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Ex-Lulzsec-Head Sabu Rewarded Six-Month Sentencing Delay

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the naming-names dept.

Government 131

hypnosec writes "Ex-Lulzsec-head and hacker Hector Xavier Monsegur a.k.a. Sabu has managed to get his court case delayed by six months – thanks to his cooperation with the US Federal authorities in getting other Lulzsec members behind bars. This news came to light after a court document appeared online, which was filed by the US Government as a request to the US district Attorney. The US Gov put forward an adjournment request "in light of the defendant's ongoing cooperation with the Government." The request has been accepted and now the case has been adjourned till 22 February, 2013."

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131 comments

Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0, Troll)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about 2 years ago | (#41106817)

He will find him and make him squeal. I know a squealer when I see one ....

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41106887)

Yes but Bubba is stuck in cell block D.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107029)

but sabu is a hacker, so wouldn't HE be the one doing the sexual harrasment?

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107089)

Ha ha! Rape is hilarious! Ha ha!

Nice job normalising a horrific crime, fuckhead. You are part of the reason the American penal system is so terrible. Everyone accepts it as OK.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1, Insightful)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about 2 years ago | (#41107147)

The American people are the reason the penal system is so terrible. They want it that way. I've seen American prisons on the TV and it scares the fuck out of me. I'd not commit a crime in the US. Fear the man.
Mind you, If I copy a file here, the UK will have me extradited for a crime that isn't even a crime in my own land.
Even when it is an infringement of copyright, they've not made a film or game I'd want to bother to download in years. I hope I'm safe not committing "cyber crime"; but I can't be sure. I'd better sign up to Amnesty International now I guess.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#41107203)

I've argued with one person who was outraged that a prison was paying for air-conditioning. In Texas. You're right: The need for prisons gives people a chance to express their sadistic desire for collective vengence, but dress it up with talk of 'justice' and 'deterrence' to make themselves seem noble.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (5, Insightful)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about 2 years ago | (#41107267)

More evidence of this ; one of our prominent politicians, Michael Portillo, did a BBC documentary where he researched for the perfect method of execution - something quick and humane. While I don't agree with the death penalty, if you have to have it, you may as well be humane about it.

The current methods used by America seem barbaric - burning someone to death with electricity, or filling their veins with painful toxic chemicals.

He came to the conclusion that the method used by slaughterhouses for killing pigs, nitrogen asphyxiation, was cheap, quick, and humane. He even went so far as to experience the effects of asphyxiation via some Air Force test chambers.

All the Americans (currently involved in the Death Row process) that he spoke to were vehemently opposed to it, on the grounds that they couldn't accept an execution method that invokes mild euphoria in the subject before they expire.

Despite the Constitution forbidding "cruel and unusual" punishments, they see nothing wrong with strapping someone into something that wouldn't be out of place in a severe BDSM fetish and then frying them to death with electricity. Or gassing them with cyanide, a deeply unpleasant experience. Given the opportunity to remove all that nastiness from the proceedings, they resist - revealing that their mentality is not about justice, but about revenge.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107315)

Gassing people with cyanide? Did he do even a small amount of research?

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about 2 years ago | (#41107837)

Yes the program was extremely good /Insightful. I can't stand Portillo; but you could tell he'd given this a lot of thought over the years. I'm against the capital punishment and against prisoners being kept in torturous prison for years (in principle). I'm not perfect, I would like to see Anders Breivik kicked to near death and sent to a prison in Saudi Arabia. I'll get 21 years in a really nice Norwegian prison. For the people that killed 1year old Peter Connelly (Baby P) well send them to North Korea and be creative. Rationality calls for more strength with cases like this.
Here is the programme - How to kill a human being - BBC Horizon
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87fdhBIbehk [youtube.com]

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41109265)

I would like to see Anders Breivik kicked to near death and sent to a prison in Saudi Arabia.

I'd like to see 10,000 more Anders Breiviks, in every western nation.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

SlippyToad (240532) | about 2 years ago | (#41110947)

I'd like to see 10,000 more Anders Breiviks, in every western nation.

Why don't you smile when you say that, motherfucker? "anonymous coward" is appropriate here.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about 2 years ago | (#41108751)

The most commonly used agent in the gas chamber [wikipedia.org] is hydrogen cyanide. Did you do any amount of research?

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41109101)

This is slashdot. Do you even have to ask?

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107695)

Do you know the procedure for lethal injection? Have you been through it? Read the procedure before assuming.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#41111235)

Yes, the procecure for lethal injection includes three substances. A barbituate, to put one to sleep. Then a paralytic so you don't convulse. And finally potassium chloride to stop the heart.

The problem is that not everyone responds to barbituates in the same way. It's entirely possible for a subject to wake from the barbituate while paralyzed by the paralytic and be conscious when the potassium chloride is injected.

If you know anything about how neuronal action potentials are generated, I'm sure you can imagine that destroying the potassium gradients every neuron uses to fire would be one of the most painful things you could do. This shouldn't happen to even one subject of lethal injection, no matter how evil he is. It's completely avoidable.

The funny part is, if we just gave them 10 times the dose of barbiturate, they would just fall asleep, stop breathing, and die peacefully. But somehow that's not acceptable to our justice system.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41109667)

Pain for pain is not justice? What is your personal definition of justice?

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (2)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#41111261)

No, pain for pain is not justice. Pain is useful for punishment, when you expect fear of pain to deter future bad behavior. Since there will be no future behavior at all after lethal injection, any pain during the procedure is simply gratuitous.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41110265)

The world, meaning Society protects itself, its life, and its property

but.... judges who administer justice and the police
the judges are crooked and the police are corrupt
and the penal system is degrading humiliating subhuman
what it means is it's not protection they want -- it's revenge

society does not want free men
they talk freedom democracy anything you want
but they don't want free men
society wants conditioned men, men who march in step
  Papillon

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41111325)

Just so you don't spread ignorance:
Lethal Injection is the default in every state that has capital punishment (37) and only a handful allow the prisoner to choose another method. If you consider a prisoner's choice (gas, electricity, bullet) cruel or unusual that's fine. Since it is a choice I don't have a problem with it and I doubt SCOTUS would find it unconstitutional.

I don't disagree that lethal injection can/may be painful but you need to keep in mind that cruel and unusual != painless.

That being said I all for less painful methods the only thing I really disagree with is your presumption that we must be barbaric to use the methods that we do.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (4, Insightful)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | about 2 years ago | (#41108265)

These people must be completely ignorant to the issue of recidivism. How do you expect someone to rehabilitate and become a functioning member of society when you punish them by treating them like an animal? Not to mention, unless you're in a very low-security prison, you won't be learning anything productive or developing useful job skills. Once these prisoners get out, how are they expected to care for themselves in a society that will forever hate them? I, as an American, also have a problem with how much we spend on our prison system, but not because we're giving prisoners basic life support, but because of how ridiculously large our prison system has become.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

crazyjj (2598719) | about 2 years ago | (#41108079)

They want it that way. I've seen American prisons on the TV and it scares the fuck out of me. I'd not commit a crime in the US. Fear the man.
Mind you, If I copy a file here, the UK

Ironic, since every depiction of UK prisons I've seen in movies and TV make them look a lot worse than any American prison I've ever seen. They look like dungeons, (compared to much cleaner and generally newer U.S. facilities). Despite fictional exaggeration, the only problems with American prisons are:

a) so many people are in them (making some of them crowded).
b) racial problems

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about 2 years ago | (#41108949)

I guess many of the prisons here were built so long ago by the Victorians they would seem like dungeons. We used to send people to Australia so they could live in paradise and eat great food.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107313)

Ha ha! Rape is hilarious! Ha ha!

Nice job normalising a horrific crime, fuckhead. You are part of the reason the American penal system is so terrible. Everyone accepts it as OK.

But it's not "rape rape", so it's OK.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1, Flamebait)

somarilnos (2532726) | about 2 years ago | (#41108187)

Hey, if the victim doesn't get pregnant, it's rape. Just ask Akin.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107785)

I've never understood what the big deal was with rape myself. It's not really worse than forcing someone to do something that isn't sexual. Yet it is widely different as far as law is concerned.

Must be a remnant of religion indoctrination, where sex is taboo.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

FatRichie (1456467) | about 2 years ago | (#41109007)

To me the big deal to do with rape has nothing to do with sex, but as you said "forcing someone to do something". But that something is akin to losing something that you can never get back (innocence, security, etc.) ...not the kind of innocence like "Santa Claus isn't real?", but more like, "I can't be alone with someone physically stronger than me anymore because I've fully realized there's a possibility they may choose to roto-root my butthole with their penis."

Then on top of that emotional suck salad, there's still plenty of physically violent croutons on top. (and yes, I stole a line from Archer to explain my views on rape) Aside from just the basic beatdown that can happen, other side effects can go as far as infertility or death.

I honestly put rape higher on the list of horrible crimes than murder (as I do with many forms of dehabilitating torture), because at least the murder victim doesn't have to live with the consequences after the fact.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41109141)

I honestly put rape higher on the list of horrible crimes than murder (as I do with many forms of dehabilitating torture), because at least the murder victim doesn't have to live with the consequences after the fact.

Then you're a fucking idiot. I've known multiple rape victims in my life; what you're essentially saying here is that they'd be better off dead. Well and truly fuck yourself.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

tilante (2547392) | about 2 years ago | (#41109917)

Yeah - because the same amount of physical and psychological harm would result from, say, forcing someone to take out the trash. Let's just go through a few things:

First off, rape involves the possibility of disease transmission from the rapist to the victim. (Or vice-versa, for that matter, but that's both generally less likely, and the rapist is choosing to take that risk, where the victim gets no choice.) Second, male-on-male rape involves a forced intrusion of a body part, which can result in physical damage (tearing, etc.). This can result in incontinence, pain, bleeding, etc., and presents the possibility of infection. Of course, male-on-female rape presents the risk of pregnancy, which has huge potential consequences to the woman.

Adding in to that, the 'sex is different' thing isn't just religious - it's found across cultures, in every culture known. People want to be able to choose who their sex partners are, and have much, much stronger reactions to forced sex than to other things being forced on them. From an evolutionary standpoint, it makes sense, given the possibilities of disease transmission, and of pregnancy when a woman is raped.

In Western culture, there's also a stigma associated with being the victim of male-on-male rape, with many people seeming to believe that if you're a male who's been raped, you must be gay, or be less of a man. In a prison, once it's known that someone's been raped once, it becomes much more likely that they'll be raped again, due to a combination of the stigma and other inmates believing that they must be easy marks, since someone else succeeded. Because of this, victims are very likely to fight back on at least their initial rapes, which adds a component of assault, with the corresponding extra damage to the victim.

The closest equivalent in 'forcing people to do things' would be something like forcing them to eat something that disgusts them -- and you'll find that people consider that to be very bad as well.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41111719)

Of course, male-on-female rape presents the risk of pregnancy, which has huge potential consequences to the woman.

Come on people! Have we learned NOTHING this past week?!

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41111853)

Why don't you have a seat right over there.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41108591)

Ha ha! Rape is hilarious! Ha ha!

Nice job normalising a horrific crime, fuckhead. You are part of the reason the American penal system is so terrible. Everyone accepts it as OK.

We all know that the gays will do what gays do. In this ultra PC society, you can't really get away with punishing them for it.

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

tilante (2547392) | about 2 years ago | (#41109929)

Yeah - because all the victims of male-on-male rape *must* be gay. So, are you a troll, or just an asshat?

Re:Big Bubba in cell block D has no jurisdiction. (1)

soup4you2 (571216) | about 2 years ago | (#41107243)

Only delaying his cock meat sandwich.

Dear Anonymous, etc.: (5, Insightful)

circletimessquare (444983) | about 2 years ago | (#41106835)

Just keep doing like you do. Us older nerds watched this TV show you might have read on your historical wiki pages: Star Trek. Not to be confused with the empty visceral current Hollywood movie incarnation.

In the TV show, they had this alien race called the Borg:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borg_(Star_Trek) [wikipedia.org]

It was a notable work of fiction because of their social organization. Their ships were perfect cubes. You could beam onto them with a landing party, and they wouldn't care. You could kill, abduct, or otherwise maim a Borg crew member, they wouldn't care. None of these actions represented a threat. They are basically the fictional representation of the social order of siafu:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorylus [wikipedia.org]

Or, of course, any social insect.

And of course:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anonymous_(group) [wikipedia.org]

"We are Anonymous. We are Legion. We do not forgive. We do not forget. Expect us."

Do not change. Do not be discouraged. Do not give in. Adhere more exactingly to the social organization trait of social insects and the Borg.

Resistance is futile.

Re:Dear Anonymous, etc.: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41106875)

Do not change. Do not be discouraged. Do not give in. Adhere more exactingly to the social organization trait of social insects

and we shall swat ye like mosquitoes and extinguish ye like cockroaches and termites, hear ye

ye

Re:Dear Anonymous, etc.: (2, Informative)

circletimessquare (444983) | about 2 years ago | (#41106899)

and mosquitoes still live, and cockroaches still live, and termites still live. and ye kill them by the thousands. and they still suck your blood, eat your garbage, chew your house

Re:Dear Anonymous, etc.: (5, Informative)

Robert Zenz (1680268) | about 2 years ago | (#41107159)

You could kill, abduct, or otherwise maim a Borg crew member, they wouldn't care.

That's not completely correct. The Borg care if you engage against them, because then you've become a threat. As long as you're not a threat or "interesting" target, they don't care. While they don't value the life of individual drones, they care very well if you start killing them.

Re:Dear Anonymous, etc.: (2)

circletimessquare (444983) | about 2 years ago | (#41107213)

Correct. True of social insects too. Army ants or killer bees will ignore you unless you get too close or hurt one of them. The resulting alarm pheromones will lead the colony to attack en masse.

My whole point was that the Sabu situation shouldn't discourage them or take up too much of their concern. Shrug it off and move on. Like a wasp colony or a Borg collective. The perfect expression of the social organization of Anonymous.

Re:Dear Anonymous, etc.: (2)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 years ago | (#41107867)

You've got it all wrong. The Borg react if it's dramatically expedient for them to do so.

Re:Dear Anonymous, etc.: (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107319)

What a faggot

Re:Dear Anonymous, etc.: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41108895)

This is the most idiotic, childish post Ive seen on /. for a long time.

Re:Dear Anonymous, etc.: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41109383)

Adhere more exactingly to the social organization trait of social insects and the Borg.

"Insects" is the most apt description I've heard of Anonymous all morning.

Re:Dear Anonymous, etc.: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41109575)

Just keep doing like you do. Us older nerds watched this TV show you might have read on your historical wiki pages: Star Trek.

Then you might also remember this. [youtube.com]

Re:Dear Anonymous, etc.: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41110391)

Oh no! What are you going to do, hack some email accounts and deface a couple web sites? Truly that is as horrifying as possessing real might.

What a terrible deal. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41106839)

Does he even have an attorney?

and then in 6 months?? (3, Interesting)

chris.alex.thomas (1718644) | about 2 years ago | (#41106853)

he has to face the same justice he would have had 6 months ago, before he ratted on all his mates?

unless he is going to get a better deal, I'd just prefer to get it done and over with, 6 month delay to me sounds like he's delaying the inevitable, if thats the case, why bother, just goto jail......

however, if the sentence was lighter because of his help, then yeah, I'd see some benefit in that, otherwise....no way!

Re:and then in 6 months?? (4, Insightful)

djsmiley (752149) | about 2 years ago | (#41106927)

If they wanted to take him down, he'd disappear.

6 months doing _what_ is the question you need to ask. He already knows the kind of social influence he needs to rise to the "top" of headless organizations such as anon. And anon has the lovely thing that no one needs to ask who you are. Anyone asking would be viewed with suspicion....

Cut off one head and many shall spawn in its place? What happens when that head is under the control of the feds I wonder?

Re:and then in 6 months?? (4, Funny)

cowboy76Spain (815442) | about 2 years ago | (#41106971)

Following in your line...

I bet the six months things is just an excuse for the REAL plan. Currently, a "Man in black" is having surgery to get his face changed to that of Monsegur. The six months are needed for healing/removing the scars, and for tattooing the prison plans in his penis.

After the six months, and just after the entry in jail, that agent will protagonize an staged prison break with several "princes of the contraculture" that are currently in jail. Once free, he will use his new connections to reach to the alien leadership that is the real mastermind of all these movements (from Anonymous to Al-Qaeda, without forgetting PETA) and he will call in the black helicopters before the alien spaceships arrive.

Is that complicated enough for you, dear?

Re:and then in 6 months?? (1)

cowboy76Spain (815442) | about 2 years ago | (#41107005)

TFA says that he is probably going to spend his life in prison (up to 124 years).

So (provided that he is currently not jailed), the sentencing is improved not by release date but by entry date. If that guy was to die (or released due to age) in (say) 30 years, entering prison today means a served time of 30 years. Entering in six months would mean a served time of 29 years and six months.

Who did this guy kill?

Re:and then in 6 months?? (3, Interesting)

reub2000 (705806) | about 2 years ago | (#41107071)

124 years is the maximum amount of time for the charges that he's plead guilty to. I assume the plea bargain he agreed to stipulates the exact prison sentence that he is going to receive.

Also 124 years jail time just for hacking? Who are the hacks that wrote these laws that allow a person to be put away for the rest of their lives just for hacking?

Re:and then in 6 months?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107145)

"Who are the hacks that wrote these laws that allow a person to be put away for the rest of their lives just for hacking?"

The guys that wrote those laws are the guys that take tons o money from the people who had insurance "claims" in the billions for the "losses" incurred by the said individual and his cohorts.

Re:and then in 6 months?? (5, Interesting)

rtb61 (674572) | about 2 years ago | (#41107191)

Actually Hector Xavier Monsegur got involved in worse crimes than that. Hector as an adult stupid enough searched for and groomed minors to commit crimes on the internet on Hector's behalf, crimes that Hector researched, planned, provided the tools and led. The sickest part of that is under the control and direction of the FBI, he continued to score the internet for minors, to entice to criminal activity, so that a bunch of Fucking Bloody Idiots could indulge in some hair brained self promotion.

Right wing control freaks all wrapped up in a illusionary scheme to pursue an organisation they had branded as a yet another ohhh ahhh terrorist organisation (the defining rule being they are a group not driven by greed and are opposed to government corruption) and one they felt could be used to stimulate laws to clamp down on free speech activities on the internet.

The ones who really should be indicted are the agents in charged who led the continued criminal activities of Lulz sec and who actively incited minors to commit crimes on the internet, so those minors could be prosecuted for crimes, controlled and led by the FBI.

Re:and then in 6 months?? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107375)

When you have a for profit prison system. Sometimes you have to make new criminals. Or entire generations of them.

It's just good business.

Re:and then in 6 months?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41110331)

He was brought in for credit card fraud at first...then turned into an informant.

Re:and then in 6 months?? (1)

shentino (1139071) | about 2 years ago | (#41108379)

The same hacks that passed obamacare because they're sucking corporate dong. And who also tried to pass SOPA, PIPA, ACTA...

Do I need to go on about how corrupt our government is that it's the lapdog of the elite?

Re:and then in 6 months?? (1)

Lashat (1041424) | about 2 years ago | (#41110043)

also look up "concurrently" and "consecutively"

Re:and then in 6 months?? (5, Insightful)

sumdumass (711423) | about 2 years ago | (#41107021)

Around election time is one of the worst times to go on trial or get arrested. Too many "see, I'm tough on crime" politicians exist. Waiting 6 months is likely going to net him more favorable terms and perhaps a more "fair" trial as behind the scenes activity will be less.

Even the deals will be better because politicians won't need to pressure judges to be strict so they can gain favor with the voters.

Re:and then in 6 months?? (1)

chris.alex.thomas (1718644) | about 2 years ago | (#41107345)

that makes sense actually, thanks!

Re:and then in 6 months?? (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#41111337)

Too many "see, I'm tough on crime" politicians exist

I'm still waiting for a single politician from either major party to claim to be tough on securities fraud.

Re:and then in 6 months?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41111819)

Too many "see, I'm tough on crime" politicians exist

I'm still waiting for a single politician from either major party to claim to be tough on securities fraud.

Well, there's Eliot Spitzer. Why'd he have to go fuck whores?

Re:and then in 6 months?? (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#41111939)

They all fuck whores. The ones who rock the boat are the ones who get outed. See also DSK.

Re:and then in 6 months?? (3, Insightful)

darkmeridian (119044) | about 2 years ago | (#41107353)

The six months is for prosecuting the other guys that he rolled on. His deal is contingent on him cooperating fully with the authorities, which means actually taking the stand against them. I'm betting that the six month delay is to let him take the stand against the other guys, and to let the prosecutors rate his performance, before they figure out this guy's punishment.

Re:and then in 6 months?? (1)

Lashat (1041424) | about 2 years ago | (#41110071)

Actually, it's easier for the authorities to make sure he testifies if he is in custody.

Re:and then in 6 months?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41108305)

"in light of the defendant's ongoing cooperation with the Government."

The more people he burns in the next six months, the more lenient the judge will be in sentencing.

Re:and then in 6 months?? (1)

pdabbadabba (720526) | about 2 years ago | (#41112147)

Well, the prosecutors can't actually control his sentence. That is exclusively up to the judge. But a judge will certainly take the degree of cooperation into account (and the recommendation of the government) so if he has more cooperating to do, best to do it before the sentencing decision is made, no? (Especially if you're already out on bond.)

Snitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41106871)

He deserves it for snithing...

Re:Snitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41106903)

nothing worse than a low down dirty snith!

Re:Snitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41108325)

Yeah, that Bradley Manning too, what a snitch. Oh wait, that word's only for people we don't like.

Re:Snitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41110905)

No, it only works when you cooperate with pigs.

"ongoing cooperation" (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41106913)

No honor among script kiddies, eh?

Re:"ongoing cooperation" (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#41107239)

It's easy for someone to feel tough on the internet. Even a script kiddie - and given Lulzsec's record, they must have had at least a couple of people of real skill to pull it off - becomes powerful there. They can take down small websites on a whim, hack emails with a little effort, impersonate, cause chaos, and all seemingly untraceable. They may read of arrests, but never expect it to happen to them. They don't act tough: They really do feel like masters of their domain. And they are. You can't beat the hackers on the internet, even the script kiddies. You can only slow them down.

Then one day the police come a-knocking. The hacker is still master of the internet, but the arena has changed: All his formidable skills aren't going to save him now: The police know they can't beat him at his game, so they changed the game. And for the first time, the hacker feels scared he could lose. That's when the tough guy breaks down, and he'll sell out anyone for even a slim hope of making it all go away.

Re:"ongoing cooperation" (1)

shentino (1139071) | about 2 years ago | (#41108405)

Not many can stand to having their balls squeezed to near bursting by the powers that REALLY be.

Rat (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41106953)

What a rat...

Why is this desirable? (4, Interesting)

gweihir (88907) | about 2 years ago | (#41106997)

Maybe I just do not understand what is going on here, but a delay looks to me like making things _worse_, not better. (You have this hanging over your head for a longer time...) Why would anybody want that? Or is this a case of a common human fallacy, namely if it is more distant, it looks less bad?

Re:Why is this desirable? (2)

Xest (935314) | about 2 years ago | (#41107049)

Because he's probably been told the longer he cooperates, the more lenient sentence he'll get.

Whether that ends up being true in the end remains to be seen, they may just fuck him anyway.

Re:Why is this desirable? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107105)

Cowardly snitch as he is, at least he seems to be man enough not to flee the country and hide in an embassy.

Re:Why is this desirable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107219)

Right, right... just like you're not a man for not committing suicide by jumping off of a building. If your definition of a "man" (whatever that is) is such that you must intentionally harm yourself to be considered one, then I think such a definition can safely be dismissed as asinine.

Re:Why is this desirable? (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 2 years ago | (#41107249)

To be fair, he knows that if he cooperates he may very well actually get lenient treatment. Perhaps even more time off his sentence. Assange, on the other hand, believes (perhaps correctly) that some people high-up in the US government are out for his head. He isn't going to gain anything by cooperating, because nothing he says could convince his enemies to go easy on him. So his only hope is to run.

Re:Why is this desirable? (2)

James McGuigan (852772) | about 2 years ago | (#41107331)

A man who has spent most of his life not playing by the normal rules of the system and being paranoid about the governments of the world being out to get him suddenly finds out that the governments of the world are actually out to get him and decides to fight back by not playing by the normal rules of the system.

Re:Why is this desirable? (1)

shentino (1139071) | about 2 years ago | (#41108425)

Lenient treatment from the authorities.

From his fellow prisoners once they find out he snitched on his buddies to get a lighter sentence? Not really quite as sure about that.

Re:Why is this desirable? (1)

Lashat (1041424) | about 2 years ago | (#41110131)

He is probably not going into general population for this very reason.

Re:Why is this desirable? (1)

gweihir (88907) | about 2 years ago | (#41107639)

Hmm. Makes some sense.

Not that I would mind if they screw him over. Lulzsec is scum, they have zero "freedom fighter" in them. They are just sadistic vandals that get off on the power trip and not care whom they harm. For example, they do not mind attacking individuals that have no way of defending themselves. The often-heard comparison to Wikileaks is invalid and just underscores how clueless some people are.

In addition, Lulzsec was fairly incompetent with regard to hacking. They just managed to convince the press otherwise by clever perception management. No real IT security expert was fooled though.

 

Re:Why is this desirable? (1)

DarkOx (621550) | about 2 years ago | (#41111623)

Lulzsec is scum, they have zero "freedom fighter" in them.

They are not scum they are mostly just kids. The fact the FBI is after them suggests to me its our Government and Law enforcement that is mostly populated by SCUM. Lets face it on the whole the harm done by LulzSec is probably less than what the other kids are doing spray painting their gang signs on the neighbors fence etc.

There is virtual zero potential for someone to get hurt or killed on the Internet. Where any exists its because of the victim's or victim's service provider's own gross negligence. I'd rather have bored teenagers defacing web sites and publishing CC numbers from people who ought to have know better than defacing tangible property any day.

Law enforcement should pay about as much attention to to these matters as any other petty crime and no more, they should be focused violent crime and serious property crimes that can't be undone with a restore from tape.

One or more of the following is true:
1. National level law enforcement is primarily about something other than law enforcement.

2. National level law enforcement has a completely screwed up set of priorities

3. National level law enforcement has to many resources for its proper scope

Re:Why is this desirable? (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about 2 years ago | (#41108529)

Six months gives more time for tying up loose ends, like suspending accounts, moving belongings to storage, returning library books...

It won't make the sentence any shorter, but it will be easier to come out of.

Re:Why is this desirable? (1)

Lashat (1041424) | about 2 years ago | (#41110105)

Or maybe he just doesn't want to go in yet. It takes some considerable effort to "prepare" for a stay in prison for most non-career criminals.

Re:Why is this desirable? (1)

greggem (1044620) | about 2 years ago | (#41110963)

Usually you want to delay your sentencing so you can show the judge what a good boy you're being. It's more difficult for the State to argue that you need to be imprisoned because you are dangerous if you've been behaving yourself for the year or so that the case was pending.

It's a better argument if you're out on bail. I'm not sure what Sabu's custody status is.

pay attention, 1337 haxors (3, Informative)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | about 2 years ago | (#41107055)

These aren't honourable revolutionaries who would sooner fall on their own sword. These are antisocial children who play straight into the authorities' hands by allowing the latter to depict all dissent as the work of mere mindless vandals.

Re:pay attention, 1337 haxors (0)

Beckyoskey21 (2714697) | about 2 years ago | (#41107263)

nice post, thank you for tour gr8 post :)

Re:pay attention, 1337 haxors (2)

Hatta (162192) | about 2 years ago | (#41111441)

And yet they still have more character than the leaders of this country. This guy organized a conspiracy to DDOS some sites, the digital equivalent of a sit-in, and he's facing over 100 years in jail.

Barack Obama on the other hand, by failing to prosecute anyone for the massive fraud that crashed our economy, can at best be described as being an accessory after the fact to that fraud. He'd rather protect billionaires who stole trillions than do his job and enforce the law.

So is Sabu a nice guy? No, but he's no where near as crooked as the people running this country.

Ex-Lulzsec-Head (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107151)

Who writes this stuff!? Who needs a run-on adjective when you can say with clarity: "Former head of Lulzsec" ?

Better dalay his release too... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107255)

You know what happens to snitches, don't you? So much time, so few knee caps.

Re:Better dalay his release too... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107343)

You know what happens to snitches, don't you? So much time, so few knee caps.

Yeah, sure. The script kiddies will climb out of their basements and do what? Scare him with their pasty-white skin?

Remember Kids.... (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#41107357)

" Sabu has managed to get his court case delayed by six months – thanks to his cooperation with the US Federal authorities in getting other Lulzsec members behind bars. "

your friends will rat you out in a heartbeat if it give them any advantage. Don't think for a second that any friend of your is loyal to you. Anyone can be bought, some can be bought for a lot less than others.

Moral of the story? Trust NO ONE if you are doing nefarious things.

Oh and deny everything to your grave. Deny, Deny, Deny...

Re:Remember Kids.... (1)

Lashat (1041424) | about 2 years ago | (#41110189)

Well, mostly, but his is not entirely true. In the classic prisoner's dilmena game theory exercise there are only two players. "Honor among thieves" can be enforced by the higher-ups in an organization or by a competing power structure within the organization.

Anonymous (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41107433)

Does not forgive. Does not forget. And tells the cops everything he knows just please don't make him cry again.

Re:Anonymous (1)

miffo.swe (547642) | about 2 years ago | (#41108303)

Lulzec is not Anonymous. Anonymous is not Lulzec.

Anonymous is a moniker used by hackers all over the world. It's not a group. Lulzec was a group that used this moniker, as does countless of others. In fact there are other branches of Lulzec even.

Re:Anonymous (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41112129)

By your own description, Lulzec is Anonymous but Anonymous is not Lulzec.

Logic. Try it.

A bit harsh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41108827)

124.5 years for ddossing? Should have shot someone instead. Apparently it is more acceptable by our society.

And I thought Game Theory would apply (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41109623)

Wouldn't the Prisoner's Dilemma be a textbook example? I'd actually not sell out fellows if I was this deep in this shit. I don't hate him for doing so, he's only human. But can't we see if game theory actually applies here?

you FAILT it (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41110345)

with the laundry Towels on the floor Let's keep to parts. The cuurent its readers and and promotes our shit-filled,
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