Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Researchers Create Short-term Memories In Rat Brains

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the I-guess-I-really-am-a-terrorist dept.

Science 114

An anonymous reader writes "Researchers say they've found a way to store artificial short-term memories in isolated brain tissue. 'This is the first time anyone has found a way to store information over seconds about both temporal sequences and stimulus patterns directly in brain tissue,' says the study's lead. 'This paves the way for future research to identify the specific brain circuits that allow us to form short-term memories.' The peer-reviewed study can be found here (paywalled)."

cancel ×

114 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

This reminds me of a movie... (5, Funny)

Ruvim (889012) | about 2 years ago | (#41295583)

Total Ratcall was it?

Re:This reminds me of a movie... (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 2 years ago | (#41296059)

Total Ratcall was it?

The original, I can only hope...

Re:This reminds me of a movie... (1)

Shoten (260439) | about 2 years ago | (#41296135)

No...in the original experiment, they used a gorilla. A very charming one, but still...

Re:This reminds me of a movie... (3, Funny)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about 2 years ago | (#41296617)

Unfortunately the artificial, implanted memories are all of cheese...

We can remember wholesale cheese for you? (3, Funny)

billstewart (78916) | about 2 years ago | (#41296897)

You are in a maze of cheesy little movies, all alike?

Re:This reminds me of a movie... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296155)

Mr. Hyde a fourth year MD/PhD student....

I think you have the wrong movie.

Re:This reminds me of a movie... (1)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 2 years ago | (#41296169)

researchers create short memories in rats? I'm pretty sure they already had short memories...

Re:This reminds me of a movie... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296735)

If we gift them with a past, we can control them better.

Re:This reminds me of a movie... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296849)

After a few years, they might develop their own emotional responses.

Re:This reminds me of a movie... (2)

davidbrit2 (775091) | about 2 years ago | (#41297799)

Well, the rat did wake up shouting, "You blew my cover!" Said his name was Mouser or something.

Re:This reminds me of a movie... (1)

dywolf (2673597) | about 2 years ago | (#41299093)

I was thinking Matrix myself.

"I know Kung Fu"...

Re:This reminds me of a movie... (1)

mcgrew (92797) | about 2 years ago | (#41299773)

As Neo leaves the monkey house at the zoo...

"I know Flung Poo!"

Dollhouse begining? (1)

Cute and Cuddly (2646619) | about 2 years ago | (#41295587)

Or are the rats being sent to the atic?

Total Recall here we come (1)

wbr1 (2538558) | about 2 years ago | (#41295601)

Oh, and my name is Hauser or is it Quaid?

Re:Total Recall here we come (1)

Director of Acronyms (232303) | about 2 years ago | (#41295647)

Dollhouse to follow...

Re:Total Recall here we come (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295679)

Ratfucker 1. You need TP for your rathole. Get it?

Obligatory... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295651)

I know kung-fu.

Re:Obligatory... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296315)

Show me.

Re:Obligatory... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296543)

Sorry, I just forgot kung-fu.

Re:Obligatory... (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 2 years ago | (#41297859)

My mistake, it was Kung-Pow, which is equally as impressive, IMO.

Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

ArcadeNut (85398) | about 2 years ago | (#41295653)

This will then lead to implanting false memories in people....

Removing tin foil hat now....

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295739)

There really is no justification for this type of research. I can't think of any possible good use, and the potential for abuse is sky-high. Implanting artificial memories would never be a good thing to do under any circumstances.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (5, Interesting)

nonsequitor (893813) | about 2 years ago | (#41295789)

There really is no justification for this type of research. I can't think of any possible good use, and the potential for abuse is sky-high. Implanting artificial memories would never be a good thing to do under any circumstances.

Understanding the mechanics of memory may lead to breakthroughs which could cure diseases like Alzheimer's.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (4, Interesting)

CRCulver (715279) | about 2 years ago | (#41295839)

The direct cause of Alzheimer's is already well-known: plaques in the brain. Destroy the plaques early, and brain function will not be impaired. While the OP may unreasonably fear the repercussions of this research, claiming that it could lead to a cure for Alzheimers is going rather too far in assuaging his fears.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (4, Interesting)

foniksonik (573572) | about 2 years ago | (#41296099)

There is also a very good link between insulin overload and plaque formation (rather the inability of the brain tissue to breakdown plaque due to insulin overload eg it's too busy breaking down insulin). This in turn is brought about by obesity aka type 2 diabetes when looking at early onset Alzheimer's (old age also inhibits plaque breakdown).

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (4, Insightful)

nonsequitor (893813) | about 2 years ago | (#41296293)

Yes, they know that the plaques impair brain function by inference, they don't understand how, because no one knows what a memory is. Face it, we know a lot about the physical structure of the brain, but we don't really know how it works. Asserting that we understand the process of memory because we know a few things about a disease linked to memory is false equivalence. It's equally disingenuous to suggest that knowing more about how memories are formed, stored, and accessed would have no practical benefit when trying to understand and treat diseases which affect memory.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41297109)

we know a lot about the physical structure of the brain, but we don't really know how it works.

Yeah, neuroscientists are like engineers trying to reverse-engineer Angry Birds source code with an electron microscope.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

AwesomeMcgee (2437070) | about 2 years ago | (#41299569)

The way old timers talk you'd think this was a pretty standard activity during the 70s, so perhaps we just need some old greybeards to get to work on this brain thingy and we'll have it whipped.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296889)

Destroy the plaques early, and brain function will not be impaired.

While it is extremely likely that the plaques do cause Alzheimers, afaik a causal relationship has not yet been rigorously established. The plaques could be associated with another factor that is causing the disease.

The direct cause of aircraft crashes (2)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | about 2 years ago | (#41296977)

Is hitting the ground. So all that crash investigation has been wasted: the answer is to prevent the aircraft from hitting the ground as soon as possible.[/sarcasm]

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (4, Informative)

durrr (1316311) | about 2 years ago | (#41298005)

Actually, the plaque correlation is rather weak. Most like a soluble form of the protein do the damage, the plaques just being a precipitation of the soluble form., plaque removal do not correlate with reversal of the condition and plaque presence can be found in people with no notable cognitive decline.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41298237)

The direct cause of Alzheimer's is already well-known: plaques in the brain. Destroy the plaques early, and brain function will not be impaired.

Always brush your brain twice a day.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

Greyfox (87712) | about 2 years ago | (#41299185)

Plaque? Sounds like a job for... MENTAL FLOSS!

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

Nikker (749551) | about 2 years ago | (#41296061)

The reason Alzheimer's works the way it does is that it destroys they way the brain's memory regions are stored. This will be as effective as restoring your to a broken hard drive.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

Nikker (749551) | about 2 years ago | (#41296145)

Your *data* to a broken hard drive :)

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296615)

Just as understanding decomposition will lead to a cure for death. I'm not saying understanding the brain isn't a worthy pursuit, but forgetfulness is just a symptom of Alzheimer's.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41297677)

Just as understanding decomposition will lead to a cure for death. I'm not saying understanding the brain isn't a worthy pursuit, but forgetfulness is just a symptom of Alzheimer's.

And treating a disease is sometimes nothing more than ameliorating symptoms. Your point is... what exactly? That curing a disease is the only thing worth pursuing. That would mean pain-killers (which treat the symptom of pain), anti-emetics (which treat the symptom of nausea) and anti-depressants (which attempt to treat the symptom of depression) are all pointless...

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 2 years ago | (#41296843)

Understanding the mechanics of memory may lead to breakthroughs which could cure diseases like Alzheimer's.

Which isn't to say that there is no danger.
We develop biological and chemical weapons so that we can craft defenses for them, but we don't lie to ourselves that we haven't first created something with its own risks.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 2 years ago | (#41297599)

Detonating nuclear bombs in downtown Chicago may lead to breakthroughs which could result in nuclear bomb-proof building design.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

Nrrqshrr (1879148) | about 2 years ago | (#41297609)

Are you kidding? Once this is advanced enough, we can have Matrix-style learning, with knowledge implanted right into your brain.
This could possibly cure the disease mankind have been suffering from since forever.... ignorance.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

C0R1D4N (970153) | about 2 years ago | (#41297693)

Or possibly the reverse, storing memories of important events or entire lives for future generations.r

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (3, Insightful)

ZeroSumHappiness (1710320) | about 2 years ago | (#41298421)

Agreed. We currently devote how many years to creating people with knowledge? What if instead of taking 22, 26, 35 or more years to gain the necessary knowledge and experience to start up in a field you spent 18 years maturing socially and two hours downloading 100 years of knowledge and experience?

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41298899)

you spent 18 years maturing socially

True nerds don't mature socially as they realize just how superficial most of that nonsense is. They only speak when necessary.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41298349)

You can't close the lid on Pandora's box. Someone, somewhere (probably someone evil) is already researching it. Better there be research in the open too.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

dywolf (2673597) | about 2 years ago | (#41299133)

It's usefulness as instant learning is attractive, though you are correct that there is potential for abuse in that. Make everyone learn that Democrats are commies and Republicans are troglodites, etc.

Myself, I just want to learn Kung Fu and fly around with my shades and cloak...

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

AwesomeMcgee (2437070) | about 2 years ago | (#41299613)

You can't afford those shades, nor that cloak, sorry it'll just be flying around in your standard hoody and stained sweat pants for the foreseeable future :(

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295881)

"This will then lead to implanting false memories in people...."

Obviously you've never watched the fight for our future and identity, in the movie, "Dark City". Even the Bible says there will come a time where people will seek death but will not be able to find it.. maybe because their identity is entirely being rerolled like a new D&D character every night/week/month/year?

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296207)

I'm sorry you're burdened with such a delusional worldview. I wish you a speedy recovery.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296573)

This will then lead to implanting false memories in people....

Removing tin foil hat now....

Or, you could get a google interface that just uploads your search results into your short term memory instead of having you to read through it.

Well, I guess that is close enough to implanting false memories but it's not like truth is absolute anyway.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about 2 years ago | (#41298367)

This will then lead to implanting false memories in people....

Removing tin foil hat now....

They are not false you insensitive clod.

Re:Putting Tin Foil hat on.... (1)

ZeroSumHappiness (1710320) | about 2 years ago | (#41298385)

Removing tin foil hat now....

Only to find you were never wearing it in the first place!

SHORT-term (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295661)

So no, not "I just made a different life for you and implanted it in your head". But, maybe "I just made you remember it's be birthday next week"

They managed to make (3, Funny)

Compaqt (1758360) | about 2 years ago | (#41295745)

lawyers remember ethics for a few seconds?

Re:They managed to make (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295879)

I was going to suggest testing on politicians, one step up from rats.

Re:They managed to make (4, Funny)

AshtangiMan (684031) | about 2 years ago | (#41296143)

Wow. What happened to make you despise the rats so much?

Re:They managed to make (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296269)

lawyers remember ethics for a few seconds?

I'm afraid not. They only made isolated samples of said brains briefly recall that there is such a thing as ethics.

Re:They managed to make (1)

Grayhand (2610049) | about 2 years ago | (#41296907)

lawyers remember ethics for a few seconds?

Call Guinness! That's twice the previous record.

Guinness rules (1)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | about 2 years ago | (#41296995)

It isn't a record unless the lawyers were trying to remember ethics. Just remembering doesn't count.

Re:They managed to make (1)

toygeek (473120) | about 2 years ago | (#41296915)

No but they got an end user to remember their password

any plans on long-term memory? (4, Interesting)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 2 years ago | (#41295767)

I might be an anomaly, but after highschool and college, I developed the ability to push things directly to long-term memory, and shortchange the short-term, removing the volatility.

I know I can do that, because the information and even the circumstances happening around me are stored such that I can recall them clearly now, years later. (The first time I did it was durng a cram session in science class concerning the simple machines physics test material in HS. I remember the entire circumstance clearly. Upon learning I could do this, I never had to really study again, just make the concious effort to store the information permanently. The most recent time I used it was last week over the holiday weekend. I visited a friend and took some extra days off. His parents wanted him to find some unusual ingredients for a recipe his dad had found online, and I memorized the missing items: mediteranean couscous, lemon preserves, and picholine olives.)

Let me know when they can deal with long term memories, because there is some stagnant data in my head that needs purging. I don't need to remember the conversation I had with the engineering student on the SW airlines return flight from my california vacation two years ago. That and numberous other things could safely be removed.

Re:any plans on long-term memory? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295929)

It certainly does sound as if you are an anomaly and a very interesting one at that. I'm sure the nearest university cognitive science department would be quite pleased to make your acquaintance, especially if you are willing to participate in a study of your ability. Seriously, get in touch with someone and tell them about this; it may provide a significant benefit for all of us.

Re:any plans on long-term memory? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296149)

Mod up! My roommate is psychology (clinical psychology) student and she claims it is extremely unlikely, and she is pretty sure cognitive study researchers would be interested

Re:any plans on long-term memory? (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 2 years ago | (#41297291)

I am not sure my local university is properly equipped for that, and don't relish the idea of being poked, prodded, or worse-- made to remember even more tedious information.

If it helps your room-mate, I do not have perfect autobiographical memory; instead, to store the information reliably, I have to comprehend the material I am being exposed to. For example, I have a weakness in mathematics. Showing me a mathematical proof, I will have difficulty storing it. However, a complex process, if I comprehend it and its steps and purpose, I can store almost immediately.

For instance, here is a recipie I like for pumpkin bread. I have made it twice. It makes 38 muffins.

Preheat oven to 350F.
In a large mixing bowl combine 4 softened sticks of butter, 4 large eggs, 3 cups of white sugar, 3/4 cup sweetened evaporated milk and one 15oz can of pumpkin puree until well blended.

In another bowl, sift together 3 and 1/2 cups white all purpouse flour, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon nutmeg, 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves, 1/4 teaspoon powdered ginger, 2 teaspoon baking soda, and 1 teaspoon salt.

Combine the dry and wet ingredients with an electric mixer until smooth. Blend in one 8oz bag of pecan chips, ad one 8oz bag of chunked english walnuts.

Place muffin paper liners in 2 one dozen muffin tins, and spoon the papers full to the top, (approx 2 tablespoons each.)

Load filled trays on center rack and bake until inserted toothpick returns clean.

(This post is entirely from memory. I have made them twice. They are delicious.)

I enjoy cooking, and easily stored this recipie for later. As you can see, it is fairly involved, and well beyond most people's ability to keep in short term memory long enough to fully commit ater only 2 uses. I had the recipie almost perfectly stored after the first use, and fully stored after the second.

Again, a complex math proof would fail me, but only because I have difficulty with that subject. I have to be able to make connections to store the information directly. If I do not comprehend the subject matter, I can't do that, and it greatly impedes the process.

As for how I do it, I am not entirey sure how to explain it. There is a certain... feel... to a successful push. Some items, if sufficiently complex, may require more than one push to fully store. It is a conscious effort, and not innate, though I do have abnormally high recall for random daily occurances, and could give you a fairly accurate description of my (entire) trip last week for example, but that would be boring and unnecessary.

I know for a fact that my short term memory is abysmal, as I often forget people and names that I do not consider important. This is probably because I rarely use it.

Lately I have been having odd cognitative issues with feeling... "full". Hence, my desire to do house keeping.

Re:any plans on long-term memory? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41297491)

This statement is contradictory "It is a conscious effort, and not innate, though I do have abnormally high recall for random daily occurances, and could give you a fairly accurate description of my (entire) trip last week for example" It takes effort, then it doesn't? Or you put effort into remembering all those random daily occurrences? You don't, even though I'm sure you'd back peddle and lie that you do. Get your story straight. A story you tell yourself, and others to convince them (if they are convinced, you are more convinced), so you can soundly fap yourself to sleep.

Re:any plans on long-term memory? (3, Interesting)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 2 years ago | (#41297571)

It takes conscious effort to remember an arbitrary unit of information, such as a complete recipie, vs remembering that I made muffins that day, and that they were delicious.

People with perfect autobiographical memory do the latter. They will associate a date with an activity, and remember it. They will remember making the muffins, what problems may have come up during baking (such as phone ringing, etc), that they were delicious, how many they ate, etc... but will not recall the recipie.

I can recall the recipie, if I make a conscious effort to store it.

This is something people with perfect autobiographical memory cannot do.

I do not habe perfect autobiographical memory, and do not claim to. I have above average autobiographical memory, and also the ability to recall discrete units of information I have consciously taken the effort to store.

Compare: remembering that my friend's dad wanted odd ingredients for something he wanted to cook VS remembering what the ingredients are.

Re:any plans on long-term memory? (1)

Whomp-Ass (135351) | about 2 years ago | (#41299217)

I use a similar mental trick to increase retention and recall; like the opp, I would say that it takes effort and is not innate, however, like any other process instantiated and existing solely within the mind, it doesn't exactly have an off switch.

Let's say that I asked you to picture a pink elephant with wings and the number 48 tattooed on it's side.

I would say that this is the kind of thing that most people, myself included, would think about for a moment, then in moving on, forget.

Now, I would like you to forget about the pink elephant.

Try really hard to forget it.

The harder you try, the harder it may well be, or is for most people, and now your going to be stuck with that damn elephant in your head...Assuming you did more than skim over this post, there exists a good chance that 5 years from now if I were to ask you what number was tattooed on the side of it, you may actually remember.

Anyway. To put that into context, do mental tricks like that often enough and they become internalized and thereafter instinctive rather than forced and you end up recalling random shit without putting effort into retaining them.

I too have a bizarre rate of recall for random things, for example, my wife brought home a box of 'Golden Crisp' cereal, asked if I like it, and I sang (verbatim) the commercial for that product, from 1980 (the one where he punches out the alligator). Why I remember that and not, for instance, that my anniversary was a week from the Sunday before last, until my phone tells me, is beyond me.

Re:any plans on long-term memory? (1)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | about 2 years ago | (#41298699)

Enough chit-chat; restrain the specimen!

Re:any plans on long-term memory? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296195)

Soooo. How do you do it? Usually, there are ways intentional mental activities like this can be described.

Hyperthymesia (3, Informative)

PanDuh (56522) | about 2 years ago | (#41296509)

Sounds like you might have a case of Hyperthymesia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthymestic [wikipedia.org]

The actress Marilu Henner supposedly has this condition. She claims to remember every day of her life since age 11.

Its rare, but it happens and apparently it can be a exhausting and a burden on the person.

Re:Hyperthymesia (1)

the_one(2) (1117139) | about 2 years ago | (#41297179)

That's not it. He has to make an effort to record it into long term memory.

Re:Hyperthymesia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41297253)

He contradicts himself. He says he has to make an effort to record it to long term memory, yet he complains about memories he wishes he doesn't want to remember. Why would anyone make an effort to remember something they don't want to remember (like meaningless conversations or recipes... I mean, common, seriously? I could see not wanting to remember some test answers, but needing to to pass, but that isn't my point) His post is an effort to boost his ego about his "superior" brain, and then tries to down play it with humor which contradicts his entire premise. He probably does have Hyperthymesia, is aware of it, and is trying to convince himself by gloating to others over the internet that he has control over it. Obviously he doesn't.

Re:Hyperthymesia (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 2 years ago | (#41297539)

Perfect autobiographical memory sufferers often fail miserably at discrete memory tasks, but excell at semantic and biographical memory tasks.

I do not have perfect autobiographical memory, and do not claim to. I do have superior biographical memory, however. I do not remember the exact conversation on said flight. What I remember is that he was a minority student, possibly italian or mediteranean in origin, as he had tanned skin, loose curly black hair with and oily sheen, brown eyes, a black shirt with white khaki pants, and a black paperback college textbook on electrical engineering.

The conversation we had revolved around the actual validity of claims that the stuardess was making concerning the disruption of flight instruments by wireless communications devices, considering the inverse cube law, and the average effective transmit energy of a personal electronic device being in the milliwatt range. This was leaving san jose airport for las vegas airport for our connecting flight.

We agreed that it might be possible for there to be a problem if there were improperly grounded and unsheilded driven elements that could act as an active reciever, and propogate the noise signal through the wiring harness, but this would be a serious design flaw of the aircraft, as it would likely have serious problems with reception of noise emissions from other wired systems in the plane.

I suggested that perhaps they were worried about miniscule chances of impairment, due to FAA officiousness. We agreed that it would likely take everyone on board simultaneously using their handsets with hacked firmwares to broadcast on max energy to create enough noise to impact flight control systems on a modern jet liner, and that the prohibition was likely pure BS, and CYA tactics on the part of the airline.

I do not remember the date. I believe it was a Thursday.

Re:Hyperthymesia (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 2 years ago | (#41297591)

Sounds like there is nothing wrong with you. The details you give here are not any more thorough than most people would remember.

Re:Hyperthymesia (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 2 years ago | (#41297629)

It was 2 years ago.

Further details of that return flight:

Upon landing at las vegas airport, we were stuck on the runway, as the plane in the stall our flight was scheduled to disembark t was grounded due to a medical emergency, and delayed for a half hour.

I was worried that I would have to rent a hotel room in las vegas on the 4th of july. (The return flight was the night of july 3rd.) We DID board successfully, as it turns out the plane we were to embark on was the very one that had experienced the medical emergency. There was an entire row of seats, 4th from the front in coach, that had barriers over them, which I assmed to be the location said medical emergency took place. Being a non-revinue ticket holder, we (my friend and I) were in the last set of people boarding, and took whatever available seats we could. He got stuck beside "squirmy man", and I got stuck behind screamer baby. I talked with the parents of screamer baby, who turned out to be a barely 4 year old girl with dark brown hair, brown eyes, and a little red dress. Her dad put in earbuds and watched the iron man movie (first one) on a laptop, and his wife read a harlequin romance novel, white tied screamer baby raised hell.

I used my hacked PSP with custom firmware to play castlevania from the nintendo GBA using an emulator, and was thankful that the earbuds I had in were noise cancelling.

There was aggressive turbulence during the flight, as we flew through a thunderstorm. It was raining when we arrived at kansas city airport.

We almost missed my friend's folks, who were our ride, due to the clusterfuck design of the airport.

Re:Hyperthymesia (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 2 years ago | (#41298391)

Nope... pretty sure you're not special at all.

Re:any plans on long-term memory? (1)

durrr (1316311) | about 2 years ago | (#41298037)

I belive you're deluded and have just forgot all the attempts where your long term storage push failed.

Re:any plans on long-term memory? (1)

dywolf (2673597) | about 2 years ago | (#41298505)

Don't move. Stay where you are. Do not be alarmed. We are going to help you, and you are going to help us. Don't fight it. Just come with us. No you don't really have a choice. Here put on this gown. Those needles? Those are just vaccines. Now relax and we can begin studying you. There we go....*whine of a bone bone saw starting*

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind in reverse ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295801)

By the way, the above is a movie, and is well worth seeing if you have not.

Article (0)

PPH (736903) | about 2 years ago | (#41295817)

tl;dr

The real question is.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295863)

Do you want the template for Sharon (1990 Edition), Jessica or Kate, and do you also want the hooker with the..... nevermind, added...

Did you know the last CZAR of RUSSIA (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295865)

had a son who was a homophalic? Now you do. You won't find that at Khan Acadamy.

David Brin to the white courtesy telephone (1)

bmo (77928) | about 2 years ago | (#41295915)

So when do we uplift the chimpanzees and dolphins?

--
BMO

Re:David Brin to the white courtesy telephone (4, Funny)

hyades1 (1149581) | about 2 years ago | (#41296591)

Right after we do conservatives. Start with the hard job, move to the easier ones. ;-)

Jesus Pill (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41295971)

Mass visions of Jesus to follow.

Paywall (0)

Arabian Nights (2597797) | about 2 years ago | (#41295979)

Nature is great and everything, but a paywalled Slashdot reference is like no link at all.

And paves the way for mind control (1)

kazekirifx (2647275) | about 2 years ago | (#41296013)

The rat army is coming! Humans will be next.

Re:And paves the way for mind control (1)

NotQuiteReal (608241) | about 2 years ago | (#41296163)

I have distinct memories of a great rat dish - pan roasted with shallots. And a nice escargot appetizer with a white wine - berry liquor mix for dessert.

mmmm rats.

Dreams for sale? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296137)

Let me know when I came wake up believing I just spent the night with Natalie Portman. That would be pretty awesome. Creepy? Yeah, but still awesome.

I for one welcome our rat-brained overlords! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296795)

Bring on splinter

Voight-Kampff Resistant Rats . . (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 2 years ago | (#41296807)

"Commerce is our goal here at Tyrell. More rat than rat is our motto. Ratchael is an experiment, nothing more. We began to recognise in them a strange obsession. After all they are emotionally inexperienced, with only a few years in which to store up the experiences which you and I take for granted. If we gived them a past, we'd create a cushion, a pillow for their emotions and consequently we can control them better." (Tyrell)

"Memories. You're talking about memories." (Deckard)

Not a good time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296899)

to be a rat or act like one!

Unless you are one of the pan-dimentional beings ofc ( http://hitchhikers.wikia.com/wiki/Frankie_and_Benjy )

Slashdot sociopaths, right on form... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41296929)

... not one of you cares for the animals who are tortured to death by these sadists. You pretend that it's 'research', when actually it's scumbags being paid to FAIL - they get paid no matter how long they waste on their 'research', even though 99% of the time it leads to nothing.

www.xenodiaries.org

DreamScape (0)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 2 years ago | (#41297479)

"Researchers say they've found a way to store artificial short-term memories in isolated brain tissue. 'This is the first time anyone has found a way to store information over seconds about both temporal sequences andstimulus patterns directly in brain tissue,' says the study's lead. 'This paves the way for government to do all sorts of cool things, like tamper with judicial witnesses, implant false memories of political opponents in voters' minds, and directly program children with State-friendly thought patterns."

There, fixed it.

But (1)

StripedCow (776465) | about 2 years ago | (#41297509)

I want a way to remove memories from my brain.
That way, I can see a movie over and over again and still enjoy watching it.

Anyway, I hope advertisers don't get a hold on this invention.

Re:But (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 2 years ago | (#41297891)

I want a way to remove memories from my brain. That way, I can see a movie over and over again and still enjoy watching it.

Alzheimer's disease.
What good is watching a movie Mr. Anderson, if you can't remember wh-- wait, what were we talking about? Why is the floor so sticky?

Re:But (1)

Greyfox (87712) | about 2 years ago | (#41299219)

Alcohol works pretty well, as long as you keep applying alcohol to the problem.

Unsubstantiated claim (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41297681)

From original Nature article:

"... , it has been difficult to link memories with changes in individual neurons or specific synaptic connections. We found that transient stimuli are reliably encoded in the ongoing activity of brain tissue in vitro. Patterns of synaptic input onto dentate hilar neurons predicted which of four pathways were stimulated with an accuracy of 76% and performed significantly better than chance for >15 s. Dentate gyrus neurons were also able to accurately encode temporal sequences using population representations that were robust to variation in sequence interval. These results demonstrate direct neural encoding of temporal sequences in the spontaneous activity of brain tissue and suggest a local circuit mechanism that may contribute to diverse forms of short-term memory. ..."

So my understanding is that researchers now are able predict how (in which neuronal circuits) information (neuronal stimulus) will be stored for short term. So the claim they found "how to store arteficial *memories* in isolated barai tissue" from blog post is unsubstantiated.

Didn't I just read about this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41298351)

must've been breakfast

Fuck paywalls (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41298411)

Nature's original mission statement:

To place before the general public the grand results of Scientific Work and Scientific Discovery

And current:

To make monney!!!

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>