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UK Paraplegic Woman First To Take Robotic Suit Home

Soulskill posted about a year and a half ago | from the can-we-call-it-a-mech dept.

Medicine 116

An anonymous reader writes "It might be a ways off, but every day we get closer to the possibility of William Gibson's short story The Winter Market becoming a plausible reality. Viable consumer exoskeleton for the paralyzed? Check, finally. Quoting Reuters: 'The exoskeleton is activated by the wearer tilting their balance to indicate the desire to take a step. It supports the body's weight and also allows the person to go up or down stairs, as well as sit or stand up independently. It costs 45,000 pounds and although clinical studies are ongoing that could back a case for health authorities to fund purchases of the device, the developers argue that savings on the treatment of ailments related to inactivity could offset the cost.'"

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116 comments

Take it to its logical conclusion. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226223)

I want a powerful exoskeleton that will let me rob a bank ... burst right through the wall, tear open the safe, and walk away with as much as I can carry while the guard's bullet ping harmlessly off my exoskeleton.

Re:Take it to its logical conclusion. (3)

Githaron (2462596) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226527)

If something like that became easily accessible to the average person, the guards would probably have similar suits.

Re:Take it to its logical conclusion. (1)

Riddler Sensei (979333) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226851)

The way most science fiction and cape-comics writers get around this is by trying to claim the suits are one-offs from individual super geniuses a la Iron Man [wikia.com] , Steel [wikia.com] and even Batman [wikia.com] at times.

Of course, this has absolutely no bearing in reality. It's really not going to happen that "just this one person in the world can makes this". I don't know if it would be awesome or terrifying if such and individual arose, but the idea is so silly that, as you said, it's not likely to ever leave the realm of fiction.

Re:Take it to its logical conclusion. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41227001)

But what about Tesla? He invented free universal wireless energy distribution that nobody's ever been able to duplicate! Clearly if he'd been a mechanical engineer instead of an electrical engineer, he'd have invented an awesome steampunkmechasuit that we still wouldn't be able to duplicate!

Re:Take it to its logical conclusion. (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#41233261)

But what about Tesla? He invented free universal wireless energy distribution that nobody's ever been able to duplicate!

Probably for the same reason that no one's ever been able to duplicate perpetual motion, time travel or cold fusion devices.

Re:Take it to its logical conclusion. (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a year and a half ago | (#41227717)

Apparently there's only one guard and he only has one bullet. So if he doesn't choose his time well the robber's pretty much in the clear.

Re:Take it to its logical conclusion. (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year and a half ago | (#41233253)

The woman took 17 days to finish the London Marathon. I don't think it's quite ready for prime time superhero/evil criminal mastermind use yet.

Nothing new (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226255)

Maybe his celebrity allowed him more sway with the NHS, but Stephen Hawking already got [theonion.com] one of these over a decade ago.

And in the future... (4, Insightful)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226281)

Won't be long before lazy fat people are using these just because they don't feel like using their own muscles to move their limbs. Happened with the mobility scooters, it'll happen with these suits.

Re:And in the future... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226379)

It wouldn't last. They must tilt and move a bit in order to move the exoskeleton. Too much effort. They would use the skeleton to sit on the mobility scooter and drive around.

Re:And in the future... (1)

Githaron (2462596) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226575)

More likely that they will start making motorized, bipedal "wheelchairs" that can go anywhere a human can walk including stairs.

Re:And in the future... (0, Flamebait)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226423)

What arrogant crap. All the people I've seen using mobility scooters actually had physical problems that made assistance necessary. OK, a lot of them should have taken better care of themselves when they were younger, but so what? I doubt that anybody on Slashdot is a paragon of healthy eating and frequent exercise.

Re:And in the future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226495)

I doubt that anybody on Slashdot is a paragon of healthy eating and frequent exercise.

I am.

Re:And in the future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226529)

6'1", 200lbs, 14%BF

365 Squat
455 DL
275 Bench
185 OHP

Your argument is invalid.

Re:And in the future... (1)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226547)

This is not www.match.com

Nobody cares how much you can lift.

Re:And in the future... (1)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226929)

Huh? I never said I was bulked. I'm pretty much the standard Slashdotter who spends too much time on the couch (which is where I am now).

I do seem to be resistant to putting on weight, despite a semi-crappy diet and desultory exercise. But that's a physiological quirk, not a moral achievement.

Re:And in the future... (1)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about a year and a half ago | (#41227013)

Not directed at you, at Mr. AC over there. It's a miracle he has enough time to read /. when he is so busy staring at himself in the mirror grunting.

Re:And in the future... (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | about a year and a half ago | (#41227839)

See, I don't think I get a lot of exercise, although I try to get out for a few miles on my bike a couple of times a week (to the pub and back). Then I realised that quite a lot of my job involves carrying 10m scaff poles up 24-storey buildings, and other such bits of steelwork. Even the radio gear I work with is heavy, and tends to need carried up many flights of stairs.

It would probably make a bodybuilder explode from the sheer blood pressure rise, if their hearts were up to it.

Re:And in the future... (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about a year and a half ago | (#41232697)

See, I don't think I get a lot of exercise, although I try to get out for a few miles on my bike a couple of times a week (to the pub and back). Then I realised that quite a lot of my job involves carrying 10m scaff poles up 24-storey buildings, and other such bits of steelwork. Even the radio gear I work with is heavy, and tends to need carried up many flights of stairs.

It would probably make a bodybuilder explode from the sheer blood pressure rise, if their hearts were up to it.

They are on the ground directing traffic.

Re:And in the future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41228087)

Not every slashdotter is American you know.

Re:And in the future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41227219)

I was at Disneyland a couple of years ago, and I saw several families taking turns on scooters to take a break from walking, and using it to bypass some of the lines by using the "wheelchair" lane.

Re:And in the future... (2)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41227905)

I don't usually care about getting modded down. But there's something extremely sad about getting multiple Flamebait mods for pointing out that somebody's an ignorant bigot.

Re:And in the future... (1)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41229311)

OK, who wasted a mod point on this post, when the could have modded up the post I was talking about?

Re:And in the future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41230927)

I don't usually care about getting modded down. But there's something extremely sad about getting multiple Flamebait mods for pointing out that somebody's an ignorant bigot.

You're mis-using the word bigot for starters. The other reason being that you're insulting the parent for making a perfectly valid statement, yet failing to offer any actual supporting argument for why your opinion is somehow more valid. Yes, many people have a physical need for a scooter. But what you failed to consider is WHY they have such a need. The parent was alluding to the fact that at any WalMart in the country you will find a very obese person using one of those scooters. Being a disgusting fatbody isn't a medical condition, it's a result of poor choices, bad eating habits, and lack of proper exercise. And yes, you do deserve to have shit talked about you, just like the kid with the crazy colored hair and the crackhead with his missing teeth and complexion problems.

Re:And in the future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41228019)

All the people I've seen using mobility scooters actually had physical problems that made assistance necessary.

I remember being at a restaurant one time and there were three of these bastarding Davros lookalikes - with oxygen bottles to boot - and each of them stuffed down more fucking food than my entire family. And despite it being the non smoking section they got through at least a pack between them.

Lazy greedy fat fucking smelly lardbastards.

Re:And in the future... (1)

somersault (912633) | about a year and a half ago | (#41228031)

I doubt that anybody on Slashdot is a paragon of healthy eating and frequent exercise.

Doubt away, but you're wrong :)

Re:And in the future... (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year and a half ago | (#41228727)

I taught a spin class at lunch today, so I'm getting a YOU CAN DO IT! PUSH YOUR LIMITS! out of your replies.

Re:And in the future... (2)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41229293)

I simply do not get stationary bikes. Has to be the most boring exercise possible.

Re:And in the future... (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year and a half ago | (#41229335)

Sure, if you sit down at the stationary bike and ride it for 30 minutes, it's kind of boring.

If you get into a spin / freewheeling class, the right instructor can make it a lot more fun and it's a better experience in a group.

Sure, you're still riding a stationary bike, but it's not the same as going for a bike ride. Same muscle groups, but you're at a hilariously high pace. It has made my daily bike ride quite a bit easier.

Re:And in the future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41229039)

"All the people I've seen using mobility scooters actually had physical problems that made assistance necessary. "

George Costanza had no physical problems.

Re:And in the future... (1)

SourceFrog (627014) | about a year and a half ago | (#41230281)

"All the people you've seen"? Wow, that must constitute almost everyone on the whole planetedy planet!!1!

Re:And in the future... (1)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41230351)

And exactly how many people have you seen who were riding scooters, but obviously didn't need them?

Re:And in the future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226787)

They simply lack the motivation [videocrank.net] to get out of their chairs.

Re:And in the future... (1)

mapkinase (958129) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226877)

>Won't be long before lazy fat people are using these just because they don't feel like using their own muscles to move their limbs.

As one of those, I testify that it cannot happen soon enough.

Re:And in the future... (3, Funny)

bitt3n (941736) | about a year and a half ago | (#41227185)

Won't be long before lazy fat people are using these just because they don't feel like using their own muscles to move their limbs. Happened with the mobility scooters, it'll happen with these suits.

step one: get them addicted to motor control suit. step two: distribute virus to suits that locks in wearer and prevents him from eating anything but celery.

Re:And in the future... (1)

Abreu (173023) | about a year and a half ago | (#41229141)

I find your ideas intriguing and would like to subscribe to your newsletter...

Re:And in the future... (2)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year and a half ago | (#41227271)

Won't be long before lazy fat people are using these just because they don't feel like using their own muscles to move their limbs

I feel sorry for fat people. It's not laziness, how would you like to have to lift 350 pounds just to get off off the couch? Plus, they usually get problems with their joints wearing out from carrying all that weight.

Obesity is a health problem, and laughing at someone's health problems, whether it be morbid obesity, insanity, or cancer, is the mark of a heartless jerk.

I'm just damned glad I'm skinny. I can't gain weight if I try.

Re:And in the future... (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a year and a half ago | (#41228477)

how would you like to have to lift 350 pounds just to get off off the couch?

It's a fact of physics that ceteris paribus it takes 1% more energy to lift 1% more weight.

Thus it would imply that at a certain point it would balance out and taper towards an asymptote.

For me, the limit is around 17-and-a-half of our Limey stone. That's nearly 250 of your colonial pounds, over 110 eurocommie kilos. This was at a point where I was eating something with meat in it and some kind of fried potatoes twice a day, plus at least a gallon of beer. I lived this lifestyle for a year and a half, and having hit that weight about six months in it didn't go up.

But then I didn't have a car at that time, so I walked and cycled a bit. Not exactly training, but still being at least moderately active.

Towards the end of the assignment, someone started a swimming club. Two lunchtimes a week, we'd eat just a sandwich and go to the pool. Bam, lost over a stone in less than a month - back down to college weight.

Perhaps the reason people become too fat to get off the couch is because they never get off the couch?

P.S. I'm only 5 foot 9. Always been stocky. Now I'm a bit below 200 pounds, close to what I was at 14 - and I certainly wasn't fat back then.

Re:And in the future... (1)

frosty_tsm (933163) | about a year and a half ago | (#41228529)

Won't be long before lazy fat people are using these just because they don't feel like using their own muscles to move their limbs

I feel sorry for fat people. It's not laziness, how would you like to have to lift 350 pounds just to get off off the couch? Plus, they usually get problems with their joints wearing out from carrying all that weight.

Obesity is a health problem, and laughing at someone's health problems, whether it be morbid obesity, insanity, or cancer, is the mark of a heartless jerk.

I'm just damned glad I'm skinny. I can't gain weight if I try.

People generally don't laugh at people who have health problems that stuck them in a mobility scooter.

However, when you see someone grabbing a 5 gallon tub to put in the basket you might stop thinking that it's not their fault. For many who are overweight, walking is the gateway exercise and they've stopped doing that.

Re:And in the future... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41231001)

Obesity is a health problem, and laughing at someone's health problems, whether it be morbid obesity, insanity, or cancer, is the mark of a heartless jerk.

No. Obesity is not caused by a health problem, it's caused by your lifestyle and choices you make, however once you become obese then yes that's a health issue. But the problem isn't the fat. That's like saying that being hooked on crack is a health problem- maybe so, but it's still your fault you're a crackhead and nothing will change as long as you keep smoking the shit.

I feel sorry for fat people. It's not laziness, how would you like to have to lift 350 pounds just to get off off the couch?

I wouldn't. That's why I make sure that I use physical activity to offset my food intake, and avoid cramming large amounts of grease and fat into my gullet.

Ever seen some huge whale of a person get that stomach bypass surgery? Guess how that works... it makes your stomach smaller so you can't eat as much. And it really works well for many people. I work with a lady who stood at 5 foot 3 inches and was tipping the scales at over 400 pounds, she's down to 175 now and doing great. But you can get the same result by cutting down the amount of food you eat, cutting soda and snack foods out of your diet, etc. The surgery is for people like her who just couldn't stop eating until she was full. But then we have a guy who was in a similar situation, dropped about 300 pounds, and has re-gained about 200 of it again because he ignored the doctor and kept his same eating habits... and now his stomach is stretching once again.

But nobody can defeat the laws of thermodynamics. If energy input into your body is less than energy expended, you WILL lose weight. It's not a "medical condition".

Re:And in the future... (1)

lxs (131946) | about a year and a half ago | (#41232451)

How would you like to have to lift 350 pounds just to get off off the couch?

I wouldn't. That's why I exercise my willpower to combat my primal urges.

Stood up at the bar (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226291)

"One of the best experiences was standing at a bar," she said. "To be stood up in this means everything to me."

Who knew being stood up at a bar could be so gratifying? If only I had known this the last 5 times I've been stood up...

Re:Stood up at the bar (1)

udachny (2454394) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226319)

Yeah, but you don't have a robotic suit to crash whoever stood you up. She, on the other hand, does.

Re:Stood up at the bar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226339)

"Sometimes I like to watch.". That line completely creeped me out at the time and stuck in my head.

Re:Stood up at the bar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226571)

I loved that line for the way it reminded the reader that while a mobility apparatus can negate the most visible effects of a disability it can not often eliminate disparity.

Re:Stood up at the bar (1)

trevc (1471197) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226671)

Bad English. She was trying to say "To be standing up in this means everything to me"...

Re:Stood up at the bar (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226739)

"Sometimes I like to watch." Is a quote from Leis in the short story The Winter Market by William Gibson. Leis is fully paralyzed, get's around by means of an exoskeleton, and speaks those words with regards to sex.

Re:Stood up at the bar (1)

trevc (1471197) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226781)

and Peter Sellers as Chancy had the same line in Being There.

Re:Stood up at the bar (1)

PPH (736903) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226829)

You had to bring that character up near election time, didn't you?

Re:Stood up at the bar (1)

trevc (1471197) | about a year and a half ago | (#41227531)

Love that movie - and Wag the Dog. Hard to believe it was 33 years ago that Being There was released. Man, I am getting old.....

Re:Stood up at the bar (1)

fiannaFailMan (702447) | about a year and a half ago | (#41227055)

Bad English. She was trying to say "To be standing up in this means everything to me"...

"Bad" English is a point of view. Many northern English dialects use "I am stood" instead of "I am standing" or "I am sat" instead of "I am sitting".

Re:Stood up at the bar (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a year and a half ago | (#41228537)

Well that's happen as mebbe, but they're still ig-piggerant. And I should know, I is one of 'em, not a chuffin' bog-trotter like you.

Re:Stood up at the bar (1)

blackest_k (761565) | about a year and a half ago | (#41229843)

maybe stood is the right word, for a person without a suit they would be standing, she has been stood up by the suit. a brush might be stood against the wall. Wouldn't standing be a verb at the bar and stood be an adjective, (something describing an aspect of a noun).

For northern folk being stood (adjective) at the bar and drinking (verb) is quite normal behaviour , for southerners they might be sat around a table sipping their wine in between tales of how uncouth the northern chaps are.

Wrong Story (1)

fm6 (162816) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226395)

It's been a long time since I read "Winter Market" but from what I remember it's about uploading consciousness, not cyborg augmentation for the paralyzed. John Varley's "Blue Champagne" seems to be much more relevant.

Re:Wrong Story (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226533)

That is indeed what the story is about, but that's why I note this as step one. I am the AC who submitted the article by the way. Leis the protagonist of the story is indeed fully paralyzed and uses an exoskeleton for mobility 24/7, which is the source of much of the conflict in Gibson's tale. It's a plot device in a way that humanizes what (at the time) was a very far flung idea. The story does indeed culminate in the uploading of consciousness.

Re:Wrong Story (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41231035)

That is indeed what the story is about, but that's why I note this as step one. I am the AC who submitted the article by the way. Leis the protagonist of the story is indeed fully paralyzed and uses an exoskeleton for mobility 24/7, which is the source of much of the conflict in Gibson's tale. It's a plot device in a way that humanizes what (at the time) was a very far flung idea. The story does indeed culminate in the uploading of consciousness.

The sad part is that this Step 1 of yours should have happened back in the late 80's or early 90's, but everyone poo-poo'd robotics and computers and said it was bullshit that would never happen, and that I watched Aliens too many times.

This is encouraging, don't get me wrong, but I don't really see it as a major breakthrough. We're still using the idea of flexing one set of muscles to simulate another, in this case by using balance and leaning. I'll be impressed when the first consumer-level model which is controlled by scanning the brain is released, and then more impressed when we get to the direct nerve-machine interfaces which allow it to be used directly as an extension of the body. Both are coming, and both are overdue.

Re:Wrong Story (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226613)

It's been a long time since I read "Winter Market" but from what I remember it's about uploading consciousness, not cyborg augmentation for the paralyzed. John Varley's "Blue Champagne" seems to be much more relevant.

Or the TV Series MANTIS

45,000 Pounds? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226407)

Why does it weigh so much?

Re:45,000 Pounds? (1)

Githaron (2462596) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226597)

I hope you are joking.

Re:45,000 Pounds? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year and a half ago | (#41227561)

I wonder if the GP's just having a go (poorly) at the writer for using "45,000 pounds," which you never really see in written British English. We have this nifty little £ symbol for such occasions.

Re:45,000 Pounds? (1)

eastlight_jim (1070084) | about a year and a half ago | (#41228305)

Random off-topic trivia: £ on a standard British keyboard layout is reached by shift+3 - all the more confusing when referring to the pound sign with someone using an American keyboard layout as the convention is to call the # symbol a pound sign and it too is shift+3.

Re:45,000 Pounds? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41231075)

Random off-topic trivia: £ on a standard British keyboard layout is reached by shift+3 - all the more confusing when referring to the pound sign with someone using an American keyboard layout as the convention is to call the # symbol a pound sign and it too is shift+3.

I live in the US and I learned it as the "sharp" sign because I'm a musician. In school they called it the "pound" sign because of typing class, and the exclamation mark was referred to as the "bang" symbol. Most commonly in classes it was referred to as the "number sign", and I don't think we ever used # to represent pounds (weight) or Pounds (currency). Anyhow, modern usage is as a "hashtag" so maybe that will become the prevailing definition and remove the confusion.

Re:45,000 Pounds? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year and a half ago | (#41232929)

I don't think we ever used # to represent pounds (weight)

That was its origin - it came from "lb" with a line through it.

"!" is/was a "pling" to me, for computing purposes (RISC OS treats directories beginning with ! as applications - double clicking executes the !Run file inside) and $ is "string".

All hail the interrobang [wikipedia.org] !

Speaking of losing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226521)

Speaking of losing How is the Presidents Golf Game doing? I mean a man that can play over 100 times during his tenure must be improving. I hear the Hollywood boys like to play for money so I figure he must be looking for a new job. Maybe somewhere where he can be in charge of a budget for a business. Nope, forget that. How about somewhere where he has to come up with original ideas for adding employees? Nope not that one either. How about telling people just how great he is and not having to do anything else but leave lip marks on their backsides asking for money? I think he qualifies for that one.

One step closer to wall-e fat carriers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226569)

I predict a world where all the fatties use these devices instead of the carts they use now.

Re:One step closer to wall-e fat carriers (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about a year and a half ago | (#41232791)

I predict a world where all the fatties use these devices instead of the carts they use now.

Like a line of Exo's instead of carts at Kroger and Wal-Mart?

This thread is useless without pics (3, Informative)

jfengel (409917) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226661)

For anybody who wants to see what the thing looks like, there were numerous pictures from when she "ran" the London Marathon.

http://www.metro.co.uk/news/898507-paralysed-claire-lomas-completes-london-marathon-in-bionic-suit [metro.co.uk]

(Not exactly running, since it took 17 days, but it's still a hell of a feat. One that deserves a few freaking pictures.)

Re:This thread is useless without pics (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41227713)

TWO MILES A DAY! So thats like a mile every eight hours or like 600 feet per hour or 10 feet per minute. Nice for stairs but I think I will stay with the wheelchair if I get disabled. My math must be off.

Re:This thread is useless without pics (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a year and a half ago | (#41228593)

Not wishing to denigrate her or her achievement in any way, but I'm sure most people reading that article had a question spring to mind, and that question involved weeing.

Just to point out.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226713)

Just wanted to point out that our socialist heath system in the UK will give these to patients in the UK for free if they're shown to be of cost-effective benefit - man I love the first world!

Related information: France. (1)

mangobrain (877223) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226847)

I thought I'd take a gamble on this one, and actually read TFA - even before reading the comments. I thought there would be a nice picture or two, maybe a few links to pages about the device itself. But you know what I got instead?

France.

No pictures, no related links at the end, and only one word in the entire article itself turned into a link - the word "France."

Tooltip? "Full coverage of France."

FFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU

ReWalk2.0 (0)

jovius (974690) | about a year and a half ago | (#41226853)

The comedy when some future model suddenly goes into the fucking mode in public. Anyway - great stuff!

fuck a do7l (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41226983)

Here, please do ppor priorities,

First exoskelton taken home? No. First ReWalk, yes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41228611)

See www.rexbionics.com

Two units have been taken home by customers.

Bad idea (2)

formfeed (703859) | about a year and a half ago | (#41228773)

Quoting Reuters: 'The exoskeleton is activated by the wearer tilting their balance to indicate the desire to take a step.

So if you stand atop a cliff and look down, the thing takes a step forward?
Nice.

Didn't the owner of Segway die exactly this way?

Not first! (1)

brianmy (198698) | about a year and a half ago | (#41229031)

This man was the first in the world to take home his own robotic exoskeleton (as far as I am aware) :
http://www.engadget.com/2011/05/02/new-zealand-paralympian-buys-first-rex-bionics-exoskeleton-take

And this man was the second :
http://www.londoncommunitynews.com/2012/04/meet-robobrogan-londons-bionic-man/

Here's another (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41230275)

Not a full exoskeleton though:

http://www.engadget.com/2012/08/08/3d-printed-magic-arms-give-a-little-girl-use-of-her-limbs/

Whatever the Air Force tells you... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41230659)

I am Ironman

Pro tip (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41232903)

Don't get to far away from a power charging point. If you can't walk without the 'suit', you aren't going to be able to carry its dead weight to the power point.

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