for mismatches? All firmware, BIOS and on PCI devices should be checksummed and saved to match with others in the cloud, and archived when the computer is first used, backing up signed firmware.

When do you recall seeing signed router firmware upgrades with any type of checksum to check against? Same for PCI devices and optical drives and BIOS.

Some have begun with BIOS security:

http://www.biosbits.org/ [biosbits.org]

Some BIOS has write protection in its configuration, a lot of newer computers don't.

#

"Disconnect your PC from the internet and don't add anything you didn't create yourself. It worked for the NOC list machine in Mission Impossible"

The room/structure was likely heavily shielded, whereas most civvies don't shield their house and computer rooms. There is more than meets the eye to modern hardware.

Google:

subversion hack:
tagmeme(dot)com/subhack/

network card rootkits and trojans
pci rootkits
packet radio
xmit "fm fingerprinting" software
"specific emitter identification"
forums(dot)qrz(dot)com

how many malware scanners scan bios/cmos and pci/agp cards for malware? zero, even the rootkit scanners. have you checksummed/dumped your bios/cmos and firmware for all your pci/agp devices and usb devices, esp vanity usb devices in and outside the realm of common usb devices (thumbdrives, external hdds, printers),

Unless your computer room is shielded properly, the computers may still be attacked and used, I've personally inspected computers with no network connection running mysterious code in the background which task manager for windows and the eqiv for *nix does not find, and this didn't find it all.

Inspect your windows boot partition in *nix with hexdump and look for proxy packages mentioned along with command line burning programs and other oddities. Computers are more vulnerable than most would expect.

You can bet all of the malware scanners today, unless they are developed by some lone indy coder in a remote country, employ whitelisting of certain malware and none of them scan HARDWARE devices apart from the common usb devices.

Your network cards, sound cards, cd/dvd drives, graphics cards, all are capable of carrying malware to survive disk formatting/wiping.

Boot from a Linux live cd and use hexdump to examine your windows (and *nix) boot sectors to potentially discover interesting modifications by an unknown party.

#
eof

Good Luck Getting There (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009593)

How will he get to enjoy asylum since he has no way of leaving the Ecuadorian embassy without being arrested? He has no protection from there to Ecuador.

Game over Assange. Time to give this up.

Re:Good Luck Getting There (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009763)

You are under the impression that this guy is that much hated. He is a political annoyance, not a massive threat. I am willing to expect he will live his life out in Ecuador... Until he realizes he hates it... This stuff happens all the time. Chinese who take refuge in American embassy seem to be able to get to the airport and make it to America. There usually isn't that big of a push to create a major incident out of a minor one. Shooting down a guy whos goal is to leave the country in care of an other one. Means attacking that other country.

Re:Good Luck Getting There (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009973)

He is a political annoyance, not a massive threat.

The politicians and other powerful people who look bad after a leak do consider him a massive threat. It's not like all these people are engaged in good statesmanship rather than looking out for #1.

Extradition to US (5, Interesting)

Ly4 (2353328) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009631)

Something that was in the press release, but that is not being widely reported:

Ecuador offered for Assange to go to Stockholm tomorrow if there was no extradition to the US.

Sweden refused.

Re:Extradition to US (1, Insightful)

Alkonaut (604183) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009803)

Source of this? Same source as "UK threatens to storm Ecuadors embassy"? These are two statements allegedly by the US and Sweden respectively, but confirmed by neither. Until they are, I'd disregard both. Completely.

Re:Extradition to US (5, Insightful)

stiggle (649614) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009823)

They offered for Swedish investigators to come to the embassy and interview Assange there - they refused.

Re:Extradition to US (1)

barnacle (522370) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009915)

let's be a little more specific:

Patino made it clear that Ecuador had asked Sweden for a guarantee that it would not extradite him to the US, were such a request made. But Sweden had said no, he said

(from the guardian's live coverage)

Re:Extradition to US (2, Insightful)

ledow (319597) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009925)

That's an issue for Sweden and/or the EU. They've previously refused too (and the UK still gave Assange three appeals to the highest courts and still he failed to provide legal basis to have the extradition quashed).

He's wanted in Britain for breach of bail, and to comply with EU laws on extradition that the UK are bound by. That's what he is being arrested for, not anything that actually may have happened in Sweden. If we just wanted to give him to Sweden, we'd have done so MONTHS ago when he turned up to a UK police station to answer exactly that charge.

And now, after every appeal possible, if his extradition to Sweden were unlawful, he wouldn't have needed to breach bail, we wouldn't have been able to send him there at all. Under UK/EU law, we are now obliged to hand him to Sweden, even if that means revoking the status of an embassy (which is pretty serious but totally legal).

As it was, the UK police sent the original extradition forms back THREE TIMES because the Swedish authorities failed to dot the i's and cross the t's properly.

The UK have no interest in him. He's just a pain in the arse at the moment and we tried our best to protect him (hell, he'd be in Sweden already if any other country had handled him). Now he's causing an international incident when he still has ZERO chance of leaving the building without being arrested. There is no law, statute or convention that protects him in there, under asylum or not (he has NOT been granted UK asylum, and cannot leave the building to be taken anywhere else that might recognise asylum for him).

All he's done is made the news - again - after breaching US, Swedish and (now) UK law. Until the time he skipped bail, the UK had no axe to grind (and if it did, it could have done a lot worse than it has done so far, all legitimately). Now he's going to be arrested no matter what, but he's playing to the cameras and trying to fabricate an incident where there is none.

The UK *MUST* extradite him or their laws mean nothing. The laws on embassies mean we *CAN* legally revoke embassy status from the building itself. Even the Vienna convention says we can just expel all the diplomats (so long as we don't harm them, etc.) "at any time, and for any reason". If we *MUST* extradite him, by law, and the only way to do that legally is to temporarily dissolve an embassy or expel diplomats, then that's what we have to do. One law is no greater than any other until a conflict exists. There is no conflict, hence there's only one legal path that can (and MUST) be followed. And all legal paths end up with Assange arrested and facing LONGER terms in prison no matter where he ends up or what charges may stick elsewhere. He deliberately and knowingly breached UK bail and will have to stand up in court for that at some point, no matter what.

Re:Extradition to US (5, Interesting)

Xest (935314) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009935)

That was only part of it, they also tried to get the UK to do the same and guarantee there was no potential for Assange to then be moved onto the US after Sweden too but they wouldn't.

They also made it clear Sweden can and has in the past interviewed people in foreign embassies and so Sweden does have the legal capability to do this.

They asked the US to also confirm whether there were any plans to try and get Assange over Wikileaks and the US wouldn't comment on that either.

It was all in all really interesting, because the statement basically drove a bulldozer through all the anti-Assange arguments that have been made here on Slashdot over the last year or so. All the stuff about how there were protections against Assange being moved on from Sweden to the US preventing that being possible, and all the crap about how Sweden supposedly doesn't allow in it's law for questioning via video link or in foreign countries hence the need for extradition turns out to be complete and utter crap.

I imagine that other countries... (0)

pointyhat (2649443) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009645)

I imagine that other countries with embassies in the UK are now starting to sound a little worried as if the government are threatening Ecuador, then what are they going to face potentially?

This is not going to end well, possibly due to other countries.

A Sad Day for Britians (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009649)

It's pretty obvious who's running your country.

I don't think so (1, Troll)

Viol8 (599362) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009847)

It proves our country is governed by the rule of law, not by the rule of Assange fanbois who would probably cheer him on no matter what.

Lets not forget Hans Reiser and all the moronic fanboi cheerleaders claiming he was a victim of [insert paranoid delusion here] even when he was finally convicted. Eventually they all STFU when he led police to his wifes body. I see the same thing going on here - Assange being treated as some sort of 2nd coming who can do no wrong.

Lets get something straight - Assange is a narcissistic egomaniac who doesn't give a stuff about rights. All he cares about is getting getting one over on a western system he doesn't like. Fine - he's off to a country where western democracy and rights are a pipe dream. Bon Voyage Jules!

Re:I don't think so (5, Insightful)

pointyhat (2649443) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009943)

Well actually no. It proves that we will break international extradition and asylum treaties on a political whim...

Assange said he'd willingly go to Sweden to face charges if they guaranteed it wasn't a ploy to extradite him to the US. They could not guarantee that which is why he's seeking asylum. He's not trying to escape the allegations.

I think the guy is an asshat generally, but he's right on this one.

What Ecuador FM said (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009675)

Ecuador FM : We tried to get Sweden to agree to no extradition to US in exchange for Assange going to Sweden - they said NO

Re:What Ecuador FM said (1, Insightful)

ledow (319597) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009729)

He also said that the UK threatened to "storm" the embassy in its letter. Have you seen the letter? It says nothing of the sort.

We know how to storm embassies. We have entire special forces teams who had experience of doing just that. It does *not* involve stating an obscure UK law and saying you are "disappointed" in quite a polite, but stern, letter.

WMD in Ecuador (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009693)

BREAKING NEWS: "Al-Qaeda is hiding a stock of WMDs in Ecuador", says a US diplomat.

Storm? Who said that, exactly? (1, Flamebait)

DeathToBill (601486) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009725)

The Guardian also carries a translated copy of the letter the UK sent to Ecuador regarding the threat to 'storm' the Ecuadorian embassy.

Where exactly is that 'storm' quoting from? You're supposed to use quote marks to indicate that you're quoting something. The relevant bit of the letter says this:

You should be aware that there is a legal basis in the U.K. the Diplomatic and Consular Premises Act which would allow us to take action to arrest Mr. Assange in the current premises of the Embassy. We very much hope not to get this point, but if you cannot resolve the issue of Mr. Assange's presence on your premises, this route is open to us.

Do you see the word 'storm' in there? I don't.

Re:Storm? Who said that, exactly? (5, Funny)

CMYKjunkie (1594319) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009861)

Do you see the word 'storm' in there? I don't.

Obvious: "We very much hope not to get thiS point, buT if you cannOt Resolve the issue of Mr. Assange's presence on your premises, this route is open to us."

Re:Storm? Who said that, exactly? (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009895)

'in the current premises' ?

We'll knock at the door, you'll answer and men with guns will politely ask for his removal.

Wow, the slave boys getting desperate (2)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010009)

I wonder what interpretation you give to the quoted text. Nobody said the word was there, but the threath is clear, the UK is willing to take action. Oh, so maybe they walk onto foreign soil with gun in hands instead of running. That makes all the difference.

You disgust me serf.

Re:Storm? Who said that, exactly? (3, Insightful)

kunyo (863739) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010039)

i think it is quite clear to anyone with an IQ higher than 75 that this is equivalent to "we are going to storm your f**** embassy if you don't surrender Assange to us"

Re:Storm? Who said that, exactly? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41010045)

1. Knock on the door.
2. "Go away" says the ambassador
3. "No, we've come to arrest someone"
4. No answer
5. Begin storming.

I won't get caught ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009743)

I won't get caught committing rape without a plane ticket to Ecuador in my pocket.

I think I speak for the majority of Brits (5, Insightful)

Dudibob (1556875) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009859)

To say I am ashamed of the actions the the Government to even threaten the Ecuador embassy with stripping it of its diplomatic status. For the alleged crimes Assange has committed this action is way way way over the top and obvious for all to see.

I'm laughing hysterically (1)

kunyo (863739) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009877)

This is the same Sweden that made jokes about Italy's freedom of speech. The scandinavian "republic" is now making jokes of any such freedom in an unmistakable way. Fascists

Dress up as Julian so he can escape undetected? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41009963)

Maybe we should all dress up as Julian Assange and form a flash mob around the Ecuadorean embassy so that he can sneak out undetected. The Brits like Monty Python after all.

Re:Dress up as Julian so he can escape undetected? (2)

ledow (319597) | about a year and a half ago | (#41010077)

You like charges of obstructing a police officer, obstructing justice, harbouring a criminal, aiding and abetting, etc. then?

Plus, the police are quite within their right to block access to the street "for public safety", to prevent the escape of someone facing arrest, etc. for any reasonable distance.

Assange is a dick who thinks he can find a loophole to let himself go free. Trouble is, each loophole he finds is smaller and smaller and ends up with him being arrested and deported, with more charges on top (breach of bail, failing to appear, etc.). Add a couple of years in the UK jail system when he does get out of wherever he ends up.

Ecuador likes rapists? (0, Flamebait)

toddmbloom (1625689) | about a year and a half ago | (#41009975)

How sad for Ecuador. Why would you WANT narcissistic rapists in your country, any way?
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