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Australian Attorney General Pushes Ahead With Gov't Web Snooping

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the you-can-trust-us dept.

Australia 148

CuteSteveJobs writes "Australian Attorney-General Nicola Roxon now fully backs a controversial plan to capture the online data of all Australians, despite only six weeks ago saying 'the case had yet to be made.' The Tax Office, the Federal Police and the Opposition all support it, with Liberal National Party MP Ross Vasta declaring 'the highest degree of scrutiny and diligence is called for.' With all major parties on board, web monitoring of all Australians appears to be inevitable."

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148 comments

Information wants to be free (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41225663)

One country at a time, the governments are putting in place the function to collect all data so it can be freed by hackers.

Re:collect all data so it can be freed by hackers. (0)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | about 2 years ago | (#41229961)

THIS is one variant of the "Mayan Grade" Apocalypse.

Forget Wikileaks, what if ALL DATA ANYWHERE got turbo-released because of a devastating flaw?

We'd have like 999*999 Terabytes of infringing data on EVERYONE, EVER.

Good luck with the lawsuits arising from THAT!

I find this hard to believe (3)

iplayfast (166447) | about 2 years ago | (#41225715)

Surely there is SOMEONE in Australia that objects to this? Surely there is at least ONE politician that sees how wrong it is to effectively wiretap a whole country.
I'm just shaking my head, and please don't call me Surely.

Re:I find this hard to believe (4, Interesting)

iplayfast (166447) | about 2 years ago | (#41225769)

I can't wait for wikileaks to start posting private info from all the politicans that proposed this bill. ALL YOUR BASE and so on.

Re:I find this hard to believe (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41227723)

the capture likely wouldn't include data for "politically exposed persons".

Re:I find this hard to believe (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41225909)

If you've got nothing to hide, why are you worried. You're just a pussy, and so is your site.

Re:I find this hard to believe (4, Insightful)

iplayfast (166447) | about 2 years ago | (#41226051)

The problem is that it's telco's that are required to retain the info for 2 years. If you've worked at any ISP you know that anyone with any access can look at anything. So suppose your significant other got scammed into buying diamond earrings, and thinking that it was a secure website, posted all her delivery info and credit card info.
You've got 2 years of possible problems.
So suppose you get into a rant about some silly online argument with ImATroll and then the guy who's name is ImATroll is murdered. Who in the last two years had problems with him.
So suppose you supported the liberal cause last year, but this year they are being stupid. Expect plenty of phone calls and emails asking for your continued support....

Yeah the examples are silly and off the cuff, but you get the idea.

Re:I find this hard to believe (3, Interesting)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 2 years ago | (#41226695)

Two years? Right, like those people with access to this information won't make copies of something useful. ISP data should be treated the same as phone conversations and mail. Why the hell aren't they?

Re:I find this hard to believe (1)

TranquilVoid (2444228) | about 2 years ago | (#41230277)

The reason is twofold; because they can, and because, unlike mail and telephone calls, web sites are semi-public.

Hopefully this doesn't pass, but if it does hopefully everything shifts to https and then the government can see you went to https://applepierecipesandchildporn.com/ [applepiere...ldporn.com] but have no idea at what you looked.

Re:I find this hard to believe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226647)

Forum spy or just a dumb ass troll?

Re:I find this hard to believe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230267)

So police officers or politicians (surely they have nothing to hide) wouldn't mind me searching through their house or internet usage, they have nothing to hide of course (or they shouldn't be in that job).

Re:I find this hard to believe (2, Interesting)

anomaly256 (1243020) | about 2 years ago | (#41227927)

Frankly, I object to the entire notion of letting 1 single person have so much control and sway on our lives. It's completely batshit insane. I have no idea why people even /tolerate/ the office of Attorney General still. SO much awesome would come from this position not existing any more. For example, Australia would have an R18+ rating for video games already, causing mediocre titles like Syndicate to not be considered illegal contraband (yes thats right, video games that are common place and considered 'no big deal' in the rest of the world are actually, to this day, fucking illegal here because they have a bit more blood than some old fuddy-duddy likes. Yet somehow the God of War series, the most violent and graphics games I've ever seen, are ma15+ ??? Guess who's on the ratings review board - thats right, the AG. The AG's office controls the entire classification review board). Policies like this internet snooping would actually be forced to go through an analysis and vetting process, held up for scrutiny by both parties, debated and rationalized before being pushed into binding law. The AU ACTA and SOPA talk minutes would be public knowledge instead of being censored by the AG, who apparently doesn't even need court approval to do such things despite it having an immense impact on our laws.

Seriously, why the fuck do we still even have an Attorney General position.

Re:I find this hard to believe (2)

slick7 (1703596) | about 2 years ago | (#41228249)

Surely there is SOMEONE in Australia that objects to this?

Surely, it's not Shirley, it's Sheila.
g'day!

Thanks, Australia! (3, Interesting)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | about 2 years ago | (#41225723)

The fiance and I have been considering emigrating for a few years while we're still young enough to be of value to another nation (I'm 31 and she's 24). Looks like you made the decision that much easier. New Zealand is now ahead in the polls.

Re:Thanks, Australia! (4, Insightful)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about 2 years ago | (#41225853)

There's something wrong when you have to have an exit strategy for your home COUNTRY. Not with you, but with the useful idiots who vote these people into elected office.

Re:Thanks, Australia! (1, Informative)

anomaly256 (1243020) | about 2 years ago | (#41228199)

Unfortunately, no one votes for the Attorney General position. It's a complete boys' club. It's also above the law in a few key ways. I don't know why we allow this office to exist still.

Re:Thanks, Australia! (3, Interesting)

sdguero (1112795) | about 2 years ago | (#41226377)

As an Californian that has spent some time in NZ, I suggest going there for more than a couple weeks before you take the plunge. Things that seem trivial during a 2-3 week vacation (like hardly anything staying open after 8PM, passive aggressive customer service, distaste for Americans, lack of culinary variety, etc) can start to grate on you after a few months. Just my experience...

Re:Thanks, Australia! (1)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | about 2 years ago | (#41226551)

I appreciate the advice. There is definitely a world of difference between a short stay and a semi-permanent home, and I've heard stories of the passive-aggressive attitudes towards Americans. I'd also want to check out the climate, as a Nevadan I've been spoiled by the high desert and the proximity to the Sierras.

Re:Thanks, Australia! (2)

sdguero (1112795) | about 2 years ago | (#41226775)

Yeah... Re-reading my post, I feel kind of bad because there is a LOT to like about New Zealand. It's beautiful and there is a lot of open space, the weather is more climactic than Southern California but really isn't that bad and varies a lot depending on which island you are on and which micro-climate you are in. The humor there is different, very dry, but they can be really funny.

My sister has been there 6 years and she seems to like it more now than ever. She is marrying a kiwi, has picked up the accent, and works as a vet-technician working with mostly sheep so she's pretty much been fully integrated. Being liberal politically helps too, NZ has a large government... Lots of taxes, welfare, and progressive legislation.

Re:Thanks, Australia! (1)

sdguero (1112795) | about 2 years ago | (#41226783)

And I meant to say... Whatever you decide, good luck!

Re:Thanks, Australia! (1)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | about 2 years ago | (#41226917)

I appreciate it! I wish that the downward slide that our country seems to be on didn't necessitate exit strategies, especially when I know of so many liberal minded, intelligent Americans. The problem is that our government doesn't reflect this and both sides kowtow to the extremes. Fortunately we have the education and experience to move anywhere, I know a lot of nervous people who aren't quite as fortunate.

Re:Thanks, Australia! (1)

Spy Handler (822350) | about 2 years ago | (#41227027)

don't worry, Australia has Crocodile Dundee and Crocodile Hunter guarding their freedoms down there.

Re:Thanks, Australia! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41227159)

As a New Zealander living in Australia (who has been back there recently). I'd say Australia is still the best choice.

New Zealand is a basket case, both economically and politically

Re:Thanks, Australia! (1)

tapspace (2368622) | about 2 years ago | (#41227729)

Odd, my girl and I are similarly aged and considering the same thing. I will have a masters in computer science in April and want ot try to get a job before that. I need to propose first, because I can't see how she'll get a visa if we aren't married. But, from what we looked at, it would likely be easy for me to get residence as an engineer (they have labor shortages). Can I ask what you all intend to do? Also, from everything I looked at, it seemed you could be fast tracked to get a visa if you were 30 or under (I am young enough for that, but you are not). Have you seen this? Can you still get a visa easily above 30? Would it be as easy in NZ? I would guess Australia would be easier.

Re:Thanks, Australia! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41228085)

New Zealand will adopt the same laws eventually so you will be dealing with the same issue again a few years down the track. Historically policy is quite parallel between the two nations, sometimes takes a little time to sync that's all. I really think they use Aus / NZ as a kind of testbed, with such small populations they can test policy and then adopt to the larger western nations if the people will put up with it.

Re:Thanks, Australia! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230293)

i've been thinking the same thing. I've got an eu passport as well as my Aussie one so Holland might be nice, but south america looks like a lot of fun.

Re:Thanks, Australia! (2)

quenda (644621) | about 2 years ago | (#41230485)

you made the decision that much easier. New Zealand .

Sure you say that now. But as soon as you get your NZ Permanent Residency, you will jump om a plane to Australia, like every other NZ immigrant.

At least they're doing it in the open (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41225733)

The US does it but says they aren't. Search for Project Echelon. Welcome to the supposedly-free world.

Re:At least they're doing it in the open (2)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 2 years ago | (#41225869)

Echelon was a quaint old thing compared to what they're doing now but you're right.

Re:At least they're doing it in the open (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226297)

This is not the Echelon you are looking for

-NSA

Re:At least they're doing it in the open (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 2 years ago | (#41228845)

Somehow I doubt they are being very open about the external pressure being put on them by the UK/US on this. I don't see any logical reason for it.

Re:At least they're doing it in the open (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230223)

Not wanting to admit that domestic policy decisions that do not benefit Australian citizens are being heavily influenced by foreign governments? Same reason they don't talk about the TPP talks. I wouldn't want to admit to being so weak either if I held public office.

Looks like the greens will be getting my first preferences for now, for all the good that will do.

Uh-oh (1)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about 2 years ago | (#41225827)

All your network traffic are belong to us.
-Says the Australian government.

Translation (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41225837)

Apparently "the case has not yet been made" is Aussie for "my campaign fund appears to be underfunded".

Re:Translation (1)

Farmer Tim (530755) | about 2 years ago | (#41226207)

Doubtful; I can't think of a commercial entity who'd benefit (the ISPs are against it for obvious reasons). More likely the pressure is being applied by the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO), since they already have dossiers on everyone involved in Australian politics and would benefit from expanded powers to hack into suspect's or related third parties' computers (not that ASIO has a history of anything shady [wikipedia.org] ).

Hang on, someone at the door. Odd for 5AM. BRB.

Re:Translation (1)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about 2 years ago | (#41226265)

I can't think of a commercial entity who'd benefit

Uh, somebody has to run the operations and servers and respond to requests etc. If Australia is anything like the US, that's a LOT of commercial entity involvement.

Also see Military Industrial complex...

Re:Translation (2)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 2 years ago | (#41226735)

Copyright cartels? I had assumed they were backing most of these pushed for data retention.

Re:Translation (1)

ByronHope (2669333) | about 2 years ago | (#41227079)

Yes, copyright is one of the stated reasons for this draconian proposal.

Re:Translation (4, Interesting)

anomaly256 (1243020) | about 2 years ago | (#41228227)

You forget that the Australian AG is in the pockets of the MPAA/RIAA who absolutely want this information by any means possible. You forget that the AG office completely own and controls the ratings review board here and makes copyright laws without court oversight.

Re:Translation (1)

gmhowell (26755) | about 2 years ago | (#41230127)

How does the AG of Australia get into office? Election, appointment? Is there a method for removal?

Re:Translation (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230237)

"Is there a method for removal?"

Baseball Bat.

Oops....please no-one actually do that (at least for the next two years).

Re:Translation (1)

gmhowell (26755) | about 2 years ago | (#41230811)

Wouldn't it be a cricket bat?

Re:Translation (1)

Farmer Tim (530755) | about 2 years ago | (#41228527)

Fair call to all responses.

That's not what it says at all... (3, Informative)

Troyusrex (2446430) | about 2 years ago | (#41225849)

This is a bill to force telcoms to not dispose of the data they've collected for at least two years. There's nothing in hear about "a plan to capture the online data...". Now the data is being retained to help in investigations but there's a HUGE difference between the telcom having it and the government having to subpoena it and the government collecting it all themselves.

Re:That's not what it says at all... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226071)

Shh, slashdot is trying to compete with fox and CNN for the "who put up the most sensationalist articles" award.

Re:That's not what it says at all... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226257)

The data shouldn't exist to begin with. It makes no difference at all.

Re:That's not what it says at all... (4, Informative)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | about 2 years ago | (#41226293)

From TFA:

The data retention plan - which would force all Australian telcos and internet service providers to store the online data of all Australians for up to two years

and

''Many investigations require law enforcement to build a picture of criminal activity over a period of time. Without data retention, this capability will be lost,''

Mean they are quite clear on collecting EVERYTHING so that they can build something up later. If it's only 'all Australians who're under suspicion' that's one thing, but it clearly says 'All Australians' without caveat.

Re:That's not what it says at all... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41228439)

What do you expect with an idiot like Conroy at the helm and dear Julia backing him for gaffe after gaffe?
Our great firewall to rival China's and that's only the 1st step!

Re:That's not what it says at all... (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | about 2 years ago | (#41230315)

Collect data on everyone, provide data on a specific person, when subpoenaed, to the authorities.

Re:That's not what it says at all... (2)

ByronHope (2669333) | about 2 years ago | (#41227003)

You forget about ASIO, they will not require a subpoena, warrant or any form of court order. Once the data is stored it will be mined. Despite ASIO wiping up fear about terrorists, their main targets are political. ASIO targets environmentalists [smh.com.au] . The data retention is designed to strike fear into the general population, terrorists (if there are any) and criminals will use secure VPNs, Tor or what have you, to hide communications. The other target of this proposal is copyright infringement, mainly Bit Torrent users. There is no "HUGE" difference, if the data exists, it will be abused.

Begs the questions... (1)

jenningsthecat (1525947) | about 2 years ago | (#41225895)

With all major parties on board, web monitoring of all Australians appears to be inevitable.

If they're all in favour of something so draconian and so anti-freedom, are they really different parties at all? And do they really have any interest in the well being of their constituents?

Re:Begs the questions... (1)

Farmer Tim (530755) | about 2 years ago | (#41226335)

If they're all in favour of something so draconian and so anti-freedom, are they really different parties at all?

The two major parties in Australia are the Liberal Party (the conservatives) and the ALP, which as far as I can tell stands for "Another Liberal Party".

And do they really have any interest in the well being of their constituents?

LOL

Re:Begs the questions... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230359)

another liberal party but doesn't have any good accountants.

Re:Begs the questions... (2)

king_grumpy (1685560) | about 2 years ago | (#41226729)

The last election was extremely close and current government only got into power by making deals with independent and green (earth first not alien) politicians. Personally, I think it was the lack of a decent choice that lead to such a close vote. Neither party had any stand out policies or direction.

Re:Begs the questions... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230401)

I don't think the liberal party wanted to win they want Australia to see how bad it gets with the ALP in control (they had an early win by spending all the money the liberal party saved, and the liberal party doesn't want to get blamed for the mess, when cleaning it up) that's why they put Tony up for PM, honestly even hardcore liberal voters are were having a hard time ticking the box.

Re:Begs the questions... (2)

ByronHope (2669333) | about 2 years ago | (#41227141)

The two major parties are identical with these types of moves. The opposition will come from some sections of the media, but not the dominant Murdoch media, and The Greens and possibly some of the small right-wing parties.

Why? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226035)

Doesn't a simple web proxy render this kind of data from the ISP useless?

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226399)

Doesn't a simple web proxy render this kind of data from the ISP useless?

Doesn't a simple [insert trivial technical workaround here] usually make most [insert 99% of ignorant Government monitoring plans here] useless? It's kind of the beauty of putting those with the computer savvy of a baboon in charge...new baboon laws become unenforceable rather quickly...

While we're destroying civil rights... (1)

MikeRT (947531) | about 2 years ago | (#41226137)

in the name of The Children, I think it's about time we grab all of the activists and other paranoiacs who've created the hysteria about the dangers to children and throw them into a Soviet-style labor camp and surround it with two miles of landmines. As an American, I volunteer Death Valley or some place in northern Alaska. If you're going to gut civil liberties like that, you have no right to complain when someone does it to you.

Re:While we're destroying civil rights... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226247)

This has nothing to do with standard domestic issues like child safety. This is all about precrime and capturing "terrorists". Basically, it's bullshit.

Re:While we're destroying civil rights... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230573)

Protect the children from the terrorists, and also all the paedophiles. By basically monitoring %100 of the population for something that less than 1% do. Then when you never catch the 1% that you got the system for, you go after a different %30 of easily caught slight criminals.

Re:While we're destroying civil rights... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230495)

I'm Australian and you have my full support.

First there was Big Brother (2)

StillNeedMoreCoffee (123989) | about 2 years ago | (#41226177)

Now there's Big Mate

Forced VOIP + Web Snooping (2)

Walking The Walk (1003312) | about 2 years ago | (#41226183)

So, hot on the heals of a Slashdot story about Australia moving to fibre so they can push VOIP [slashdot.org] , we now get a story that states that they want to:

force all Australian telcos and internet service providers to store the online data of all Australians for up to two years

Yeah, don't worry - they're not related though. Really, we just think VOIP will improve everyone's lives.

Don't trust the Attorney General (Cricket) (1)

NSN A392-99-964-5927 (1559367) | about 2 years ago | (#41226189)

Aussies are pretty smart and something will change if they get upset.

Solve it by a game of cricket ;-) Throw a full yorker at the attorney general and see how the law sticks when he is on the crease!

The Onion Router, GnuPG, TrueCrypt (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226353)

I am doing almost all of my browsing using TOR. Now, what if we would all use TOR, publish our stuff as a hidden TOR service (it's quite easy) and encrypt each and every Email using GPG, encrypt harddisks routinely using TrueCrypt.

Yeah, I know all the bitch/whining about it "being sooo complicated", but reality is that We Are So Lazy. Let's get off our asses and do something about all the Surveillance-Industrial-Complex (SIC). And if you think TOR is not good enough, build a competitor and I will happily use it. Hint: The weak point is the directory system and the fixed hop count.

Re: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226559)

Agree, if you don't want "advertisers" and RIAA snooping on you (that's beside law enforcement's) encryption is the way to go.

BTW, is there any equivalent to "secure-tunnel" outside of US? I'm using almost always for regular browsing.

Re:The Onion Router, GnuPG, TrueCrypt (1)

JockTroll (996521) | about 2 years ago | (#41226715)

Useless. Encrypted traffic = person of interest = GASP TERRORYZIST = men in bulletproof armour spraying-and-praying SMGs and flamethrowers all over your block (just to be sure) as required by the UBERPATRIOTSIEGHEIL LETSKILLEVERYBODYFORTEHCHILDREN ACT.

TrolSlkore (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226523)

Trying to diisect

Australia the Internet Police State (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226537)

Seems like every day I hear about Australia further restricting and monitoring Internet usage. Does Australia have so few problems that they must create an evil to declare war on? Not saying my home country doesn't do the same thing, mind you...

Re: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226687)

My guess they are so impressed with China's performance that they are trying to simply copy it. If everything goes fine Another Great Firewall is coming. :-/

Re:Australia the Internet Police State (2)

tdelaney (458893) | about 2 years ago | (#41228277)

Basically, yes. And the worst thing is that IMO the current government is almost complete crap, but they're far far better than the Opposition.

Economically:

We survived the GFC with minimal impact.

We have a tiny amount of government debt (despite the Opposition constantly harping about our "high level of government debt" - an example of them "creating an evil to declare war on").

We have a budget that is close to balanced.

We have an ambitious and important infrastructure project underway (the National Broadband Network) that is using largely-borrowed money to pay for the build and is projected to make a 7% ROI (and again, the Opposition opposes this as a "huge waste of taxpayers' money" despite it not being any such thing - neither a huge waste, nor taxpayers' money).

Socially:

We have reasonable public health care and education (not brilliant, but it's a pretty good safety net).

We don't have a lot of unstabilising elements in the community.

So evils like "illegal boat people" (no such thing - it is not illegal to seek asylum) and all the various justifications for data retention need to be created or blown out of all proportion to create hysteria.

ok, so... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41226703)

...3 things..

1) What's to stop most people from tossing back and forth some randomly generated files, thus causing these already massive "backups" of all of the "data" to become super-duper-massive?

2) What sort of data are they keeping? If I pay for a song from itunes (as if), does that mean that they keep a copy?

3) If I download illegal documents, or documents that are not meant for civilians, and they keep a copy, do they keep that too?

Fuck, if I could just get a job with an Australian ISP, I could use them to store my files, and look clean!

With all major parties on board (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 2 years ago | (#41227063)

May I assume that the Greens are not a major party yet? Or have they aligned themselves with one of them? And are they speaking up? They received no mention the article. Oh well, it's up to the people to vote the 'major parties' out if they are interested in stopping this atrocity.

Re:With all major parties on board (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230019)

doesn't matter with both government and opposition support. that covers all but about 95% seats of the lower house and about 90% or more of the upper house. so its passes both houses. without fuss

The Jews are running scared... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41227119)

... which is why they are rapidly implementing their police state - from which nobody will be able to escape...

What is the Jew most terrified of? Being NAMED. Naming the Jew, they call it. The Jew doesn't want you to know that he runs YOUR country, YOUR banks, and YOUR military, and YOUR media.

I wonder..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41227135)

if that includes snooping all of the govt's web traffic too....

I think it's great (2)

ozduo (2043408) | about 2 years ago | (#41227215)

As an Ozzie I love the idea that my government will provide me with a free back up of all my data.

Re:I think it's great (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230685)

Why because your a crooked cop with access to the proposed data base?

Nanny said it is to protect us (1)

bug1 (96678) | about 2 years ago | (#41227279)

Nicola Roxon seems to be a genuinely caring person, she has won international recognition for her campaigned against cigaret companies, she isnt one of these power seeking politicians looking for kickbacks or to earn favors from the intelligence community.

She seems to genuinely believe this is need to protect society, and doesn't seem to expect this information to abused.

I cant think of anyone more fitting for the "Nanny" tag from the nanny state.

Advance Australia Fair (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41227471)

Fair my arse.

Australia is turning into an Authoritarian state.

Give him everything right now. (2)

arthurpaliden (939626) | about 2 years ago | (#41228737)

Cut out the middle man send Attorney-General Nicola Roxon every thing right now. CC him on every email and photo upload and send him your daily web browsing histories, if he has twitter the update him on what your are doing.

This is what they did in Canada and they crashed the Parliamentary mail and web servers. After a few days of this the bill was effectively withdrawn.

Re:Give him everything right now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41229041)

It's a she.

Re:Give him everything right now. (1)

arthurpaliden (939626) | about 2 years ago | (#41229093)

Then why is she putting forward such a stupid bill? I thought only men did that kind of thing...

Re:Give him everything right now. (1)

Majkow (604785) | about 2 years ago | (#41230035)

i think she accidently deleted some emails or photo's on facebook. she is introducing this so she can have a backup.

Re:Give him everything right now. (1)

slash.dt (701002) | about 2 years ago | (#41229193)

Cut out the middle man send Attorney-General Nicola Roxon every thing right now. CC him on every email and photo upload and send him your daily web browsing histories, if he has twitter the update him on what your are doing.

This is what they did in Canada and they crashed the Parliamentary mail and web servers. After a few days of this the bill was effectively withdrawn.

Her. Send *her* everything right now. Surely the name and the photo were reasonable clues to the gender?

Re:Give him everything right now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230873)

People claimed the same thing about Janet Reno.

Re:Give him everything right now. (1)

PuZZleDucK (2478702) | about 2 years ago | (#41230255)

I like this idea... anyone know her contact details? I tried to look up my local candidate once and failed at that :p my chances of finding the AGs personal email is zero, but i figure one of the /. crowd might know.

Re:Give him everything right now. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230527)

http://www.nicolaroxonmp.com/j20/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=174&Itemid=83

Post the politicians data for the public (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41229143)

If it's good enough for the government to collect our data, then the public should be able to see the data of the people collecting the data. I'd like Nicola Roxon to be the first to publicly make available all of her private emails, google search history, email addresses and all other data collected.
If Nicola Roxon wil do this, I'd be in favor of the government snooping and intruding into our lives.

The Labor party will be wiped out in the next federal election, similar to what happened to them in QLD, and anyone voting in favor of this is committing political suicide. Another day, another lie from a Labor politician. What's new.

Question to any Aus ISP staff here (1)

davesag (140186) | about 2 years ago | (#41229159)

Since reading about this I've been wondering just how long do Australian ISPs retain such data for currently, without these new laws in place? Given GSM phone towers supposedly retain 37 years worth of EMEI logs, I can't imagine many ISPs would totally roll their logs within two years anyway. Can someone here who actually works at an Aussie ISP clarify the current situation please?

All Australians? (1)

OzJimbob (129746) | about 2 years ago | (#41229313)

It is a bit disingenuous to state that "web monitoring of all Australians appears to be inevitable". I, for one, am tunneling my web traffic via SSH to a server overseas, so they won't be monitoring my URLs ;)

Nicola Roxon? Not Rucola Nixon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41229417)

Because that would be more fitting. :P

Obligatory link to the Pirate Party of Australia (2)

pipedwho (1174327) | about 2 years ago | (#41229725)

http:/pirateparty.org.au [pirateparty.org.au]

Re:Obligatory link to the Pirate Party of Australi (1)

TranquilVoid (2444228) | about 2 years ago | (#41230447)

It strikes me as odd that the Pirate Party would be against someone copying your data.

Re:Obligatory link to the Pirate Party of Australi (1)

pipedwho (1174327) | about 2 years ago | (#41230561)

I know you're probably going for a Funny mod, but The Pirate Party does not condone piracy. It is about making sure people are not harassed by one-sided laws that go against the common good.

Re:Obligatory link to the Pirate Party of Australi (1)

TranquilVoid (2444228) | about 2 years ago | (#41230705)

You're right, I'd conflated their position with the standard SlashDot take on abolishing copyright, which was a bit flip anyway as anti-copyright thought usually applies to public, not private, data.

Reading their site it's not clear exactly what they propose other than 'reform'. As best I can work out they want to reduce the length of copyright and patents to some unstated period, and possibly make it only apply to corporations. For the data-rentention issue you may be better off linking to the Greens who have similar policies on privacy and aren't tainted with the one-issue label (sort of).

All parties except the people (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41229833)

Yes, all major parties are on board. The only dissenters are the public. When the people fear their government it is a tyranny, when the government fears the people it is liberty. Australia is becoming increasingly tyrannical, perhaps only so as to snuggle up to China just like they snuggled up to Suddam Hussein.

Dear All website owners (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41230135)

Please default to https

They want to keep what? (2)

thogard (43403) | about 2 years ago | (#41230253)

I deal with security of a payment gateway. Part of my job is to make sure we don't keep any credit card details floating around yet these new laws conflict with that. Years ago it seemed simple, just purge the field that has the card number in it. Too bad that is a naive solution for a far more complex problem and now I may be required to keep logs for years? Do you know how many card numbers show up in logs for stupid reasons?

Do you know how many people put their card number in the "name on card field"? What do you do about a email address of 5123456789012345@gmail.com when they used card xxx345? What do you do with the message "Did payment to card number 4123... go through?" How about encrypted files that use a credit card number as the file name? How about reference text of "ref_cardnumber" to deal with refunds? How about card numbers in https GET requests even though the data must be POSTed to even work?

I used cardrecon to scan my DNS personal server's DNS logs and it found people probing what appears to be cardnumber.abnormal.com. I have no idea what that is about. It finds all sorts of odd things that appears to have card numbers in it like deleted text from word or pdf documents.

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