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Mt. Fuji May Be Close To Erupting

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the must-be-fukushima's-fault dept.

Japan 269

SpuriousLogic points out an article at Wired discussing research into pressure levels inside Mt. Fuji's magma chamber, which scientists claim is higher than it was in 1707, the last time it erupted. "The new readings, taken by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, reveal that the pressure is at 1.6 megapascals, nearly 16 times the 0.1 megapascals it takes to trigger an eruption." A series of earthquakes shook the area around Mt. Fuji a little over a decade ago, and a fault line was discovered underneath it. "Since the March 2011 tsunami and the 6.4 magnitude earthquake that followed four days later, Japan has been on tenterhooks, and in May 2012 a professor from Ryukyu University warned that a massive eruption within three years would be likely because of several major factors: steam and gases are being emitted from the crater, water eruptions are occurring nearby, massive holes emitting hot natural gases are appearing in the vicinity." While the rising pressure within the magma chamber is of concern, it is but one factor among many that lead to eruptions.

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Another thing to worry about... (5, Funny)

redbeardcanada (1052028) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262449)

I am going to Japan in October, so in addition to earthquakes, tsunamis, radiation, ninjas, and godzilla, I now also have to worry about lava??? Damn...

Re:Another thing to worry about... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262489)

Hahaha.

Where is your god now?

Re:Another thing to worry about... (0)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262541)

I am going to Japan in October, so in addition to earthquakes, tsunamis, radiation, ninjas, and godzilla, I now also have to worry about lava??? Damn...

Don't forget vorpal bunnies [youtube.com]

Re:Another thing to worry about... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262945)

Just a matter of time before they get the taste of blood.

Re:Another thing to worry about... (3, Informative)

camperdave (969942) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262969)

I am going to Japan in October, so in addition to earthquakes, tsunamis, radiation, ninjas, and godzilla, I now also have to worry about lava??? Damn...

Don't forget vorpal bunnies [youtube.com]

Well, that was a waste of time. No vorpalness, no attacks, no fights, nothing at all but a bunch of rabbits scurrying after pellets.

Re:Another thing to worry about... (1)

modecx (130548) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264697)

Yes, that's because you didn't see what happens when the bunnies' ravenous, all encompassing hunger isn't sated with tourist's tasty pellets. The horror!

Re:Another thing to worry about... (1)

smitty97 (995791) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263513)

And those TV shows that cause seizures

Re:Another thing to worry about... (1)

Rob Kaper (5960) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264391)

No. You have to be reasonably prepared for it, that's all. It's futile to worry about things you cannot control. Or those you can control, because then you just have to take necessary actions. Worrying is never the right solution.

Re:Another thing to worry about... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263727)

You may not have to worry about lava. The volcanic earthquake may cause an opening in the earth and you may fall in or something may just fall on you. A directed blast may throw material on you and crush you. If you're lucky, your clothes may just be affected from the acid rain from the volcanic gases.

I suggest you stay near the beaches and let a tsunami sweep you away.

Re:Another thing to worry about... (1)

es330td (964170) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264817)

This sounds like a classic side scroller video game. What are you going to do for power-ups or extra lives?

Re:Another thing to worry about... (1)

steelfood (895457) | more than 2 years ago | (#41265047)

You don't have to worry about ninjas unless you're a pirate.

Well? Are you?

Re:Another thing to worry about... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41265053)

I am going to Japan in October, so in addition to earthquakes, tsunamis, radiation, ninjas, and godzilla, I now also have to worry about lava??? Damn...

Just dont stay too long and becoming slanty eyed.

Mt. Strongbadia (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262483)

My mountain asplode!

I erupted last night. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262499)

The girlfriend was happy. The wife was not.

I feel sorry for the Japanese (3, Interesting)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262517)

They have indeed had more than enough of natural disasters, as well as self-triggered disasters.

Read the summary... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262525)

all I saw was Ryu

"Nearly"? (2)

sacrilicious (316896) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262527)

>the pressure is at 1.6 megapascals, nearly 16 times the 0.1 megapascals it takes to trigger an eruption.

I'm no mathematician, but I'm pretty sure that 1.6 divided by 0.1 is *EXACTLY* 16.

Re:"Nearly"? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262803)

My P5 system says 1.6 / 0.1 = 16.000739068902037589.

Re:"Nearly"? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263545)

If I could remember where my Pentium 60 is buried, I would dig it out and check your math.

Re:"Nearly"? (4, Insightful)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263905)

I wonder how many people here are old enough to get your joke?

Re:"Nearly"? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41264305)

Sadly not nearly enough.

FYI
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_FDIV_bug

Re:"Nearly"? (4, Interesting)

gman003 (1693318) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264889)

Probably more than you think.

My high school had an Engineering Ethics class, mandatory for all students in a tech-related major. One of the case studies was the Pentium FDIV bug, and how Intel handled it. Other case studies included Tacoma Narrows, Chernobyl, and a bunch of other forgettable ones.

I graduated HS in '09. So "my generation" may be learning about it in a history class rather than through usage, but we *are* learning about it.

In other words, "no, YOU get off the lawn, old man!"

Re:"Nearly"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41264107)

F00F !

Re:"Nearly"? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264191)

"P5"...?

Re:"Nearly"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41264325)

Sure, it was the first in the series, but George Lucas renumbered them all for the prequels.

Besides, my old Gateway PC clearly has "P5-75" on the front.

Re:"Nearly"? (3, Informative)

tippe (1136385) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262829)

In their defence, both 1.6 and 0.1 are likely numbers that are rounded from some more precise measurements. The term "nearly" probably applied to the original measurements as opposed to the nicely rounded numbers presented in TFA. Just sayin'...

Re:"Nearly"? (4, Insightful)

Calydor (739835) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262897)

I'm curious, do you say, "I'll be there in 58 minutes and 48 seconds," or do you say, "I'll be there in an hour?"

I'm pretty sure both the .1 and the 1.6 megapascals is a rough estimate and not a 100% exact, set-in-stone figure.

Re:"Nearly"? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262999)

better check your zipper, a prick is showing.

Re:"Nearly"? (1)

NikeHerc (694644) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263775)

... not a 100% exact, set-in-stone figure.

I saw what you did there. Nice pun.

Re:"Nearly"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263659)

:) those numbers are probably rounded, and with a margin of error, I'm guessing saying nearly might be a big safer. Though good catch.

Evacuation test run next year ??? (5, Interesting)

ACK!! (10229) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262529)

From the article: "Regions that would be affected, including Kanagawa, Yamanashi and Shizuoka, plan to hold a test run of an evacuation by 2014, with a meeting of local governments covering progress of the plans and of shelter preparations slated for April 2013." It seems if the pressure is higher than the last time the damn mountain went boom that they would speed up preparations a tad. Wow, laid back disaster relief.

Re:Evacuation test run next year ??? (1)

Alworx (885008) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263003)

Resistance is futile....

Re:Evacuation test run next year ??? (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264065)

Evacuating that many people would be a gargantuan civil project, its doubtful many countries could even attempt a test run. Its not like everyone can simply form an orderly line and proceed calmly to the nearest exit, transport infrastructure will be swamped, to say nothing of post-incident survivor support. I wonder will they move everyone, or just a few in trial areas.

Re:Evacuation test run next year ??? (4, Funny)

chromas (1085949) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264561)

They don't want to risk premature evacuation.

Re:Evacuation test run next year ??? (1)

kelfink (603517) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264695)

Are local governments the ones you want running this, anyway? Seems like they're going to be the ones who need the help.

In Olde English units (0)

thatseattleguy (897282) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262533)

1.6 MPa = 232 psi (pounds/sq in). High, sure, but within the level you can contain in a soda pop bottle [youtube.com] .

Re:In Olde English units (1)

g0bshiTe (596213) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262585)

Fuji is just one large soda bottle then?

Keep the mentos away from it.

Re:In Olde English units (5, Informative)

meekg (30651) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262617)

Pressure vessels get increasingly difficult to build as their size grows.

When a 150 PSI compressor tank goes (and they do, even though they are made out of steel, a lot thicker than a soda pop can) they take away the room with them.

This pressure vessel is probably miles on a side, and the walls don't have good tensile strength - it's just gravity that's holding it down.

In short converting it to Olde English units doesn't help.

Re:In Olde English units (2)

uigrad_2000 (398500) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263035)

How exactly do they measure the magma pressure?

I looked through this whole page on volcano monitoring techniques [oregonstate.edu] , and it never mentions monitoring the pressure.

Re:In Olde English units (2)

PIBM (588930) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264349)

Last I had looked it up, they measured height variation, and with an estimation of the size of the magma vessel and the expected overhead mound of rock/dirt they would evaluate what kind of pressure was required to obtain the difference.

Re:In Olde English units (1)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263041)

1.6 MPa = 232 psi (pounds/sq in). High, sure, but within the level you can contain in a soda pop bottle

Would this explain the Chinese military's program to develop a really big Mentos?

Very helpful, actually (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263077)

Having it expressed in units familiar to us Yanks is quite useful. Putting it in psi let me see right away that it's about 16 times atmospheric pressure (which I know to be ~14 psi, so x 16 = 224). Hmmmmm, 16x, 16x...where I have seen that number before? Oh, yea - in the summary, where it says, "16 times what it takes to trigger an eruption".

So after seeing that, it's clear that all the article's breathlessly informative science tells us that what it takes to trigger an eruption is to have pressure inside the volcano is....wait for it....HIGHER THAN THE PRESSURE OUTSIDE. Wow. We couldn't have figured that one out ourselves.

So, yes, the guy posting the Olde English units not only gave me a better understanding of the forces, it helped me understand the article was more than a little sensationalistic. Which to me is damn helpful.

Re:Very helpful, actually (1)

xaxa (988988) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263269)

Normal atmospheric pressure is about 100kPa, so that was clear to many of us anyway.

(For some reason they use millibars on the British weather forecasts (here), which is metric but not SI. 1000millibars === 100kPa. The weather today [bbc.co.uk] is 1023mb)

Re:Very helpful, actually (1)

kidgenius (704962) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263961)

Well, the brits do all sorts of weird things. They measure weight in stone, talk about distance in miles, but they talk about height in meters.

Re:Very helpful, actually (2, Informative)

adonoman (624929) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264977)

It's no worse than in Canada where we measure height in feet/inches, distance in KM, people's weight in lbs, deli meat in grams, liquid in liters, dry baking ingredients in cups, indoor temperatures in F, outdoor temperatures in C...

Re:Very helpful, actually (1)

SleazyRidr (1563649) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264707)

Jumped in before I could comment that 16 bar (16*10^5 Pa) is indeed around 16 times 1 bar (near as makes no difference to 1 atm.)

Look at a map (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262583)

Mt. Fuji is clearly a zit on Japan's ballsack.

Better rescue the coke machine (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262603)

Or leave it there for science. If Fuji-san erupts and buries the park on top in lava and/or ash, how long will the coke inside the cans stay fresh? We could dig it out a hundred years from now to check on the carbonation levels.

Re:Better rescue the coke machine (3, Interesting)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262783)

I had a can of Mellow Yellow that didn't get a pull tab installed, so I kept it as an conversation piece. It got left on it's side for a few years, and the contents ate through the aluminum lid. I think the sides of the can were coated, but not the top. Most can machines keep their cans on the side, so they won't last more than a decade or so if not refridgerated.

Re:Better rescue the coke machine (5, Informative)

TheRedSeven (1234758) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263611)

True. Most metal cans (the kind used for packaging, anyway) are coated with a layer of plastic to prevent interaction with the Al/Sn in the metal of the substrate itself. Particularly with acidic contents (tomatoes are the ones that come most readily to mind.) Can *ends* are manufactured separately and joined to the can bodies themselves after filling. Some can ends are coated with plastic over the majority of the surface, but others have perforations and other 'gaps' that allow for proper sealing/seaming between the can and the can end, and for tabs to break through, etc. Any place the plastic coating is missing and an acidic ingredient can come into contact with the metal, corrosion can occur (though slowly).

Source: I'm a market researcher specializing in food/beverage packaging in the US.

Re:Better rescue the coke machine (1)

guttentag (313541) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264005)

Coke machines are essential in times of national emergency. Haven't you ever seen Dr. Strangelove?

Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: Colonel... that Coca-Cola machine. I want you to shoot the lock off it. There may be some change in there.
Colonel "Bat" Guano: That's private property.
Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: Colonel! Can you possibly imagine what is going to happen to you, your frame, outlook, way of life, and everything, when they learn that you have obstructed a telephone call to the President of the United States? Can you imagine? Shoot it off! Shoot! With a gun! That's what the bullets are for, you twit!
Colonel "Bat" Guano: Okay. I'm gonna get your money for ya. But if you don't get the President of the United States on that phone, you know what's gonna happen to you?
Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: What?
Colonel "Bat" Guano: You're gonna have to answer to the Coca-Cola company.

would a buncha drillbots work?? (2, Interesting)

RobertLTux (260313) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262717)

could they maybe drill a set of holes and
1 steer the lava to someplace NOT populated
2 prevent the lava camber from going full bore BOOM

when using Po^HMnt Fuji for your scam always set your clock for Volcano Day

Re:would a buncha drillbots work?? (2)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263135)

could they maybe drill a set of holes and
1 steer the lava to someplace NOT populated
2 prevent the lava camber from going full bore BOOM

when using Po^HMnt Fuji for your scam always set your clock for Volcano Day

I say we send Bruce Willis and his team of oil roughnecks to drill the holes and relieve the pressure. He saved the planet once [wikipedia.org] , he may as well do it again.

Re:would a buncha drillbots work?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263409)

No can do, dude-- Michael Clarke duncan just died. That means earth is screwed.

Re:would a buncha drillbots work?? (1)

Talderas (1212466) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263175)

Only if the drillbots are equipped with drilldos.

Re:would a buncha drillbots work?? (2)

denis-The-menace (471988) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263179)

According to this http://maps.google.ca/maps?oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&q=mount+fuji+map&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Mt+Fuji&gl=ca&t=p&ll=35.241133,138.952332&spn=1.323484,2.425232&z=9&vpsrc=6 [google.ca]

They should be able to divert it to the water and make Japan bigger.

I don't know if this has ever been done before.

Re:would a buncha drillbots work?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41264341)

Except for those darn cities that are along the water in the paths that they would take.

WTF is a... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262731)

...tenterhook?

Re:WTF is a... (2)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262805)

There is an amazing new thing out there called an online dictionary. Perhaps you might consider using one? [merriam-webster.com]

Re:WTF is a... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262831)

Seriously? Are you twelve? Or just never read anything?

Re:WTF is a... (2)

Daetrin (576516) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262935)

It's possible they're just confused because a number of people seem to mispronounce it as "tenderhooks".

Re:WTF is a... (2)

margeman2k3 (1933034) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262847)

They're hooks used in a device called a tenter.

Re:WTF is a... (2)

Lashat (1041424) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263215)

I love looking up an mid-18th century phrase so I can understand a 21st century article about an active stratovolcano that last erupted at the beginning of that18th century.

You didn't know what a tenterhook was either unless you were/are a historic actor fuller specialist or a Chris Mars fan. (A what who when?)

Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (1)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262735)

Any vulcanologist around that can explain why we can't relieve the pressure in some way.

Re:Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262879)

Not a slashdot... More kids here than actual professionals.

Re:Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (3, Insightful)

oogoliegoogolie (635356) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263145)

IANAV, but I would guess that a 30cm bore hole wouldn't have much of an effect on a magma chamber that is miles wide.

Re:Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (2)

Hillgiant (916436) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264111)

There would also be the difficulty of keeping the hole from plugging as the magma cooled on its way to the surface. Or what to even drill the hole with... I'm not aware of any drilling equipment that can reliably drill into liquid rock.

Lastly, even if you do solve the above problems; there is a word for venting magma to atmosphere: Volcano.

Re:Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (1)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264223)

I guess it would depend on the temperature/pressure/bore hole material. Would some magma burp up, cool, and reseal the hole after destroying the drill bit, or would it blow to the surface and destroy the drilling rig, and continue flowing for days or weeks? Perhaps you could drill almost to the magna, then use an explosive to break the seal.

If a flow could be established, the pressure would eventually go down, and the hole would tend to melt itself bigger. That might cause earthquakes in itself.

Crazy plan #2, Drill a hole not to the existing magma, but to intersect with the path it would take to the surface. Then when it's about to blow, it would come out your hole in a more controlled manner.

Re:Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263195)

They want to, but Bruce Willis already died in space saving the world from that asteroid.

Re:Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (5, Funny)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263525)

They want to, but Bruce Willis already died in space saving the world from that asteroid.

So who inherits his iTunes collection?

Re:Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263763)

They want to, but Bruce Willis already died in space saving the world from that asteroid.

So who inherits his iTunes collection?

Nobody, you can't own an iTunes collection. Ba-da-bing!

Man, that joke is nowhere near as funny as "Where do they bury the survivors?"

Re:Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263203)

drilling likely cause it to go boom. it's like opening a soda can... a tiny hole makes the foam go all over...

Re:Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263839)

Any vulcanologist around that can explain why we can't relieve the pressure in some way.

My god man drilling holes in the vulcanoe is not the answer. We're dealing with medievalism here.

Re:Drill a hole, relieve the pressure? (2)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | more than 2 years ago | (#41265067)

Yeah, everyone knows the proper way to relieve pressure is to sacrifice a virgin.

Not a second to lose... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262787)

Warn Koji to get Mazinger ready...

What triggers an eruption? (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | more than 2 years ago | (#41262795)

The new readings, taken by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, reveal that the pressure is at 1.6 megapascals, nearly 16 times the 0.1 megapascals it takes to trigger an eruption

If that's what it takes to trigger an eruption, why didn't it happen 1.5 megapascals ago?

Re:What triggers an eruption? (1)

jkflying (2190798) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263027)

Because, according to TFS:

While the rising pressure within the magma chamber is of concern, it is but one factor among many that lead to eruptions.

Re:What triggers an eruption? (3, Insightful)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263187)

The new readings, taken by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, reveal that the pressure is at 1.6 megapascals, nearly 16 times the 0.1 megapascals it takes to trigger an eruption

If that's what it takes to trigger an eruption, why didn't it happen 1.5 megapascals ago?

Probably the same reason why even though a cigarette is enough to trigger a gasoline explosion, people still manage to smoke while fueling their cars without blowing themselves up - a cigarette is sufficient to set it off, but it takes a combination of factors to make it happen.

Re:What triggers an eruption? (1)

geek (5680) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263565)

Cigarettes won't set off gasoline. You need an open flame. A cigarette will just get put out when dipped in liquid fuel.

Re:What triggers an eruption? (1)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264329)

Reference?

While being drawn, a cigarette has a temperature of around 400 - 500 degC, while the auto ignition temperature of gasoline is 280 degC.

You may be able to throw a lit cigarette in a pool of gasoline and extinguish the cigarette, but I woudn't want to bend down and tie my shoe with my mouth near the gas filler nozzle with gasoline vapor escaping from my gas tank (which admittedly with modern sealed tanks and vapor recovery nozzles is minimal, but I still wouldn't bet my life on it).

http://wandererh.hubpages.com/hub/Can-The-Tip-Of-A-Lit-Cigarette-Butt-Ignite-Gasoline [hubpages.com]

Even those bastions of science, the Mythbusters, say it's partially plausible: http://mythbustersresults.com/special7 [mythbustersresults.com]

Granted, there's a limited set of conditions where a cigarette could ignite gasoline vapors, but that was my point - a cigarette canignite gasoline, but other conditions have to be just right to make it happen.

Re:What triggers an eruption? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41264493)

A cigarette won't set off liquid gasoline. Gasoline, when a vapor, can certainly be set off by a cigarette (or electrical spark). Heck, if the mix between air and gasoline vapor is correct the mixture can be set off by just heat and pressure.

Has there a recent erection happened? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262901)

where all over magma ejects?

Possible Solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41262923)

Why don't we throw more grant money at it? They more we can learn about volcanoes, the more we understand. We can beat this thing.

Happened ~300 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263075)

The last time Mt. Fuji erupted in 1707, it rained ash as far as Tokyo (Edo) and up to 1m deep over much of the farm land of what is now Kanagawa and Shizuoka. This would be very, very bad... possibly an order of magnitude worse than the tsunami last year.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historic_eruptions_of_Mount_Fuji

Earth's Cure? (1, Troll)

thomasw_lrd (1203850) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263101)

I think this is Mother Earth's way to tell all AGW'ers that, "Hey I can fucking take care of myself."

Seriously, though, I wonder how much ash this will put in the air and how much it will cool the Earth's warming, if at all? This seems like it could be a major ELE, or it could be a major dud.

Obvious connection (1)

RobertNotBob (597987) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263159)

I was watching a documentary about Mt St Hellens and they mentioned that due to the shape of the mountain (pre-incident) it was called "The Mt Fuji of North America". - They went on to describe why the shape of the mountain contributed to the particular way in which St Hellens went.

Ever since then, I was wondering why Japanese scientist weren't worried about Fuji. - Now I know: They ARE worried.

AGW (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263161)

I blame global warming!

how do they know (0)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263171)

What the pressure levels were in 1707?

Inferred? Or some renaissance japanese scientist at work?

Either way, doesnt sound like a reliable value

Re:how do they know (4, Insightful)

ppanon (16583) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264149)

They probably figured it out based on the pattern and quantity of ejecta. i.e. to launch boulder of this size this distance and to cover this area with this much ash then, assuming the lava reservoir was roughly the same size as it, the pressure needed to be X.

Re:how do they know (1)

ppanon (16583) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264201)

...was roughly the same size as today,...

Help on the way (2)

jasper160 (2642717) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263243)

Godzilla!

Horrible News for the Locals (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263441)

I climbed Mt. Fuji about 4 years ago and all I can think about is whats going to happen to all the people who make a living off the mountain? When you get to the top there is actually a small village on top with shops and homemade food for the people who make it, even at the bottom theres tons of base areas for people to stock up on supplies before the trek. Even along the way there are rest stops and marker points with people to provide services if needed and to sell food. Its a shame to think that all the people located anywhere near that area could possibly lose their entire way of life.

Re:Horrible News for the Locals (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41264243)

Its a shame to think that all the people located anywhere near that area could possibly lose their entire way of life.

Not to mention their lives. Period.

Of course those pyroclastic flows have a way of cramping one's style.

Rainier (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263705)

Makes me wonder about Mt. Rainier.

Tokyo and Seattle are about the same distance from their respective Lords Protectorate.

populated area (1)

schlachter (862210) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263715)

I hiked around Mt Fuji in 2009. It's a beautiful area surrounded by a nice town and tons of hotels and tourist areas. It's pretty scary that it could pop at any moment. There will be lots of lost life and property if it erupts big.

Social Impact of an Eruption of Mount Fuji (2)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 2 years ago | (#41263733)

Here is an excerpt from an article called "Social Impact of an Eruption of Mount Fuji"
(www.hiroi.iii.u-tokyo.ac.jp/index-katudo-kyodo-kenkyu-hujisan-shakaiteki-eikyo-english.pdf)

"The current study focuses only on possible damage from ashfall in an eruption of Mt Fuji
that is comparable to that in the Hoei Eruption. If there are other volcanic disasters such
as landslides, lava flow and pyroclastic flow, the damage will be even greater. The
important message sent out by this study is that even ashfall alone can cause severe
damage: the social and economic impact will likely be felt by the entire nation, not just
restricted to a local area around the mountain.
The following topics will be important from a policy science perspective:
1) socioeconomic impact of interruptions to transportation and logistics including the
expressways (Chuo, Tomei, Metropolitan), bullet trains, metropolitan and other train
networks, and domestic as well as international air services;
2) verification of the primary and secondary types of damage postulated by this study;
3) closer study of damage to the manufacturing industry caused by the uncertainty
perceived by suppliers and customers and damage to the tourism industry due to
cancellations by consumers; and,
4) study of ash removal methods (based on experiences in past ashfalls) and their
feasibility.
The present paper is an interim report of the work to create an eruption scenario based on
the interview-based surveys. It is our plan to conduct questionnaire studies of
businesses, survey researches, interviews of local agencies in the areas of past ashfalls,
and expert surveys in disaster-related fields. The scenario will be refined through
critiques and discussions as a re sult of these further works.
As far as the specific effects and implications of ashfall are concerned, the current study
has based itself on interviews with disaster-prevention practitioners in companies,
different levels of governments, and lifeline services. The following effects are left for
future study:
- implications on sewage-system overflow, flooding of rivers (problems in
drainage when ashfall is followed by rain );
- estimated volume of ashfall that will settle on riverbeds (estimating the
probability of flooding) ;
- effects of volcanic ash on wireless communications and radio waves;
- effects of volcanic ash on water quality;
- effects of volcanic ash on outdoor precision equipment and automobiles
and other machinery;
- effects of volcanic ash on boilers and combustion systems (since ash
affects airplane engines); and,
- indoor pollution by volcanic ash and its effects on precision equipment
indoors.
It is, strictly speaking, important to conduct empirical studies in engineering and physical
science on these topics, but apparently not too much has been done in this area. When
more is known about these topics, the present scenario of ashfall damage equivalent to
that in the Hoei Eruption could be further refined."

This answers the Microsoft interview question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41263995)

Wait for Mt. Fuji to move itself.

Start Drilling (1)

ironicsky (569792) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264019)

This may sound very ignorant, but when something is pressurized, can't you just open it up and release the pressure? Grab some remote control drilling rigs, plop it down in the crater and let it get to work, release the pressure slowly so that it doesn't come out with a bang at random. This way too, they can tell the surrounding area that they may have to evacuate during the drilling process, just in case, and potentially save lives instead of having a random boom?

That's what she said (1)

trevc (1471197) | more than 2 years ago | (#41264155)

Cat got your tongue? (something important seems to be missing from your comment ... like the body or the subject!)
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