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Survey Reveals a Majority Believe "the Cloud" Is Affected by Weather

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the stormy-weather dept.

Cloud 261

SmartAboutThings writes "In a recent survey performed by Wakefield Research, it has been discovered that the majority of the surveyed Americans are quite confused about the notion of Cloud, when it relates to Cloud Storage/Computing. The most interesting fact is that 51% of the surveyed persons thought that stormy weather interferes with cloud computing!"

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261 comments

It does (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173183)

When that stormy weather takes out power supplies to the data centres.

or when rain / rain water get's in the phone / cab (4, Insightful)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173247)

or when rain / rain water get's in the phone / cable lines.

Also stormy weather can take down your cable line even if you still have power in your area the cables from your place to the headend may have areas with no power and dead battery (they don't have the number of needed portable generators to cover all of them) in the nodes.

DSL works better and the phone RT's (Remote Terminals) and central offices have a better power backup system.

Satellite rain fade (4, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173283)

Or when you're stuck out in BFE where cable and DSL aren't available and rain fade hurts your satellite connection. Not that people who rely on satellite would use "the Cloud" anyway because of the single digit GB/mo caps typical of satellite Internet service.

Re:Satellite rain fade (5, Funny)

MagusSlurpy (592575) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173327)

Or when the rain provides enough interference that you can no longer poorly piggy-back on your neighbor's WiFi.

Re:or when rain / rain water get's in the phone / (3, Funny)

MrLint (519792) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173669)

I was told once by the cable crew who came to fix my cable, that because of squirrels eating at the cable, water had leaked in. As it was a 3 pole run,, some stupid amount of *gallons* of water poured out of the cable.

Re:or when rain / rain water get's in the phone / (5, Funny)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173863)

I was told once by the cable crew who came to fix my cable, that because of squirrels eating at the cable, water had leaked in. As it was a 3 pole run,, some stupid amount of *gallons* of water poured out of the cable.

I had a cable guy try to tell me that the plasma in a plasma TV was the same as the plasma in human blood. I gave up trying to explain it to him as he was pretty adamant about it. I can only imagine how he thought the manufacturers got it.

Re:It does (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173569)

I know some folks who lose their cable signal when it rains a lot. Some damaged cable covering somewhere down the line.

It isn't? (4, Informative)

Daetrin (576516) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173189)

Didn't we have a story in the last couple weeks about Amazon's cloud servers getting taken out by a large storm and the resulting power outage or something like that?

Re:It isn't? (5, Informative)

Daetrin (576516) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173255)

Okay, found the link: http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/12/06/30/162250/more-uptime-problems-for-amazon-cloud [slashdot.org]

"An Amazon Web Services data center in northern Virginia lost power Friday night during an electrical storm, causing downtime for numerous customers â" including Netflix"

So the east coast has a big storm, power goes out, and the cloud goes down, and somehow people are drawing the conclusion that stormy weather can have an adverse effect on the cloud? It's possible they're confused about how big a storm is required, the article doesn't address that point, but clearly the idea isn't crazy.

Re:It isn't? (3, Funny)

mrmeval (662166) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173527)

Don't trust the clowd clowns with your data!

Re:It isn't? (3, Funny)

SomeJoel (1061138) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173663)

Don't trust the clowd clowns with your data!

I certainly won't. Thanks for the tip. One other thing, how do I distinguish clowd clowns from regular clowns?

Re:It isn't? (1)

asylumx (881307) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173767)

how do I distinguish clowd clowns from regular clowns?

They have vertical development and moderate turbulence.

Re:It isn't? (5, Informative)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173921)

Don't trust the clowd clowns with your data!

I certainly won't. Thanks for the tip. One other thing, how do I distinguish clowd clowns from regular clowns?

Can you really think of a situation that would require you to trust any kind of clown?

Re:It isn't? (4, Funny)

Obfuscant (592200) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173975)

Can you really think of a situation that would require you to trust any kind of clown?

Eating at McDonalds?

Re:It isn't? (5, Insightful)

sjames (1099) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173281)

Yes. The people who believe storms may disrupt cloud computing are 100% correct. Not only can they, but there is a history of it.

As for not knowing what the cloud is, I'd argue that they're in the same boat as marketing and the media that pumps out the breathless cloud stories 24/7.

Key European Computing Hub in Ireland Outage 2011 (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173571)

Yes, a huge data center in Ireland was knocked out by a severe storm last year, causing major disruptions. Why people seem to think Cloud computing = distributed computing I have no idea. See http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2011/08/07/lightning-in-dublin-knocks-amazon-microsoft-data-centers-offline/

Re:It isn't? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173345)

Exactly... I'm more worried about the ones who think cloud computing is NOT impacted by weather. If some random person walked up to me on the street and asked me this, I'd say, "sure, it can", and I'm quite technical.

This seems much like the hand-writing shocked headlines announcing that most Americans think humans and dinosaurs existed at the same time... the only problem being that we DID exist at the same time. Paleontologists consider modern birds to be dinosaurs, so most people are quite correct.

Paleontologists regard birds as the only clade of dinosaurs to have survived the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event 65.5 Ma ago> [wikipedia.org] .

In both cases, this shows that most people are not as dumb as the ones giving the survey.

Re:It isn't? (1)

xevioso (598654) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173413)

Yes but in the second instance, the correct follow up would be, "Do you think birds are dinosaurs", and if a majority answered no, than the original implication of ignorance on a large part of America would be correct.

Re:It isn't? (2)

ldobehardcore (1738858) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173535)

I'd say a large part of America simultaneously believes birds aren't dinosaurs, and that birds didn't evolve from them, since they feel in their gut that life as we know it today is the exact same as it was when created by god 6000 years ago when the earth wasn't around, but the ocean was.

Re:It isn't? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173607)

Not really - the word 'dinosaur' has a specific technical meaning, but there's also a different non-technical meaning:

"any of a group (Dinosauria) of extinct often very large chiefly terrestrial carnivorous or herbivorous reptiles of the Mesozoic era "

Under that definition, birds are not dinosaurs irrespective of whether the two should be grouped together as a clade.

Re:It isn't? (2)

Obfuscant (592200) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173753)

Yes but in the second instance, the correct follow up would be, "Do you think birds are dinosaurs", and if a majority answered no, than the original implication of ignorance on a large part of America would be correct.

Birds are not dinosaurs, any more than humans are single cell protozoans. If you truly believe in macroevolution, of the kind that can create new species and animals from existing ones, then you must believe that things CHANGE over time. That is, they aren't the same anymore. You must answer "no" to that question if you are to be honest.

And if you don't believe in macroevolution, just microevolution (the kind that causes birds to develop different beaks to deal with different environments, but they are still birds), then you will still say "no".

And, of course, a creationist will say "no", as well.

Your question does nothing to differentiate between what you are obviously trying to imply about the ignorance or lack thereof of a person based on a belief or disbelief in evolution.

Re:It isn't? (2)

digitig (1056110) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173981)

Er -- perhaps you don't understand the meaning of "clade". Being in a clade of dinosaurs doesn't mean that they are dinosaurs. Humans will be in the clade of some ancient eukaryote, but that doesn't make us eukaryotes.

I weep for my country (1, Insightful)

Isara (869637) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173191)

In a saner world, our educational systems would teach science and technology...

Re:I weep for my country (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173211)

Instead of meteorology?

Re:I weep for my country (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173223)

You apparently missed the multiple amazon outages due to weather. Weep...

Re:I weep for my country (5, Insightful)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173241)

My uncle is a biological engineer; he was a member of the team who first managed to grow human body parts in rats.

I asked him what he knew about 'The Cloud' the other day; his response?
"How the fuck should I know? I'm a biological engineer, not a goddamn weatherman!"

In a saner world, our educational systems would teach science and technology...

You seem to be confusing "science and technology" with "marketing buzzwords."

Stop it. Stop it right now.

Re:I weep for my country (4, Interesting)

causality (777677) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173439)

I asked him what he knew about 'The Cloud' the other day; his response?
"How the fuck should I know? I'm a biological engineer, not a goddamn weatherman!"

Okay, despite his confusion, at least he admitted he was ignorant about the subject. At least he didn't go and form a strong opinion and start arguing about a subject he knows nothing about.

"Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge'." -- Isaac Asimov

This Slashdot article may as well have said "average public school-educated Americans unable to distinguish their own (obese) ass from a hole in the ground."

Sure that may sound like I am being negative. But it's so hard not to be negative about this. Without even considering its finances, there is good reason to question the long-term viability of my nation. You just can't have this many adult people who hate thinking, who embrace anti-intellectualism, and expect to remain prosperous. It's not even just anti-intellectualism, as though that were not bad enough. Emotional intelligence is on the decline as well, and it manifests as a bunch of people who generally mean well, but are far too self-absorbed to understand things so basic as "needlessly blocking a doorway in a public place is rude".

They do mean well but they tend to be childish, indulgent, and haven't the maturity to overcome their own thoughts and their own worries. That's why when I say "self-absorbed" I don't mean it in terms of narcissism, I mean it in terms of having become so thoroughly alienated from their fellow humans that they are unable to consider how their actions affect others. Generally the USA is becoming decadent like every other great nation just before its collapse.

I am seriously wondering just how hard it is for an American to immigrate to a small Western European nation and become a naturalized citizen.

Re:I weep for my country (5, Insightful)

b4dc0d3r (1268512) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173707)

You seem to have a severely myopic view of what is important in the world. Until very recently, even cloud providers could not define cloud computing beyond whatever their implementation was. Not knowing what "the cloud" is does not exemplify in any way anti-intellectualism. I think your rant is a generalized one, way off topic, and pretty much a knee-jerk response to any sign that someone doesn't know about something you consider important.

Reading your post history, you realize that you are part of a small minority of people who are aware of the business behind service offerings, whether it is data mining of social networking or broad categories such as cloud offerings. Based on that reading, it should not surprise you to find that people don't care how their phone works, or what powers their website. And they don't want to know. Not because of anti-intellectualism. They just have no need to know, or don't have any connection to people who do know.

Sure they lack curiosity, but we can only say that about this subject, where they may have interests in mechanics or art or cuisine instead.

So you have rated your opinion of the nation on people who don't need to know about something, being asked about that thing, and making a guess based on the information they already have at hand. Or, you used this as an excuse to jump up on your soapbox.

Either way, you are my example of why someone should pity a culture, not the people who were busy minding their own business when a surveyor gave them a pop quiz.

The actual study has a much less exaggerated title, and as far as I can tell from the actual survey, it was a true random sampling. Ask a random person what "the could" is, given no context, and I'm surprised that only 29% said it related to weather. "51%" is described as "most", and as posted above that bunch of people are technically correct that weather can cause problems, including damage from lightning and flooding or just plain power outage.

The margin of error was +/- 3% meaning it could have been as low as 48%. You can't even claim "majority" with those numbers. And this was an e-mail invitation to an online survey. Automatically, anyone who clicked on an unexpected mail to answer questions is an idiot, but my opinion aside this is self-selection. There is no description of what measure they took to ensure the sample was anything other than "too stupid not to click."

So now you got your panties in a bunch over "People who think it's okay to click on e-mail links don't care how technology works." Which everyone here already knew.

Re:I weep for my country (4, Insightful)

Obfuscant (592200) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173895)

Okay, despite his confusion, at least he admitted he was ignorant about the subject. At least he didn't go and form a strong opinion and start arguing about a subject he knows nothing about.

And, from reading TFA, neither did those 51% who thought that weather would interfere with the cloud. They were asked about it and they answered. They weren't protesting on the streets demanding something be done about the weather to protect their access to the cloud.

You just can't have this many adult people who hate thinking, who embrace anti-intellectualism, and expect to remain prosperous.

So you think that people who don't know what the rather nebulous concept of "the cloud" (which is quite appropriate since "clouds" are already nebulous and consist of many different kinds) is "hate thinking" etc. etc.? Quite a leap, I'd say.

They do mean well but they tend to be childish, indulgent, and haven't the maturity to overcome their own thoughts and their own worries.

And people who rant about others who simply don't care about technical things are grown up, mature individuals who are fastidious? By the way, I think you want to call them "self-indulgent", because most people are indugent of others.

I am seriously wondering just how hard it is for an American to immigrate to a small Western European nation and become a naturalized citizen.

I sense that this statement is much like the random movie or TV star who tries to influence voting trends by claiming that "if X wins, I'm moving to England" or similar. It's not hard to move to Europe, but why you'd want to become a citizen there is a mystery. You'd just be stuck in the same kind of situation where you'd threaten to "move to the US" if politics didn't go the way you wanted.

Re:I weep for my country (0)

Isara (869637) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173441)

nope, pretty sure I meant what I said. But the point is taken. Perhaps if people understood both science AND technology (including popular technology, vis a vis marketing concepts), there would be less conflation of unrelated concepts.

Re:I weep for my country (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173911)

Idiot

Re:I weep for my country (5, Insightful)

icebike (68054) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173453)

In a saner world we wouldn't let hypsters foist stupid names on an entire industry for things as simple to explain as "remote storage".

Re:I weep for my country (5, Funny)

Mashiki (184564) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173629)

In a saner world, we'd just ship all hipsters to Seattle, and be done with them.

Re:I weep for my country (1)

lobiusmoop (305328) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173741)

Well, strictly speaking the cloud is 'remote storage and remote processing', which is a bit of a mouthful. Cloud is one syllable in place of several, which is more of a practicality than marketing hype IMHO.

Re:I weep for my country (1)

icebike (68054) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173933)

Well strictly speaking remote processing isn't necessary nor is it always present. Remote storage with redundancy and backup managed by others (Skydrive, dropbox) is really what most people see. If you get any remote processing (aka amazon, Azure) its probably more akin to scalable hosting.

Lumping all those different capabilities under one name helps no-one.

Re:I weep for my country (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173931)

gNewSense.

Re:I weep for my country (2)

Dahamma (304068) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173487)

This particular problem with the US is not with technology education, it's with antiquated power and communications grids. Though fortunate not to be exposed to any wars on home soil in the last century, it means many of these systems consist of 100 year old wires strung up on wooden poles rather than buried underground like much of Europe, etc. Weather thus *significantly* affects Cloud computing in many areas of the country...

Weather does affect it (4, Informative)

Nightlight3 (248096) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173207)

Recent outages of AWS and other providers demonstrate that weather does affect the "Cloud" platforms.

Re:Weather does affect it (0)

quantaman (517394) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173339)

By that metric weather affects everything, and you'd be asking a completely useless question.

Most people realize the actual question being asked is whether cloud computing is affected by weather more than other generic things, to which the answer is no, in fact it's less affected by weather than other generic things. What do you prove by deliberately misinterpreting the survey question?

Re:Weather does affect it (4, Insightful)

Dahamma (304068) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173577)

Actually, no, it sounds like it WAS a completely useless question. Most people did NOT realize what the question being asked was about.

"54% of Americans do not know what the cloud is and claim to never have used it. ... also, another alarming number is that 51% of the surveyed Americans think that stormy weather can interfere with the functionality of the cloud."

So, if 54% surveyed had never heard the term, and and almost identical 51% surveyed who don't know it refers to computing services over the Internet, then it doesn't mean people are stupid, just uninformed, and the second number means nothing (of course, the survey doesn't mention how these numbers overlap, which makes it all the more useless).

And honestly, I would bet over 50% of those who BUILD network-based services that could be considered "in the Cloud" think the whole "Cloud" terminology is one of the stupidest things pseudo-technology journalists and marketers have foisted on the public in years. Based on the over-saturation of "the Cloud", I'm surprised everyone isn't starting to call the Internet "the Tubes"...

Re:Weather does affect it (2)

quantaman (517394) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173857)

Actually, no, it sounds like it WAS a completely useless question. Most people did NOT realize what the question being asked was about.

"54% of Americans do not know what the cloud is and claim to never have used it. ... also, another alarming number is that 51% of the surveyed Americans think that stormy weather can interfere with the functionality of the cloud."

So, if 54% surveyed had never heard the term, and and almost identical 51% surveyed who don't know it refers to computing services over the Internet, then it doesn't mean people are stupid, just uninformed, and the second number means nothing (of course, the survey doesn't mention how these numbers overlap, which makes it all the more useless).

And honestly, I would bet over 50% of those who BUILD network-based services that could be considered "in the Cloud" think the whole "Cloud" terminology is one of the stupidest things pseudo-technology journalists and marketers have foisted on the public in years. Based on the over-saturation of "the Cloud", I'm surprised everyone isn't starting to call the Internet "the Tubes"...

People have different definitions about what it means to know what something is, if you ask me if I know what a guava I'm aware that it's a fruit, and I know it's supposed to be nutritious, but if you asked me to pick out one from a set of unfamiliar fruits my odds would be no better than chance. Should I say I know what it is or not?

We know that 54% of people feel like they don't know what cloud computing is, we also know that 51% of people are so uniformed that they think cloud computing has something to do with weather. These questions are testing different things, and while an overlap would be very nice, we can still surmise that the public is both largely uninformed, and aware of the fact they're uninformed, or there were a lot of people being smartasses and saying the cloud is affected by weather because everything is.

Re:Weather does affect it (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173967)

Should I say I know what it is or not?

Since you've just admitted that you know what it is, the honest answer would be 'yes'. Now, if the question was "do you know what it looks like?", you'd have to say "no".

You can ask someone if they know what a Pontiac Grand Pre is (it is a CAR), but they might have no idea how to pick one out of a used-car lot.

We know that 54% of people feel like they don't know what cloud computing is, we also know that 51% of people are so uniformed that they think cloud computing has something to do with weather.

No, we don't know that. The question was whether is was affected by the weather. A Pontiac Grand Pre doesn't have "something to do with the weather", but it certainly can be affected by the weather. (The gas milage of most cars is affected by the density of the air, and thus the weather. Icy roads will make driving a Pontiac Grand Pre harder.)

Re:Weather does affect it (4, Insightful)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173829)

By that metric weather affects everything, and you'd be asking a completely useless question.

Ladies and gentlemen, we have a winner!

Most people realize the actual question being asked is whether cloud computing is affected by weather more than other generic things, to which the answer is no, in fact it's less affected by weather than other generic things. What do you prove by deliberately misinterpreting the survey question?

Rank the following in terms of likelihood:

1.) A person thinks cloud computing involves actual clouds.
2.) The people running the survey deliberately asked ridiculous or trick questions in order to get a sensational response that would drive readership and therefore profits.
3.) A person genuinely gave an over-literal response due to the weather's actual ability to take out a data center despite the question being intended to gauge whether a person thinks cloud computing involves actual clouds.

Re:Weather does affect it (1)

Penurious Penguin (2687307) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173745)

I wonder what affects the cloud more; the weather, or the temperament of government. I for one, welcome mother nature before her disaffected authoritarian underlords.

I am more worried about the 49%... (4, Insightful)

MarcoAtWork (28889) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173209)

... that believes that the cloud is this magical place disconnected from the utility grid, immune to lightning strikes, floods, storm surges, etc. etc.

Re:I am more worried about the 49%... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173433)

Thank you!! exactly! The cloud IS effected by weather...Everything is!

Re:I am more worried about the 49%... (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173541)

Fuck the cloud. All my data is in Heaven administered by God! Nothing can go wrong. Everything is where it should be. Simply perfect.

"Heaven. Are you good enough?"

Re:I am more worried about the 49%... (2)

PRMan (959735) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173937)

Fuck the cloud. All my data is in Heaven administered by God! Nothing can go wrong. Everything is where it should be. Simply perfect.

"Heaven. Are you good enough?"

I've heard that God doesn't take care of data for people with such foul mouths....

Re:I am more worried about the 49%... (1)

vux984 (928602) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173573)

Exactly... At first blush, as someone in IT, my gut would be a resounding "yes".

One of the big "risk factors" I attach to cloud and any offsite solutions is that they are by definition only accessible when internet connectivity is established.

Generally the ONLY time my office internet access goes down is during bad weather. Snow, wind, lightning can take down internet. My choices here are satellite, ADSL, and fixed point-to-point wireless. And all 3 are disrupted by enough snow, wind, rain, and lightning. All of which happen here enough to ensure that weather not merely "may" affect any cloud services we use, but absolutely "WILL".

And that's just my local internet, and doesn't get into the only slightly more abstract premise that wherever the offsite computing is actually taking place can also be hit with severe weather.

Also in the news (5, Funny)

colin_faber (1083673) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173215)

Surveys suggest most surveys are wrong :)

Re:Also in the news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173599)

The Cloud only affects people in metallic structures.

Hence Log Cabin republicans, who have found immunity to conventional reality.

Re:Also in the news (2)

newcastlejon (1483695) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173751)

Most surveys aren't wrong; they're purposefully designed to yield a particular result (usually one that sells newspapers).

Per the newspaper of record, it does. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173225)

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/30/amazon-web-services-knocked-offline-by-storms/

Ehh (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173227)

It's a stupid Marketing Buzzword anyway. Call it what it really is: "Storing-your-data-in-small-amounts-spread-out-across-many-thousands-of-computers-on-the-Internet"

not so glamorous now is it?!

Cloud is affected by weather (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173233)

The 51% are right, in many cases. For instance, where I live most people are on some sort of wireless connection which goes completely to crap during lightning storms. Any data in the cloud is pretty much unavailable during those times. Ditto during snow storms. In the past /. has covered news stories about data centres being knocked off-line, some I suspect due to tropical storms.

So, yes, in several cases cloud storage and services are affected by the weather.

Only 51%? (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173245)

Until marketers can accurately and succinctly define "the cloud" they're going to wind up with people not understanding "the cloud".
Of course, that's their fucking goal. They don't want anyone knowing that "the cloud" is just "a bunch of servers somewhere, idunno where, just give me money and I'll sell you things".

If I was a cloud provider I'd have 3 data centers and 5 or 6 fake data centers with nothing in them.
I'd tell customers I had 8 or 9 locations and they'd never fucking know.

Ironically (2)

JWW (79176) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173261)

Ironically, one of the bigger outages we had where our AWS instances went down was due to ..... weather.

time to add to the ever growing (2)

nimbius (983462) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173269)

BOFH collection, which includes but is not limited to:
blade computing requires routine sharpening
grid computing can sometimes get out of alignment and needs to be centered and degaussed sometimes
clustered computing includes a creamy nougat center
network degradation can be attributed to stains on the network fabric that didnt come out after the last wash
the datacenter certification plaque specifies the air pressure for the tires as well as the type of oil to be used in the cloud

Re:time to add to the ever growing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173619)

BOFH collection, which includes but is not limited to:
blade computing requires routine sharpening
grid computing can sometimes get out of alignment and needs to be centered and degaussed sometimes
clustered computing includes a creamy nougat center
network degradation can be attributed to stains on the network fabric that didnt come out after the last wash
the datacenter certification plaque specifies the air pressure for the tires as well as the type of oil to be used in the cloud

We might as well include chemtrails and HAARP effecting Cloud Computing as well, since these are man-made affecters of weather.

Which reminds me about another "weather" connection to Cloud Computing: NSA/Google's WC datacenter is powered by photovoltaic panels and can be seriously degraded by bad weather, including chemtrails which can reduce power output significantly. I'm waiting expectantly for a false flag terror attack directed against NSA/Google where somebody hijacks a cropduster, loads up on black paint, and destroys $millions worth of photovoltaics without realizing that the power grid and backup generators would be available, albeit at much greater expense -- think of the carbon credits NSA/Google would lose.

Bad Title (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173271)

should read:

Survey Reveals a Majority Know "the Cloud" Is Affected by Weather, Along With Pretty Much Everything Else

Stormy weather DOES affect cloud computing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173277)

You obviously didn't watch Artem's talk.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZ8s1JwtNas

Re:Stormy weather DOES affect cloud computing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173337)

For the uninitiated: Bit flips in computer RAM happen at a predictable rate due to heat, cosmic radiation, lightning & other EM, and other causes. Heat & lightning are directly correlated with storms. Additionally, cloud computing causes bit errors in DNS names, an attack Artem dubs bitsquatting, to become vastly more impactful, a fact he demonstrates when a bitsquat attack affected Zynga's cloud, redirecting thousands of Farmville users to an attacker controlled site.
Conclusion, storms directly affect cloud security, and 51% of America know Artem is the bomb.

85% of the so-called (1)

Archfeld (6757) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173299)

professionals don't know what cloud computing is either, so all-in-all things are about the same as the always were..

Packet storms (4, Interesting)

WaffleMonster (969671) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173305)

Funny they list facebook, twitter, online photo sharing, online banking and shopping as "the cloud". It would be interesting to hear from TFA what on the Internet does not count as "the cloud" ?

Had noticed TFA is making fun of people who think stormy weather can "interfere with the functionality of the cloud" when just a few weeks ago an electrical storm triggered a massive outage in the Amazon "cloud".

For icing on my cloud cake we have marketeers commenting about how everyone has a favorable view of the cloud when the only thing that seems clear is too many people including the author does not seem to have a coherent grasp of what it is their talking about.

Re:Packet storms (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173907)

It would be interesting to hear from TFA what on the Internet does not count as "the cloud" ?

Absolutely nothing. "The Cloud" is the in, new buzzword, and thus Marketing is making sure that whatever they're selling, it's part of The Cloud. Coming your way, Cloud-enabled galoshes! You can order them over the Internet!

Stupid Buzzword (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173319)

HA!

Take that stupid new buzzword for dumb terminal computing.

But they are not entirely wrong. (2)

Nadaka (224565) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173331)

Bad weather can knock "the cloud" offline or make access unreliable, Bad weather can knock down suspended power and data lines, interrupting access between you and the cloud. It can flood service tunnels, basement and first floor switches and short out improperly sealed equipment.

Haha... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173343)

stupid americans.

I'm all metaPHOR it (1)

Crypto Gnome (651401) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173365)

The Cloud is *such* a wonderful metaphor, especially good for Joe Average Citizen who never had any ph0rkin idea what went on "on the internet" in the first place.

Not only is The Cloud impacted by weather (lightning strikes, electrical failures, overheating Data Centres etc) but it also has a non-trivial impact on Global Climate.

Scientists are still debating whether it's a net INCREASE or DECREASE in global temperature (DCs can be MUCH more power efficient than individual businesses running their own server farms both thermally and electrically, economies of scale, power-efficient DCs, Green Power DCs etc).

Phone and Cable Lines often go dark in storms (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173367)

Phone and Cable Lines often go dark in storms around here.

OTOH, chipmonks have brought the internet down more often and for more outages than anything else.

Chipmonks take down the cloud here!

Make sense. (1)

Nyder (754090) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173401)

I play EQ2, quite often someone will say, we are having thunderstorms, might lose power.

So, all those people who lose power to storms might just think that the cloud can lose power in storms.

I know better, but I also live in a city, and don't tend to lose power.

Re:Make sense. (1)

vux984 (928602) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173661)

So, all those people who lose power to storms might just think that the cloud can lose power in storms.

Anything that interferes with the internet between you and the service disrupts your ability to use the service. Weather impacts on internet links both big and small all the time. Are the actual computers running the service likely to go down? No... but a lightning strike on their internet connection... or yours... or any link between you will make them as good as down.

51% responders live in Louisiana (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173405)

51% of surveyed live in Louisiana and New Orleans.

"On Somebody Else's Computer". (5, Insightful)

wanderfowl (2534492) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173425)

I've said it before [linguisticmystic.com] , and I'll say it again. Every instance of "In the Cloud", facing a naive end user, should be replaced with "On somebody else's computer". This study shows that people have absolutely no idea what The Cloud is, and that might, just maybe, be affecting their choice of what to upload to it. "I keep our business records in the cloud" sounds sane, but “Oh, don’t worry, all of our business information is backed up on somebody else’s computer” doesn't.

Pretty Stupid, but... (1)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173473)

Yeah, most people are clueless about the Internet. But that said, it's also true that polls are easily skewed by the wording of a poll question, or the way it is asked.

So what... (2)

HockeyPuck (141947) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173489)

ahahah let's all laugh at the ignorance of the masses... I'm sure there are plenty of lawyers/doctors/plumbers that laugh at the /. crowd for their lack of knowledge...

Most people in IT can't agree on the same definition of cloud, or what it is and what it is not. Is cloud an application, infrastructure, platform, API? It can be.

In other news...

Most Americans think RAID is a bug spray.

Random binary distribution FTW! (2)

conspirator23 (207097) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173611)

51%? So what this tells me is that a majority of respondents didn't understand enough to care, or didn't care enough to understand and provided random answers. This is what happens when you take squishy social science methodologies and put them in the hands of even squishier marketing consultancies. Just bend the scientific method over and shove a white paper up it's ass.

Weather affects other tech... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173641)

The weather affects TV, mobile phones and other radio networks. It's called "rain fade". There's "sun fade" too!

Since the access network is part of "The Cloud", the local weather conditions affect "The Cloud".

Many people get their Internet over their satellite TV connection, and many more over radio networks (fixed or mobile). If their network connection goes down because of rain (or sun), the cloud goes down because of the rain.

Half the population (1)

Cute Fuzzy Bunny (2234232) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173675)

Half the population also believes in all sorts of things when they shouldn't.

I wonder how much overlap there is between the various stupid halves? Anyone have a venn diagram?

Arthur c Clark is alive and well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173765)

His famous quote is very true: "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."

We have reached, and surpassed, the point where most people understand much of how our everyday world works.

Standing up The Cloud recently (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173791)

Just recently we started bringing up an internal cloud. After we begun to bring up VM's and attach storage to it, the first thing I thought was, "1) in no less than 2 weeks this will go to production, 2) how will it behave under a power outage, and 3) why am I not being paid more now for this new company convenience when it is no less than a growing nightmare for me".

YUO FAIL IT? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41173847)

never hh3ded

Why shouldn't they? (1)

petsounds (593538) | about a year and a half ago | (#41173925)

"Cloud" computing was always rooted in meaningless sales jargon created by the same kind of non-tech people in the tech industry who gave us all the other pundit phrases you read at VentureBeat et al. It's a snappy one-syllable name, so all the marketing monkeys at other tech companies soon caught on, then Apple introduced iCloud, and now we're stuck with this bullshit for a good five years. Until "Coconut" or something else catches on.

Expecting an average person to know that "Cloud" doesn't actually mean that data isn't beamed from satellites or something, but instead is just an esoteric, ham-fisted metaphor for centralized data storage is a tall order. Tower of Babel in the clouds tall.

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