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Space Station Saved By a Toothbrush?

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the break-out-the-emergency-floss dept.

ISS 179

Hugh Pickens writes "Denise Chow reports that two spacewalking astronauts successfully replaced a vital power unit on the International Space Station today, defeating a stubborn bolt that prevented the astronauts from properly installing the power unit on the ISS's backbone-like truss with the help of some improvised tools made of spare parts and a toothbrush. Astronauts Sunita Williams and Akihiko Hoshide started by removing the power box, called a main bus switching unit (MBSU), from where it had been temporarily tied down with a tether, then spent several hours troubleshooting the unit and the two bolts that are designed to secure it in place on the space station's truss. After undoing the bolts, the spacewalkers examined them for possible damage, and used improvised cleaning tools and a pressurized can of nitrogen gas to clean out the metal shavings from the bolt receptacles. 'I see a lot of metal shavings coming out,' Hoshide said as he maneuvered a wire cleaner around one of the bolt holders. Williams and Hoshide then lubricated a spare bolt and manually threaded it into the place where the real bolt was eventually driven, in an effort to ensure that the receptacle was clear of any debris. Then the two applied grease to the sticky bolt as well as extra pressure and plain old jiggling until finally 4½ hours into the spacewalk, Hoshide reported: 'It is locked.' When Hoshide reported that the troublesome bolt was finally locked into place, the flight managers erupted in applause while astronaut Jack Fischer at Mission Control told the astronauts 'that is a little slice of awesome pie.'"

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This is why we need people in space (5, Insightful)

jmorris42 (1458) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242629)

And this is why robots aren't going replace people anytime soon. One little thing goes wrong with an unmanned mission and either a major subsystem is written off or the entire mission is a failure. People are able to do thigs robots aren't going to be able to do for quite a while longer. And it gets even worse as soon as you go beyond full duplex radio range. If you have to send a command, wait for a result, try something else, repeat until you scream, things get really slow the second you aren't executing preplanned directions without errors.

And people can perform physical actions we have yet to build a robot to do reliably. Sure they can put thousands of bolt on one after another on an assembly line but how many could deal with this one stuck bolt? None. Now try to build one that can open up a panel and troubleshoot wiring or plumbing.

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

gagol (583737) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242693)

I agree machine learning are not there yet, but this field is progressing. I would not be surprised if this capability would be reached within a lifetime.

Re:This is why we need people in space (5, Funny)

CheeseTroll (696413) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242825)

Perhaps, but a robot wouldn't have had a toothbrush in space, would it?

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

INeededALogin (771371) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242961)

+5 Awesome

Re:This is why we need people in space (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243287)

+5?

That's a big slice.

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243517)

+5?

That's a big slice.

Hey, it is "awesome pie" after all...

Re:This is why we need people in space (3, Informative)

gagol (583737) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243867)

A multitask space robot builder would probably pack cleaning brushes and advanced 3D printer.

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41244549)

Probably, Bender would have it.

Re:This is why we need people in space (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243367)

Maybe even nanobots.

Re:This is why we need people in space (4, Informative)

EETech1 (1179269) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243521)

It is very easy for some CNC machines to tell if it has a dull or broken drill bit, or tap. I don't think it would take that much to add that capability to many of today's robots.

We had servo controlled torque wrenches with process monitors on a robotic production line where I worked that could also tell you way more about how that bolt (torque and turn) tightened than most observant skilled wrench operators (yes there is a skill to feeling a bolt tighten) and almost anyone that does it for 8 hours straight. Every bolt, every time, perfectly tightened, or rejected!

The logic to determine the failure (bolt, threads, nut, washer, or part interference) was there, and normally spot on, I doubt the programming to rework the various parts would add much to the complexity of today's state of the art assembly (line worker replacement) robots.

Cheers! to our manual labor (job) eliminating robot overloards!

Re:This is why we need people in space (5, Insightful)

stepho-wrs (2603473) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244411)

Except you are solving a known problem, after it happened.
It's much harder to solve problems before they are known.
It's much harder to build a robot that can solve unknown problems.

What might be useful though is a general purpose manipulator that can be controlled by humans on the ground.
Humans are useful because they have brains, eyes and general purpose hands, the combination of which can solve a huge number of problems.
Give the robot cameras, hands so that it can pick-up and use other tools or even non-tools (ie whatever is laying around the craft but wasn't explicitly designed as a tool) and a link to a human controller.

Re:This is why we need people in space (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242711)

Question about your sig... which democrat needs to be destroyed?

This is why we need V'Ger in space (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242715)

Voyager was a robot sent to do a man's job.

Re:This is why we need people in space (5, Funny)

crmanriq (63162) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242735)

You are missing the obvious difference:

Robots don't use toothbrushes.

Notoriously poor dental care. It's almost like robots are, um, ... British.

Why do you think the cybermen just use speakers? And the daleks hide inside their little trash cans?

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243027)

American robots [gifsoup.com] aren't much better.

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242811)

Except that with robot missions "We had to scrub the mission because of an unexpected problem... oh well, at least we've got another three, and we're still under budget."

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

SuperSlacker64 (1918650) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242997)

Sooner or later though, they will all have problems. Murphey's Law will see to that.

Re:This is why we need people in space (2)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243313)

oh well, at least we've got another three, and we're still under budget."

Um, not the NASA in our reality. They're almost never under budget and they never build four copies.

Re:This is why we need people in space (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242841)

"And this is why robots aren't going replace people anytime soon."

You've got some flawed reasoning there, because if robots made the offending part it wouldn't have had metal debris in it.

Re:This is why we need people in space (3, Interesting)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243331)

You've got some flawed reasoning there, because if robots made the offending part it wouldn't have had metal debris in it.

It's worth noting at this point that there's a good chance the errant part was made by machine. Perhaps not a robot in the technical sense, but not a human either.

Re:This is why we need people in space (3, Insightful)

Bacon Bits (926911) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243757)

You've got some flawed reasoning there, because if robots made the offending part it wouldn't have had metal debris in it.

It's worth noting at this point that there's a good chance the errant part was made by machine. Perhaps not a robot in the technical sense, but not a human either.

More to the point, the argument that humans will create flawed tools while robots will not is false on it's face. Robots are tools made by humans. What's to stop the robot from being flawed in the first place?

[Insert "it's turtles all the way down" reference here]

Re:This is why we need people in space (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242867)

For the cost of sending one man you could send an army of robots...

Re:This is why we need people in space (2)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243293)

And the ISS would be down 25% of its total powre budget for months to come.

Let's face facts. The only way to make space safe for robots is keep them close enough to humans for repairs. Otherwise, one tiny component fails, so does a significant portion of the mission.

Re:This is why we need people in space (2, Insightful)

sFurbo (1361249) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244405)

How big a part if the ISS's power budget is life support? How much lighter and smaller could it be if it did not have to accommodate humans? If there were no humans aboard, it would be much easier to shut of some systems temporarily or permanently in case of power problems.

In short, humans make space travel large, energy-intensive and expensive. Sure, they also make it more flexible, but it is not a given that that outweighs the massively more complex operations they require.

Re:This is why we need people in space (2)

azalin (67640) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244555)

Nice try, but if there weren't any humans on board, the power budget would have already been much lower to start with. Therefore the power loss would still have seriously impacted the mission.
Machines make for cheaper space travel not only because the need less support, but also because you can afford to loose them.

Re:This is why we need people in space (3, Insightful)

whoever57 (658626) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242923)

And this is why robots aren't going replace people anytime soon

A robot might not have cross-threaded the bolt in the first place (why do you think there were metal shavings in the threads?)

Re:This is why we need people in space (4, Insightful)

adolf (21054) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242999)

A robot might not have cross-threaded the bolt in the first place (why do you think there were metal shavings in the threads?)

Galling. If you haven't experienced it yet, you just haven't yet turned enough bolts.

Re:This is why we need people in space (4, Informative)

timeOday (582209) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243113)

True, but not everybody's success rate is the same. One good trick is to start by turning the screw backwards until you feel it click, then start tightening.

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

johnny cashed (590023) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243229)

Even better is to higbee the first thread like they do on fire hydrant and aerospace electrical connectors.

A 38999 series connector is a good example of this.

Re:This is why we need people in space (3, Insightful)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244793)

True, but not everybody's success rate is the same. One good trick is to start by turning the screw backwards until you feel it click, then start tightening.

WTF. You mean they WEREN'T doing it this way? I thought everyone did this -- It's how you start a screw.

Oh to be an alien drifting along that orbit:
"Look at the silly hairless apes, thwarted by a single simple screw.... Oh my, listen to them all cheering now. Congratulations you primitive little beasties, you've tightened an errant fastener in SPACE! Wow. Let's get out of here, at this rate it'll be centuries before they even discover reusable pop rivets."

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

ColaMan (37550) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244981)

I'd image it's quite difficult to 'feel a click' though chunky gloves. Especially in a fashion that ensures you continue to hold it securely between said chunky-gloved-fingers.

Although 'dropping' the screw in orbit would be a hassle, in most cases you could just wait half-an-orbit for it to come back to you.

Re:This is why we need people in space (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242939)

"This is why we need people in space... because we have people in space, and they need taking care of".

Also, we have robots as off-the-shelf toys these days that, 10-15 short years ago, would have been several-hundred thousand dollars of bleeding-edge experimental technology, and while AI isn't quite matching pace, it's certainly not staying put, either.

I feel confident that by the time it's actually economically possible for mining/research/exploration, we will have the AI to do stuff for us.

Re:This is why we need people in space (3, Insightful)

Paul Slocum (598127) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243025)

I'm not much of an expert, but I can think of more human missions that have failed (expensively and tragically) than robotic missions that have failed. And the mars rovers have lasted dramatically longer than expected. Plus, getting the rover unstuck from the sand shows that you can fix tough problems that require improvising even with a robot.

Re:This is why we need people in space (3, Interesting)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243323)

Take a look at the overall mission records to Mars. About half the missions have failed spectacularly, compared to what, half a dozen manned missions that ended in death? I'm including Apollo 1 and a couple known Russian meatshots, btw.

Re:This is why we need people in space (3, Insightful)

gagol (583737) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244311)

Non human payloads don't have the same levels of safety regulations...

Re:This is why we need people in space (4, Interesting)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243415)

Then you are indeed not much of an expert. Mars missions are notorious for failure. Manned missions despite their many flaws are not. For example, there have been four in-flight accidents that killed astronauts out of perhaps 200-300 manned missions over the past 50 years. In comparison, 26 of the 50 unmanned missions to Mars have failed.

This is not intended to be an apples to apples comparison (going to Mars is a wee bit harder than achieving orbit and doing a few things for a few days). I'm just pointing out the far greater number of failures on the unmanned side.

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

Yoda222 (943886) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244639)

And if we compare robotic mars missions with human Mars mission, its 26 failures vs 0. Impressive records for human exploration.

Re:This is why we need people in space (1)

t0p (1154575) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244683)

Manned missions are, and have almost always been, LEO jaunts. Let's start sending people to Mars and see how many of them we kill. And any we miss, HAL can take care of for us.

Re:This is why we need people in space (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41244275)

I'm not much of an expert, but I can think of more human missions that have failed (expensively and tragically) than robotic missions that have failed. And the mars rovers have lasted dramatically longer than expected. Plus, getting the rover unstuck from the sand shows that you can fix tough problems that require improvising even with a robot.

The point is that if we'd had humans on Mars, we could have had the rover unstuck in a couple minutes. We also could have wiped the dust off the solar panels and it'd still be functional. We are still a very, very long ways away from robotic systems which even come close to approximating the general flexibility of the human body. Sure, we can simulate a few very specific tasks fairly well, but the ones which robots do best are also the ones least suited to the human form in the first place.
Robots are helpful because they complement our capabilities, not because they replace them.

Oh please. (-1, Offtopic)

apparently (756613) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243239)

If I can invent a robot that has an asshole, surely some government-funded NASAbot can be invented that has teeth.

Re:Oh please. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243395)

I can invent a robot that has an asshole

Your ideas are intriguing to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

Re:Oh please. (1)

azalin (67640) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244577)

you mean like this [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:Oh please. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41244759)

I can invent a robot that has an asshole,

Just make sure there are no metal shavings left inside.

Re:This is why we need people in space (3, Informative)

Solandri (704621) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243999)

The power unit is probably vital only because the ISS is manned, and having humans aboard means a higher power requirement. The thing about space is that the enormous launch costs (on the order of $5000 per kg [wikipedia.org] at the low end) means many things you take for granted on earth (like a toothbrush and toothpaste) add horrendously to your overall cost. Estimates are that it takes about 2 tons of life support equipment to keep one person alive in space. So sending a single person to space incurs an extra $10 million in cost (ignoring consumables like food, water, and oxygen). For a fraction of that, you can just build your unmanned system with redundant backups for everything, including "vital power units".

e.g. The cost of the manned mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope cost almost as much as building and launching a replacement HST. If we'd had an unmanned launch vehicle other than the Shuttle capable of putting something Hubble's size into orbit, we could've put 3 HSTs into orbit for the cost of one Shuttle-launched HST and one repair mission. Remember the Solar Max repair mission [wikipedia.org] ? Ever wonder why aside from Hubble, that was the only repair mission conducted by the Shuttle? Because it was literally cheaper to build and launch a replacement satellite than to send the shuttle up to repair one.

We're trying to run before we can walk. We should kill the manned space program for about 10 years, or at the very least drastically scale it back. Work on lowering launch vehicle costs. Once we get those costs down to about $1000-$2000/kg (Falcon comes close), then restart the manned program. The Shuttle and ISS wasted hundreds of billions of dollars just so we could brag "Look! We have people in space!" If that money had been spent instead on researching and developing cheaper launch vehicles, we could've potentially been putting a dozen people in space for the cost of putting a single person in space today.

Re:This is why we need people in space (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41244165)

Spirit AND Opportunity put together cost $820 million to build, launch, land, and operate on Mars for the first 90 days.

Walking on the moon cost $100 Billion

We could sent 240 rovers to Mars for the cost of 1 mission a fraction of the distance.

Biggest Surprise (4, Funny)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242637)

I'm more surprised that they have spare toothbrushes on hand than I am they were able to fix this.

Re:Biggest Surprise (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242677)

after your second or third space-one-night-stand with the martians, you learn that its only polite to
keep extra toothbrushes

Re:Biggest Surprise (1)

gagol (583737) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242679)

Clean breath is probably very important to crew relationship in this closed space. Toothbrush are light, a couple spares dont cost much to launch.

Re:Biggest Surprise (1)

Burning1 (204959) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242689)

Oh, you know how it is... a couple of friends come to visit, and forget to bring their toothbrush home.

Seriously though, toothbrushes are awesome. Always like having a couple spares around when I'm working with cars.

Re:Biggest Surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243525)

Working on cars is a homosexual activity.

Re:Biggest Surprise (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242705)

I *always* have extra toothbrushes for brushing non-toothy things.

Spare? (5, Funny)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242911)

"Williams and Hoshide reporting in commander. We have good news and bad news. We managed to clear the threads on this power unit and complete installation. That's the good news. The bad news is that the only toothbrush we could find was yours."

Re:Biggest Surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243625)

All toothbrushes are spares when the problem you need to fix is big enough.

Wish I was there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242649)

That's basically my job but here on earth they just needed more swear words to loosen it up.

Re:Wish I was there (1)

guises (2423402) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243039)

I can't stop laughing at the bit about erupting in applause. Take some mundane task, add "in space" and it becomes noteworthy enough to get articles written about it.

Maybe some day we'll have a movie about replacing a power box. No, _the_ power box. Some day.

Space station saved by ... Brains ... (2)

davidwr (791652) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242651)

Space Station Saved By Human Beings Using Their Brains And The Resources At Hand

There, fixed that for you.

Now this is not really news, is it?

Re:Space station saved by ... Brains ... (4, Funny)

tragedy (27079) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242995)

It wasn't them, it was the inanimate carbon rod!

Re:Space station saved by ... Brains ... (1)

b4dc0d3r (1268512) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243031)

I was going to be a bit more biting, sarcastic, and insulting, so I'm glad you got here first.

But you missed the part about the question mark at the end. I don't know, was it saved by a toothbrush?

Pretty soon, everyone here will know about "Betteridge's Law of Headlines" and quit clicking on this nonsense. Until then, I intend to inform as much as I can, though I may repeat myself.

Don't click on a question to find the answer.

I must be MIT material (0)

ClassicASP (1791116) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242667)

There, I fixted it. I'mma real good ass-tro-not!

But what about.... (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242725)

So then... "canned air" and a toothbrush saved the ISS from an energy crunch and rolling blackouts?

all hail (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242773)

all hail the inanimate carbon rod!

Re:all hail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41244569)

In rod we trust!

Obligatory Simpsons (4, Funny)

DarkBlackFox (643814) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242783)

"It's an inanimate carbon rod!!" http://i.imgur.com/ijjIh.png [imgur.com]

Re:Obligatory Simpsons (1)

SOOPRcow (1279010) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243013)

Honest to god that is the first thing I thought of when I saw this story. 3

Re:Obligatory Simpsons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243399)

Same here. Highly doubt we're the only ones.

Re:Obligatory Simpsons (1)

DarkBlackFox (643814) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243443)

I'd be disappointed in Slashdot if I were the only one. Glad to see others thinking the same.

Re:Obligatory Simpsons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41244597)

Don't you mean, "honest to rod"?

Re:Obligatory Simpsons (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243181)

In Rod we trust....

Re:Obligatory Simpsons (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243771)

"In Toothbrush We Trust"

What brand of toothbrush was it? ;)

Not a paper clip. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242785)

They had to resort to a toothbrush because they didn't have any spare paper clips. They were all in use with the duct tape.

Simpsons did it.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242805)

Well, it was an inanimate carbon rod..... but still the same. In brush we trust!

Thank you, Slashdot... (2)

Schmorgluck (1293264) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242807)

Now I have the MacGyver theme music stuck in my head. Thank you oh so very much!

Re:Thank you, Slashdot... (3, Funny)

jd2112 (1535857) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243049)

MacGyver

In

SPACE
SPACE
Space
Space
space
space

Yeah but how much did the toothbrush cost? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242857)

Yeah but how much did the toothbrush cost?

Re:Yeah but how much did the toothbrush cost? (1)

game kid (805301) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242905)

Would you like that figure in retail USD or government contractor USD?

Re:Yeah but how much did the toothbrush cost? (1)

CubicleZombie (2590497) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242983)

Throw in enough CMMI, and even a toothbrush gets expensive.

Re:Yeah but how much did the toothbrush cost? (4, Funny)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242947)

You get one free with each toilet seat.

Don't ask.

Re:Yeah but how much did the toothbrush cost? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242953)

Yeah but how much did the toothbrush cost?

The toothbrush was 98 cents.

The paperwork to comply with government regulations and certifying its space worthiness was $599.02.

Toothbrushes (1)

BuypolarBear (2713397) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242903)

Not just for fighting cavities!

Re:Toothbrushes (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41242949)

No, they are for getting rid of the smell of black dick on your breath as well.

Re:Toothbrushes (2)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243087)

Hah. Toothbrushes, they clean, whiten, brighten and fix clutches and space stations.

My first car was a '81 mercury lynx. The thing was a piece of shit. But it worked, it got me from point to point. But it used an old style mechanical clutch with no built in spacer adjustment. I fixed that with a toothbrush and some bailing wire. I got another 40,000mi out of that clutch, and by that time the car was dead.

My faith in NASA has been restored (5, Funny)

sabri (584428) | more than 2 years ago | (#41242937)

American spaceship, Russian spaceship: all fixed with toothbrush!

Re:My faith in NASA has been restored (1)

Alex Belits (437) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243077)

American spaceship, Russian spaceship: all fixed with toothbrush!

As far as I know, Salyut and Mir didn't have screws hammered into threads at an angle. Bottles of vodka smuggled inside spacesuits on Progress, botched docking while "experimenting" with manual controls for no earthly (or space-y) reason -- sure. Stripped threads on the outside structures -- no.

Good, now... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243095)

Now hunt down the machinists, engineers and managers responsible for a manufacturing process that left "lots of metal shavings" in a piece of life critical aerospace equipment and flay them alive as a lesson to all other machinists, engineers and managers.

Post the video on youtube, with a message officially obviating all current and future contracts with each and every subcontractor involved in this pathetic farce.

Re:Good, now... (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243243)

Now hunt down the machinists, engineers and managers responsible for a manufacturing process that left "lots of metal shavings" in a piece of life critical aerospace equipment and flay them alive as a lesson to all other machinists, engineers and managers.

Post the video on youtube, with a message officially obviating all current and future contracts with each and every subcontractor involved in this pathetic farce.

Ah, yeah, except the metal shavings were probably from the first cross-threaded bolt that was carving out a new threading in the mounting. Although astronauts are known to be god-like in competence, without any additional information, it would initially appear to be a case of operator error when the original bolt was first attempted.

Well Done! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243203)

:)

So basically... (1)

Dahamma (304068) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243259)

...they did the same thing that millions of people around the world do every day in their homes, garages, and workplaces - but in space!

Re:So basically... (1)

Confusador (1783468) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244173)

I don't think millions of people around the world lose their fingernails [nationalgeographic.com] every day doing things like this.

Re:So basically... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41244427)

and to make the trip even more fun, some of them remove their fingernails beforehand.

Next time.....saved by toilet paper :) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243275)

Haha... if there was a leak that is. LOL

'It is locked.' (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41243667)

Maybe lost in translation from the Japanese language, but a guy reporting a threaded fastener as 'It is locked.' would cause me to wonder maybe this guy didn't get the proper training.

Farm style engineering done right I reckon (1)

DeTech (2589785) | more than 2 years ago | (#41243683)

Next comes the space grade bailing wire.

Slice (1)

nigelo (30096) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244323)

Awesome Pie, because the cake was a lie.

The shavings, where did they go? (3, Interesting)

advocate_one (662832) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244453)

I hope they had some means in place to capture them like a magnet and some sticky paper... (a vacuum cleaner would have been useless there). Who knows where those shavings could get to if not captured...

Just wait (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41244459)

You should see what they can do with a little floss.

See? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41244527)

FUCK bolts.

Terminology (0)

Yoda222 (943886) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244717)

Aren't we supposed to say "cosmonaut" for people travelling on russian spaceline ?

Took 2 people and 4½ hours? (1)

petes_PoV (912422) | more than 2 years ago | (#41244839)

If they'd said they couldn't do the job for a couple of weeks they'd have been made honourary life members of the plumbers union.

YES! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41244985)

Without that toothbrush, the ISS would have crashed and burned, killing everybody on board. The Toothbrush was critical to keeping the ISS going!

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