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Workers Working An Extra 20 Hours a Week Thanks To BYOD

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the otherwise-you-get-fired dept.

Businesses 202

Qedward writes with the apparent downside of bring-your-own-device policies. From the article: "Many employees are working up to 20 additional hours per week unpaid as a result of bring your own device (BYOD) policies adopted by their firms, many of which have no security safeguards. According to the quarterly Mobile Workforce Report from enterprise Wi-Fi access firm iPass, a third of mobile enterprise workers never fully disconnect from technology during their during personal time The report also said that 92% of mobile workers 'enjoy their job flexibility' and are 'content' with working longer hours. In fact, said the report, 42% would like 'even greater flexibility for their working practices.' But 19% of mobile workers said their companies did not require security on smartphones or tablets to access work data."

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202 comments

Cry me a river... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083089)

Occasionally glancing at your cellphone while getting black out drunk with your idiot friends doesn't sound like work to me...

Re:Cry me a river... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083165)

Occasionally glancing at your cellphone while getting black out drunk with your idiot friends doesn't sound like work to me...

I'm a taste tester for Johnny Walker you insensitive clod! They want to know how bad my blackouts and hangovers are!

Re:Cry me a river... (1)

plover (150551) | about 2 years ago | (#41083365)

Occasionally glancing at your cellphone while getting black out drunk with your idiot friends doesn't sound like work to me...

I'm a taste tester for Johnny Walker you insensitive clod! They want to know how bad my blackouts and hangovers are!

You hiring? I'm more than qualified and have a long history a d rich experience with various forms of whiskey, including blackout and falling down experience.

And do you have extra openings for my mates?

Re:Cry me a river... (4, Funny)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | about 2 years ago | (#41083593)

Occasionally glancing at your cellphone while getting black out drunk with your idiot friends doesn't sound like work to me...

I'm a taste tester for Johnny Walker you insensitive clod! They want to know how bad my blackouts and hangovers are!

I'm going to put in an application with Trojan right now.

Re:Cry me a river... (5, Funny)

idontgno (624372) | about 2 years ago | (#41083801)

You're seeking a job as a condom taste-tester?

Not my idea of a dream job, but if it's what floats your boat....

Re:Cry me a river... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41084663)

You're seeking a job as a condom taste-tester?

Not my idea of a dream job, but if it's what floats your boat....

ROFL.....I think I just peed a little.

Re:Cry me a river... (2)

wjousts (1529427) | about 2 years ago | (#41084359)

Sure. Just bend over and grab your ankles. I hear they are testing the magnum extra large ones today.

Re:Cry me a river... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083275)

It does to me, since I was obviously working at 11PM on Friday. See, I sent an email asking for a status update!

Re:Cry me a river... (4, Interesting)

Sir_Sri (199544) | about 2 years ago | (#41083455)

Even if it is, I'd rather spend 15 minutes at 11pm typing an e-mail that will solve a problem right then, than having to spend 2 hours fixing something first thing the next morning.

My boss is one of those guys who doesn't check his e-mail at home (or at least not very often) and not on his smartphone. But he goes home at 3 as part of his flex hours. If something happens that he's really really needed, well, you wait until tomorrow, which just adds stress, confusion and sometimes creates new problems as people try and do what they need without him, and make life hard for themselves.

I'd rather be 'on call' every day for 4 hours after work, on top of my 8 hours a day at work if that means those 8 hours aren't spent cleaning up messes created in my absence, or if that means other teams (including other time zones) can actually get their shit done on time. That makes my working hours a lot less stressful, and gives me more time during working hours to do things like post on /.

I did a job once that was multinational - next day for anything. So if we had a problem that needed authorization for spending or an engineering decision or whatever at 10 in the morning our time, we'd be stuck waiting on our arses until the next day for someone at one of the corporate offices to look at it. Which was just a huge waste of time and money, and made doing anything on site a nightmare because you could never be sure how long you'd be stuck there.

Re:Cry me a river... (3, Insightful)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41083595)

Not all jobs involve problems where the repair commitment expands over time. Maybe car mechanic? Factory on a quota/piecework system? Struggling to think of a stereotypical /.er job like that. Personally I've never had to do anything afterhours, in decades, other than fundamentally because there's an angry waiting internal or external customer. Never to save time.

So if we had a problem that needed authorization for spending or an engineering decision or whatever at 10 in the morning our time, we'd be stuck waiting

That's an executive level cultural problem thats outside your paygrade to fix, so don't worry about it or change your lifestyle. I've intentionally never worked anywhere without a 24x7 escalation sheet and a culture of "better ask forgiveness than permission". I've turned down jobs at bureaucratic micromanagement style companies for those exact cultural reasons. If thats the way they want to run things, thats fine, but its not my problem, I'll patiently wait.

Re:Cry me a river... (2)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#41083919)

"From: Doe, John [US/CORPHQ]
Sent: Fri 2/13/2012 6:35PM
Help I have a small grease fire! I am contemplating dousing it with water. Any advice? --JD"

If I can tell that idiot to use baking soda instead of water, he will stand a much better chance at saving himself and others a lot of time, money, and effort as opposed to ignoring it until monday. The analogues in the business world are MANY, I come across them all the time. If you don't see them, maybe you aren't in that kind of job, or you just aren't the fix-it guy.

Re:Cry me a river... (5, Insightful)

element-o.p. (939033) | about 2 years ago | (#41084451)

With all due respect, I disagree, and I *am* the fix-it guy -- well, one of two, anyway -- where I work. The solution, in my experience, is simple. First, hire competent people with good judgment. Second, trust them to do their job. If you abide by those two rules, then you should be able to seriously reduce the number of escalations when there's a problem after hours.

Yes, I get called out after-hours or on the weekends from time to time. Yes, 10% -- maybe even as high as 20% at times -- don't really need my attention RIGHT FREAKING NOW but for the most part, the people who escalate to me are pretty good at triage and won't call me unless there's something they really need me to look at. And when I do get called to look at something, I generally don't get called out on the carpet for the steps I've taken to resolve the issue unless I do something *REALLY* boneheaded, and off-hand, I can't think of a single time in over six years with my present employer that that's happened. I've maybe had my boss say something like, "You probably should clear that with a manager before doing that again," once or twice, but that's about it.

As far as being on-call for an additional four hours every day after my eight hour shift (from your original post)...well, if my employer needs fix-it guys after hours that badly, then they'd better hire some more employees, or they'd better up my pay significantly so that I can retire early. Otherwise, I'll answer the phone when/if I have time, but I make no guarantees. I'd consider six hours in the office and four hours on-call for an eight-hour-a-day salaried position, since I know I wouldn't get called every day, but I'll find a new job if you tell me you want to pay me for eight hours a day and have me on-call for free for an additional four. Life is too short to spend 12 hours a day working indefinitely. My parents worked their butts off for years. Then in 2006, my dad died from an aneurism. They had made all kinds of plans for what they'd do "one of these days" and never got to accomplish A. Single. One. Of. Them. because they didn't take time while they had the chance. My mom, a "32-hour per week" employee worked 5x12 (sometimes 6x12 or more) for the last year before my dad died; she just about completely missed out on his last year on earth. I may not be the sharpest tool in the shed, but I *can* be taught. The only time you have is RIGHT NOW. IME, there are very few people who wished they could have worked a few more hours in their lifetimes, but plenty who wished they'd crossed a few more items off their bucket lists or spent a little more time with their loved ones.

Re:Cry me a river... (3)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#41084729)

Your point is taken, but for the record I wasn't the one who made the "original post" and you weren't the target of my example; I was pointing out that many jobs outside of car mechanics and factory work DO involve snowball issues that are best dealing with early on. An ounce of prevention, as it were. If you don't experience this in your job, then it sounds like a good spot and I suggest keeping it for a long time. Those of us who arent that lucky, get that availability has its price and its benefits.

Re:Cry me a river... (4, Funny)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#41084463)

"From: Doe, John [US/CORPHQ] Sent: Fri 2/13/2012 6:35PM Help I have a small grease fire! I am contemplating dousing it with water. Any advice? --JD"

If I can tell that idiot to use baking soda instead of water, he will stand a much better chance at saving himself and others a lot of time, money, and effort as opposed to ignoring it until monday.

Perhaps, but conversely, if you ignore the request, you stand a much better chance of never having to deal with that particular moron ever again!

Re:Cry me a river... (1)

icebike (68054) | about 2 years ago | (#41084093)

This.

The cell phone with real email capability, full document attachments, links, etc was a godsend.

It got me away from my desk, while remaining fully responsive to my customers and employees.
Its cut international long distance charges to zero with skype and SIP clients right there on the phone.

By and large the intrusion into private time has been less than you might expect. Most people are fairly responsible
about calling after normal business hours, and the few pests that require excessive hand-holding soon find that voice mails
will be responded to in a time frame longer than it would take for them to solve it themselves.

Answering an email on a tablet or phone now and then is a small price to pay for not having to sit in the office all day waiting
for something to happen. Having my full source code base on the device for quick reference is another godsend.

Re:Cry me a river... (1)

1u3hr (530656) | about 2 years ago | (#41084109)

Even if it is, I'd rather spend 15 minutes at 11pm typing an e-mail that will solve a problem right then, than having to spend 2 hours fixing something first thing the next morning.

You seem to have missed reading the headline, let alone TFA "Workers Working An Extra 20 Hours a Week". You won't get two hours off tomorrow for your 15 minutes of work at 11pm. You'll still work be at work tomorrow morning. Now that you have put yourself on call at 11pm, they don't need to pay someone else to do it, so staffing levels go down, your workload goes up. If you're a shareholder this is great. If you're an employee, if you're married and have children, or you just like to sleep at night, maybe not so rosy.

I'd rather be 'on call' every day for 4 hours after work, on top of my 8 hours a day at work

You need a hobby and some friends.

Re:Cry me a river... (2)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 2 years ago | (#41084603)

Even if it is, I'd rather spend 15 minutes at 11pm typing an e-mail that will solve a problem right then, than having to spend 2 hours fixing something first thing the next morning.

You seem to have missed reading the headline, let alone TFA "Workers Working An Extra 20 Hours a Week". You won't get two hours off tomorrow for your 15 minutes of work at 11pm.

The thing about a lot of knowledge-based jobs is that usually a company (even a big one) has one, maybe two or three people with deep domain knowledge into a particular subject. This means that you are responsible for every issue regarding subject X, regardless of if it's too much work or if the issue comes up on the weekend or whatever. If you choose to ignore things over the weekend, and to ignore things that require working more than 8 hours a day, sure you can probably get away with it and you might even survive the next round of layoffs (but no guarantees.)

If solving a problem in 15 minutes that would have ballooned into a 2 hour fiasco once management gets their hands on it (say for example if the customer is shitstorm mad that they were waiting for an answer all weekend and now want a dog and pony show to keep them happy) then hell yes I would rather spend the 15 minutes on it now and maybe i can get something else productive done the next day with those 2 hours (or i can post to slashdot... ahem).

You are right that this comes down to understanding. What it means is that a worker (who is getting paid to fill a role, not getting paid to perform piecemeal work) can now be productive 4 more hours a day without being in the office for those 4 hours. Given the choice between staying in the office for 12 hours, and taking a 33% pay cut so that the company can hire someone else to show up for those 4 hours to get that work done, i would rather keep the money and blast out a few emails after hours. This is the new economy, it's not a question of convincing management to keep 2 guys around doing the same job. It's a question of are you the one guy left or are you are the one guy let go (hint they will probably choose the one that knows how to be more productive.)

Re:Cry me a river... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 2 years ago | (#41083599)

Occasionally glancing at your cellphone while getting black out drunk with your idiot friends doesn't sound like work to me...

I don't really get why this post was modded down. I watch my email over the weekend, too. When the phone is silent, which mercifully over the weekends it usually is, then I know I'm not going to come in to a clusterfuck on Monday. I suppose that time I sit on the can reading the email is 'work' and that you could add that up to show my work week is longer, but I earned myself some peace-of-mind. If I do have to bail somebody out, then my quick response will be remembered come layoff time.

My stress level is pretty low.

Re:Cry me a river... (1)

icebike (68054) | about 2 years ago | (#41084239)

I suppose that time I sit on the can reading the email is 'work' and that you could add that up to show my work week is longer,

Exactly.
The story, I believe, is over hyped.

They seem not to just measure the time spent reading emails (because there is no way that adds up to 20 hours per week). They simply attribute all the time you might receive and read an email to an extra hour at work. Of course that is just silly, as two minutes reading an email and sending a one line reply from a cell phone between the 6th and 7th green hardly count's as an hours worth of work.

Getting yanked off the golf course to come into the office EVEN ONCE costs me way more time and money than answering an email.

Re:Cry me a river... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41084701)

Sounds not too different from some people in the office here...

Frosty Piss (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083099)

Winning!

BYOD has nothing to do with it... (1)

Elminster Aumar (2668365) | about 2 years ago | (#41083137)

People keep losing their identity due to *how* computers have pushed society's evolution. We're all numbers now but not because that's how authorities preferred it. It's done out of necessity. There's simply too many people on earth anymore and the use of computers is always seen as a means to match this. Obviously, this bleeds down into our everyday jobs and because of this, is always taken a step further--especially by those who have no understanding of what some people are expected to do with their machines (i.e. - developers). Point being here is that this "extra work" is nothing new... Unfortunately. It has nothing to do with BYOD and everything to do with seeing people as tools instead of individuals.

Re:BYOD has nothing to do with it... (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#41083375)

I don't feel like a number? Look I have a name: cpu6502. Not just here but on facebook, on gmail, and at work (though each name is different). People even call me by that name.

No actually I feel more like a cow (human "resource"). The company provides a stall for me to hang out with food, water and toilet facilities located nearby. From time-to-time it milks me for product, which it can sell on the open market. As long as the company does not abuse me, I am a happy cow. ;-)

Re:BYOD has nothing to do with it... (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 2 years ago | (#41083561)

As long as the company does not abuse me, I am a happy cow. ;-)

From Robert Plant's Liar's Dance:

Kneel before the fatted cow
Let's take a little moo before we go
We won't be back again

Re:BYOD has nothing to do with it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083687)

No one cares about your life. You're just another neckbeard off to the slaughter. Now shut your filthy pie hole and get back to work.

Somebody had to say it... (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 2 years ago | (#41083757)

No actually I feel more like a cow (human "resource"). The company provides a stall for me to hang out with food, water and toilet facilities located nearby.

Bullshit.

Re:BYOD has nothing to do with it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083777)

I am the new number 666.
You are number 1960974.
We want information. Information. Information!

Re:BYOD has nothing to do with it... (1)

Elminster Aumar (2668365) | about 2 years ago | (#41083827)

If that works for you, fine. What if that doesn't work for everyone else?

Re:BYOD has nothing to do with it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41084505)

Look I have a name: cpu6502. ... People even call me by that name.

Really? I thought we all called you Commodore64Love after your prior "name" Mr. 1960974.

Re:BYOD has nothing to do with it... (1)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41083615)

People keep losing their identity due to *how* computers have pushed society's evolution. We're all numbers now but not because that's how authorities preferred it.

We should go back to the good old days on the factory floor. Oh wait we didn't even have numbers then. Whoops. There never really was a golden era "for the masses".

Re:BYOD has nothing to do with it... (1)

Elminster Aumar (2668365) | about 2 years ago | (#41083755)

Fair enough, but do you have anything to propose that could help with the issue being discussed?

Re:BYOD has nothing to do with it... (1)

icebike (68054) | about 2 years ago | (#41084615)

Actually, his offering was on par with you whiny complaint (above).

Do you really think it was ever any better? Seriously?
Twelve hour days in dingy factories, or 16 hour days trudging behind a house guiding a plow?
People have always been tools, willingly, because even an uneducated farm hand understood that they were trading their hours of existence for food and shelter.

Suggesting that we fail to see people as individuals simply because now, just as in the stone age, there is a necessity to work in order to live, is romantic nonsense.
Mankind learned about 15 million years ago that banding together and specializing makes less work and greater safety for everyone. That we still band together today to make toilet paper in a paper mill does not make the mill worker less of an individual, known by his first name by friends, foremen, and shift mates alike.

That there exists desk workers who push your paperwork into a computer so that you get paid does not mean that the authorities desire this system, nor does it mean the factory worker would rather stand in line at the pay-master's window and have his wages handed to him at the end of the week.

And if said desk worker gets an email saying the payroll run crashed and she can take care of the restart over the phone without leaving the dinner party, or when the factory floor worker gets an email saying their paycheck was deposited automatically in the bank while deciding which bicycle to buy at the bike shop, that IS significant change and it IS an improvement over historical situations. People choose this route voluntarily every single day.

In short, I didn't see a single truth or useful notion in your post, simply a romantic lament for days gone by, where the grass was never as green as you seem to remember it.

Your actions harm me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083675)

When it becomes trendy to work long hours, employers start to require it. Then, I have to work those same long hours, because there are no jobs where a proper work/life balance is respected.

Thanks a lot, you damn busybodies!

Re:Your actions harm me (5, Insightful)

Samalie (1016193) | about 2 years ago | (#41083915)

When it becomes trendy to work long hours, employers start to require it. Then, I have to work those same long hours, because there are no jobs where a proper work/life balance is respected.

Thanks a lot, you damn busybodies!

Actually this. 1000 times this.

We had an individual in my office. For the sake of this story, we will refer to him as "Fuckwit".

Now, Fuckwit came in to work 7 days a week, and roughly 12-14 hours per day. He was paid a standard 40-hour-workweek salary, and effectively then volunteered 60 hours more a week.

This became the standard against which the rest of the staff are measured. Fuckwit is doing it, why the fuck can't you? Fuckwit needs you while you are on vacation....fuck your vacation, do what Fuckwit wants of you. Never mind Fuckwit is a single male with no girlfirned, no kids, no social life, whatever. Fuckwit has set the bar.

Today, Fuckwit is on a 2 year sabbattical because (from what I've heard) he hit the wall and burnt out to shit. But guess what? He set the fucking bar, which we still to this day fail to measure up to. Management could care less that it destroyed Fuckwit, requiring a massive sabbattical...they got 3 1/2 years of 100 hour workweeks out of him before that happened.

Now, multiply Fuckwit across America. Millions of Fuckwits who are "lucky to have a job at all" working double the hours they are contracted (and often paid) to do. So suddenly, we have millions of Fuckwits doing the effective job of 2 people....where the company SHOULD be hiring 2 people, but why the fuck would they when there is Fuckwit who will do it anyway.

And then we wonder why unemployment is shot to shit right now. Of course there are hardly any fucking jobs being created, because they keep making US do the work for a job that SHOULD be created.

In other words, fuck every last one of you Fuckwits out there. YOU are fucking us all. Personally, I hope the stress eats you up inside till you have a mental breakdown or a fucking heart attack. THen these companies might actually have to, you know, hire the appropriate number of staff instead of fucking us all.

Re:Your actions harm me (1)

berashith (222128) | about 2 years ago | (#41084227)

this would suck.

I am currently in an environment where long hours and constant availability are required, but it is great. I dont have to sit a round the office with nothing to do. I come in around 10 to 10:30 most days which allows me to do marathon training runs in the morning. I have 2 days with 9 am meetings, and I work those into my life. If there is nothing going on in the afternoon then I can leave before 5. I may need to make production changes around 8 or 10 at night, but those are not so bad as the kids have gone to bed already, and I actually got to see them and eat dinner with them. I dont even have to check email and stay in constant contact, as they took a page from the 80s and gave me a pager for required contact situations ... i didnt want MY phone that I pay for hooked into their security, so we compromised.

Not every place is like this, but the few nights of odd hours actually fit into a balanced life as I dont have to just attend the office for the appearance of being available on everyone else's hours. My responsibilities are a bit different, and management has recognized that my value can be better used if spread out, and has gotten greater time coverage of my skills at a good trade off. I have had plenty of jobs where I wasnt required to be available as much where somehow the normal day prevented me from having time for my own interests.

Re:Your actions harm me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41084421)

You screwed me over in high school.. it's my turn now..

Re:Your actions harm me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41084465)

Fuckwit, this in my hand is the bar you set so high. See it rushing to crush your cranium?

Re:Your actions harm me (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 2 years ago | (#41084501)

"Now, multiply Fuckwit across America. Millions of Fuckwits who are "lucky to have a job at all" "

We already have this. It's called Slashdot!

Re:Your actions harm me (0)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#41084529)

Well said, nothing to add.

Re:Your actions harm me (3, Insightful)

netwarerip (2221204) | about 2 years ago | (#41084561)

Completely agree with this. Problem is, management typically looks at Fuckwit no differently then they look at a printer. Oh, burnt out the fuser? No problem, just go get a new one. Lather, rinse, repeat as necessary.

BYOD should be amended to mean 'Bend Y'ass Over, Dude'.

Re:Your actions harm me (1)

Stormthirst (66538) | about 2 years ago | (#41084635)

I was once asked by my boss to come in on the weekend, which turned out not to be an emergency, just routine work that could have waited. I double checked my contract, and found I could be paid overtime. So, come Monday I submitted my claim for overtime. The boss never paid me, but I also never got called on the weekend to do routine work. Worth it, consider the hours others were being expected to do

Disclaimer (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083179)

"According to...enterprise Wi-Fi access firm iPass...their companies did not require security on smartphones or tablets to access work data."

If "did not require security" didn't make any sense to you, you're not alone. It looks like they actually meant "did not use our magic tiger-repelling-rock based product". The whole "report" is a slashvertizement.

Re:Disclaimer (1)

element-o.p. (939033) | about 2 years ago | (#41084659)

That quote from TFS gave me pause, as well (in true /. tradition, I have not RTFA'd): how would most employees know if their company "require[d] security on smartphones or tablets to access work data?"

Where I work, we have a VPN that people can hit with a myriad of devices, and the VPN runs a couple of tests to make sure that you've got adequate security on your device before allowing the connection (no, it doesn't nmap it, and no, I'm not going to describe the process on an Internet forum). The process is more or less transparent and only takes a few seconds; I doubt most people would even notice it. Did they poll the admins to find out what policies are in place, or did they just ask the end users? If the former, then okay, I'll buy it. If the latter, then that assertion is highly suspect.

"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (5, Insightful)

Neil_Brown (1568845) | about 2 years ago | (#41083197)

Two excellent books which made me question why I had my email pushed to me, notifications popping up, looked at work email before I went to bed and so on. Switching email to "pull" (both work and personal, both mobile and computer), not having work email enabled on my phone unless I actually needed it, and minimising distractions ("silent" on my phone means no vibrations either — no distractions), I've found that I get a lot more done in a given period of time (may sound silly, but "Getting Things Done" did a lot for me here, too), and am generally more relaxed.

I'm a huge fan of being connected, but this experience has made me realise I truly value having connectivity available when I want it, rather than letting things rule me.

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083237)

In the future, rich people will be disconnected from the Internet unless they have to be, and only the poor will be connected full-time, because they're so insignificant that anyone can bug them about anything at any time.

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (1)

Neil_Brown (1568845) | about 2 years ago | (#41083265)

Interesting. There's got to be a short story in that (if there is not already)...

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083485)

Slightly similar is Alfred Bester's "The Stars My Destination." Except instead of the internet, it's teleportation, and disconnecting means walling yourself inside a teleport-proof mansion.

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (1)

Quakeulf (2650167) | about 2 years ago | (#41083425)

I have lived without internet access for 1 and a half years so far and enjoying it as it actually helps my productivity a lot, just like in the early 2000's and late 90's when I didn't have a decent enough internet connection. I've come to the point where I have started developing my own projects and learned a lot of new and useful skills simply by not being on Youtube all day. I suggest more people follow suit.

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (0)

JoeMerchant (803320) | about 2 years ago | (#41083543)

Ummm... and your presence on /. at 1:30 on a Wednesday?

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083747)

Hey moron! The world's a sphere last time I checked!

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (1)

ArhcAngel (247594) | about 2 years ago | (#41083609)

living without internet access and posting to /.

Mind Blown!

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (1)

element-o.p. (939033) | about 2 years ago | (#41084683)

He dictated the post to his personal assistant, who does have Internet access :D

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (4, Insightful)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#41083479)

I noticed that with my boss today. We were chatting and his "push" email updated, so he glanced at it. Then we resumed chatting and his email updated so he glanced at it again. I found it annoying & made our chat last 1.5 times longer than it should have. I check my email just twice a day..... I figure if it's urgent they can pick up the phone and call. Or send an instant message.

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (2)

swillden (191260) | about 2 years ago | (#41084555)

I'm a huge fan of being connected, but this experience has made me realise I truly value having connectivity available when I want it, rather than letting things rule me.

+1

I love my smartphone (Galaxy Nexus), tablet (Nexus 7) and highly-portable laptop (MacBook Air), and it's very convenient to have 24/7 access to my desktop at work via VPN, my work e-mail and IM on all devices, etc. I love the flexibility all of that provides. However, I also have my mail client (Gmail) on my phone & tablet configured not to provide any notifications at all for new e-mail in my work account, not even the icon in the notification bar and I keep my work IM account turned off except when I decide to use it to contact someone else. On my laptop, I use Chrome with two different profiles, one for work and one for personal, and I close the windows with the work profile when I'm not working.

I occasionally do decide to hack a little on my current project at work in the evenings when the family has gone to bed, because I have some idea I want to try out, or I hop on to check the monitors that show the transactions being processed by my recently-deployed-to-production project, or to check the exception-logging tool, and I frequently scan my e-mail priority inbox and my calendar before going to bed. But that's because I choose to do those things, and if I don't happen to want to, I don't. And if anyone tried to tell me that I should do those things, I'd tell them to take a flying leap. But no one has asked, and I don't expect it to happen.

I like the freedom and flexibility all of the tech gives me, but I'm not going to let it cause work to interfere with what's really important. It allows me to work extra hours when I want to, but imposes no requirements on me to do so -- and I will refuse to accept any such requirements without corresponding compensation.

Oh, and as for the other part of the article, yes, my devices are all locked down. In order to have my company e-mail on my cell and tablet, I have to install a device policy enforcement tool, which makes sure my devices are appropriately password-protected, encrypted and can be remotely wiped by the company. If I don't comply with policy, or remove the tool, the mail server won't talk to my devices. My laptop, of course, is company-issued, uses full-disk (full-SSD?) encryption and has its own policy enforcement tool.

Re:"Hamlet's BlackBerry" and "In Praise of Slow" (1)

mordred99 (895063) | about 2 years ago | (#41084733)

There was a company that came into my former company which preached this. They had a training called "How to optimize outlook to get stuff done" or some such. We used to get between 200-300 emails a day, most were FYI stuff.

* Basically they said, don't check your email but a couple times a day. Typically when you first get in, right after lunch, and right before you leave at night. Allocate a certain amount of time to it and block your calendar (such as the first 30 minutes of the day, last 30 minutes of the day, 30 minutes after lunch) depending on how much email you get in a day.

* Change your email signature to say something like "Emails will be responded to in a 24 hours period. Anything with more urgency please call or drop by my office." And have your number and office number in your signature.

* Spend no more than 3 minutes on an email. If you have to, push that out until you start over your next "email time". You can come back to it if you have time left in your xx minute slot in your calendar and need to answer it. You just want to make sure that you get done with all the emails in your inbox before the time is up.

* Move FYI emails to a "Read Later" folder where you can read them later if you have time.

* Turn off all notifications except meeting notices. This way you will not get distracted and be tempted to check when you are not in your allocated time.

There was a bunch more, but at the end of the day, this was all I did. It was a wonder for my productivity, when I was not reading a manual and every 3 mintues got an email and I would check it out based on the preview. The only people that complained were people like my old boss would would send out 30 page documents and expect the team to read it and give detailed analysis in less than 30 minutes before he would run to a meeting about that topic. I told him he had to plan ahead as giving me 30 minutes to read a 30 page document isn't going to get a good response from me.

LOL (5, Insightful)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41083217)

But 19% of mobile workers said their companies did not require security on smartphones or tablets to access work data.

Somehow I don't think 19% of mobile workers can tell the difference between http and https access to their corporate webmail, much less the intricacies of imap on port 143 vs imaps on port 993

Asking them is about as wise as asking the average man on the street if his blood is RH positive or RH negative and then basing your blood bank inventory plan on their random choices. I'm guessing the average moron would assume RH is a disease so you'd skew negative, but the actual population is mostly positive (exact value depending on where you live)

Re:LOL (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 2 years ago | (#41083989)

Why was device security mentioned in the summary at all? It's not in the article that this submission is ostensibly about. Which of the two issues was the submitter hoping to discuss?

FWIW while my cell phone is able to connect to my work email, it only checks for new mail manually. I still check it once during evenings and once or twice on weekends, but I've gotten much better about ignoring anything that's not truly urgent until the next workday. Just because a particular faculty member didn't think about setting up a class webpage until 10pm the evening before doesn't make it an emergency for me; but if the server's down I'd better deal with it.

"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (5, Insightful)

gallondr00nk (868673) | about 2 years ago | (#41083219)

The report also said that 92% of mobile workers 'enjoy their job flexibility' and are 'content' with working longer hours

Well done, what a great way to undermine your own wage and working conditions.

Re:"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (2)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about 2 years ago | (#41083315)

If they 'enjoy' and are 'content', then it's hard to say they've 'undermined' themselves. They have perhaps undermined 'you' and your conditions, but that's called competition.

Re:"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083841)

You poor, dumb, sheltered bastard.

Re:"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (2)

gallondr00nk (868673) | about 2 years ago | (#41084159)

If they 'enjoy' and are 'content', then it's hard to say they've 'undermined' themselves. They have perhaps undermined 'you' and your conditions, but that's called competition.

Hard to say they've undermined themselves? How about if they were paid, lets say, $10/hour. That contentment of which you speak is costing them $200 per week net, assuming 20 hours a week. Quite a sacrifice, wouldn't you say?

Secondly, you're damn right it undermines me. It undermines you as well. Working extra hours a week unpaid isn't competition, its a race to the bottom. How precisely does one compete with someone who works for free?.

Re:"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (1)

element-o.p. (939033) | about 2 years ago | (#41084759)

If "flexibility" means work a normal business week (5x8), plus an unspecified number of additional hours after CoB for free, then yes, from an objective point of view, they've undermined themselves because they are no longer earning their advertised salary, even if they get to use their shiny new iToy to get said work done.

Re:"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083357)

Why? I'm in that 92%. I very much 'enjoy my job flexibility' and am very 'content with working longer hours.'

But then again I'm a porn actor.

Re:"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (1)

atlasdropperofworlds (888683) | about 2 years ago | (#41083371)

Since they are now working 20 extra hours per week, their total weekly working time has gone up to 21 hours thanks to BYOD. Yay for progress.

Re:"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (2)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41083389)

The report also said that 92% of mobile workers 'enjoy their job flexibility' and are 'content' with working longer hours

Well done, what a great way to undermine your own wage and working conditions.

It goes both ways. "Boss says I'm working 24x7 now... I'm redefining working as I occasionally glance at and ignore my email while eating, surfing the net, listening to music, playing games, drinking, talking about sports, endless smoke breaks, flirting ... oh wait were you talking about while at work or while at home? You mean there's supposed to be a difference?" It can be a real productivity killer. I know at a previous employer a punishing pager schedule (basically working part time 2nd and 3rd shift every month or so while also working full time 1st shift) meant that we gave ourselves comp time during the day by Fing off about two to four times as much as the time we spent outside of work in the recent past. So if I had to work from 2am to 5am because it was my on call week, well lets just say I basically did nothing at work but F around from 8am until about 2pm or so.

In the long run I don't think you make money by smearing the working hours across 24 hours all spread spectrum like, but the integrated actual number of hours actually worked drops from 8+ to maybe less than 5 or so hours per workday.

There are other interesting issues, like I have talked to customers while drunk, not because I drink at work, but because I drink at home and its not like my 24x7 on call job forbids me from drinking for the duration of my employment. So drunken / sleepy / distracted / having sex during "work" simply happens. Given that I'll bet you're glad I do programming / sysadmin stuff and not airline pilot / truck driver.

Re:"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083683)

Good luck sucker. You'll wake up and realize what those 'damn communists' were complaining about 100 years ago, once you have a family, or when you realize the 'Sword of +5' doesn't slay mortgages.

Re:"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 2 years ago | (#41083527)

My job flexibility means that when the boss says "update that server" I can do it from home, during off hours, when nobody at work cares that they can't get email or whatever. That means less explanations to the other bosses, fewer complaints, and I can focus more on my other duties while actually in the office.

A morale boost like that could come from a raise, or from me logging in from via my cell phone, while watching TV with a drink in hand. I'm okay with the latter.

Re:"Flexibility" like that can go to hell. (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#41083575)

Depends on what they're doing AT work. Many people listen to music or talk radio or audiobooks... same stuff they'd be doing if they were at home. So no real difference in home vs. work.

Also there was a time, for about 10,000 years, when work and home were integrated because it was the same place (your farm or your shop). That experience shaped our brains' wiring. It is only recently that the two became separated.

I work +20 to makeup time (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | about 2 years ago | (#41083269)

The time I wasted on my Bring Your Own Device's applications instead of working. 12 hours a day are my new norm (and leave the weekends for myself).

Re:I work +20 to makeup time (1)

djchristensen (472087) | about 2 years ago | (#41083435)

If I had mod points I would mod this up. This is the exact point I made the last time this subject was discussed on /.. I have not RTFA, but I have to wonder if they just asked people how much time they spent working when outside of normal working hours, or if they also took into account the amount of time they spent not working during normal working hours. I wonder if, on average, number of hours spent working hasn't really changed.

That said, I do what a previous poster suggested, which is to pull work email when I want to. I don't even own a smartphone, and I have to make a conscious effort to check email on my iPod. I put in a small number of hours in the evening because that kind of schedule suits me. So I fall into that "enjoy their job flexibility" group without giving up anything to my employer.

Re:I work +20 to makeup time (1)

Bigby (659157) | about 2 years ago | (#41084201)

I'm curious how much time was saved because the individual are actually able to use computers that work.

I am sick of getting into an office where I am a "software developer" with a computer worse than those who use a web browser and Microsoft Office. Do they realize that an IDE and application server, let alone "the other stuff" take far more resources and I could work, not exaggerating, 100% more efficiently. When I have to wait 1 minute for something that should take 5 seconds, then I wind up getting distracted and visiting Slashdot.

Re:I work +20 to makeup time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41084673)

Dang, that sucks having an old and slow box like that. I have an HP Z820 workstation with two 6 core processors with hyperthreading (so it looks like 24 CPUs in task manager), 64 GB of RAM and a huge amount of disk. And I only use a web browser and MS Office. OK, so I jest. That is the machine I have, but I have a position where I get to do several things. I design our notebook / desktop images (so a lot of VMware Workstation usage) and I also develop code. Your work really should get you a machine that allows you to be productive.

Its not the device.. (5, Insightful)

SuperCharlie (1068072) | about 2 years ago | (#41083281)

Its the blurring of lines of what is work time and what is private time due to the always connected world we have become addicted to. When your "master" can summon you 24 hrs a day, 7 days a week, no matter where you are.. guess what.. they will.

Re:Its not the device.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083515)

In addition to this I think it's also related to the personality of the worker. I have this flexibility and I typically put in 45 hour weeks, some of it at home. The flexibility part comes in where if I need to leave the office for something, I can make up the time over mobile at home. Did I put in more time because of the mobile device? Most of the time no - it's time I would have been at the office anyway.

But I do know people who just can't stay away from the mobile device, and it's not necessarily because the corporate overlords are summoning - it's their addiction.

Re:Its not the device.. (3, Insightful)

JoeMerchant (803320) | about 2 years ago | (#41083567)

It's a free country, choose your master wisely.

Re:Its not the device.. (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 years ago | (#41084601)

It's a free country, choose your master wisely.

Mind = blown

Re:Its not the device.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41084091)

That is why I make my boss pay for it. You want me to have a cell phone, then you get to pay for it. Really cuts down on the number of calls you get when your boss knows that he will have to pay for it.

I bring my own device to work daily. (4, Insightful)

BigSes (1623417) | about 2 years ago | (#41083329)

Its called my brain, and trust me, worrying about that bullshit when I leave the building should count as "additional hours".

Removing Barriers makes people productive. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083331)

Gee Wiz. When IT stops putting up obsticals, people can actually get work accomplished. Who'd of thunk it.

Re:Removing Barriers makes people productive. (2)

Fned (43219) | about 2 years ago | (#41083605)

Gee Wiz. When IT stops putting up obsticals, people can actually get work accomplished. Who'd of thunk it.

Aw, whoseums confuses longer hourses with more productivities? You do! Yes you do! Wuzzle wuzzle wuzzle.

You're so adorable, with your wee little toes and your backwards ideas about working productivity. I could just eat you up!

Maybe they do private work (2)

gshegosh (1587463) | about 2 years ago | (#41083333)

On their private devices during employer paid time.

Wow.. lots of dumb.... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#41083335)

Sorry, but I work less with a BYOD requirement. IF you are too cheap to buy me an iPad you require, then I am going to screw off using that ipad during work hours.

Also Work more at home? I dont even answer the bosses phone calls in the parking lot 3 minutes after I leave.

Re:Wow.. lots of dumb.... (2)

gstoddart (321705) | about 2 years ago | (#41083495)

Also Work more at home? I dont even answer the bosses phone calls in the parking lot 3 minutes after I leave.

You wait until you leave? ;-)

Re:Wow.. lots of dumb.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083793)

My solution to all phone calls is voicemail. If it's truly important they'll leave a message.*

*thankfully my voicemail is full.

We don't do BYOD (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 2 years ago | (#41083347)

I don't do BYOD in my business. I in fact encourage my employees NOT to work on their own time. Having adequate time with work out of focus makes them happier and more productive when they are at work.

Re:We don't do BYOD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083503)

MST3k says this.... [youtube.com]

Re:We don't do BYOD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083633)

You sound like a SOCIALIST!

What kind of capitalist wouldn't want his employees to pay for their own tools and do huge amounts of unpaid overtime? If they are too tired you should fire them and hire some workers who aren't so lazy! They should be happy they have jobs at all!

Re:We don't do BYOD (1)

Samalie (1016193) | about 2 years ago | (#41083965)

Can I work for you? Seriously?

Heh (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 2 years ago | (#41083475)

But 19% of mobile workers said their companies did not require security on smartphones or tablets to access work data."

Of course not, that would eat in to IT's youtube time!

Personal things at work. (2)

bjwest (14070) | about 2 years ago | (#41083477)

How much time does the average worker spend on personal things while at work? Checking personal email, personal phone calls, surfing the web and playing games during non-break time? They may not consume 20 hours of work time doing these things, but they are being done.

Maybe you won't have to bring your work home with you if you do your work while at work.

What did you expect to happen? (1)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about 2 years ago | (#41083559)

Users never seem to be able to see past their noses when wanting to use personal gadgetry for work.

BYOD (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 2 years ago | (#41083713)

They should just be honest and call it MARFYOB.

Question for fans of BYOD (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | about 2 years ago | (#41083745)

How do you propose to keep company data private?

If you have a work-issued machine, the lines are clear: Work stuff is on the work phone/laptop/whatever, and it's password protected. Home stuff is on your device.

If it's BYOD, and Junior wants to play games on you iPhone, you just handed him a device that has your work stuff on it. If it's your own device, it's much more likely to be less protected and touched by more hands than a work device.

All those stories on the /. frontpage about credit card numbers stolen? They start with little leaks, and then the attacker wiggles his way in.

BYOD is a disaster.

Re:Question for fans of BYOD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41083913)

How do you propose to keep company data private?

If you have a work-issued machine, the lines are clear: Work stuff is on the work phone/laptop/whatever, and it's password protected. Home stuff is on your device.

Well, with the blackberry enterprise server, RIM makes it easy. You can have a division between "work" and "personal" on the device. RIM calls it blackberry balance. Only the "work" side is managed & controlled by the office. Only work-approved apps can access work data. Wiping the device (say the employee is fired) only wipes the work data. You have have a separate password for "work" so that you can give Junior your device to play with without compromising "work". Playbook does this too.

Of course, no one seems to be buying blackberry. Sad, since RIM has a number of smart people who have thought long & hard about mobile device security and resolved just about every issue.

Re:Question for fans of BYOD (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | about 2 years ago | (#41084567)

Many people don't need to carry around things like credit card numbers. Actually, why would ANYONE need to carry around credit card numbers? That sounds like something that should always remain on the server, locked in a closet somewhere in the company's building.

I don't work in industry but frequent glances over the stuff the business people are always pecking away at on their notebooks and Blackberries seems to indicate that most of it is boring busywork.

20 hours spent... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41084005)

checking FB, slashdot, etc etc

a few questions on this (1)

RobertLTux (260313) | about 2 years ago | (#41084063)

Okay im going to assume this is in jobs where you are not being paid hourly (since the Wolves at the DOL find extra hours without extra pay "interesting")

1 are companies actually paying for the extra "on call" time?

2 do they also realize that your response time may be impaired if you can't stop and sit down to do X?

3 are they just using this to comp for "dead times"?

I've been on call since last October (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 2 years ago | (#41084255)

I've been on call since last October.
I get $50/week for it.
It's kind of lame.
I wasn't able to start taking vacation again until about 3 months ago, and even then I was required to always be in cell coverage areas, within 10min of an internet connection and carry a company laptop with me at all times. I once had to remote in from a pontoon boat while tethered to my cellphone.

Re:I've been on call since last October (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41084333)

That is not a vacation.....

What the hey 20 hours... (1)

niftymitch (1625721) | about 2 years ago | (#41084365)

What the hey 20 hours...
If you are part time that takes you to full time.
If you are full time that is a 60 hour week and
should be getting compensation for the hours
beyond 40. It is the rare person that is truly
exempt from overtime if the boss calls at random
time to see if you answer in a sliding 12 hour
window.

Keep a call log.... normal bills will do. If the boss is
calling and checking on you he is in effect posting extended hours and
you should be compensated. If he leaves a demand
for prompt action outside of normal business hours....

The dam OCD fast twitch caffeine over loaded ADD kids that so quickly
get into middle management will cost the company good employees
or big bucks. They look at their smart phone like a Gameboy
and your are some little sprite gathering power points and gold coins
for them.

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