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Astronaut Neil Armstrong Has Died

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the he-had-a-very-good-run dept.

Moon 480

dsinc writes "Neil Armstrong, first man on the Moon, has died. NBC News broke the news, without giving other details. Neil was recovering from a heart-bypass surgery he had had a couple of weeks ago. Sad news, marking the end of a glorious and more optimistic era... RIP, Neil." Also at Reuters.

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A class act (5, Insightful)

schwit1 (797399) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124085)

And a great pilot. You will be missed.

Re:A class act (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124137)

I really hoped he would win the Tour de France again. ;_;

Re:A class act (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124145)

Don't forget, he was one of the first true engineer-pilot astronauts.

Re:A class act (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124573)

"I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow." - Neil Armstrong

Re:A class act (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124231)

Neil Armstrong has truly been an inspiration to each and every one of us. What we wouldn't have done to be in his shoes when he made that One Small Step.

Re:A class act (5, Insightful)

C0R1D4N (970153) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124289)

I hope we send his ashes there at the very least.

Re:A class act (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124375)

Or launch his coffin into space, if thats the way the family wants it.

Pilot, Engineer, Professor .. A Real Role Model (5, Interesting)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124303)

A class act. And a great pilot. You will be missed.

Navy pilot - combat veteran, test/research pilot, aerospace engineer, university professor. Of course he was most famous for being an astronaut, commander of the Apollo 11 mission and the first to walk on the moon.

He inspired generations of scientists and engineers. Because of Armstrong and his fellow astronauts my friends and I in elementary school knew math and science were important and were highly motivated to pay attention. We had real heroes are role models.

Re:A class act (5, Informative)

Niklas Ohlsson (1281818) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124319)

And with balls of steel, he proved this with the uncontrollably rolling Gemini 8 and the successful manual landing on the moon.

Re:A class act (5, Informative)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124349)

He was known for his patience and concentration in difficult situations. In early Earth orbit tests, his capsule was spinning out of control off-axis due to a faulty stabilizer nozzle. He used the spares to straighten the ship even though it was difficult to tell which end was "up".

He later had to bail out of a LEM lander during a test run in the desert just barely in time to open the chute as the lander crashed. He came to work the next day cool and calm as if it was any other work day, yet determined to find out what went wrong.

And then during the Apollo 11 landing, he took control from the auto-pilot because the lander was headed for some large boulders. Fuel was running out because back then they didn't know the moon's center of gravity was offset from its physical center. The margin was tiny, but he found a way.

They picked the right guy for the mission.

Re:A class act (5, Informative)

mvdwege (243851) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124471)

It's even better than that. NASA in the sixties and seventies showed us just how powerful a robust process is.

A process is fragile if it attempts to solve a crisis by planning ahead for all contingencies. Inevitably an incident will happen that was not planned for, and the whole edifice will fail.

A robust process assumes something unforeseen will go wrong, and concentrate on making sure that there are adequate resources to respond in an ad-hoc manner.

NASA's processes in the Apollo project relied on a robust response: when anything went wrong, a highly qualified person was on the spot to think of a response and execute it. Sure they planned for incidents, but the final contingency plan was to have smart people with high stress tolerance to provide incident response 'on the ground'.

Armstrong was one of the exemplary examples of those people. He was by no means the only one though.

Re:A class act (5, Insightful)

MtViewGuy (197597) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124505)

I think it was Armstrong's ability to "stay calm" in times of crisis in the two instances you mentioned was the reason why he was chosen as mission commander on Apollo 11. During his days as X-15 test pilot, some test pilots at Edwards AFB thought he didn't have enough "stick and rudder" skills to handle sophisticated test vehicles, but Armstrong proved them all wrong....

Godspeed, Neil Armstrong.

One of my first memories (5, Interesting)

spineboy (22918) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124513)

I was 4 and remember being rushed inside by my parents and grandparents. Many people were crowded around our TV, as not everyone had one yet.

That blurry, slow, staticy picture would forever inspire me to love space and science.

We need more of this for our future. Money better spent on building and science as opposed to destruction....

Re:One of my first memories (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124557)

Mine too. I was the same age and my dad worked on the LEM.

It's a conspiracy! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124095)

Aliens!

NO ITS AN ACTOR (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124365)

same thing come form same nation

Oblig xkcd (5, Interesting)

myrdos2 (989497) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124103)

http://xkcd.com/893/

RIP Neil.

Re:Oblig xkcd (4, Insightful)

suso (153703) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124127)

Actually, think this is a more obligatory XKCD:

http://xkcd.com/202/ [xkcd.com]

Re:Oblig xkcd (1)

Forty Two Tenfold (1134125) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124477)

Only he's got it wrong. The comments are in the wrong order! It's fake, dude!eleven

oblig xkcd (5, Interesting)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124109)

Re:oblig xkcd (1, Funny)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124119)

Gah! Someone posted this during the same minute as me!

Re:oblig xkcd (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124343)

Nasa is not sending any more people to the moon until they figure out why everyone who went there is dying.

I guess he was not Headstrong... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124111)

Just Armstrong.

Re:I guess he was not Headstrong... (1)

firex726 (1188453) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124179)

If only he was Heartstrong.

World's Greatest Pioneer (2)

systemidx (2708649) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124117)

May he rest in peace.

Be as nasty as you want to the Baby Boomers... (1)

dtmancom (925636) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124121)

But at least they were able to get men on the moon. The USA can't even get people into space at the moment.

Re:Be as nasty as you want to the Baby Boomers... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124195)

The boomers were teenagers or just graduating college when Armstrong walked on the moon. It was the generation before. There's a reason they call them "the greatest generation".

Re:Be as nasty as you want to the Baby Boomers... (5, Insightful)

firex726 (1188453) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124225)

Technically most of the astronauts and people involved with NASA/Apollo missions were NOT boomers.

Neil was born in '30, while the Boomer generation was from '46-'64.
Moon landing was in '69, so the Boomers would have been at most 23 yrs old at the time, so they would have just been finishing college and entering the workforce.

The Boomers were responsible though for the eventual budget cuts to NASA and education, but still reaped the benefits of it's hay day.

Re:Be as nasty as you want to the Baby Boomers... (1)

M1FCJ (586251) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124259)

Surely you should be blaming the cost of a war in a faraway country called Vietnam for the moon-shot cancellations?!

Re:Be as nasty as you want to the Baby Boomers... (2)

firex726 (1188453) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124367)

Not really, because the major budget cuts did not happen till after Nam; when the Boomers started getting elected into Congress and the older generation retiring/dying off.

And besides, do we need further moon missions? We've been there lot's of times, we know what's there and have a crap ton of stuff on it's surface and in it's orbit. Until it becomes more feasible to put a permanent presence there it'll be a waste to keep sending people to hang out for a few days and collect rocks.

We'd probably get more benefit my concentrating NASA on more terrestrial endeavours.

Re:Be as nasty as you want to the Baby Boomers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124565)

Not really, because the major budget cuts did not happen till after Nam; when the Boomers started getting elected into Congress and the older generation retiring/dying off.

And besides, do we need further moon missions? We've been there lot's of times, we know what's there and have a crap ton of stuff on it's surface and in it's orbit. Until it becomes more feasible to put a permanent presence there it'll be a waste to keep sending people to hang out for a few days and collect rocks.

We'd probably get more benefit my concentrating NASA on more terrestrial endeavours.

Then don't send people for a few days on the moon. Build a fucking moonbase already.
We have the technology, we have the means. Of course, while our Congress is plenty with anti science dorks it's already half a miracle they haven't defunded the entire public school system. We're "educating" a mass of ignorant fools. The only thing they will aspire to in life is what they see in "idocracy" the future of the US.

Re:Be as nasty as you want to the Baby Boomers... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124239)

No beef with the baby boomers, but weren't they in high school in the 60s? It was their parents who put people on the moon.

Re:Be as nasty as you want to the Baby Boomers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124451)

The USA can't even get people into space at the moment.

No reason we couldn't.

We have the technology. We have people with the skills, or the capacity to learn the skills.

We're just not putting money into it.

That's a choice. You may not like that choice. But don't use your sneering condescension to look down on people for making a choice that you don't like. Especially since as already pointed out, Neil Armstrong was not in the Baby Boomer generation. His children? Yes. Him? No.

A true loss (5, Insightful)

mykepredko (40154) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124123)

One of the greatest men of the last century - thank you for your contributions to mankind.

Re:A true loss (2)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124209)

One of the greatest explorers of all time; right up there with Columbus, Magellan and de Champlain.

Re:A true loss (0, Troll)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124277)

One of the greatest men of the last century - thank you for your contributions to mankind.

I am sorry the guy is dead, and I don't mean to be disrepectful, but this is way overstating his importance. Neil wasn't the quarterback, he was the football. If he wasn't available, the next guy in line would have done the job.

Re:A true loss (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124335)

He was non-military, for one. And yes, a number of people would have been able to replace him. But - someone had to do it and he did.

Read up the story about his heart rate during the Saturn takeoff compared to the Lander landing. I doubt that many people would have been that cool.

Re:A true loss (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124385)

Selection of non-military may have been purposeful.

Re:A true loss (2)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124569)

Selection of non-military may have been purposeful.

It was definitely on purpose, to end run around any claims from other countries (USSR) that the US was doing this as a military mission.

Naval Aviator - Combat Pilot (4, Informative)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124445)

He was non-military, for one.

He was a former Naval Aviator who flew combat missions in Korea. This experience probably made a significant contribution to his ability to remain focused and calm.

Retired is not "non-military".

Re:A true loss (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124465)

It sounnds from the article like Neil himself shared parent's view...as do I honetsly. He did some great things, but it seems an injustice to put all of the credit in his lap when there were several other people on the mission with him.

He was a pilot, not a passenger (4, Informative)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124541)

Neil wasn't the quarterback, he was the football.

When the football has a bad spin or tumbles it does not correct the spin/rotation itself. Armstrong did so with a Gemini capsule that was in danger of going out of control. Similarly he had to land Apollo 11 manually when the computers were hazarding the ship. He was a pilot, not a passenger.

A hero, but without the hype please (3, Insightful)

fm6 (162816) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124341)

Sigh. Not to minimize Armstrong's achievements — which took courage, brains, and skill — but he himself would probably wince at your hype. One of the greatest men in the 20th century? He led a historic space mission. That's a big deal, but it's not in the same class as wiping out smallpox, discovering relativity, defeating Nazi Germany, holding a nation together with a third of its workers unemployed, laying the foundations of the computer revolution...

Re:A hero, but without the hype please (3, Insightful)

sackbut (1922510) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124401)

I think that his great humility and quiet nature was what made him the perfect choice to do why he did. He was not the leader although he did command the moon landing mission. he was one who recognized and acknowledged the efforts of all who enabled him to do what he did.

A hero, don't discount him (3, Insightful)

plover (150551) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124479)

I agree that he would probably have considered it hype as well, but I disagree that he wasn't in the same class. He inspired a generation of kids to become engineers, pilots, and astronauts. He rallied the entire globe around a peaceful cause. He was a leader. And he was the face of NASA, and the proud face of what America was capable of. And in 1969, in the middle of the Cold War and the Vietnam War, amidst huge problems around the country with race riots in Watts and Minneapolis and Chicago and Baltimore, here was this Great American Hero that we could all agree had made a remarkable achievement. We needed Neil Armstrong to be who he was.

Allegedly (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124157)

Correction. The first man to allegedly land on the moon. There is no proof this wasn't all done on a Hollywood soundstage. We can't even see the supposed flags they planted on the moon. I'm not buying it. RIP, ACTOR Neil Armstrong.

Re:Allegedly (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124169)

I hope your balls fall off. Show a little respect FFS.

Re:Allegedly (5, Funny)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124171)

I urge you to go tell Buzz Aldrin your opinions.

Re:Allegedly (1)

game kid (805301) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124265)

Oh that would be fun to watch [youtube.com] .

When I saw this on Slashdot's front page, my heart sank like "oh god no". Then I saw the comments under TFA about how the site managed to have it as "Neil Young" in the headline...a more dubious feat, but disturbingly typical for the proofreaders at NBCNews.com for some reason. (I read 'em daily so I've seen their fumbles too often...slow down a bit guys!)

Anyway, RIP Neil Armstrong. I hope we can step on the moon again soon.

Re:Allegedly (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124271)

'Moon landing' team members have admitted to the fakery, so it's not even alleged any more.

Re:Allegedly (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124297)

There's no proof that you actually have a brain, either. Funny how you can sit there typing a message that can be broadcast instantly all around the world from your house, on a computer that is engineered to sub-nanometer precision, you can take medication that is engineered on a molecular level, and you can drive a car made of composites that were only dreamed of 50 years ago, yet you refuse to believe in the Apollo program.

So what, pioneer, voyager, viking and all the rest are fake, too? Curiosity is fake? To what end would the government continue to fake all these programs - considering the glee with which it cuts NASA funding wouldn't it be easier to just not to fake them in the first place?

Re:Allegedly (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124399)

Go pour salt in your eyes.

Why?

Because being that fucking egregiously stupid should HURT.

Honorary Citizenship (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124163)

Neil Armstrong, honorary Mooninite.
"On the moon, our weekends are so advanced they encompass the entire week."

I'm too young... (5, Insightful)

flogger (524072) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124165)

I'm too young to remember his accomplishments firsthand, but because of his accomplishments with the help of the entire infrastructure of the space race, I was able to grow up with the dream of living in a future in which I could visit the moon and mars... Now I feel that dream has died right along with him.

The final step for a man. (5, Insightful)

Guano_Jim (157555) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124175)

And a loss for all mankind.

Godspeed, Mr. Armstrong.

Re:The final step for a man. (1)

Dr. Eggman (932300) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124249)

Beautiful sentiment. If only it were not just a day after my mod points expired... Mr. Armstrong will be greatly missed.

The state of space travel is a sad one. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124185)

The fact he lived so long and yet didn't see other people go to mars, or even back to the moon is an offensive reality, I really hope things change within the coming decades.

Re:The state of space travel is a sad one. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124237)

I doubt that they will. I leave you to wonder why. [globalactint.com]

Re:The state of space travel is a sad one. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124459)

Yeah - I wonder... [youtube.com]

Sad News (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124193)

I just heard some sad news on talk radio - Astronaut and first man on the moon Neil Armstrong died today. There weren't any more details. I'm sure everyone in the Slashdot community will miss him, there's no denying his contributions to popular culture. Truly an American icon.

Re:Sad News (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124371)

Truly an American icon.

I grant you that, but as a non-American I'd like to add: Truly a human icon.

One small step... (1)

BeerCat (685972) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124203)

...and he's taken the last giant leap for mankind.

Doesn't get any more legendary than that. RIP

Thank you, Neil Armstrong (5, Insightful)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124219)

Mr. Armstrong, I watched you jumping about on the moon when I was nine years old. It was unbelievably cool! The future seemed to be one of boundless possibility.

Now I'm older, and more cynical, and the world hasn't really turned into the place I thought it would be at this point - but whenever I think about your trip to the moon I'm suddenly a wide-eyed nine-year-old that still believes anything can happen. It gives me hope that mankind really will solve it's most vexing problems, once it finally decides to do so.

Thank you for everything, sir. I hope your eternity is a pleasant one.

Re:Thank you, Neil Armstrong (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124301)

I was a wide-eyed seven-year-old in Germany - and you mirror my feelings one hundred percent.

*bows*

NBC fixed the name (4, Funny)

tbq (874261) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124223)

At least NBC fixed the headline. It first read "Astronaut Neil Young, first man to walk on moon, dies at age 82."

What will happen to his remains? (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124247)

A lot of people ask to have their remains sent into space, but he's already been there. Has he said what he wants done with his remains?

Of course, as best we know, nobody has operable technology right now to place a person on the moon...

A great loss (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124253)

I'm just sad to hear this.

he was (1)

maeda (1967878) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124263)

One of the greatest, you will be remembered

The real story: the Earth landings were a hoax (5, Funny)

seifried (12921) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124285)

Everyone knows the real Neil Armstrong never left the moon, who do you think started building the first military moon base, and was later put in charge of it? In fact the entire Apollo program was designed to deliver astronauts to the moon, and then fake an Earth landing and use body double to replace them. Did you see how big the rocket needed to get all that crap to the moon was? And how small the lunar module was, no way did it have the power to escape to orbit and enough fuel to return to Earth. The Moon landings were real but the Earth landings are a HOAX!

Re:The real story: the Earth landings were a hoax (1)

seifried (12921) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124421)

For people down voting this, you may want to have your humour/sarcasm glands checked.

Re:The real story: the Earth landings were a hoax (2)

Hartree (191324) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124475)

The old usenet maxim still holds: There is no ironic humor so blatant that someone on the net won't take it seriously. ;)

A true steely-eyed missile man (4, Insightful)

Picass0 (147474) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124295)

A moment of silence for one of those who used math and fire to punch a hole in the sky.

Re:A true steely-eyed missile man (4, Interesting)

houghi (78078) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124441)

Don't tell me the sky is the limit when there are footsteps on the moon.

A hero (4, Insightful)

AbrasiveCat (999190) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124299)

One of my heroes. He will be missed.

I was little during the moon landing and thought it was pretty cool! It was only later when I came to appreciate the hazards and the guts to do the moon landing.

We stand on the shoulders of giants (1)

niks42 (768188) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124315)

And Neil was a giant of Mankind. Thank you for being there, to lift us up and show us a view beyond our horizons. You will always be remembered, and admired along with all those who worked as part of the biggest and most successful team ever assembled, to take that one, small step for all of us.

Arguably the most important American ever (4, Insightful)

Grayhand (2610049) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124337)

If we do become a space faring people to future generations he will likely be the best remembered American. Name anyone that accomplished anything greater in the last 200+ years? There is only one person in all of human history that will be remembered as the first person to step foot on another world. Even to this day it's likely the greatest accomplishment of us as a species let alone as a nation.

Re:Arguably the most important American ever (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124409)

Even WWII will fade relatively and the first thing remembered will be the walk on the moon.

Re:Arguably the most important American ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124433)

You better hope so. If Germany had won WWII, chances are pretty good we would have got to the moon a whole lot sooner! Where do you think the US and Russia got those rocket scientists from?

Re:Arguably the most important American ever (5, Informative)

shipbrick (929823) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124511)

"A scientific colleague tells me about a recent trip to the New Guinea highlands, where she visited a stone age culture hardly contacted by Western civilization. They were ignorant of wristwatches, soft drinks, and frozen food. But they knew about Apollo 11. They knew that humans had walked on the Moon. They knew the names of Armstrong and Aldrin and Collins." from A Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan

Curiosity (2)

nastav (2611511) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124357)

There was a time when I was hopeful that humanity would form colonies on Moon or Mars, or perhaps even terraform there. It became extremely clear in the last couple of decades that infrastructure projects - the kind requiring massive investments and and resulting in long-term (only) benefits - are no longer easy to fund. This statement holds true for everything - space exploration, bridges, high speed railways, safer investments in nuclear energy, better fuel alternatives, improved roads - if it lacks immediate gratification and short-term economic and political upside, it is no longer generally funded.

This reality notwithstanding, we (as a species) are making some serious (but very slow) progress into space. There are concerted efforts by private organizations to build manned space vehicles, and helped by prizes like the Ansari X prize. Even government sponsored work - like Curiosity landing on Mars successfully - is stirring up public's imagination (although I'm afraid not enough to overcome the forces that prevent infrastructure investments across the board). Up and coming economies - especially China - are interested in making a name for themselves as innovators. This desire to establish a brand in the world stage is seemingly fueling China's space program (as it once fueled America and Soviet Russia's programs). India might yet join in and make real investments (but given India is India, there is no end to it's tendency to fail despite having all the talent and resources it needs to succeed).

So I think Armstrong might have died being disappointed at what we have achieved so far, and what we have not - but I suspect that he did not die thinking that we have given up, or that our future in space is bleak - I suspect that he'd have instead known that there is still hope, and that we are making progress - just that our progress isn't structured and US-centric as one might have imagined a few decades ago.

RIP Mr. Armstrong (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124361)

Godspeed.

People who don't believe in heroes... (4, Interesting)

NemoinSpace (1118137) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124379)

Never met Neil Armstrong. I suspect one day we will have a memorial park at tranquility base.

Re:People who don't believe in heroes... (4, Insightful)

tengu1sd (797240) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124431)

It would be nice if the Chinese were willing to do that. Maybe as a tourist attraction?

An ambassador of humanity (4, Insightful)

zugurudumba (1009301) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124381)

Hundreds and thousands of years from now, people who made the first moon landing possible will live on through the name of Mr. Armstrong, who will continue to appear in the history books. Thank you, Mr. Armstrong.

Re:An ambassador of humanity (3, Interesting)

zugurudumba (1009301) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124403)

Also, please say hi to Mr. Gagarin for us.

One small step for man (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124443)

That's one small step for man, one giant leap for hnnnngh!

Threes (1)

albeit unknown (136964) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124449)

After Phyllis Diller and William Windom died this week, I thought about the proverb of death coming in threes. Crap.

Another Step down for this graph (0)

maijc (1365289) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124457)

Another Step down for this graph http://xkcd.com/893/ [xkcd.com]

Too bad (1)

cyberzephyr (705742) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124461)

It's too bad we lost a great adventurer.
May he rest in peace. :-(

My Earliest Childhood Memory (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124473)

Is of him and Buzz Aldrin walking on the moon. My dad worked for Grumman and worked on the LEM.

A great man has left us. RIP.

Rest in Peace... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124493)

The first true World Hero. At the center of a great collective effort they put the right man. And he never wanted to steal the credit from the team. You will be missed.

"WE LANDED ON THE MOON!" - Dumb & Dumber (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124499)

but the fake moon landing hoax remains.

One giant loss for mankind... (1)

Kilobug (213978) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124517)

RIP Neil Armstrong. You'll forever rest among the heroes of humanity, alongside with Gagarin, Newton and Einstein.

All around the world, regardless of politics, religion and nationality, you inspired people and opened the future. You were the first human to ever walk another world. To cross the immensity of the hostile void, and to actually walk on the moon. You made us all make that giant leap. You changed forever the way we think, at night, when we looked at that silvery crescent up there.

I wasn't born when you did it, and yet, you still inspired me to love science and dream of a better future. Future generations won't forget you. The best tribute we can make to you is continuing what you started. More than ever, we should continue the space program. Unite humanity together to send people on Mars and beyond. That would be the best way to honour you, Neil Armstrong, hero of humanity.

how does one country produce Armstrong AND Obama? (3, Funny)

NemoinSpace (1118137) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124519)

stupid statement,
Armstrong wasn't born in Kenya.

A rat done bit my sister Nell... (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124521)

Godspeed on your final journey (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124523)

So passes Major General Neil Armstrong. Born in August of 1930, died this day in the 2012th year Anno Domini. Veteran of the Korean War. Test piliot when man was trying to go as fast as possible. Father, grandfather. Part of the Gemini missions, part of the Apollo program, Congressional Gold Medal recipient, Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient, first human being to ever walk on the moon. American hero.

You were the first of a handful of us to ever walk there, let alone leave our planet. Those first steps on the moon will always be yours sir. I can only imagine what it was like. Godspeed on your final journey and may you rest in peace Mr. Armstrong.

Mourn His Passing (1)

ks*nut (985334) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124527)

This is indeed a sad day as we have lost one of the world's great explorers. The population of this planet has some very tough decisions to make in the course of the next few years; decisions that will make a huge difference in the quality of life, if not the future of our species. Let this moment be a time for inspiration and I hope that it helps us realize that we can recapture that spirit of adventure that led a modest man from Ohio to accomplish one of the greatest accomplishments in human history.

If he chose to be cremated... (3)

epp_b (944299) | more than 2 years ago | (#41124543)

...then may his ashes be scattered among the moon's dust.

Were I American, I'd be proud to see my taxes pay for such a mission. Heck, I'd be proud to see my *Canadian* tax dollars pay for it (though, it might only get them 99.742% of the way there ;)

What a hero and what a sad day.

to infinity and beyond (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41124549)

I guess Toy Story 4 is out of the question now.

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