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US To Drive 3,000 Wi-Fi Linked Vehicles In Massive Crash Avoidance Trial

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the trying-to-break-fewer-things dept.

Transportation 89

coondoggie writes "The U.S. Department of Transportation said it will run a massive road test of cars, trucks and buses linked together via WiFi equipment in what the agency says will be the largest test of automated crash avoidance technology to date. The test will be conducted by the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI), and feature mostly volunteer participants whose vehicles have been outfitted with vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication devices."

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Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (3, Funny)

ewg (158266) | about 2 years ago | (#41072577)

Ann Arbor is a good place to start, its drivers are too preoccupied with their dissertations to watch the road...

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41072663)

We can be certain of one thing - the people who came up with this are not black. Blacks do not innovate. They did not even have a written language, the wheel, or shovels when we found them in Africa, living like tribal savages.

Blacks are the net drain on society. They cause many costs like incarceration, trials, arrests, executions, welfare, affirmative action, discrimination suits, cities not safe to walk at night, gang violence, crack cocaine, and all of the above. They contribute next to nothing. They are a net drain on society. Importing forced African slave labor seemed like a good idea at the time to greedy imperialist colonial bastards but it costs you dearly in the long run.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

lightknight (213164) | about 2 years ago | (#41072899)

Nonsense. They came up with jazz (as well as a number of other genres of music), technology, and so on.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#41082249)

Nonsense. They came up with jazz

Far more notable than his skin color is the fact that the inventor of jazz music was a schitzophrenic. But my question is, why are you feeding that troll? He's at -1 and invisible, don't encourage these jerks. Just ignore them.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

lightknight (213164) | about 2 years ago | (#41093235)

A little education goes a long way. But sadly, I think you are correct.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (0)

PT_1 (2425848) | about 2 years ago | (#41073153)

Blacks do not innovate.

False. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41073637)

Alright, you've convinced me. The question now is, do you have some sort of ultimate answer to the black problem? How's that new flavor of Mt. Dew tasting by the way?

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

gmhowell (26755) | about 2 years ago | (#41075387)

Alright, you've convinced me. The question now is, do you have some sort of ultimate answer to the black problem? How's that new flavor of Mt. Dew tasting by the way?

I don't know about an 'ultimate answer', but judging by what he wrote, I bet he has a 'final solution'.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41075631)

Thanks for spelling out the joke, dipshit.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (0)

SlippyToad (240532) | about 2 years ago | (#41074451)

Figures an anonymous coward posted this -- don't quite have the balls to say it with your name attached, do ya?

Of course, anonymous coward in your case also equals ignorant retard. That's one thing that's really frustrating about racism -- the people who practice it seem to actually be mentally deficient in addition to being hateful fucks who serve no purpose on the planet, except possibly as landfill or speed bumps. You almost feel sorry for people so rigorously stupid, but then you don't. It's like a grown man who is continuously crapping his pants and running around, showing off how badly he stinks, as if he's got something to be proud of.

Of course you could be a troll, but since it is impossible to tell a troll from a flaming fuckwit stupid, there's no real difference.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (2)

History's Coming To (1059484) | about 2 years ago | (#41075463)

Sadly, I'm off on a bit of an essay here. If you're the tl;dr type then you do not have my permission to read further and if you do you are expected to burn all your Bieber albums, it's a rite of passage you'll thank me for later.

Slashdot "nigger" trolls aren't necessarily racist. OK, yes, they use that word a lot, but that's simply evolution, they've learned (collectively, not individually) that using the N word is likely to get a reaction, and this promotes further troll activity of this nature. Responding to the N-trolls is akin to not completing your course of antibiotics, you just ensure more, worse and faster.

With this in mind, can I suggest that the Slashdot community, those of us with the balls to put names to our comments and ACs with intelligent arguments alike, all act as one.

From now on we must all solemnly pledge to only respond to the trolls when they come up with something tyruly imaginative, creative and interesting. For example, if they can whip up a (truly extraterrestrial) xenephobia argument then I for one will be happy to argue with them, I've read Ender's Game and everything.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#41083497)

That's one thing that's really frustrating about racism -- the people who practice it seem to actually be mentally deficient in addition to being hateful fucks

You have to realize that half the people on the planet have two digit IQs. Racism has one purpose -- to keep poor dumb whites and blacks at each others' throats and blame each other for their poverty and hopelessness (yes, there are more whites on food stamps than blacks) so they won't attack their real enemies, the 1% and their lapdog, the Tea Party.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (2)

Naatach (574111) | about 2 years ago | (#41072709)

And with the forward facing radar, the bastard computers can tailgate you even worse than Ann Arbor drivers!

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

Naatach (574111) | about 2 years ago | (#41072743)

And with the forward facing radar, the bastard computers can tailgate you even worse than Ann Arbor drivers!

Of course, this would render my favorite method of retaliation on a tailgater null - riding my windshield washer for about 1/2 mile.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

jafiwam (310805) | about 2 years ago | (#41076741)

I bet releasing a trunk load of mylar and foil balloons in front of one of the tailgating computer-cars would make it back off. ;)

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 2 years ago | (#41077555)

This trick works best if the balloons are filled with hydrogen!

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41072721)

Anywhere in Florida or North Carolina (particularly Raleigh) would be a good test, too. Some of the worst drivers I've ever seen in those places. Either full acceleration or full brake, no in-between, and they seem to just point their cars in the direction they want to go, rather than actually driving.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41072937)

My vote is Washington D.C. The belt way is translated into the ancient greek word for parking lot for a few reasons.

1. Bad drivers in expencive cars... well its good enough for goverment work, eh.

2. Its far enough north that it gets a conciderable about of snow each year and people dont quite understand what tailgating is.

3. Its far enough south that the local plowing groups cant keep the roads clear without a little extra help.

so bad drivers, snow, and no fast way to clear it.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

camperdave (969942) | about 2 years ago | (#41073623)

Sorry. Nothing in the US can compare with Cairo, Egypt for driving mayhem... except maybe a figure eight demolition derby.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

mlts (1038732) | about 2 years ago | (#41073225)

I'd recommend Austin for a number of reasons:

1: Most major roads have not been upgraded since the 1970s, with the last real traffic improvement being done in '95 (183).

2: A ton of various driving styles, due to people coming from all backgrounds.

3: Drunk/drugged drivers due to multiple universities in the area (UT, TSU, even A&M sometimes.)

4: Very unforgiving roads in the city core. Run a light, and you might get hit by a train.

5: Lots of semis that act as radio wave blockers.

6: Lots of techies, a lot of which tend to run jammers just for grins.

Austin is a good real world test. If this trial can survive the people drinking Bud Light out of a tap off their dashboard, it can survive almost anything but a Middle Eastern country.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 2 years ago | (#41074099)

4: Very unforgiving roads in the city core. Run a light, and you might get hit by a train.

I like that. I say let's put railroad crossings at every intersection.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

cduffy (652) | about 2 years ago | (#41074365)

Disagree. Austin is considerably easier to drive in than several other places:

  • Unlike much of the rest of Texas, freeways have one-way frontage roads.
  • Unlike the California bay area, onramps and offramps are generally highly forgiving.
  • Unlike New Jersey, California, and several other locations, there are cultural prohibitions against tailgating. (Yes, some implants don't follow them, but a fairly substantial number of drivers do).

I think you also underestimate the amount of new road work being done -- 183 has undergone pretty substantial changes just in the last decade. Also, by the time this trial takes place, the Mopac Improvement Project may well be underway (as a cyclist, I'll very much welcome this one -- having a north/south throughfare on the other side of a sound wall will be very much a welcome thing).

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41074591)

Another Austinite here, although modded on this topic so posting as AC: Problem is the Mopac project constitutes turning the highway into a toll road where the toll rises the more cars on it. The mentioned 183 improvements are not Austin's doing. A lot of them are in preparation by a private firm for a toll road on 290. In fact, any recent construction has all been tollway related.

For cycling, Austin is hard to beat. In fact the city council is putting a bond amendment up for a $143 million bike path from Zilker to Hays County (about 30 miles.) I just wish COA would get the bus system up to par with everyone else. As of now, it is a living room/bedroom/bathroom for the local hobos (who get a free unlimited pass.) It would also be nice to see the highways looked at too, so us plebes who have no way to bike it from Slaughter to Stonelake might be able to get to work in a reasonable time.

As for tailgaters, the fix is easy, be it a car or pickup... Get a receiver hitch, and stick a tow ball in it. It not just keeps the people off your bumper, but if they do hit, their radiator ends up cracked, so when they try to drive off, it is easy to just follow the steam trail.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

cduffy (652) | about 2 years ago | (#41074781)

I just wish COA would get the bus system up to par with everyone else. As of now, it is a living room/bedroom/bathroom for the local hobos (who get a free unlimited pass).

I agree that the bus system is awful -- but to correct a factual point, it isn't free-of-charge for the hobos, merely cheap (as they tend to buy day passes and use them to the max)... and not cheap for anyone on the express routes; I use those only if I have a month pass for the train, which has MetroExpress folded in. Moreover, being pricey keeps the express lines hobo-free.

For that matter -- my significant other has a Cap Metro disability pass, but bus access isn't free for her either, merely reduced-fare. (This wasn't always the case, and is a fairly recent change -- perhaps this is where the impression that hobos get free access came from?).

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (1)

metamatic (202216) | about 2 years ago | (#41087123)

I live in Austin, and it's a hell of a lot easier driving than Boston, which has all the features you mention plus angry Massholes who will cut you off as they lean on the horn and give you the finger.

Re:Ann Arbor drivers thinking about dissertations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41087623)

I don't know... I've driven both places, and the thing about Boston drivers, they will cut in, but they jam the hammer and get out of the way. Same with Dallas. Everyone drives like an ass, but they will go as fast as they can.

Austin drivers just want to cut in, then do 5-10 under the limit because they can. It always amuses me when on a two lane road in the Central TX area, and I pass someone via the dotted lines, and they lay on the horn like I've just tore a pound of flesh from their gut. Austin, it seems like a personal, in-your-face insult to be passed.

Funny thing, go 20-30 miles outside of Austin, and you see the "normal" Texas behavior... people will actually move to the shoulder so you can pass them if they see you coming up.

3000 WiFi radios at once ? (3, Interesting)

psergiu (67614) | about 2 years ago | (#41072665)

3000 WiFi radios emiting together on how many channels and using what bandwidth ? Even if they drop to 1Mbps and use all 11 US 802.11 2.4Ghz channels, the collisions caused by ~270 devices on the same channell will make that network unuseable.

What about the trolls with a WiFi jammer (like a microwave over with a screwdriver jammed in the door safety switch) ? Turn-it on and watch the pile-ups.

Or will they use all channels in the 802.11n 5Ghz spectrum ?

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (4, Funny)

Naatach (574111) | about 2 years ago | (#41072789)

..the collisions caused by ~270 devices on the same channell will make that network unuseable.

With that many collisions, that would make the road pretty much unusable too.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41072809)

Sponsored by: Orville Redenbacher!

We need at least a couple drunk humans driving this circuit, preferably in 1970s-era pickups.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41072821)

Look up AIS at Wikipedia.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_Identification_System

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (5, Informative)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 2 years ago | (#41072895)

Because of course the engineers building an automated network aren't aware enough to think about what the car should do if it loses connections to other cars...

If I had to hazard a guess, I'd say that the 3000 radios aren't all transmitting to each other. Rather, each one would lower its power to broadcast only to its immediate area, so other cars can avoid it. A jammer would force cars nearby to switch to backup systems, and other vehicles could increase their own transmission power to compensate for the noise.

Also note that though the article uses the term "WiFi", these are likely not standard 802.11 devices. Rather, they are in the 5.9 GHz band [wikipedia.org] , with 75MHz bandwidth.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (2)

Idbar (1034346) | about 2 years ago | (#41075255)

Also, nobody said they will all transmit at once... that would cause not just a massive packet crash, but likely the car crash as well if the system is not properly designed.

But as you said, engineers probably have thought of what happens if data reliability turns to zero, but also implement some of the Ad-hoc/Mesh networking routing techniques to properly propagate sufficient data (it's not like all the 3000 vehicles will start transmitting HD video to each other, right?). To the GP, this experiment will probably behave more like a sensor network, rather than a P2P torrent network.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (3, Insightful)

Baloroth (2370816) | about 2 years ago | (#41073089)

These aren't driverless cars. The crash-avoidance system is a supplement to help drivers avoid collision (giving them warnings of incoming cars at intersections, alerts of possible rear end collisions, stuff like that), rather than a replacement for the drivers. In other words, if the system goes down you simply don't get the benefits, which is exactly what we have now anyways.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (2)

RicktheBrick (588466) | about 2 years ago | (#41075729)

Why can't we control intersections this way? Every car going through a intersection would be given a certain speed to avoid being in the intersection at the same time as another car. If we could get rid of traffic lights, stop signs and yield signs, I am sure we could increase gas mileage enough to pay for the system. I would also like to see every car being mandated that it has both a gps system and cruise control. If they were integrated with the accelerating pedal so that no car would be able to speed, I would think there would be less accidents.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41076719)

Why can't we control intersections this way?

Nice idea, until someone has a flat tire or other problem that stops one car from making it's schedule...

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (1)

Baloroth (2370816) | about 2 years ago | (#41076775)

This is possible. You'd have to track car length (a tractor-trailer truck takes much longer to go through the stop light than a Prius, for instance) and that would prevent pedestrian crossings at stoplights, which is actually a pretty significant problem. Of course in some places you could build a bridge or tunnel for them, but that isn't feasible everywhere.

Such system are, however, a natural progression of automated driving and would massively decrease travel times and fuel wastage (in theory, every car could be travel at or near the speed limit, always, even during the busiest times).

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (1)

zmollusc (763634) | about 2 years ago | (#41078181)

Why pay for a new system? Get rid of traffic lights, stop signs, yield signs and one-way streets and reap the benefits of increases economy and shorter journey times.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#41085199)

If we could get rid of traffic lights, stop signs and yield signs, I am sure we could increase gas mileage enough to pay for the system.

The less gasoline is sold, the fewer taxes are collected. It would be good for the motorist, but bad for the city government that would be tasked with paying for it.

I suspect that's why Springfield has twice as many traffic lights and stop signs per capita than the average city -- to reduce your gas mileage and collect more tax (sales tax is collected on gasoline and diesel here, as well as the state and federal motor fuel tax).

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41078599)

I believe there are two of these 'crash-avoidance' systems already built-in to every skull called eyes.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41073109)

You can get ~270 cars in the diameter of a broadcast from a 802.11a/g/n radio? Maybe if they are all packed tightly together...

Most cars are a decent amount away from each other and follow these things straight things called roads...

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (1)

KingMotley (944240) | about 2 years ago | (#41074027)

Based on the experience of 802.11a/g/n in my house, you'd have to fit 270 cars in 10'.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (1)

garyebickford (222422) | about 2 years ago | (#41074275)

Let's put them all in a big circle, pointed inward, and have them accelerate as fast as possible toward the center. Then see what happens! :D
That would be video worth watching!

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (2)

bob8766 (1075053) | about 2 years ago | (#41073141)

In other news, Rush hour traffic is at a complete standstill on I-94 in both directions due to a "Software Glitch" with a traffic monitoring hub. The internet hactivist group "Anonymous" has claimed responsibility for the glitch.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (1)

garyebickford (222422) | about 2 years ago | (#41074251)

Without RTFA, I'm thinking that the typical message would only need to be about 100 bytes or less, every 100 msec. so the throughput per car would only be on the order of 1KiB to 2KiB per second, even taking encryption into account. So that's 10-20 Kbps per car - quite a bit better than 100Mbps. Just guessing, of course.

And I wouldn't be surprised if any production system would have its own set of channels that are illegal to use for anything but navigation. This wouldn't stop the jammers, but it would isolate the auto traffic from any other standard signals. I think that a good timebase * ident * encryption method would work against most attempts to penetrate, leaving only vulnerability to brute force 100 KW jamming by someone who wants to stop everything that moves. And then (assuming the drivers aren't even more idiotic than they are now), drivers could just revert to actually driving.

If this is only a collision avoidance system, not navigation or actual driving, drivers are still driving, but they would now just have an enhanced collision alert + auto brake function.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41074335)

3000 WiFi radios emiting together on how many channels and using what bandwidth ? Even if they drop to 1Mbps and use all 11 US 802.11 2.4Ghz channels, the collisions caused by ~270 devices on the same channell will make that network unuseable.

What about the trolls with a WiFi jammer (like a microwave over with a screwdriver jammed in the door safety switch) ? Turn-it on and watch the pile-ups.

Or will they use all channels in the 802.11n 5Ghz spectrum ?

Back when i worked on vehicle to vehicle & vehicle to infrastructure in the early 2000's we had a dedicated 802.11p for vehicle specific applications.

Re:3000 WiFi radios at once ? (1)

FunkDup (995643) | about 2 years ago | (#41075111)

3000 WiFi radios emiting together on how many channels and using what bandwidth ?

Yeah, all 3000 devices will have high gain antennas and be on the same stretch of road.

Sounds like a place for a jammer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41072697)

It can't be difficult to build a powerful Wi-Fi jammer. Like almost anything wireless, this sounds like a dangerous thing to develop reliance on.

Re:Sounds like a place for a jammer. (2)

Githaron (2462596) | about 2 years ago | (#41072869)

I assume the wireless communication is simply for efficient coordination between the vehicles. The vehicles would be able to function without the wireless communication but traffic flow would not be as efficient. The vehicles would simply have a fail safe that if the network goes down. The gap between cars is increased and speed is decreased since the uncertainty of the situation is increased.

Re:Sounds like a place for a jammer. (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#41072947)

Probably something involving ultrasound, laser or image-recognition imaging, and driving at greatly reduced speed. Not ideal, but good enough to get you past the disruption.

Re:Sounds like a place for a jammer. (1)

Githaron (2462596) | about 2 years ago | (#41073047)

They have already been testing [latimes.com] complete autonomous cars.

Re:Sounds like a place for a jammer. (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#41073099)

It can't be difficult to build a powerful Wi-Fi jammer. Like almost anything wireless, this sounds like a dangerous thing to develop reliance on.

Screw that, MITM those bastards and send them all bad coordinates.

Or is this one of those closed "look how perfect everything works in a lab environment, which of course translates to identical real world results!" type of trials?

Re:Sounds like a place for a jammer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41073343)

Quite the opposite. This looks more like one of those things that work just fine in the real world, even though some douchbags with homicidal fantasies can dream up ways to hurt people.

If you want to kill people on the highway, do it the old fashioned way - steal a stop sign, point a curve indicator in the wrong direction, blind drivers with laser pointers, pour some oil on the road surface, etc.

Of course, there are those tens of thousands of deaths each year caused by jammed aircraft and ship transmissions. And of course the 'wireless' GPS system is totally unusable and suseceptible to jamming. Cell phones? Nope, never work.

Re:Sounds like a place for a jammer. (1)

timeOday (582209) | about 2 years ago | (#41076083)

Light is easy to block also; even a sheet of paper will do it! Anybody who relies on vision for collision avoidance deserves whatever they get.

Interferance (1)

Bizzeh (851225) | about 2 years ago | (#41072727)

1. 3000 wifi radios all broadcasting together on only 13 channels? My wifi at home can hardly handle the 2 other people in the street and my phone's bluetooth being on at the same time.

2. wouldnt ever street these cars are to drive need wifi? unless the plan is to connect to the infrastructure network via 3G, which dies the second a single spec of rain is in the air.

3. there is a reason a plane has a pilot, people wont fly if the plane is flown by computer (which actually does most of the work now anyway), people also wont allow a computer to drive their car for them without someone being sat at the wheel to take control "just incase".

I can see it already... (1)

milbournosphere (1273186) | about 2 years ago | (#41072759)

"...caused a 3000 car pile-up today, the largest in US history..."

Re:I can see it already... (1)

lightknight (213164) | about 2 years ago | (#41072949)

Nonsense. It will be a 14-car pileup, with the rest working perfectly. It'll give the tea drinking engineers at DOT something to ponder over (bonus points if they find a reference to "Grassy Knoll" in the core dump).

Data release? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41072783)

I'm sure there would be privacy concerns (maybe not, given that it's volunteer), but I would love to see som graphical animations of how these Wi-Fi-equipped cars interact with each other around a town. It would be interesting to see a heat map of overlap with regard to things like rush hour, sporting events, etc.

I have to assume they'll have Wi-Fi stations set up in various spots to monitor traffic. Could replace the old pressure tubes for estimating throughput.

mostly volunteer? (3, Funny)

a2wflc (705508) | about 2 years ago | (#41072813)

Will they at least tell the non-volunteers that their vehicle has been modified? I hope medical scientists don't pick up this new way of increasing the size of your test group.

Re:mostly volunteer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41072877)

I think the implication is that the other participants are paid. At least, I hope so.

Re:mostly volunteer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41076007)

Or that some of them are government vehicles, where an employee doesn't control what hardware is/isn't installed in the vehicle they're being paid to drive.

Microwave ovens (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41072829)

WiFi? What madness. When I run my 2.4 GHz microwave oven, WiFi virtually dies in my apartment. A leaky microwave oven next to a freeway could lead to a chain of crashes in cars whose owners have grown to trust too much this crash-avoidance technology.

Something this critical, shouldn't be in the crowded 2.4 GHz band.

Re:Microwave ovens (1)

ozduo (2043408) | about 2 years ago | (#41074907)

Better hand out tin foil underpants to your dinner guests.

I can't wait (2)

maroberts (15852) | about 2 years ago | (#41072875)

...for the video of the resulting Blues Brothers style pile-up.

The results? (1)

slacktide (796664) | about 2 years ago | (#41072885)

I sure hope the post the results on YouTube.

Re:The results? (1)

PPH (736903) | about 2 years ago | (#41074833)

Here [youtube.com] it is.

This is how it *really* starts.... (1)

paulsnx2 (453081) | about 2 years ago | (#41073011)

And this is how it begins. First the computers keep you from crashing your car. Then they are injected into every car.

Then they eliminate us all.

Re:eliminate us all. (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | about 2 years ago | (#41073863)

"Powered by Windows 8"

Re:eliminate us all. (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 2 years ago | (#41074655)

"Powered by Windows 8"

Then we have nothing to fear, Hackers will still be in control of everything.

Re:eliminate us all. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41078473)

and by hackers you mean 'teenagers on 4chan'

just what we need.. (1)

cod3r_ (2031620) | about 2 years ago | (#41073019)

Government devices reporting back what we are doing where we are going how fast we are going.. BIG BROTHER!!!!

Is NASCAR selling tickets ? (1)

RichMan (8097) | about 2 years ago | (#41073021)

Where do the spectators sit?

Re:Is NASCAR selling tickets ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41073063)

Inside the cars of course!

link to project page (4, Informative)

Trepidity (597) | about 2 years ago | (#41073037)

Here is the DOT project page [dot.gov] on the experiment, which includes a nice FAQ, and a description of the purpose.

This particular 3,000-vehicle experiment, fwiw, is not intended to test the crash-avoidance technology in a live trial, but rather to collect a data set. The indicators aren't going to be displayed to the drivers on a HUD or anything, but just recorded for analysis, along with vehicle position/telemetry.

Re:link to project page (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41081669)

so they'll be able to tell how often I am speeding and when I don't come to a full and complete stop? No thank you!

surely... (4, Funny)

zmollusc (763634) | about 2 years ago | (#41073055)

...they are using the wrong networking topology? Token ring is the way to go if you don't want collisions .

Re:surely... (1)

freeze128 (544774) | about 2 years ago | (#41073667)

That will only work if you're driving in circles.

Re:surely... (1)

besalope (1186101) | about 2 years ago | (#41075755)

That will only work if you're driving in circles.

I thought that was why they started building roundabouts all over the place.

Re:surely... (1)

evilviper (135110) | about 2 years ago | (#41077319)

Ethernet doesn't have collisions anymore, either. Hubs are a thing of the past.

They missed something (2)

na1led (1030470) | about 2 years ago | (#41073151)

They programmed all the cars to avoid hitting each other, but forgot to tell the cars to also avoid hitting everything else.

Sounds like "Maximum Overdrive" just became viable (1)

Timmy D Programmer (704067) | about 2 years ago | (#41073701)

Time to find a truck stop to hide at!

And There Go the Trucker Jobs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41074339)

Well, truckers, you're about to become obsolete. Great job creation, right?

Re:And There Go the Trucker Jobs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41074845)

Were we previously relying on truckers for crash-avoidance?

Urban challenge (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41074349)

What ever happened to the software that was used in the desert and urban challenges? Are the academic institutions involved actually producing something useful now or is their stuff still relegated to the 'lab' (either due to lack of generality or because things are broken)? Anyone know?

What a great idea (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 2 years ago | (#41076113)

Put our safety in the hands of equipment operating in unlicensed spectrum that can be interfered with by every microwave, cordless phone, and cell phone hotspot within 200 yards.

5.9GHz radios and enhanced 802.11 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41076551)

Some of the radios used will feature an enhanced 802.11 processing that allows a improved performance in urban clutter situations over conventional chipsets. See one of the providers of radios for this trial. :
http://www.cohdawireless.com/technology/solution.html

Station HR972 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41076773)

Slashdot is crazy relevant the last few days. Not for any of you necessarily but for me because I've been reading a collection of short stories called Nightmare Age edited by Frederik Pohl on the topic of how the earth will be ruined in various ways by humans. So first it's the Matt Ridley essay (the anthology starts with an over the top 1977 scenario by Paul Ehrlich). Now this which fits with the radio control technology from the Kenneth Bulmer story Station HR972.

2.4ghz is not feasible 5ghz yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41078037)

Although 2.4ghz has more range than 5ghz, it has only 3 non overlapping channels with approximately 60mhz total bandwidth available to the North American public.

5ghz has 21 non overlapping channels.
Think of non-overlapping as saying non-interfering channels. Also most legacy and current devices use 2.4ghz. There is great probability that a 2.4ghz wifi device will have to compete with other nearby wifi networks, water, metal, microwaves, 40mhz 2.4ghz 300mbs n+ routers.

With factors like this plus different transmit powers on the devices 2.4ghz would only be feasible in urban areas. The way to go would be 5ghz with high transmit power and omnidirectional antennas on the vehicles roofs. That alone only covers the issue of interference. you have to deal with network technology and topology next.

Unintended consequence (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 2 years ago | (#41079369)

In the minus column of autonomous vehicles and car trains is this: the death of the freedom of travel (sans real-time monitoring). This will rapidly become mandatory, even for current cars via a module plugged into the OBD2 port. The insurance companies want it to more efficiently deny claims (and raise rates in real time) and John Law wants it as he despises privacy above all else.

Just like a free lunch, there ain't no such thing as a care-free autonomous car.

More likely (1)

Sqreater (895148) | about 2 years ago | (#41079801)

...it will be a crash production test. Bad ideas just never seem to die.
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