×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Diaspora* Announces It Is Now a "Community Project"

Unknown Lamer posted about a year and a half ago | from the running-out-of-cash dept.

Social Networks 124

History's Coming To writes "Decentralised social network startup Diaspora* announced on their blog today that they will become a 'community project' with the intention of making it an entirely community-driven, community-run project. Whether this is a sign of the project losing impetus, or whether this will provide the push needed to challenge commercially run social networks, remains to be seen."* If you're looking for the footnote there isn't one**, the asterisk is part of the name. Sorry, it's been a point of annoyance on /. before.

** There are two of them, nested.

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

124 comments

Announcement that is almost like (5, Funny)

Subway Analogy Guy (2717033) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146529)

This announcement by Diaspora is like the good old Chicken & Bacon Ranch Melt sub from SubWay. It's filled with delicious bacon and ranch sauce and their intention is good. However, you notice something lacking. Something different. There is chicken! The lack of good old meat (girls) is drawing attention away from Diaspora. Hell, even Google+ is losing their battle against Facebook. You have to take it with ham, man!

Re:Announcement that is almost like (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146625)

Where've you been since Facebook's IPO? I don't see it surviving the pressure of monetizing and pandering to investors without alienating its user base.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (1, Offtopic)

Subway Analogy Guy (2717033) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146653)

Where've you been since Facebook's IPO?

At Subway, eating delicious sandwiches like Subway Club with Avocado. If you didn't know before, super food avocado is a delicious addition to a Subway Club! Lean Turkey Breast, Roast Beef and tender Black Forest Ham loaded with smooth avocado. Itâ(TM)s a sub with a flavorful punch!

Re:Announcement that is almost like (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146857)

Where've you been since Facebook's IPO? I don't see it surviving the pressure of monetizing and pandering to investors without alienating its user base.

They just have to adapt, like the way Subw*y does by using substandard meats sourced from third world countries. Athletes love the time saved by having their steroids already in Subw*y sandwiches, thus saving them an extra step.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (-1, Offtopic)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147241)

Went to a Subway once, saw that they had a "seafood special" or something like that, but it didn't say what kind of fish.

I asked the woman who worked there, she said it was crab.

Now there are two kinds of crab, the real crab which is bloody expensive, and the assorted marine mystery meat w/ flavoring concoction that is supposed to pass for crab.

I looked at the prices and it cost less than the chicken I was thinking of getting so I know it was the latter.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (1)

ultrasawblade (2105922) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147297)

The "mystery meat w/flavoring concoction" is known as surimi.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (1)

Fwipp (1473271) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147591)

It's also pretty tasty.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (1)

famebait (450028) | about a year and a half ago | (#41148121)

So is that artificially orange-flavoured candy I like. Doesn't mean they should be able to pass it off as "oranges"

Re:Announcement that is almost like (1)

History's Coming To (1059484) | about a year and a half ago | (#41151049)

Yup, I usually have some "seafood sticks" for snacking on. No, they're not made from the finest cuts of sturgeon or put together by a celebrity chef, but who cares, they're a quid a packet.

Anyone else notice that the "urgh, you can't eat that, that's disgusting, do you know how they get the meat for that?" crowd are almost always the same as the "we should go back to nature, do you know native Americans used every part of the animal?" brigade?

Re:Announcement that is almost like (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41149269)

Subway saves on cost? You pay so much for so little that it amazes me. Sure, the sub is tasty, but you can make your own at home for a quarter of the price.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41150889)

Actually, Subway subs aren't all that tasty. The bread is like eating cardboard. Here, I can get a sub, walk across the street to the Albertson's bakery, buy a loaf of Albertson's fresh-baked "French bread", drop the Subway ingredients into it, and the sub is much improved -- it's actual bread, baked with butter.

Since this is a fairly costly approach, I mostly don't buy Subway subs, but build my own instead. Using Albertson's French bread. :)

That's what happens when you try to be all politically correct and make your food "healthy" instead of actually "good."

Re:Announcement that is almost like (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146737)

Diaspora needs to enlist some playgirl models. Playgirl models will draw the faggots. Women like faggots. Profit. Also tell the teens that their loser parents aren't on board because it's open sores, and like all open sorres software, no one with a life away from the computer will be able to figure it out. Double prophet.

P.S. I just discovered my asshole is a scratch n sniff. Doesn't taste too bad either.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (0)

mug funky (910186) | about a year and a half ago | (#41148695)

troll offering a half-serious post?

is this a fail troll or a win for regular posts?

btw, playgirl wont be necessary. diaspora was full of dick pics already last time i looked.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (3, Interesting)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146753)

G+ losing against facebook? maybe for the inane crowd. Certainly not for the professional crowd.

Let me guess you were one of them that said "Facebook is losing compared to MYspace"... I use both and I see G+ to look exactly like Facebook did in the early two years except it's a hell of a lot larger than Facebook was during those years.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146789)

Note to OP

Don't slag off anything from Google when Lumpy is around. The only way he has any self esteem is by defending google and calling other people inane and by implication calling himself professional.

He is a weak character

Re:Announcement that is almost like (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147455)

says the 13 year old kid without a job or social skills.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147179)

G+ losing against facebook? maybe for the inane crowd. Certainly not for the professional crowd.

That's right, G+ is losing against LinkedIn for the professional crowd.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147331)

Zing! zing!

Re:Announcement that is almost like (1)

mug funky (910186) | about a year and a half ago | (#41148713)

yammer called. the have some nails to pass to facebook. something about closing a coffin lid or some such.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about a year and a half ago | (#41151585)

Let me guess you were one of them that said "Facebook is losing compared to MYspace"

Guilty as charged, which is why I'm not ruling out Friendster coming back and taking over.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (1)

Seumas (6865) | about a year and a half ago | (#41152555)

* Facebook is for self-involved attention whores.
* G+ is for the navel-gazing crowd of photographers, podcasters, and tech journalists.
* LinkedIn is for actual grown-ups who do actual work for a living and don't have time to sit around begging for attention or yanking each other's dicks.
* Diaspora is for people who like concepts far better than utility and don't care about the feasibility of it. It's like the flying car. There's always some guy out th ere making one and some company trying to back the invention of one, but the amount of research remaining and the amount of infrastructure that would be necessary to facilitate adoption of it is just not there and never will be. So it'll always be one of those little back-page curiosity stories that we all think is a potentially good idea that will never see any real use.

Re:Announcement that is almost like (1)

Patch86 (1465427) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146829)

Subway Analogy Guy? Oh god, not another lame gimmick joke account. I'm not sure I have the energy to ignore another one of you!

(Or I could just set you to -1, but that always seems almost fatally harsh. I'm not sure I could bring myself to do that to my worst enemy)

Re:Announcement that is almost like (1)

Seumas (6865) | about a year and a half ago | (#41152589)

You have the idiots at reddit to thank for this idiotic trend. The increase of circle-jerk-humor around here also seems clearly derived from the teenagers and colleges kids growing up on reddit and thinking that Slashdot is just like that.

This could *help* fix diaspora but... (3, Interesting)

thatkid_2002 (1529917) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146549)

But it's probably better to put the work into http://buddycloud.org/ [buddycloud.org] instead. Far better base for a federated social network than Diaspora... And a better core team (who welcome contributors). Getting rid of all that Ruby crap would also take a lot of work, and because they're not standards based you can't just (easily) write a Diaspora node in a more sane ecosystem.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146567)

Untill you bashed Ruby I actually followed what you were saying.

Someone who blames the tools, is a worthless worker, so, sorry, can't take anything you say serious.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146593)

Someone who blames the tools, is a worthless worker, so, sorry, can't take anything you say serious.

Sometimes you have to call a tool a tool, and that's exactly what the Diaspora crowd are like.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (1)

macraig (621737) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146915)

So are you saying the Diaspora crowd *are* tools, or are you saying they're people willing to call a tool a tool?

If it's the latter, you might not wanna join Diaspora, unless being called a tool makes you feel useful....

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146621)

Maybe Ruby really is shit?

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146727)

Maybe Ruby really is shit?

Bearing in mind the sites that use Ruby [setfiremedia.com] I don't think so. I think it is more the lack of skills and that you will probably need some time with your nose in a manual to set up the rails environment to run a node.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (5, Informative)

Raenex (947668) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147019)

Bearing in mind the sites that use Ruby [setfiremedia.com] I don't think so.

Since Twitter is the Ruby poster-child, how about Once Again, Twitter Drops Ruby for Java [readwriteweb.com]:

"Twitter has now moved its entire search stack from Ruby-on-Rails to Java.

That's a big shift. Twitter moved its back end message queue from Ruby to Scala, a Java platform in the 2008-2009 time frame. The move was attributed to issues with reliability on the back-end.

This latest move makes the shift pretty much complete. At Twitter, Ruby is out of the picture."

I think it is more the lack of skills and that you will probably need some time with your nose in a manual to set up the rails environment to run a node.

Ah yes, just throw more nodes at your unreliable and resource-hungry server code.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (5, Insightful)

An dochasac (591582) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147317)

Bearing in mind the sites that use Ruby [setfiremedia.com] I don't think so.

Since Twitter is the Ruby poster-child, how about Once Again, Twitter Drops Ruby for Java [readwriteweb.com]:

"Twitter has now moved its entire search stack from Ruby-on-Rails to Java.

That's a big shift. Twitter moved its back end message queue from Ruby to Scala, a Java platform in the 2008-2009 time frame. The move was attributed to issues with reliability on the back-end.

This latest move makes the shift pretty much complete. At Twitter, Ruby is out of the picture."

Hey if they can make the world's largest social network [facebook.com] out of PHP, spit and bailing wire, I don't think technology matters as much as we wish it did. A frighteningly large percentage of business logic still runs on Visual BASIC and Cobol.

I think it is more the lack of skills and that you will probably need some time with your nose in a manual to set up the rails environment to run a node.

Ah yes, just throw more nodes at your unreliable and resource-hungry server code.

Careful, I think there are several patents on that.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (3, Insightful)

Rich0 (548339) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147637)

Hey if they can make the world's largest social network [facebook.com] out of PHP, spit and bailing wire, I don't think technology matters as much as we wish it did. A frighteningly large percentage of business logic still runs on Visual BASIC and Cobol.

And rightly so. The fact is that scalability is just not that important for a startup. Most likely the startup will fail with few customers at all. If they do have customers chances are they won't be on the scale of today's Facebook. If they do have a huge mass of customers and run into scaling issues, then they'll also have gobs of money coming at them from all direction with which they can solve those problems.

The alternative is to burn through all your capital making a really nice infrastructure that could be used to run Facebook, but which nobody will ever use anyway.

In business procrastination often pays off. It is hard to anticipate what your needs will be in 10 years, so don't sacrifice your needs in the next 2 years to get there.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (2)

DrXym (126579) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146911)

Not shit, just esoteric. You have a lower pool of talent to draw from than if the same project were implemented in a more popular language.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (2)

rtfa-troll (1340807) | about a year and a half ago | (#41149227)

Ruby does have some very strange action at a distance type of things which make it very difficult to understand what a given set of characters making up a program mean. In a language like lisp this is counteracted to some extent by regularity. In other languages care and taste seem to limit the side effects of too much cleverness; python is the extreme example where the language is not just simple but also has a culture of trying to make it very clear. With ruby it really doesn't seem that way at all. This kind of stuff has to be counteracted by perfect documentation; very readily available examples and extreme care to make sure everything works consistently. Those things definitely don't seem to be present in Ruby to a person starting up with it.

At some point; long before we start doing object oriented programming in Whitespace; "esoteric" becomes a problem. I'm not sure if Ruby as a programming language is there, however that's the way it seems.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (4, Interesting)

thatkid_2002 (1529917) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147083)

Untill you bashed Ruby I actually followed what you were saying.

Someone who blames the tools, is a worthless worker, so, sorry, can't take anything you say serious.

Actually, sometimes people use the wrong tool for the job. Diaspora is one of those times.

Some tools are just plain bad. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147097)

Even the best master craftsman is left powerless when the tools he must use are broken beyond repair. An experienced carpenter can't build a house when his saw has no teeth. A glassblower can't create masterpieces when his furnaces create no heat. A talented software developer can't build complex applications when his programming language and runtime are crippled.

Ruby on Rails promotes quick-and-dirty software development, but in a more dangerous way than, say, PHP. Most PHP users know they're ignorant about programming. In fact, some wear it as a badge of honor! That's quite different from the Ruby crowd, where they mistakenly believe they know good software development practices, but in reality are only slightly less ignorant than the PHP crowd. This attitude is dangerous, because it makes them think the software they're writing is secure and of high quality, when the reality is the opposite.

A practice like "convention over configuration" causes many RoR developers to stop thinking about what they're doing, often leading to security holes. The use of the so-called "active record" pattern does the same, except it usually results in horrible performance because of extremely stupid data access queries and patterns.

Maybe you don't remember when Diaspora was first released. It was full of holes [theregister.co.uk]. Many of them were very unacceptable for software of any sort, even for an initial release. Good web frameworks actively help prevent many of these security flaws from even being possible in the first place! The fact that they could still happen while using Ruby on Rails just goes to show that much of the problem is with Rails itself. Yes, it's true. Some tools are inherently shitty.

Re:Some tools are just plain bad. (2)

miketheanimal (914328) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147341)

I detest Ruby and ROR as much as the next man, but I have to take issue with "active record" causing security holes. Its not active record, its using active record with mass assignment that is the problem. Though, active record can cause horrible performance. I blame the lets-hide-SQL-behind-an-ORM culture; nothing wrong with ORM *provided* you understand what happens behind the scenes (and how RDBMSs can be performance killed).

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147185)

No, it was Ruby that absolutely killed Diaspora. Don't get me wrong, I love Ruby as a language but its implementation leaves a lot to be desired, especially in regards to speed and security. Hell, I even loved the idea of Diaspora and was one of the original financial backers, but then I actually tried to setup my node and realized how utterly unprepared these guys were for this project.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (4, Insightful)

DuckDodgers (541817) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147379)

1. Language speed is not always the problem. Youtube's backend is written in Python, which is about as slow as Ruby, and it works fine. Most of Github is written in Ruby, and that works too.

2. The security problems were developer problems, not problems fundamental to Ruby. Early releases of Diaspora had SQL Injection vulnerabilities and Cross-Site-Scripting vulnerabilities, and a poor developer can create those in any language.

3. The reason they picked Ruby on Rails is that four kids were trying to create a distributed social network in less than a year. In order to have a prayer of pulling that off, you need a damn fast rate of development. If they had built the thing in Java using Spring and JSF, at this point they would be almost finished their "Hello World" implementation.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41150487)

1. Oh you must be kidding. The speed issues were definitely a huge problem. Every Ruby on Rails project I've ever run on my test server, including the super-simple to-do list given in the tutorials, have ground the execution of said project to a halt; something that would take PHP milliseconds to do would take 30 seconds minimum while Ruby fired itself up. Pointing to Youtube,etc. who have plenty of money to run clusters isn't really making your case for me. These Diaspora nodes were supposed to be able to be run by almost anyone except they were barely able to run at all on human accessible machines. The fact that the Diaspora crew started begging for money AGAIN so they could afford to run the servers they were based on is all the proof I need that it was the wrong choice.

2. The security problems were fundamental to Ruby, not the developers; I wasn't even referring to Diaspora in that regard. A simple search turns up multiple examples as to why it makes a lousy web app of any sort. It's great for scripting but beyond that it's a child's toy. I stopped using it for web-related apps for this reason alone.

3. So instead of using Java or anything else that might make sense, they chose something that might take a year for the application to finish starting.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (2)

Safety Cap (253500) | about a year and a half ago | (#41151923)

The speed issues were definitely a huge problem. Every Ruby on Rails project I've ever run on my test server, including the super-simple to-do list given in the tutorials, have ground the execution of said project to a halt; something that would take PHP milliseconds to do would take 30 seconds minimum while Ruby fired itself up.

Personal Anecdote FTW!

Unlike you, I wrote, deployed and maintained a RoR app in a professional environment that got a minimum of 40,000 hits per day, every day. It worked like a champ with no speed issues, because a) I worked with the server guys to ensure the web, application and database servers were tuned, and b) I know how to use a profiler.

I wouldn't dream of using PHP because besides being one of the few languages where every feature is broken in some way [veekun.com], I needed TDD and MVC baked in as well as threading support.

I would've used Java, but (as usual) the artificial deadlines required rapid deployment, and the minimum viable product would've taken too long to code in Java. I could've just as easily gone with Perl, but using some gems that allowed me to basically drop them in and go saved lots of time I would've wasted coding the same things in Perl (even though CPAN rocks).

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41150439)

So all this VB6 code I'm stuck with at work has nothing wrong with it. It must be my coding skills.

Sorry but if you knew the first principle of media you'd know "The media IS the message"(McLuhan - Understanding Media). The tools are pivotal to any effort, your platitudes are nonsense.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146685)

I agree. Using http://buddycloud.org/ [buddycloud.org] would certainly make most any modern software better. BuddyCloud (http://buddycloud.org/) [buddycloud.org] helps any truly talented group achieve their potential. And by putting your project on BuddyCloud (that's http://buddycloud.org/ or just type buddycloud into your browser's search tool) you could help save not just your project, but this economy as well. That's BuddyCloud (http://buddycloud.org/) [buddycloud.org] ... the cloud is your buddy.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41151311)

You can create any social network you can imagine... with Zombocom [zombo.com].

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (1)

unixhero (1276774) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146853)

Thanks a lot for the mention of Buddycloud! I have been hoping and looking for some great framework that implements XMPP to its fullest. It looks like this was what I have been waiting for, after all those years [since Jabber emerged]. Thanx

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146907)

The web page you linked to has only one big fault: Had it not been linked from your post, which effectively told me what it is, I wouldn't have figured out from the web page.

If they want to be successful, they should make a prominent text explaining what the damn thing is. Ideally, right below the initial "ad" statement. A one sentence description would suffice (for example: "Buddycloud is a distributed social networking system" or similar).

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (1)

dodex1k (2712675) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146947)

How could BuddyCloud be a better social network? That name isn't edgy at all. It doesn't even have a random symbol or a missing letter.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147091)

But it does have The Cloud!

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147205)

I was about to ask if it ran on Ruby because if it did, I wasn't going to use it(and I actually like Ruby as a language). I may have to check this out and see what it's like.

Re:This could *help* fix diaspora but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147223)

Amen to that. Fuck Ruby and fuck Rails. That's the real problem of Diaspora. Get rid of those eleist Mac devs that don't fucking know how to develop a website and replace it with competient developers and a REAL language like JAVA.

Presentation (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146563)

I think that diaspora is a great idea but think that the angles are too blurred between http://diasporaproject.org/ [diasporaproject.org] and https://joindiaspora.com/ [joindiaspora.com].

The diasporaproject page needs some sort of overview of the architecture - on a simple level, how does it work technically?

Yet from the joindiaspora website it seems to be too technical - to attract new users we need a page which shows the social aspect of what is possible - most social network users don't care whether they own their data or not - just whether they can waste their time on a page looking at what their friends are doing, and sharing their own lives.

I would love to see this type of open system being taken up as a replacement for something like email - but for me it needs to be very simple in the first instance - just like email

Re:Presentation (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147007)

I think that diaspora is a great idea

So do I.

Disband the murderous tribe [bbc.co.uk] of Israel and give the land back to those who lived there now!

Re:Presentation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41149817)

Rachel Corrie was where she had absolutely no business being if she didn't want to be in danger. End of story. Now fuck off.

XHTML + CSS (3, Insightful)

SgtChaireBourne (457691) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146663)

Will this mean that they will soon also migrate over to XHTML and CSS so that their site will work in more than one or two browsers? I give Diaspora a try every now and again but in most of the browsers I use daily, it flat out refuses to render. Seriously at this late day and age there is no excuse not to be using a foundation of valid, well-formed XHTML. Fancy AJAX bells and whistles can be added on top of that layer, but it should first work across browsers and across platforms to reach the largest possible audience.

Anything short of that is alienating potential users and making the technology look bad. If they are missing such a simple check box, what other problems are they neglecting? I want it to succeed but it will continue to not get anywhere until it can render in regular browsers.

Re:XHTML + CSS (2)

omni123 (1622083) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146943)

Browsers without AJAX issues are pretty regular...

Well-formed HTML (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#41148555)

there is no excuse not to be using a foundation of valid, well-formed XHTML.

Since the HTML5 project came up with a well-defined way to transform tag soup into a fairly clean DOM, there exists a concept of "well-formed HTML" as well. What inherent advantage does the XHTML serialization have over the HTML serialization?

Re:XHTML + CSS (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41149465)

XHTML? Oh, you're one of those "hip" developers from 2002.

Like my dog (5, Insightful)

fph il quozientatore (971015) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146665)

I remember this dog Waldo that I had when I was a kid. He had been old and quite ill for a while, and one day my parents told me he was sent to join an open-source community project outside town.

I am sure he is still there, writes GNU Hurd device drivers all day and waits for the time when he'll come back to me on his flying car.

Bored.. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146667)

"Community Project" = developers are now bored and want to move on to new things. It's been what, two or three years since Diaspora started and it hasn't exactly exploded on to the social networking scene and stolen Facebook's crown.

The developers are now working on some lame picture mashup thing called Makr.io, probably hoping Facebook will buy it so they can retire.

Posting anon as I am moderating.

Re:Bored.. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146803)

Here's the joke about makr.io -- it looks and functions identically to canv.as (which is moot from 4chan's startup). The difference is that makr.io has slightly more hipster-ish imagees and is aiming to be a Facebook app. I wonder if Diaspora users' donations were used to fund the development of makr.io. D:

Re:Bored.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41149615)

The other difference being, of course, that one has a name which can be pronounced and remembered, whereas the other has some bizarre attempt at cleverness.

Re:Bored.. (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146903)

"Community Project" = Kickstarter money has run dry and they don't care any more.

If ever there was a failed Kickstarter project this was it [kickstarter.com]. It was the biggest and best and promised unicorns and ponies and delivered almost nothing.

Re:Bored.. (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147027)

I imagine it delivered some tickets to Aruba. The hint was that it was a bunch of nobodies with no track record asking for money before they'd delivered anything beyond an hilariously badly written "Hello, world".

Re:Bored.. (1)

am 2k (217885) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147439)

The hint was that it was a bunch of nobodies with no track record asking for money before they'd delivered anything beyond an hilariously badly written "Hello, world".

Another one is that they offered physically mailing a CD at the $5 pledge level. From the comments on the project I see that they wisely simply ignored this part of the deal, I guess it'd have costed them more than $5 per CD to do that (from what I've gathered from other Kickstarter projects).

Translation ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41146787)

... "Our Kickstart funding has run out, so we need to get real jobs now"

Community project does not mean success (2)

autonomousautomator (2709383) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146813)

Good products survive and flourish, its as simple as that. Having a open environment is neither sufficient nor necessary to give people what they enjoy actually using. Look at Linux and Apple complete opposites but successful I'd say. A pinch of difference won't do them harm, but wheres the vision.

Re:Community project does not mean success (0)

Robert Zenz (1680268) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147207)

Comparing Linux vs Apple in terms of popularity is a little bit unfair as you'll see when comparing the Linux PR budget to the Apple PR budget.

And it's subjectivity anyway...how often did you see an Apple Computer serve a website? Or run as router?

Re:Community project does not mean success (1)

Robert Zenz (1680268) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147219)

On second thought...I think I just misread your comment completely...

Re:Community project does not mean success (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147313)

Imagine that. Linux fanboi does a total knee jerk anytime Apple/MS are mentioned next to Linux.
 
Can you now understand why most people think that you and your crowd are a joke? If it wasn't for you neckbeards being so uptight and insecure about everything Linux maybe you wouldn't be the punchline so often. Taking a bath wouldn't hurt either but even over the interwebs we can see you guys for what you are.
 
It's seriously amazing to me just how far gone some of you are. Really. Sit back and let it go for a minute. It's a flipping OS, not a holy relic.

Wonder why it failed.... (1)

antifoidulus (807088) | about a year and a half ago | (#41146931)

Could it be because it was a horrible, horrible idea to begin with? I can either:
a)Run my own "pod", requiring me to set up hardware and software for that purpose...or
b) connect to another pod, thus defeating the whole purpose of the network....yeah...wonder why it failed.

Re:Wonder why it failed.... (2)

DuckDodgers (541817) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147809)

a.) Running your own pod isn't too bad if you rent a cloud server - not dirt cheap, but for example a Rackspace.com cloud server starts at $17 per month. Then instead of having Facebook, or Google, or whoever access your personal data you only have to worry about your hosting provider caring enough about whatever it is that you do on your social network to trawl through your rented server instance and integrate the results with some other data set. That's a lot more work than having someone sitting at a superuser console at Facebook or Google getting complete access to your personal history from a few key strokes. And setting up your own server may not be too bad - you don't need a rack server and a T3, a dedicated small home server with a processor that uses a small amount of power (using an Intel Atom or some other low energy processor) might be less than $400. Or an old laptop would probably work too, and also draw relatively little power. Then you own the whole system front to back and the monthly cost is just electricity (since I presume you already have an internet connection).

b.) Even using someone else's pod isn't bad. I wouldn't put my credit cards into the account, but then I don't put my credit card information into Facebook or Google Plus either. You have to trust that the person hosting the pod has purer intentions and perhaps more importantly less to gain by raiding your personal information.

Plus how much for business class internet? (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#41148637)

a dedicated small home server with a processor that uses a small amount of power (using an Intel Atom or some other low energy processor) might be less than $400

Plus how much per month to upgrade the home Internet connection from a home SLA that bans servers and offers no uptime guarantee to a business class SLA that allows servers and offers refunds for more than a certain amount of downtime per month?

Re:Wonder why it failed.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41149923)

So at what point does it become more betterer and magicaler than just setting up WordPress (etc, etc) to make a blog on your own server, turning on OpenID for logins, and publishing an RSS feed?

Ilya Zhitomirskiy (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147021)

Apparently Ilya was Diaspora*

These guys are Mark.io

RIP IZ [wikipedia.org]

Untimely Suicide (2)

Penurious Penguin (2687307) | about a year and a half ago | (#41151221)

The general consensus seems that the stress of starting diaspora* lead him to suicide; but I've never fully accepted it, even though it's reported he suffered Asperger's and that his mom thought he was depressed. I have never been able to find details on his suicide other than reports that he died of asphyxiation -- something that can be difficult to achieve without the right "tools". Almost immediately after his death, a "suicide note" was posted on the internet, then removed [oobly.com] shortly after. From what I remember, the coroner's report was delayed [dailymail.co.uk] for a few weeks or more, and the police-report didn't mention what item Ilya used to kill himself, yet "suicide" was prematurely announced by nearly every media outlet.

It was a project that caught a lot of attention; from the NY Times, Wall Street [wsj.com] Journal, to Mark Zuckerberg himself.

At one point in their startup, Papal froze [techdirt.com] their donation account.

Whatever the truth of the situation be, I don't dispute any aspect of it. I do remain curious though. Here's an old interview with Ilya: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=3QwvlnhpDSo [youtube.com]

Re:Untimely Suicide (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year and a half ago | (#41152275)

I thought you only needed a plastic bag and the will to do it for asphyxiation.
for me it just didn't seem that they never did the biz side properly or paid someone else for that. that can get pretty stressful.

of course Zuck knew about the project, it's not like he ignores _all_ tech sites you know. sending some guys to whack them up though.. would make no sense, there's a bunch of projects that are a bigger threat to the establishment than diaspora.

he probably got a chuckle out of it, since the internet already is diaspora like social network without diaspora. we got email, we got personal web servers, personal forums and all that stuff - people who can be bothered are already using them - it's not like there werent a gazillion password protected blogs out there too. making it centralised but distributed but free.. well, there's just something that doesn't compute straight to the end.

they could've used some of the money to consult a better name for the package too. "myPersonalSocialBox"-mypesobo or whatever. it's like they just glanced over the dictionary meaning of the word and ran with it.

Re:Untimely Suicide (1)

Seumas (6865) | about a year and a half ago | (#41152635)

Yeah, since Mark Zuckerberg donated to the Diaspora project right out of the gate, I'd say it's a pretty sure bet that he knew about the Diaspora project.

Re:Untimely Suicide (1)

Penurious Penguin (2687307) | about a year and a half ago | (#41152781)

"I thought you only needed a plastic bag and the will to do it for asphyxiation."

Surely you are correct; but I was only stating that I've been unable to find any report of such items as plastic bags or anything else. And it's pretty darned difficult to suffocate yourself with a plastic bag if you don't have a plastic bag. It would also be a comparably unusual method of suicide.

I just wanted to clarify that bit. And I am only expression suspicion -- not making wild claims while clad in aluminum plate-mail.

Diaspora in a Box (3, Interesting)

DrXym (126579) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147057)

Diaspora could become a lot more popular if there were installers and scripts which allowed people to download, install and run the software with a minimal amount of effort. Not just on Linux but Windows and OS X too.

Re:Diaspora in a Box (1)

thatkid_2002 (1529917) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147251)

In-a-box works best with Linux because you can provide the entire setup in one go as well as having a built-in update mechanism... Besides, letting OSX and Windows touch the internets is a little insane. Coincidentally Buddycloud (http://buddycloud.org) has a "In-A-Box" thing plus documentation/demo video to help you roll your own instance.

Re:Diaspora in a Box (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41147339)

stop spamming.

Re:Diaspora in a Box (1)

RobinH (124750) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147449)

This is the difference between most "great idea but not quite successful" open source projects and "hit" open source projects: put in the time and effort to make it really, really easy to start using it. It turns out that even a little friction is enough to prevent most people from trying it. Unless there's a big green button called "Start Using This Now!" then it's probably too complicated. I know you all think your 7-step installation process is easy if you just follow the directions, download all the prerequisites, etc., but the fact is, most people aren't going to do it.

Re:Diaspora in a Box (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year and a half ago | (#41152317)

joining diaspora could never be as simple as joining fb(or twitter) though.

not everybody runs their own box connected to the net 24/7 - and if you're thinking about just using some guys who you know box.. well yeah, it's better if your privacy is accessible by some guy who doesn't care than by someone who knows you.

Re:Diaspora in a Box (1)

Rich0 (548339) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147735)

They'd get a lot further if they bothered to package the thing for any linux distro. I mean, when you can't even find a .deb for it, you know nobody is going to use the thing.

Sure, Windows and OSX would be icing on the cake.

VM? (1)

xororand (860319) | about a year and a half ago | (#41151949)

A pre-installed virtual machine image could be the easiest solution.
It can be easily converted to different VM technologies, e.g. VirtualBox, KVM or VMware.
Just forward some ports or route an IP and you're good to go.

I suggest some standard distribution like Debian stable with automatic security updates for the guest.

Whatever happened to FOAF? (2)

BorisSkratchunkov (642046) | about a year and a half ago | (#41147275)

I kind of wish that someone would just create a desktop client that could read in FOAF [foaf-project.org] files, look across the people who are in your network, download their status updates directly from them (or from mutual friends) BitTorrent style, and not allow any one entity (corporate or otherwise) to own you or your friends' data by default. Semantic Web forever- viva la revolucion?

A name change is in order (1)

logicassasin (318009) | about a year and a half ago | (#41149809)

It's my belief that in order for Diaspora to attract more people, it needs to be named something that more people can pronounce properly and either understand what it means or don't need to know thanks to the name (i.e. Myspace was just that... My personal space for useless crap on the intarwebs). When Ilya Zhitomirskiy died, I ran across a number of people asking me about Diaspora... except many of these people couldn't pronounce the name with a good number of them simply calling it "some other social networking site". From those same people, you would be hard pressed to find even one that knew what the word means or even how it's spelled if you just asked them out of the blue... And these were some pretty intelligent people (engineers, SE, ME, EE, etc).

IMO, the name itself is a barrier to people getting on board for these two simple reasons... Unless that's the whole point.

Re:A name change is in order (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41151465)

More important than technical perfection (which is quite debatable when it comes to Diaspora*, even now; but that's a debate for another time/post) is branding if you want to attract the masses. D* has none; I agree. Their image needs a makeover.
I see this echoed even in this story; complaints about diasporaproject.com being nonspecific and joindiaspora.com being too technical. There is no node installer - why not make it easy to set up and be self-contained; let it run in the Windows system tray and have everyone install it? Issues with offline nodes nonwithstanding, everyone being their own node would be the holy grail of such a project.

I've given up twice on making my own node - it's just overly complicated. Easy to remember and easy to use are key; D* has neither.

it's larger problem within the FOSS community... (1)

logicassasin (318009) | about a year and a half ago | (#41152849)

Branding is key to getting people to use the stuff you created (and that you -want- people to use, lest you keep your code on you own machines). Ease of use keeps people interested in what you're offering by making the barrier to entry low. Many, many otherwise good FOSS projects die because of these two things.

Take LMMS (http://lmms.sourceforge.net) for instance. I've been trying to use it for a while now, and I'm pretty much ready to submit a laundry list of changes to the project, starting with a name and/or logo change (I've already whipped up a sample logo if the name must remain LMMS). The majority of changes are for usability, making things that should be obvious to the user stand out more.

I've tried to get guys on various message boards to look at LMMS as another tool to consider for making music on a tight budget even though its really not as complete as the tool it mimics the most (FL Studio - http://www.image-line.com/documents/flstudio.html [image-line.com]). Those that do try all complain about the same thing: Usability... And they hate the logo.

Written in ruby on rails, isnt it? (1)

someones (2687911) | about a year and a half ago | (#41150237)

Did anyone seriously expect it to become anything? Have you ever looked at their installation manual?
I tried it like 2 years ago, and fail'd miserably...
I liked the idea, but needing to go thru a longer installation manual than the gentoo quickinstall guide, JUST for checking it out... no thanks, i stopped somewhere in the process.
Also because I failed to install the pod, im not gonna try again, it was just a too big waste of time back then.

And if noone can easily bring up an pod and all just join the one pod, how is that diffrent from joining facebook?

Re:Written in ruby on rails, isnt it? (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year and a half ago | (#41152767)

And if noone can easily bring up an pod and all just join the one pod, how is that diffrent from joining facebook?

Well.. it would be different in the way that you could spy on everyone who joined your pod.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...