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Anonymous Leaks 1M Apple Device UDIDs

timothy posted about 2 years ago | from the don't-forget-the-one dept.

Crime 282

Orome1 writes "A file containing a million and one record sets containing Apple Unique Device Identifiers (UDIDs) and some other general information about the devices has been made available online by Anonymous hackers following an alleged breach of an FBI computer. 'During the second week of March 2012, a Dell Vostro notebook, used by Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K. Stangl from FBI Regional Cyber Action Team and New York FBI Office Evidence Response Team was breached using the AtomicReferenceArray vulnerability on Java,' the hackers claim." Update: 09/04 13:44 GMT by T : A piece at SlashCloud points out that if the leak is genuine, this raises some sticky questions about privacy and security; in particular: "[H]ow did the agency obtain said information, and to what purpose? Why did all that personal data reside on the laptop of one special agent?"

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My Reaction (-1, Offtopic)

Mr. Disappointed (2722485) | about 2 years ago | (#41221711)

How I feel when anonymous blabbers another leak: My Reaction [upload.ee] .

Re:My Reaction (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221733)

Are you sorely disappointed? Tell us how you really feel.

Re:My Reaction (0)

plaukas pyragely (1630517) | about 2 years ago | (#41221995)

4chan* & reddit* animated reactions plague spreads.

* IANAME - not a meme expert, not sure if these two are to blame for this.

Re:My Reaction (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222157)

It's because the average IQ is about 100. Have you tried having a conversation lately with someone outside of your normal circle? Most people are blabbering morons.

Re:My Reaction (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222319)

IT'S OBAMMY'S FAULT!

Re:My Reaction (3, Informative)

icebraining (1313345) | about 2 years ago | (#41222393)

And you're a nice example.

It's because the average IQ is about 100.

It's not "about" 100. It is 100, because that's how they are designed.

When modern IQ tests are devised, the mean (average) score within an age group is set to 100

So is apple... (4, Interesting)

santax (1541065) | about 2 years ago | (#41221721)

Going to explain why they gave all the UID of their devices to the FBI?

Re:So is apple... (0, Redundant)

coinreturn (617535) | about 2 years ago | (#41221737)

Going to explain why they gave all the UID of their devices to the FBI?

You assume Apple gave them to the FBI. More likely, the FBI has a covert spying app in the app store.

Re:So is apple... (5, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#41221751)

Why is that more likely?
You think if the FBI asks Apple or AT&T won't cough up such a list?

Re:So is apple... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221873)

There's an Axis group of predatory software companies comprising of largely of Apple, Microsoft, Oracle and Facebook. with a few smaller companies used mostly as proxies. They cooperate with US government agencies in exchange for favorable treatment in courts and legislature.

In this instance, the Facebook app on Apple's iOS was used to mine contact data from iPhone users.

Re:So is apple... (3, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#41221933)

Oh please, all the big boys play this game. Any major firm is not going to do anything other than send a bill when any three letter agency asks for data. Nothing to do with favors, just typical amoral corporate behavior that we need to regulate against.

Re:So is apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221955)

Do you dispute the fact that Apple allowed the Facebook app to mine iPhone users contact data for the FBI?

Re:So is apple... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#41221969)

Not one bit.
I dispute the fact that only a limited set of companies are doing this or that they gain favors by doing it. Big companies like telcos have nice simple request for data forms pre made, so long as they get paid they are more than happy to share any and all data.

Re:So is apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222043)

Do you have any evidence that the Facebook app on Android is doing the same thing?

Re:So is apple... (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#41222113)

The fact that it is facebook?

Facebook exists for basically this sort of thing. Tracking devices or not, anything you post to it you should consider public knowledge. Sure you have privacy settings, which do not apply to the three letter agencies. At some point they may not apply to anyone.

I am not saying don't use it, but consider anything you say on facebook the same as printing it on a billboard.

Everything is in place for Big Brother to step in (4, Interesting)

dna_(c)(tm)(r) (618003) | about 2 years ago | (#41222543)

Review the permissions of the app. It can read and write contact information and it can take pictures and video, access phone state and identity, determine your location and record audio. At any time. Anybody actually read 1984? But at least Android tells you about it.

Re:So is apple... (3, Insightful)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | about 2 years ago | (#41222019)

We need government rules against a company cooperating with the government?

On one hand you argue for regulation, which is more powerful government. On the other hand, you bemoan the government using any power.

Companies and governments don't go to heaven. They don't act morally or amorally. They just do what is necessary to get thru the day.

Re:So is apple... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222131)

Companies and governments don't go to heaven. They don't act morally or amorally. They just do what is necessary to get thru the day.

Bullshit. Can't speak for government, but in business I see it from C-levels every day: how can we make more money from our customers without driving most of them away? There are some pretty fucken awful things done in the name of profit.

Re:So is apple... (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#41222291)

Yes, much like we have government rules limiting what the police can do.

Regulation does not imply a more powerful government, it can be done with the same level of power it has now.

No one goes to heaven, it does not exist. They act amorally, since that is what the people who make them up do.

Re:So is apple... (4, Interesting)

Sique (173459) | about 2 years ago | (#41222625)

Regulation does imply a more powerful goverment. If someone runs afoul the regulation, the government steps in and hands out punitive fees, prison time or exclusion from government contracts. This amounts to actively reign into formerly autonomous business processes or personal decisions.
Each regulation gives the government more power. Before the regulation, the government had no right to interfere. Regulation gives the right to the government. And each additional regulation forces the government to actively administer the regulation, and thus to add governmental jobs.
There is no point in regulation if there is no one to enforce it.

Re:So is apple... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#41222713)

Not true. Some regulation limits government, like police may not just search your house at random. This is the kind of thing I am proposing. The end result would just be such evidence could never be used in court and at that point existing administrative actions could be taken against those who collected it.

Re:So is apple... (2)

icebraining (1313345) | about 2 years ago | (#41222491)

That's not how it works. Not for an individual, and not for a complex organization like a company or government. Regulations are not reducible to more/less powerful.

There are separation of powers, multiple levels of checks and balances, etc, that do counteract such forces.

For example, not that long ago a project by our government for installing a bunch of CCTVs was struck down by a different government commission that's responsible for protecting personal data.

Re:So is apple... (1)

dna_(c)(tm)(r) (618003) | about 2 years ago | (#41222623)

I think you do not understand the separation of powers: legislative power (congress) would make a law prohibiting collecting arbitrary data about individual citizens without reason and companies to provide them that information without due process. Executive power (government) is not allowed to subvert that law.

Re:So is apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221961)

"the personal details fields referring to people appears many times empty leaving the whole list incompleted on many parts"

If the data came from Apple, it would probably have a higher quality.

Re:So is apple... (1)

siddesu (698447) | about 2 years ago | (#41221757)

He's gotta be as shrewd as one Mr. Manning. Are they using Android tablets to access customer databases at the Genius Bar?

Re:So is apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221761)

lol.
wait.. really?
no. lol.

Re:So is apple... (1)

gullil (1959802) | about 2 years ago | (#41221935)

Probably a Flashlight app

Re:So is apple... (4, Funny)

GNious (953874) | about 2 years ago | (#41222451)

So Apple can now drag both the FBI and Anonymous to court over copyright infringement? Nice ...

1 million UIDs, value at [price of iPad or iPhone], should be pretty nice income for Apple's legal department.

Re:So is apple... (0)

Sique (173459) | about 2 years ago | (#41222745)

A list of UIUDs is basicly a database, not a creative work in itself. You only get copyright protection for databases in the E.U., but not in the U.S. (I wonder, why there is no database giant based in the E.U., but a lot of them are in the U.S. :) )

Re:So is apple... (5, Insightful)

ATMAvatar (648864) | about 2 years ago | (#41221793)

Yes, that seems like the larger issue here. What purpose does the FBI Cyber Action team have with 12M Apple UUIDs (from TFA: of which only 1M was leaked so far)?

This actually seems like a care of actual well-meaning hacktivism, as the purpose here is to inform users they are being tracked. It is only a matter of time before the remaining UUIDs are released. Unfortunately, most people have little more tech savvy than a newborn, so it is unlikely many people will even know how to compare their device to the list even if they care to do so.

The best we can hope for is that more of them wake up to the large-scale surveillance being undertaken and the abuse of power it represents. I wish I could be optimistic, but I know better by now.

Re:So is apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221919)

Maybe they asked for a specific UUID, and FBI got them all since "data and storrage is cheap".

Re:So is apple... (4, Insightful)

Dan East (318230) | about 2 years ago | (#41222001)

The problem is that although Anonymous does have a list of Apple IDs (which I doubt has been verified yet), they don't have hard evidence attributing them to an FBI source. We have to just take their word on that one, unless the FBI admits to the breach.

Re:So is apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222051)

Just FYI:

UDID "Unique Device ID", Apple's way of tagging their devices.
UUID "Universally Unique ID", a standard which would have done the job for all intents and purposes.

Re:So is apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222231)

A UUID is not guaranteed to be unique whereas a UDID is.

Re:So is apple... (2)

v1 (525388) | about 2 years ago | (#41222243)

UDID "Unique Device ID", Apple's way of tagging their devices.
UUID "Universally Unique ID", a standard which would have done the job for all intents and purposes.

I'd like someone with more specific expertise to follow up on this branch of the thread, but iirc one of those IDs is used to encrypt the data on the ipod/iphone, and is also used to encrypt the data backed up to the computer when synced, if you select to encrypt the backup. (itunes option)

So, having a big database of these IDs is also potentially useful for extracting the information from a protected device or backup.

If they have a database that contains names and product serial numbers with them, that probably makes their job much faster. Instead of having to try 12 million codes to see which one works on a phone they've just confiscated/borrowed, they may get lucky and find it in the db. If not, after spending the time (20 minutes? I have no clue) trying IDs until they find the right one, then your info gets added into the db for later faster retrieval. And identification I suppose too. But they don't need the IDs for that.

I've also read recently that some LEA have access to special software or hardware that can be plugged into an idevice and download data without syncing. I don't know how much truth there is to this, and I don't know if the information downloaded is also decrypted at the same time. I assume those are using unpublished exploits or possibly back doors that apple provided them with.

Could someone with more expertise in the use of those IDs please make additions/corrections to the above?

Re:So is apple... (3, Informative)

ToastedRhino (2015614) | about 2 years ago | (#41222529)

Not sure why you think this. If you have access to an iPhone backup (encrypted or not) you almost certainly have access to the UDID already since backups are store (on OS X) in ~/Library/Application Support/MobileSync/Backup/[iPhone UDID]/[Actual Data]

(It's similar on Windows in that it also includes the UDID in the folder name, but I don't know the full path off the top of my head.)

Anyone getting to the actual data would be able to see the UDID in the folder name that contains the data.

Also, let's not forget that before iOS 5 developers were able to use UDIDs as identifiers when apps were downloaded. So lots and lots of developers have this same information on lots and lots of users in databases of their own. In my mind, it seems pretty ridiculous to think that Apple would have given developers carte blanche to collect information that is an integral part of the phone's encryption protocol.

That's not to say this isn't a privacy problem, but I don't think it could affect the strength of the encryption on or off the phone in any ways, shape, or form.

Re:So is apple... (3, Insightful)

Shavano (2541114) | about 2 years ago | (#41221841)

From that comment I gather that you believe an anonymous person who claims to be a hacker who claims to have gotten what he claims is Apple UDIDs from what he claims was an FBI computer.

Re:So is apple... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222641)

This is considered "insightful"? If Shavano had taken the 5 seconds required to verify that those UDID are, in fact, valid, he wouldn't be saying silly things like this.

Sure, we have no idea of the source of this (FBI, Apple, random person with 1M+ harvested UDIDs, etc.), but it's trivial to verify that (at least a good part of the data) is valid.

Maybe google for "Apple UDID deanonymize" and you'll get there.

Re:So is apple... (3, Funny)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | about 2 years ago | (#41221993)

I'm more interested in why a high-budget outfit like the FBI is buying Vostros!

Re:So is apple... (1)

AbRASiON (589899) | about 2 years ago | (#41222251)

Don't quote me on this but I think the Vostro is one of the few laptops with a matte finish nowadays.
So the remainder of the Apple (obviously) and Dell stock is pretty much defective by design. Thank the lord for the Vostro.

Let's ignore... (1, Insightful)

craznar (710808) | about 2 years ago | (#41222027)

... the possibility that the FBI was doing its job.

The only possibilities here are that the FBI or Apple are in the wrong, there is NO possibility that criminals did something wrong.

Remember that simple rule... the FBI and Apple sometimes make mistakes, therefore they are ALWAYS responsible for things. /groan

Re:Let's ignore... (2, Interesting)

RMingin (985478) | about 2 years ago | (#41222129)

Ok, yes yes, the crazy mugger (cracker) was clearly in the wrong. That does leave the question of why an unconnected, shady character (the FBI) was walking around with everyone's paychecks (Apple info for which the FBI has no clearly demonstrated need).

Nobody is declaring Anonymous innocent, but why the HELL does the FBI need a list of UDIDs? Are they tracking TERRISTS via their iPhones now, or is it more likely that the FBI just likes reading your mail, watching you in the shower, and knowing all your passwords?

Re:Let's ignore... (3, Insightful)

craznar (710808) | about 2 years ago | (#41222633)

So - why does a cop car need a million bucks worth of Heroin in their boot ?

One option is - they nabbed a criminal.

Re:So is apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222081)

The FBI has 12 million UDIDs (iPhone and iPad). Apple has sold far more than 12 million iPhones and iPads. Based on the names, many of UDIDs are not from the US. Either Apple gave them the full set of all UDIDs (and then deprecated it) but this asshole only had a small subset on his laptop or it came from elsewhere.

Only USA Apple ID's or others (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222099)

Was the leak only for USA ID numbers, or are we talking major criminal action in foreign countries here?

It's always tempting to think the USA is the world police, but Apple do not have immunity from foreign courts if they've been handing over data like that.

Re:So is apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222119)

You'd have to be pretty naive to think that the FBI doesn't have access to all of the information Apple, Google, Microsoft, Facebook etc. has about you...

A shocking discovery (-1, Offtopic)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | about 2 years ago | (#41221745)

Friends and followers on the Slashdort web site:

I am almost at a loss for words. What I have discovered in the past days has shaken my world-view to its foundations.

As you know, I have been a consistent, sometimes even strident voice denouncing whatI believed to be Italian subterfuge and infiltration against the Internet and related things, from soup to nuts as they say.

Then oneday, a few days ago, I was perusing oldfamily photo albums when I discovered a picture and birth-certificate of a heretofore unknown great great grandfather of mine!

His name -- I still can hardly belive it: Giuseppe Pescatore Puzzolo.

This changes everything.

Please bear with me, it will take time for me to extract the rational and revolutionary core ofmy liberating message from the cloud of anti-Italian confusion from which it once seemed so inseparable.

In the meantime, boungiorno a tutti!.

One thing remains solid in this disorienting spiritual earthquake: my undying love for you, Laura. Ciao!

Re:A shocking discovery (1)

dskzero (960168) | about 2 years ago | (#41221801)

wat

Re:A shocking discovery (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221877)

Laura is the only person who can help you through this moment of crisis my spaghetti swallowing friend.

Viva la connessione internet gratuita!

Re:A shocking discovery (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222387)

Italians are savage gaffets, worse than people of color. We need more Italian on Italian crime.

How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (-1, Flamebait)

Viol8 (599362) | about 2 years ago | (#41221775)

by Anonymous

Step 1) Release private details of fellow geeks from Sony.
Step 2) Release private details of fellow geeks devices from Apple

For kids who are so keen on releasing the details of others, they're strangely reluctant to release their own. Funny that.

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221853)

Its just so much easier when ID10Ts use Windows...

The details of the "others" isn't on Windows....

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221863)

Sony is for rich people and gamers. Apple is for hipsters. None of those are geeks in my book.

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221865)

Would geeks really be using Apple devices?

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (2, Insightful)

jbernardo (1014507) | about 2 years ago | (#41221869)

geeks? I see no geeks there, why would geeks using fashion accessories instead of smartphones or using devices made by a company who likes to install rootkits on their users machines?

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (1)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 2 years ago | (#41221957)

I'm seeing a lot of posts like these, so I'm thinking there is something wrong with the groupthink's reading comprehension. He said geeks from those respective companies, not geek users. He means, release personal information of the engineers and other technical people designing/building/testing these devices. They will be fighting as hard as anyone, but from the inside.

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (1)

jbernardo (1014507) | about 2 years ago | (#41222213)

Doh... Know you say that, I went and re-read his post and I agree, I misunderstood. He mentioned getting the details on geeks working at Sony and at Apple, not geeks buying devices from these two companies.

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (5, Informative)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#41221963)

Linus Torvalds used a macbook pro with linux last I checked. Is he not a geek?

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (-1, Troll)

Coisiche (2000870) | about 2 years ago | (#41222097)

I didn't know that Apple permitted their hardware to run linux.

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 2 years ago | (#41222371)

Permitted?
How can they do anything about it?

I have linux running on a macbook air and I have seen android on a 3GS.

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222123)

Linus Torvalds used a macbook pro with linux last I checked. Is he not a geek?

Not anymore. He is a sell out, compromising his true geek ideals. He is married to a babe. Wtf, have you ever heard of a married geek? See, proof right there.

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222083)

Why the fuck would you affiliate yourself with a group called "anonymous" which commits crimes online, and then decide to reveal your personal info ensuring that you get caught straight away?

You dumb fuck.

Re:How to lose friends and not infuence anyone (1)

Viol8 (599362) | about 2 years ago | (#41222677)

Whoooosh.....

udid (5, Interesting)

watice (1347709) | about 2 years ago | (#41221829)

UDID's aren't allowed to be used by apple anymore. Well maybe not disallowed but strongly discouraged, & depreciated in ios5, as far as I can tell.

Re:udid (1)

superflippy (442879) | about 2 years ago | (#41222709)

So is there anything you need to do just in case your device is on the list? Upgrade to iOS6 if you can, I'd assume.
For older devices that can't upgrade (thinking of my original AppleTV here), is there any risk? Is it likely someone would use your UDID to simulate being you so they can jailbreak their devices?

I give this stunt one thumb up the A** (1)

museumpeace (735109) | about 2 years ago | (#41221833)

I am now looking for my device IDs in that list...a drag. But how oblivious is the typical iPhone customer to just how naked they are? I salute the hackers for giving the fascist bureau of iDevices and their lackies a big black eye.

And the use of a UDID? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221849)

So what can you do with an Apple UDID?

Re:And the use of a UDID? (3, Informative)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 2 years ago | (#41221915)

A lot of apps use it, and with one, you could spoof requests using a simulator. It isn't a secure form of identity, but at least a good way to troll.

Re:And the use of a UDID? (5, Informative)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41221947)

So what can you do with an Apple UDID?

Yeah that's a good question. As to what a UDID is:

http://theiphonewiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=UDID [theiphonewiki.com]

UDID = SHA1(serial + IMEI + wifiMac + bluetoothMac)

So its not much more than a checksum of the serial num and the various RF ids. So given 5 pieces of information, the UDID is what amounts to a checksum of the other 4 parts proving that row of the database has no errors.

What it is, does not superficially seem to help much with what they do with it, but maybe it helps a little in isolating what it isn't (it isn't, for example, the itunes CC number for the account, or the owners SS number, so there's no point discussing those type of issues)

Re:And the use of a UDID? (1)

vpness (921181) | about 2 years ago | (#41222087)

sorry - still not clear what someone - the FBI - can do with a UDID ? can the FBI tell what (terrorist) podcasts I listen to ? can they track where I go ? do my listening habits correlate to the potential to commit crime? Target can predict if you're pregnant , so can my listening habits be corrlated as well ?

Re:And the use of a UDID? (1)

jittles (1613415) | about 2 years ago | (#41222521)

It depends on the applications you use. They could certainly jailbreak a device and then write some custom code that returns your UDID for the device UDID. Then they could spy on your communications through certain applications that use UDID to identify an account. Not many applications do that, especially since the UDID is deprecated in iOS5, but some do. Otherwise, I can't think of anything else that this allows the FBI (or a criminal) to do.

Re:And the use of a UDID? (1)

Qzukk (229616) | about 2 years ago | (#41222749)

The UDID is used by developers to provision an app for a phone so it can be installed without going through the app store (see here [tutsplus.com] .)

Re:And the use of a UDID? (1)

ed1park (100777) | about 2 years ago | (#41222185)

Doesn't seem that far fetched that it could be a single column from a larger database referencing oodles of more data allowing one to spy on and track any individual at anytime using such a device.

Re:And the use of a UDID? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222321)

So what can you do with an Apple UDID?

Control your very soul, of course. Apple clearly has such protocols in place with their phones. It also allows the FBI to contact all your childhood friends and tell them all the embarrassing stories of your youth that you didn't think anybody knew about, which will keep you from getting that job you wanted. Plus, ownership of that many UDIDs at once gives them the right to rape up to 1200 people per day without any legal repercussions (up to 1500 per day if they also have that many Intel processor IDs!).

Or at least that's what it'll sound like if you read enough paranoid Slashdot comments.

Re:And the use of a UDID? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222707)

Lots of things.

Like... I don't know... going to https://api.openfeint.com/users/for_device.xml?udid=XXX [openfeint.com] (replacing XXX with the UDID you want to get info on) and getting nice information like the games the person is playing or their profile picture (and you used to be also able to get Facebook account, GPS coordinates, etc.). This is just an example. But google for "Apple UDID deanonymize" and you'll find more examples.

Yes, the UDID is just a checksum/hash (as pointed out by someone who replied to you). But when you have lots of APIs using UDID for cross-referencing to uniquely identify someone (or, worse, as an authentication token), bad things are bound to happen once those UDIDs get leaked.

Dear Georg Orwell... (1)

syngularyx (1070768) | about 2 years ago | (#41221851)

1984 is now but we pretend it's not the case!

Re:Dear Georg Orwell... (1)

syngularyx (1070768) | about 2 years ago | (#41221859)

... George!

Re:Dear Georg Orwell... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222223)

Maybe you should read the story again...I think that might be a bit of hyperbole...

Test if yours is on the list here: (1)

Luxusleben (808718) | about 2 years ago | (#41221855)

Re:Test if yours is on the list here: (2)

Lehk228 (705449) | about 2 years ago | (#41221927)

disappointing, i expected the page to reply "it's compromised now"

kind of like those password security checkers "not secure: reason: you typed it into a random site on the internet"

catchy job title (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41221907)

> Supervisor Special Agent Christopher K. Stangl from FBI Regional Cyber Action Team and New York FBI Office Evidence Response Team

This guy must have business cards 2 feet wide.

Re:catchy job title (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 2 years ago | (#41222731)

Billy Rosewood - Deputy Director of Operations for Joint Systems Interdepartmental Operational Command (DDO-JSIOC)

Re:catchy job title (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222739)

This guy *HAD* business cards 2 feet wide.

FS (5, Funny)

Altanar (56809) | about 2 years ago | (#41221939)

Eh, if the FBI wants to know where I am at all times, they can follow me on Foursquare like everyone else.

Re:FS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222095)

That's really the point - you clearly don't understand how important it is to not have folk making lists like this.

Put it this way: what if McCarthy's cronies had these lists? There wouldn't even be the question of "Do you know a communist?" Of course you do, we know who you know and where you've been.

And that type of thing will happen again. It's happened again and again throughout history of man.

1. Make lists,
2. group people,
3. use the groups against each other
4. profit.

sadly, it's not even funny.

Re:FS (2)

madhatter256 (443326) | about 2 years ago | (#41222535)

It is the execution of the list that would result in bad things. Fortunately, the government doesn't have the gusto to use a list in the ways you describe...

Except for republican and democratic campaign coordinators... that's real fucking scary...

Apple bless you (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222015)

It's obviously a product of Apple innovation. Apple know better than us what features are good and which one are bad. Those criticizing Apple have obviously low IQ or are too old to adapt to the innovative idevice future. Once more, Apple shows the way forward to the future. Apple be praised.

All your UUIDs are belong to us (2)

GeekWithAKnife (2717871) | about 2 years ago | (#41222065)

Seriously, does anyone really think this is not commonplace? If the government is doing this behind the scenes just imagine what Facebook does with the data you willingly sign over to it. This is just the tip of the iceberg. Sure it's not suppose to happen, sure it's wrong, sure no one agreed to it and it needs to be corrected...but if something can be abused, it will be.

Re:All your UUIDs are belong to us (1)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | about 2 years ago | (#41222401)

This is why facebook only knows that I like to cook random food stuff. Seriously that is type of data I would trust facebook with or any random company or government agency. By the way some of my more recent postings are of:
Soda bread
Pork schnitzel in the style of Vienna
Sweet Potato Pie
German chocolate cake
Home made ravioli (stuffed with bison, venison, beef, 3 cheeses, and spinach) in creme sauce
Beef and Guinness stew
Bacon wrapped venison roast slow cooked and smoked in my barbeque
Spicy chili
7 bean casserole
Bison Porter house (it is the size of a dinner plate)
Garlic soup

Re:All your UUIDs are belong to us (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222507)

Those health insurance premiums... increased lately?

Re: All your UUIDs... recipes are belong to us (1)

walter_f (889353) | about 2 years ago | (#41222705)

I'll go for the home made bison and cheese stuffed ravioli, thank you.

As to the garlic soup, don't bother.
Relations between humans tend to be difficult enough even w/o garlic. ;-)

Re:All your UUIDs are belong to us (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222525)

Sure it's not suppose to happen, sure it's wrong, sure no one agreed to it and it needs to be corrected.

This is why it's nothing like what happens with Facebook.

LOL Java (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222139)

It's the new ActiveX. Full of holes and unfortunately deployed all over the place and used by people who ought to know better.

Begone, Java plague!

Isn't this illegal? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41222169)

I mean, there is no way that it is legal for the FBI to store data about 12 million people?

So which application? (3, Interesting)

nweaver (113078) | about 2 years ago | (#41222367)

It sounds like this is a dump of data from an application vendor to the FBI: Apps have (in the past) used UUID for identification, and the push-notification tokens also suggest application, not apple, as the source.

So which application is responsible?

Re:So which application? (1)

FFOMelchior (979131) | about 2 years ago | (#41222569)

Maybe the FBI was attempting to investigate the mafia -- and must've gotten that mixed up with Mafia Wars?

In a self followup, push notification token... (1)

nweaver (113078) | about 2 years ago | (#41222579)

If one finds a phone which is in the list, is there a way to find out which application is associated with the push notification token? If so, this would help identify the application vendor responsible for dumping this data onto the FBI.

Re:So which application? (1)

BillHop (82717) | about 2 years ago | (#41222583)

Perhaps that Furious Birds clone that promises a hand grenade for each level mastered?

"... on the laptop of one special agent?" Har har. (4, Insightful)

walter_f (889353) | about 2 years ago | (#41222621)

"Why did all that personal data reside on the laptop of one special agent?"

Probably it didn't and doesn't.
Reside on the laptop of *just one* special agent, that is.

Whenever one of these special agents gets something particular from the boss, all the others want that, too.

Hereâ(TM)s how to check if your Apple device (1)

cirrus_minor (2461290) | about 2 years ago | (#41222695)

Hereâ(TM)s how to check if your Apple device UDID has been compromised by the AntiSec leak http://goo.gl/GJC2q [goo.gl] ï
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