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Assange Makes Statement Calling For an End To the "Witch Hunt"

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the can't-we-all-just-get-along? dept.

Crime 915

An anonymous reader writes "After a statement from a window at an upper floor from the Ecuadorian Embassy, Julian Assange '... called on US President Barack Obama to "do the right thing" and for his government to "renounce its witch hunt against Wikileaks."'" However, the U.S. issued the following statement regarding Assange's stay at the Ecuadorian Embassy, "The United States is not a party to the 1954 OAS Convention on Diplomatic Asylum and does not recognize the concept of diplomatic asylum as a matter of international law,"

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Not recognized? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045423)

Not recognized, huh? Kinda like the multi-trillion dollar deficit, eh?

What a crock of shit.

"Witchunt" (5, Funny)

Forty Two Tenfold (1134125) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045483)

Meanwhile, Anonymous threatened Slashdot editors that if they continue to neglect their responsibilities, the consequences will never be the same. Here's Tom with the weather.

Re:"Witchunt" (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045711)

I think that the United States is not thinking about Julius Assange as much as Julius Assange wishes they were.

Re:Not recognized? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045539)

Not recognized, huh? Kinda like the multi-trillion dollar deficit, eh?

What a crock of shit.

Hey the US doesn't even recognise the International Court of Justice.
What a shit country it is. It has no rule of law, it has institutionalised torture, it has its own STASI, it has a militarised police aparatus, and it incarcerates more of its own citizens than any other first world country. Oh and it can assassinate its own citizens without any judicial oversight. As well as throwing people in jail without discolsing any kind of public evidence.
France should reclaim The Statue of Liberty. It serves no purpose anymore in a land that has become more oppresive and arbitrary than what you would have experienced in the Soviet Union during the cold war years. What a terrible irony.

Re:Not recognized? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045673)

but they do recognize the international court of flying planes into buildings, perhaps they need another reminder

Re:Not recognized? (4, Insightful)

Titan1080 (1328519) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045717)

100% correct. The US, for a while now, is nowhere near 'the land of the free'. It's not even the home of the brave. And it's only going to get worse.

UPDATE: Assange is out! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045425)

He tricked the Police:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yu1TZVX72Aw&t=4m9s

"Do the right thing" (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045439)

Also applies to himself regarding facing up to the charges against him in Sweeden.

Re:"Do the right thing" (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045509)

Also applies to himself regarding facing up to the charges against him in Sweeden.

Read this article [t.co] written by Naomi Wolf

Re:"Do the right thing" (0, Flamebait)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045537)

let's see, that would be charges of "rape" from two women who voluntariliy took off their clothes and went to bed with him for sexual activity? who at first merely wanted him to take HIV test but later came up with "rape" stories?

get a clue, a woman who takes off her clothes and jumps into the sack with a guy for sexual activity forfeits a rape claim.

Re:"Do the right thing" (1)

kanweg (771128) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045585)

No, because it is still dependent on how he behaves after she takes her clothes off. If it is true that both women withdrew their complaints, he should be off the hook and threatening to storm an embassy doesn't seem to be too appropriate.

Bert

Re:"Do the right thing" (1, Informative)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045727)

he behaved just fine, until weeks later the women became unhappy with him and then made up a new story. that is not rape. that is pandering to rabid feminist bullshit.

Re:"Do the right thing" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045757)

NB: The "victims" never afaikt accused Assange of rape. That charge was an invention by the well know man-hater turned prosecutor Marianne Ny, a person well connected in the political sphere.

Re:"Do the right thing" (2, Insightful)

Schmorgluck (1293264) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045587)

In one of the cases, he admitted himself that they had sex with protection, then later he engaged in intercourse, without protection, while she was asleep. That's rape by surprise. Clear and simple.

Re:"Do the right thing" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045643)

Source?

Re:"Do the right thing" (1, Flamebait)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045713)

but that story was made up later. rape doesn't mean a woman gets mad at a guy weeks after having sex with him and changing her mind and maknig up a new story about what happened. this rabid feminist bullshit needs to cease.

Re:"Do the right thing" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045775)

If the condom breaks or comes off during sex, is that rape too? Where is the line drawn? Who decides where to draw the line? Is it this sort of stupidity that has 17 years old being made sex offenders for life in the US?

Is it rape? I don't know, a jury/legal process will have to decide that, until then I say the only thing I see is that a lawyer wants to question him to see if there is the possibility of placing charges of rape against him. AND, that he has willingly said he would answer any questions if the lawyer wants to come to him (which has been done many times in the past by Sweden) and that Sweden's lawyers have refused for this case (demanding he be sent to Sweden for the questioning -- see note below). AND, that the UK has 20-30 officers surrounding the Ecuador embassy in order to arrest Assange for this "questioning".... I don't know about you, but even a murder here never gets 20-30 officers involved around the clock, so how does a "questioning" deserve this much attention?

NOTE: If you were accused of a crime, should the prosecution be able to drag you from your country to another to answer questions? Think about this carefully.

Re:"Do the right thing" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045591)

Disagree.

Re:"Do the right thing" (0, Troll)

Spritzer (950539) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045583)

Yeah, I really don't care about the Wikileaks part of this. Bradley Manning can burn in hell for that mess. As for Assange, he needs to face the rape and molestation charges in Sweden. It's easy to forget that he is an accused rapist and needs to stand trial amidst all of the Wikileaks BS. Let Sweden try him. If he's found guilty clamp his balls in Bradley Manning's mouth and string them both up.

Re:"Do the right thing" (3, Insightful)

shentino (1139071) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045665)

Except he knows the charges are complete bullshit and just a facade to get him extradited to the US.

Considering what the US thinks is at stake, causing a diplomatic incident by kidnapping assange wouldn't be enough of a problem to make it not worthwhile.

The UK won't intervene, they don't want to piss off the US. Sweden will find assange swiped from right under their nose, probably before he even touches swedish soil

Re:"Do the right thing" (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045753)

Yes. The US have decided to get the UK to deport him to Sweden so they can kidnap him there. It's just not enough of a challenge to get the UK to deport him to the US and be done with it.

Re:"Do the right thing" (4, Insightful)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045767)

I only see an obligation to "face up to a charge" if you believe you're going to receive a fair trial.

If there's a risk that you're going to be extradited to a third country and face internment and torture, it really doesn't matter how bad the charges against you are - you avoid the trial.

Assange's main mistake was to be politically dangerous while not also being celibate.

Re:"Do the right thing" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045809)

He cooperated with the prosecutor when the case was originally opened and he was held for questioning for a month at his own expense. He left only when the prosecutor informed him that he was not going to be charged after all and that he was free to leave the country if he wished. Later, when Interpol announced that he was wanted for questioning, he promptly went to a nearby police station and turned himself in. Swedish authorities insist on extraditing him to Swe(e)den for questioning (not to face any charges yet, unless I missed that development) and refuse to question him elsewhere.

I think he's already "done the right thing".

Re:"Do the right thing" (3, Insightful)

Dunge (922521) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045811)

Come on you know the rape charge are made up. No government would go as far as they do for him if it were a simple rape charge.

is this for real? (0, Troll)

elvis the frog (580312) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045443)

"The United States is not a party to the 1954 OAS Convention on Diplomatic Asylum and does not recognize the concept of diplomatic asylum as a matter of international law,"

hey, where's that coming from? The obama administration? could it be a proto-tyranny?

Re:is this for real? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045481)

now you see the true face of your government

Re:is this for real? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045489)

In the past:
-The United States has cut off funds to Unesco as a punitive action after the Palestinian Authority was accepted into the UN agency as a full member in defiance of American, Israeli and European pressure.

-They're not part of The International Criminal Court

-They didn't sign for the Kyoto protocol

etc...

Re:is this for real? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045495)

Ecuador granted political asylum. Political asylum != diplomatic asylum. The statement about diplomatic asylum is deliberately deceptive waffle.

Re:is this for real? (4, Insightful)

runeghost (2509522) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045497)

If it is, I'm certain the Chinese will be happy to know. Especially the next time we shelter one of their dissidents at our embassy.

Re:is this for real? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045627)

Yeah, I was thinking Chen Guangcheng or maybe Fang Lizhi. I think the quote was a misstatement. It should have read, "The United States is not a party to the 1954 OAS Convention on Diplomatic Asylum and does not recognize the concept of diplomatic asylum unless it is politically expedient."

Re:is this for real? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045707)

Chen Guangcheng was not given asylum--the Chinese government gave him permission to go to school in the US, and he was allowed to leave. Fang Lizhi was not given asylum either--the Chinese government gave him permission to "get medical care" in the US, and he was allowed to leave.

Re:is this for real? (3, Insightful)

jbolden (176878) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045777)

I don't see the conflict. The United States and China both support the Vienna convention which holds that the US embassy in China is under US law. If we shelter a dissident China is free to file an extradition request under the extradition treaty. Our ambassador to China has no authority to grant immunity from Chinese persecution but does have the authority to require paperwork.

Re:is this for real? (1, Funny)

dutchd00d (823703) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045519)

Any bets on when Ecuador gets "liberated"?

Re:is this for real? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045529)

Do they have any oil?

Re:is this for real? (1)

pipatron (966506) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045527)

It's also pretty interesting that out of the blue they issue this statement. Because, you know, they have absolutely no intentions on bringing Assange to the US after the trial in Sweden. Right?

Re:is this for real? (5, Informative)

russotto (537200) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045569)

As it turns out, it was the answer to a question:

Question from press briefing [state.gov]

So some reporter asked a loaded question (implying the US had an OAS commitment to recognize diplomatic asylum), and this is a correction.

The case of Cardinal Mindszenty, which many are bringing up, is one where the Communist Hungarian government did not in fact recognize diplomatic asylum; Mindszenty was stuck in the US embassy for 15 years until the Hungarians relented.

Re:is this for real? (-1, Flamebait)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045659)

hey, where's that coming from? The obama administration?

I'd guess it's rather Hillary Clinton... the leaks hit where it hurts her the most (as a US Secretary of State, in charge with the foreign affairs).

While technically still Obama administration, I'd say:
- I can't remember when Obama has had something to say about foreign politics... Seems to me there's a deal between the two in regards with what they take care of and how to avoid stepping on each other's toes.
- Hillary feel she has something extra to pay to the male side of humanity...

Re:is this for real? (1)

Titan1080 (1328519) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045751)

Yes. Obama has been president since 1954.

Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (-1, Troll)

RogueWarrior65 (678876) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045447)

Hey, Jules, dude, lemme esplain...no, there is too much, lemme assum up. You put people's lives at risk. This isn't like leaking photos of the iPhone 5 innards. You may have very well gotten people killed because of your arrogance. You get no sympathy from me. Ever.

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (3, Insightful)

TemperedAlchemist (2045966) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045461)

Oh you're right, people shouldn't know what their government is up to. What ever was I thinking?

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045473)

Jules COULD HAVE gotten some people killed.

The actions described in the leaked cables and classified information show that the US government DID kill innocent people. Then tried to cover it up.

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (2)

Surt (22457) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045545)

Good god, what is happening to AC? This is like the third time this week AC has slapped down a named account with a frank and accurate comment.

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (3, Informative)

shentino (1139071) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045697)

I still find it strange that wikileaks got burned by a NEWS agency that supposedly leaked the decryption key.

Why would a news agency shit on its own sources like that?

The whole thing smells like a covert operation designed to give the world a reason to hate wikileaks.

All wikileaks did was mitigate the danger by making the leak public and giving everyone at risk a fair chance at protecting themselves. They TRIED to keep it redacted, but thanks to the decryption key leaking thanks to the news agency, their hand got forced.

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (2)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045781)

Why would a news agency shit on its own sources like that?

s/malice/incompetence/

Most news agency have no clue about computer security or cryptography. Wikileaks is one of the few places that does a reasonable job of protecting whistle blowers these days; major media outlets are clueless, still applying techniques that worked decades ago.

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (5, Interesting)

BeanThere (28381) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045779)

In principle, exposing the murder and cover-up of innocent people actually helps save the lives of innocent people in future, as it discourages such behavior.

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045491)

The dirty deeds done in the dark by dirty people who assumed it would always be dark... got people killed. Wikileaks just turned on the lights.

We don't live in a world of secrets anymore. Human communication is too rich and evolved for that kind of thinking. Finally, we can have some honesty and progress.

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045499)

firstly, why are you talking like that? i can't tell...

secondly where does your impression that wikileaks puts lives at danger come from? the US maybe? i don't know whether it has or not but if i were anti wikileaks and wanted to smear them to drum up support. that would be my go to argument.

also this: http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20110105/04094912528/debunking-wikileaks-puts-lives-danger-zimbabwe-myth.shtml

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045595)

firstly, why are you talking like that? i can't tell...

It's a line from and reference to Mandy Patinkin's bad accent as Inigo in "The Princess Bride"

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (3, Insightful)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045551)

you seem to have a blind spot, an out of contorl government in the pockets of wealthy elite killing and maiming innocents is DEFINETLY putting people at risk

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (1)

shentino (1139071) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045783)

censored spot, more like.

We americans aren't all blind to what's happening. There's also this thing called learned helplessness where fighting to change things at best wastes time and at worst backfires and makes us regret resisting.

Genuinely curious (1)

ryzvonusef (1151717) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045693)

Is there any proof of people dead due to wikileaks?

Re:Zero sympathy...none...nada...bupkis (1)

Dunge (922521) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045785)

I wonder how people like you can even be serious. I would like every government documents to be public..

Inside Your Box: What You Least Expect! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045449)

Nobody Seems To Notice and Nobody Seems To Care - Government & Stealth Malware

In Response To Slashdot Article: Former Pentagon Analyst: China Has Backdoors To 80% of Telecoms 87

How many rootkits does the US[2] use officially or unofficially?

How much of the free but proprietary software in the US spies on you?

Which software would that be?

Visit any of the top freeware sites in the US, count the number of thousands or millions of downloads of free but proprietary software, much of it works, again on a proprietary Operating System, with files stored or in transit.

How many free but proprietary programs have you downloaded and scanned entire hard drives, flash drives, and other media? Do you realize you are giving these types of proprietary programs complete access to all of your computer's files on the basis of faith alone?

If you are an atheist, the comparison is that you believe in code you cannot see to detect and contain malware on the basis of faith! So you do believe in something invisible to you, don't you?

I'm now going to touch on a subject most anti-malware, commercial or free, developers will DELETE on most of their forums or mailing lists:

APT malware infecting and remaining in BIOS, on PCI and AGP devices, in firmware, your router (many routers are forced to place backdoors in their firmware for their government) your NIC, and many other devices.

Where are the commercial or free anti-malware organizations and individual's products which hash and compare in the cloud and scan for malware for these vectors? If you post on mailing lists or forums of most anti-malware organizations about this threat, one of the following actions will apply: your post will be deleted and/or moved to a hard to find or 'deleted/junk posts' forum section, someone or a team of individuals will mock you in various forms 'tin foil hat', 'conspiracy nut', and my favorite, 'where is the proof of these infections?' One only needs to search Google for these threats and they will open your malware world view to a much larger arena of malware on devices not scanned/supported by the scanners from these freeware sites. This point assumed you're using the proprietary Microsoft Windows OS. Now, let's move on to Linux.

The rootkit scanners for Linux are few and poor. If you're lucky, you'll know how to use chkrootkit (but you can use strings and other tools for analysis) and show the strings of binaries on your installation, but the results are dependent on your capability of deciphering the output and performing further analysis with various tools or in an environment such as Remnux Linux. None of these free scanners scan the earlier mentioned areas of your PC, either! Nor do they detect many of the hundreds of trojans and rootkits easily available on popular websites and the dark/deep web.

Compromised defenders of Linux will look down their nose at you (unless they are into reverse engineering malware/bad binaries, Google for this and Linux and begin a valuable education!) and respond with a similar tone, if they don't call you a noob or point to verifying/downloading packages in a signed repo/original/secure source or checking hashes, they will jump to conspiracy type labels, ignore you, lock and/or shuffle the thread, or otherwise lead you astray from learning how to examine bad binaries. The world of Linux is funny in this way, and I've been a part of it for many years. The majority of Linux users, like the Windows users, will go out of their way to lead you and say anything other than pointing you to information readily available on detailed binary file analysis.

Don't let them get you down, the information is plenty and out there, some from some well known publishers of Linux/Unix books. Search, learn, and share the information on detecting and picking through bad binaries. But this still will not touch the void of the APT malware described above which will survive any wipe of r/w media. I'm convinced, on both *nix and Windows, these pieces of APT malware are government in origin. Maybe not from the US, but most of the 'curious' malware I've come across in poisoned binaries, were written by someone with a good knowledge in English, some, I found, functioned similar to the now well known Flame malware. From my experience, either many forum/mailing list mods and malware developers/defenders are 'on the take', compromised themselves, and/or working for a government entity.

Search enough, and you'll arrive at some lone individuals who cry out their system is compromised and nothing in their attempts can shake it of some 'strange infection'. These posts receive the same behavior as I said above, but often they are lone posts which receive no answer at all, AT ALL! While other posts are quickly and kindly replied to and the 'strange infection' posts are left to age and end up in a lost pile of old threads.

If you're persistent, the usual challenge is to, "prove it or STFU" and if the thread is not attacked or locked/shuffled and you're lucky to reference some actual data, they will usually attack or ridicule you and further drive the discussion away from actual proof of APT infections.

The market is ripe for an ambitious company or individual to begin demanding companies and organizations who release firmware and design hardware to release signed and hashed packages and pour this information into the cloud, so everyone's BIOS is checked, all firmware on routers, NICs, and other devices are checked, and malware identified and knowledge reported and shared openly.

But even this will do nothing to stop backdoored firmware (often on commercial routers and other networked devices of real importance for government use - which again opens the possibility of hackers discovering these backdoors) people continue to use instead of refusing to buy hardware with proprietary firmware/software.

Many people will say, "the only safe computer is the one disconnected from any network, wireless, wired, LAN, internet, intranet" but I have seen and you can search yourself for and read about satellite, RF, temperature, TEMPEST (is it illegal in your part of the world to SHIELD your system against some of these APT attacks, especially TEMPEST? And no, it's not simply a CRT issue), power line and many other attacks which can and do strike computers which have no active network connection, some which have never had any network connection. Some individuals have complained they receive APT attacks throughout their disconnected systems and they are ridiculed and labeled as a nutter. The information exists, some people have gone so far as to scream from the rooftops online about it, but they are nutters who must have some serious problems and this technology with our systems could not be possible.

I believe most modern computer hardware is more powerful than many of us imagine, and a lot of these systems swept from above via satellite and other attacks. Some exploits take advantage of packet radio and some of your proprietary hardware. Some exploits piggyback and unless you really know what you're doing, and even then... you won't notice it.

Back to the Windows users, a lot of them will dismiss any strange activity to, "that's just Windows!" and ignore it or format again and again only to see the same APT infected activity continue. Using older versions of sysinternals, I've observed very bizarre behavior on a few non networked systems, a mysterious chat program running which doesn't exist on the system, all communication methods monitored (bluetooth, your hard/software modems, and more), disk mirroring software running[1], scans running on different but specific file types, command line versions of popular Windows freeware installed on the system rather than the use of the graphical component, and more.

[1] In one anonymous post on pastebin, claiming to be from an intel org, it blasted the group Anonymous, with a bunch of threats and information, including that their systems are all mirrored in some remote location anyway.

[2] Or other government, US used in this case due to the article source and speculation vs. China. This is not to defend China, which is one messed up hell hole on several levels and we all need to push for human rights and freedom for China's people. For other, freer countries, however, the concentration camps exist but you wouldn't notice them, they originate from media, mostly your TV, and you don't even know it. As George Carlin railed about "Our Owners", "nobody seems to notice and nobody seems to care".

[3] http://www.stallman.org/ [stallman.org]

Try this yourself on a wide variety of internet forums and mailing lists, push for malware scanners to scan more than files, but firmware/BIOS. See what happens, I can guarantee it won't be pleasant, especially with APT cases.

So scan away, or blissfully ignore it, but we need more people like RMS[3] in the world. Such individuals tend to be eccentric but their words ring true and clear about electronics and freedom.

I believe we're mostly pwned, whether we would like to admit it or not, blind and pwned, yet fiercely holding to misinformation, often due to lack of self discovery and education, and "nobody seems to notice and nobody seems to care".

##

Schneier has covered it before: power line fluctuations (differences on the wire in keys pressed).

There's thermal attacks against cpus and temp, also:

ENF (google it)

A treat (ENF Collector in Java):

sourceforge dot net fwdslash projects fwdslash nfienfcollector

No single antimalware scanner exists which offers the ability to scan (mostly proprietary) firmware on AGP/PCI devices (sound cards, graphics cards, usb novelty devices excluding thumb drives), BIOS/CMOS.

If you boot into ultimate boot cd you can use an archane text interface to dump BIOS/CMOS and examine/checksum.

The real attacks which survive disk formats and wipes target your PCI devices and any firmware which may be altered/overwritten with something special. It is not enough to scan your hard drive(s) and thumb drives, the real dangers with teeth infect your hardware devices.

When is the last time you:

Audited your sound card for malware?
Audited your graphics card for malware?
Audited your network card for malware?

Google for:

* AGP and PCI rootkit(s)
* Network card rootkit(s)
* BIOS/CMOS rootkit(s)

Our modern PC hardware is capable of much more than many can imagine.

Do you:

* Know your router's firmware may easily be replaced on a hacker's whim?
* Shield all cables against leakage and attacks
* Still use an old CRT monitor and beg for TEMPEST attacks?
* Use TEMPEST resistant fonts in all of your applications including your OS?
* Know whether or not your wired keyboard has keypresses encrypted as they pass to your PC from the keyboard?
* Use your PC on the grid and expose yourself to possible keypress attacks?
* Know your network card is VERY exploitable when plugged into the net and attacked by a hard core blackhat or any vicious geek with the know how?
* Search out informative papers on these subjects and educate your friends and family about these attacks?
* Contact antimalware companies and urge them to protect against many or all these attacks?

Do you trust your neighbors? Are they all really stupid when it comes to computing or is there a geek or two without a conscience looking to exploit these areas?

The overlooked threat are the potential civilian rogues stationed around you, especially in large apartment blocks who feed on unsecured wifi to do their dirty work.

With the recent news of Russian spies, whether or not this news was real or a psyop, educate yourself on the present threats which all antimalware scanners fail to protect against and remove any smug mask you may wear, be it Linux or OpenBSD, or the proprietary Windows and Mac OS you feel are properly secured and not vulnerable to any outside attacks because you either don't need an antivirus scanner (all are inept to serious attacks) or use one or several (many being proprietary mystery machines sending data to and from your machine for many reasons, one is to share your information with a group or set database to help aid in threats), the threats often come in mysterious ways.

Maybe the ancients had it right: stone tablets and their own unique language(s) rooted in symbolism.

#

I'm more concerned about new rootkits which target PCI devices, such as the graphics card and the optical drives, also, BIOS. Where are the malware scanners which scan PCI devices and BIOS for mismatches? All firmware, BIOS and on PCI devices should be checksummed and saved to match with others in the cloud, and archived when the computer is first used, backing up signed firmware.

When do you recall seeing signed router firmware upgrades with any type of checksum to check against? Same for PCI devices and optical drives and BIOS.

Some have begun with BIOS security:

http://www.biosbits.org/ [biosbits.org]

Some BIOS has write protection in its configuration, a lot of newer computers don't.

#

"Disconnect your PC from the internet and don't add anything you didn't create yourself. It worked for the NOC list machine in Mission Impossible"

The room/structure was likely heavily shielded, whereas most civvies don't shield their house and computer rooms. There is more than meets the eye to modern hardware.

Google:

subversion hack:
tagmeme(dot)com/subhack/

network card rootkits and trojans
pci rootkits
packet radio
xmit "fm fingerprinting" software
"specific emitter identification"
forums(dot)qrz(dot)com

how many malware scanners scan bios/cmos and pci/agp cards for malware? zero, even the rootkit scanners. have you checksummed/dumped your bios/cmos and firmware for all your pci/agp devices and usb devices, esp vanity usb devices in and outside the realm of common usb devices (thumbdrives, external hdds, printers),

Unless your computer room is shielded properly, the computers may still be attacked and used, I've personally inspected computers with no network connection running mysterious code in the background which task manager for windows and the eqiv for *nix does not find, and this didn't find it all.

Inspect your windows boot partition in *nix with hexdump and look for proxy packages mentioned along with command line burning programs and other oddities. Computers are more vulnerable than most would expect.

You can bet all of the malware scanners today, unless they are developed by some lone indy coder in a remote country, employ whitelisting of certain malware and none of them scan HARDWARE devices apart from the common usb devices.

Your network cards, sound cards, cd/dvd drives, graphics cards, all are capable of carrying malware to survive disk formatting/wiping.

Boot from a Linux live cd and use hexdump to examine your windows (and *nix) boot sectors to potentially discover interesting modifications by an unknown party.

#
eof

Ta da! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045467)

All the kings horses and all the kings men...
Couldn't put humpy dumpy back together again
Thank you

After a statement from a window at an upper floor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045471)

[[i]from the Ecuadorian Embassy, Julian Assange '...[/i]

"He isn't the messiah, he is a very naughty boy!"

Re:After a statement from a window at an upper flo (1)

pipatron (966506) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045541)

Not very "upper" about that floor, it was from the first floor judging from the video and pictures where you could see the whole building.

Let's make a deal .. (-1, Troll)

johnlcallaway (165670) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045477)

US will stop this one witch hunt when Assange and Wikileaks stops all of theirs. Or stops breaking laws.

Oh wait ... if he stops breaking laws, then the witch hunts will stop on both sides. Seems Assange has control of what happens and his decisions in the past have led to the current situation.

What a freakin' baby.....it's always somebody's fault other than his. He was probably the kind of kid that poked a wasp nest with a stick, and then blamed the wasp when he got stung.

Re:Let's make a deal .. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045523)

You're an idiot if you think US LAW applies WORLDWIDE.

STUPID AMERICAN, and I say that AS ONE!

Re:Let's make a deal .. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045589)

In fact, some U.S. laws do apply worldwide. Just like some Swedish laws apply worldwide and some Ecuadorean laws apply worldwide. It's called "extraterritorial jurisdiction", try Googling it.

Re:Let's make a deal .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045701)

kill yourself, idiot

Re:Let's make a deal .. (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045563)

that would be breaking laws of evil countries not his own?

Re:Let's make a deal .. (2)

pipatron (966506) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045579)

Seems to me that Assange did not break any law. Not in the "cablegate" case at least. Manning might have, which is why he's being held in the U.S.

Re:Let's make a deal .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045613)

You probably broke a lot of North Korean laws, why don't we extradite you?

Re:Let's make a deal .. (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045761)

What a freakin' baby.....it's always somebody's fault other than his. He was probably the kind of kid that poked a wasp nest with a stick, and then blamed the wasp when he got stung.

Ok. I got it. US is not a democracy, it's govt. no longer believes in the state of law, it's... you know... just a wasp nest.
No wonder many developed such an allergy to US govt.

Misleading (5, Informative)

chill (34294) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045485)

Assange spoke today -- Sunday. That statement by the U.S. was released two days ago in response to Ecuador calling for a meeting of the OAS. It was *NOT* in response to Mr. Assange's speech, as the summary implies.

tag 'inaccuratesummary' (3, Interesting)

anilg (961244) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045685)

I've noticed this in many slashdot summaries lately.. either as a result of poor selection by moderators, or by deliberate selection of yellowish content. Lets tag such stories with 'inaccuratesummary', and hope the editors take notice.

the US did grant political asylum in the past (2, Insightful)

darkeye (199616) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045507)

wonder how they don't recognize it now..

for example in 1956, the US granted political asylum to cardinal Mindszenty at their embassy in Budapest, Hungary: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yu1TZVX72Aw&t=4m9s [youtube.com]

Re:the US did grant political asylum in the past (2)

darkeye (199616) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045521)

Re:the US did grant political asylum in the past (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045575)

Way to out yourself as an anonymous coward there, funny man.

Oh wait, that should be alleged funny man.

Alleged attempted funny man.

But thanks for the movie tip, all the same. Hadn't seen that one.

Re:the US did grant political asylum in the past (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045615)

Is there a difference between Diplomatic Asylum and Political Asylum?

Re:the US did grant political asylum in the past (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045653)

Political asylum is not the same thing as diplomatic asylum.

Re:the US did grant political asylum in the past (2)

phayes (202222) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045765)

The US is not legally bound by the treaty as they have not signed it much as for the landmine treaty. However that does not mean that the US does not generally use the same behavior as that described by the text, just that there are conditions in which they do not wish to be bound by the treaty's terms (again much like the landmine treaty where the US refuses to eliminate it's well defined and maintained fields of landmines in the Korean DMZ which have not been the cause of any civilian casualties).

Sweden's extradition practices (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045513)

This may be of interest:
http://www.svd.se/nyheter/inrikes/svenska-dagbladets-fact-check-assange_6717619.svd

Re:Sweden's extradition practices (1)

kanweg (771128) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045629)

Wow. Balanced article. Swedes are great.

Bert

Re:Sweden's extradition practices (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045657)

Not really. That article says that Assange claimed that every request for extradition the US filed against Sweden was granted. They then fact check this, and find that out of six requests, two were not granted - however both of these cases was because the person could not be found. So they give him an "amber light" on the old traffic light scale.

I don't really see how that's particularly enlightening, since we know nothing about the vast amount of behind the scenes things going on, from informal requests before any formal requests are sent in, to extraditions made without paperwork. (This has happened before, it's fully legal by some particular clauses in our agreements with the US.)

Of course we're never going to find out the truth here. Unless of course assange is sent to Sweden, and then mysteriously ends up in the US or something along those lines. Then we'll know, we'll be all "bad bad bad US" and then we'll forget all about it due to the next war or whatever scandal kicks up. So if for no other reason than human decency I say err on the side of caution and let him get the fuck away.

But what about the rape charges, I hear you shout? Yeah, what about them. Set up a little investigation into them as they are, and into why the prosecutor refused to question Assange via video or have scotland yard do the job for them, something that is fully legal by our cooperation with the UK, and into why the case was dropped cold because the defendants backed out and then forcefully brought back by another prosecutor when the media mentioned it a few times. Investigate if he has been treated the same as any other rape case where the allegations boil down to "didn't want to use a condom" and "broke the condom intentionally" (the broken condom that was handed in as evidence, long after the act, contained no traces of dna).

Yeah, let him walk. Any random guy on the street seems just as likely to be guilty.

Corrupt westerners making themselves fools again (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045515)

Some more progressive country would had settled this silly dispute by giving Assange a little polonium cocktail, and whole issue would had been buried long ago.

Re:Corrupt westerners making themselves fools agai (2)

kanweg (771128) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045603)

Don't you think he'd leak the radiation?

Bert

but but (2, Funny)

Surt (22457) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045517)

Every TV cop show says that if the suspect makes it onto embassy property they are untouchable!
The TV lies ... my reality is ruined!

Re:but but (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045631)

It must be true...several Slashdot commenters said so. And they didn't say "IANAL", so they must be trained experts on international law and diplomacy.

Re:but but (2)

mrbester (200927) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045683)

Because the TV cop show is right (if the embassy belongs to a country that honours diplomatic immunity and possibly political asylum). The fact that the US doesn't recognise political asylum is immaterial. Ecuador does and has a duty of care for anyone accorded that protection.

The US can't crash the party and then claim that the music isn't to their taste.

Corruption (0, Troll)

Rik Sweeney (471717) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045557)

We all know there was no sexual assault, it's just a bunch of corrupt countries trying to quietly silence an individual that has exposed their corruption to the world.

Unfortunately, Assange is pretty screwed now. The countries he embarrassed will most likely get him by fair* means or foul because, after all, it's what they're good at.

*By fair, I mean they'll simply assassinate him and make it look like he suffered a stroke or something, rather than simply storming the embassy and shooting him.

Re:Corruption (2, Insightful)

csumpi (2258986) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045687)

No, we don't know that there was no sexual assault.

The only way we find out, is if he goes to Sweden and clears his name with the police, or the court.

Re:Corruption (4, Insightful)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045793)

and clears his name

No, that's not how criminal justice works at all.

Convention on Diplomatic Asylum (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045561)

From the Convention on Diplomatic Asylum, Ecuador should not have provided Asylum:

Article III
It is not lawful to grant asylum to persons who, at the time of requesting it, are under Indictment or on trial
for common offenses or have been convicted by competent regular courts and have not served the
respective sentence, nor to deserters from land, sea, and air forces, save when the acts giving rise to the
request for asylum, whatever the case may be, are clearly of a political nature.
Persons included in the foregoing paragraph who de facto enter a place that is suitable as an asylum
shall be Invited to leave or, as the case may be, shall be surrendered to the local authorities, who may not try them for political offenses committed prior to the time of the surrender.

http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/topic,4565c22517,4565c25f203,3ae6b3823c,0,,,.html [unhcr.org]

No doubt, this probably has at least something to do with the charges against Assange.

I fail to see how the US could pursue a case against Assange, as he is not a US citizen and not bound by US law. On what charge could he be extradited under?

The US does not adhere to International law and cannot really make any claims under it.

The following claims are made in some articles:

"Despite this, and apparently on the basis of still classified off-the-record discussions with US officials and private legal experts, the embassy reported the existence of the grand jury as a matter of fact. It identified a wide range of criminal charges the US could bring against Assange, including espionage, conspiracy, unlawful access to classified information and computer fraud."

This is complete nonsense. US Federal law only applies to US citizens and cannot be applied to a foreigner without consent.

Re:Convention on Diplomatic Asylum (1)

Dasuraga (1147871) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045655)

>US Federal law only applies to US citizens I believe federal law applies in any area of US jurisdiction. Being a foreigner does not somehow preclude you from this. Pretty sure the UK ( or wherever assange was at the time of the crime ) isn't in that area, but espionage is espionage, I don't really think that the locality of the crime matters to the legal system. I don't see why the US couldn't ask for extradition.

Re:Convention on Diplomatic Asylum (2)

mrbester (200927) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045721)

"US Federal law only applies to US citizens and cannot be applied to a foreigner without consent."

Of course it can. Why? Because fuck you, that's why. Ask for consent? That's what pussies do.

Re:Convention on Diplomatic Asylum (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045729)

Megaupload *cough*

Re:Convention on Diplomatic Asylum (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045773)

"I fail to see how the US could pursue a case against Assange, as he is not a US citizen and not bound by US law."

Wrong. U.S. law governs the leaking of U.S. government documents. Doesn't matter whether you are a citizen or where you are located. Google "extraterritorial jurisdiction."

"The US does not adhere to International law and cannot really make any claims under it."

Wrong, and a bizarre thing to claim. The U.S. recognizes customary international law, and has also signed many international treaties.

"US Federal law only applies to US citizens and cannot be applied to a foreigner without consent."

Completely wrong. You think that you're allowed to break the law just because you're not a citizen? Why would the law favor non-citizens over citizens like that?

Courage (2, Interesting)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045611)

I personally admire the courage of Julian Assange standing up to the US Government. I don't know that I would have the same amount of courage. The US has a nasty habit of mostly getting what it wants through force, fear, and intimidation. It takes someone truly fearless and I hope that Assange prevails. It is episodes like this that really make me support Ron Paul!

Re:Courage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045647)

I personally admire the courage of Julian Assange standing up to the US Government. I don't know that I would have the same amount of courage. The US has a nasty habit of mostly getting what it wants through force, fear, and intimidation. It takes someone truly fearless and I hope that Assange prevails. It is episodes like this that really make me support Ron Paul!

It doesn't take much courage to (allegedly) commit rape. But it does take courage to face charges of rape and defend oneself. Assange is trying to duck and confuse matters by claiming everyone is out to get him.

Oh, and if Ron Paul is like Assange, I hope that man is never elected to any high office.

Re:Courage (1)

jbolden (176878) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045797)

The issue of Julian Assange is not now nor has it ever been about possibly borderline date rape. Borderline date rape doesn't have multiple governments involved at the 2nd highest levels in a blow by blow.

Re:Courage (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045795)

support Ron

Fuck you. It's the "Guerilla-Fanbois" like you that have made sure a lot of people are going to vote ABP (AnythingButPaul).

Re:Courage (0)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045803)

The only reason not to support Assange is that some people might think he's on the side of Ron Paul.

Assange is right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045625)

Anyone who cared about democracy would follows his lead and demand that their government stopped prosecuting whistle-blowers who expose corruption and incompetence. Unfortunately more people seem to care about making cheap shots against Assange than they do about their democracy...

Re:Assange is right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41045819)

Does Ecuador publish all of its government documents and military documents on the internet, or do they keep some of them secret? What is the punishment for espionage or leaking documents in Ecuador?

Shame on Hillary and Obama (1, Insightful)

DarkOx (621550) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045741)

The United States is not a party to the 1954 OAS Convention on Diplomatic Asylum and does not recognize the concept of diplomatic asylum as a matter of international law"

Once again the Obama administration shames us with its foreign policy. Let hope the Chinese don't remember this statement next time one of their dissidents shows up at our Embassy.

US doesn't recognise? (1)

Andrewm1986 (1013059) | more than 2 years ago | (#41045807)

And why on earth does that matter? He's in Britain! It's just an empty threat
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