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WD Builds High-Capacity, Helium-Filled HDDs

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the it-slices-it-dices-it-sings-in-falsetto dept.

Data Storage 356

Lucas123 writes "Western Digital subsidiary HGST today announced that after 10 years of development it is preparing to release 3.5-in data center-class HDDs that are hermetically sealed with helium inside. The helium reduces drag and wind turbulence created by the spinning platters, all but eliminating track misregistration that has become a major issue to increasing drive density in recent years. Because of that, HGST will be able to add two more platters along with increasing the tracks per inch, which results in a 40% capacity increase. The drives will also use 23% less power because of the reduction of friction on the spindle. HGST said the new seven-platter helium drives will weigh 29% less per terabyte of capacity that today's five-platter drives. In other words, a seven-platter helium disk will weigh 690 grams, the same as today's five-platter drives."

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Why not a vacuum (5, Informative)

suso (153703) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328431)

Those of you wondering why they don't just use a vacuum inside the drive. Hard drive heads ride on a cusion of air (or in this case, a gas of some kind) so that they don't crash against the drive.

Re:Why not a vacuum (4, Insightful)

suso (153703) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328443)

I meant against the platter.

Re:Why not a vacuum (4, Funny)

xynopsis (224788) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328469)

Hard drive heads ride on a cusion of air (or in this case, a gas of some kind) so that they don't crash against the drive.

Why a gas? Why not float it using an electromagnet instead?

Re:Why not a vacuum (-1, Redundant)

slashmydots (2189826) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328503)

Because that would give off electromagnetic radiation lol. That and magnets and hard drive platters don't get along.

Re:Why not a vacuum (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41329049)

Yes, that was the fucking point of the joke.

Re:Why not a vacuum (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328511)

Er.... [wikipedia.org] maybe because they already have a number of electromagnets inside?

Re:Why not a vacuum (2)

mrbester (200927) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328545)

Not sure if trolling...

Re:Why not a vacuum (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328549)

Because magnets are required to operate the drive, too many magnets would probably start screwing with the operation of the drive itself.

Re:Why not a vacuum (4, Insightful)

nschubach (922175) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328557)

Wouldn't that be like strapping an eraser to the end of your pencil so anything you write will be cushioned by the soft rubber?

Re:Why not a vacuum (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328703)

No. It would be more akin to filling your car with clowns before driving it, instead of bothering with seatbelt or airbags. Which in fact sounds like a pretty damn good idea!

Re:Why not a vacuum (2)

Galestar (1473827) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328911)

Magnets, how to they work?

Re:Why not a vacuum (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328961)

Aren't magnets kryptonite to hard drives?

Re:Why not a vacuum (2)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328979)

Man, if you were fishing for Wooshes......

Re:Why not a vacuum (1)

angelbar (1823238) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329013)

4 fooled, one confused... well done !!

Re:Why not a vacuum (1)

XiaoMing (1574363) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328571)

Those of you wondering why they don't just use a vacuum inside the drive. Hard drive heads ride on a cusion of air (or in this case, a gas of some kind) so that they don't crash against the drive.

If it's filled with helium, you can fill it to a pressure that's equal to environment (or at least really close).

Try to picture the failure rates if an airtight seal holding back 1 atm of pressure vs. one that only has to deal with a tiny fraction of that.

Re:Why not a vacuum (4, Interesting)

Pepebuho (167300) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328671)

Well, this means that NOW I can submerge reliably the whole PC into Mineral Oil without fear of oil getting into the only moving part, the hard drive. Can't wait to try this out!

Re:Why not a vacuum (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328791)

Do you have a blog?

Re:Why not a vacuum (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328719)

Not only that, but after the helium migrates through the pores in the metal housing, the heads will crash! Physically programmed disk death!

Sure they weigh less (5, Funny)

countach (534280) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328743)

Sure they weigh less, because they are filled with helium. But when the servers start lifting off the ground and floating off, they might have to rethink this idea.

Disaster (3, Funny)

darkpixel2k (623900) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328455)

Just imagine something like this [youtube.com] with a huge 'WD' logo on the side inside your computer.

Re:Disaster (5, Funny)

netdigger (847764) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328491)

Yes yes, you have to watch out for that non explosive helium.

Re:Disaster (5, Funny)

darkpixel2k (623900) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328563)

*facepalm*
*hands over nerd card*

Re:Disaster (4, Informative)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328653)

Actually, you good-naturedly admitted your facepalm moment.

You may keep your card, good sir.

Re:Disaster (2)

Richy_T (111409) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328721)

Oh the humanity(-student level understanding of science)

Re:Disaster (1)

ZankerH (1401751) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328509)

Helium is an inert gas. You're thinking about hydrogen gas.

Re:Disaster (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328643)

Argon walks into a bar. An alarm goes off and the bartender yells "Hey, we don't serve your kind here!" Argon, of course, didn't react.

Re:Disaster (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328537)

Well we will look out for it when they release HDDs with hydrogen in them.

Re:Disaster (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328597)

They already tried that, it was called a Deathst^H^H^H^H^H^H^HDeskstar Hard Drive.

The Humanity! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328547)

Someone doesn't know what helium is!

Re:Disaster (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328567)

Helium, not hydrogen...

Headline: (2)

mhajicek (1582795) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328461)

New Helium filled drives weigh less!

Re:Headline: (1)

rrohbeck (944847) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328901)

If they make them bigger, with more helium, they'll float!

This explains it! (2)

billakay (1607221) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328471)

So that is where all the Helium has gone...

Re:This explains it! (4, Informative)

slashmydots (2189826) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328527)

In case anyone didn't get that, there's a worldwide helium shortage at the moment.

Re:This explains it! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328615)

Don't worry, here in Nebraska we don't care about any so-called helium shortage!!

http://journalstar.com/sports/huskers/football/what-helium-shortage-football-tradition-is-back/article_3dff8c13-7c52-5477-9eab-76cfbba06f7e.html

Re:This explains it! (4, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328823)

Likely to be a permanent condition.

Helium is light enough that it doesn't persist very well in the atmosphere(unlike the heavier noble gasses, that you can just distill out if the price gets high enough to pay for the energy needed), and it is only replenished quite slowly by alpha decay of assorted radioactives in the crust.

The only significant source is natural gas wells in proximity to suitable minerals over geologic time and equipped to capture the helium when the product is brought to the surface.

Re:This explains it! (2)

RicktheBrick (588466) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328857)

If there is a shortage why are they still selling helium filled balloons at dollar tree for a dollar? All those balloons will eventually pop and the helium will be lost into outer space.

Re:This explains it! (4, Interesting)

glueball (232492) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329041)

Liquid Helium sell for $8.00/L on the wholesale quantity market.
It is still very, very cheap.

Last fill on my MRI machine was 800L due to cold head failure. Lucky me I have a service policy, but still, that's a big use of Helium. I would not worry about your Helium balloon.

Bill
 

But the cost? (4, Interesting)

sandytaru (1158959) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328479)

Is this going to be cheaper than SSD? The price point for solid state finally reached where platter drives were about ten years ago (a dollar or less a gig) and I installed one on my system just last week as my OS drive. Also, are these going to be significantly faster than the standard five platter density drives? Frankly, weight only matters in tablets, phones, and laptops. I'm not aware of any crushing weight problems in the steel server racks...

Re:But the cost? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328609)

This will be marketed for enterprise solutions, large data centers, etc. They will cost more than consumer drives that are out now, but in this market segment, cost is not really an issue.

So much for HDDs being boat anchors... I'm gonna have to bolt my PC down...

Re:But the cost? (1)

oji-sama (1151023) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328631)

Drives with more platters in them usually have better price to storage capacity ratio. And the density can be increased. I would not be surprised if these were cheaper (relatively) than the current server HDDs. Probably not significantly faster though.

Re:But the cost? (3, Informative)

Tough Love (215404) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328689)

Is this going to be cheaper than SSD?

Yes, of course. Only a tiny amount of helium is used.

Also, are these going to be significantly faster than the standard five platter density drives?

As usual for density increases, transfer rate goes up, seek time is unchanged. Moving disks even further into the role formerly occupied by tape. Maybe the reduced friction (= less heat) could make 10K drives more practical, improving seek time but probably also being a boutique product squeezed between SSD and 72k disks, and thus expensive.

Re:But the cost? (1)

vux984 (928602) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328737)

seek time is unchanged

Reduced friction and reduced turbulence might enable higher seek times.

Re:But the cost? (4, Funny)

vux984 (928602) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328759)

Reduced friction and reduced turbulence might enable higher seek times.

By higher I meant better, which in the case of seek times is of course lower.

Re:But the cost? (3, Funny)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329055)

Reduced friction and reduced turbulence might enable higher seek times.

By higher I meant better, which in the case of seek times is of course lower.

That's what she said.

Re:But the cost? (2)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328809)

Reduced friction and reduced turbulence might enable higher seek times.

Slightly faster seek times as there's less, err, air resistance that the heads have to oppose. Unfortuantely, they added two platters which means the seek arm has nearly 40% more mass. More mass means more inertia, which means the heads are harder to start and stop quickly, which probably more than compensates for the reduction due to air resistance. It could seek *slower*, too.

Re:But the cost? (1)

RubberDuckie (53329) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328773)

I'm not aware of any crushing weight problems in the steel server racks...

For most server racks. probably not as there is a log of empty space in standard servers. Here at $WORK, we have a MAID array for archival storage. Since the drives in the unit only spin up (and get hot) when needed, the array contains many more drives than a standard disk array. This makes the unit quite heavy, and could overload the floor on some buildings. Luckily, this is on the first floor, so it won't come crashing through the ceiling.

Re:But the cost? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328843)

Weight matters in the datacenter too... Drives are probably the densest component in a rack. A fully populated rack can easily weigh over 2000lbs (900KG for people who use a sane system of measurement). A well managed datacenter (and competent sysadmins) should include consideration of the structural load (on the building), point loads (particularly on raised floors), and weight in transit. After you've done a few datacenter moves, you begin to think of things like the weight limit on elevators, truck lift-gates, ramps leading to a raised-floor facility, etc.

Re:But the cost? (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328955)

There's weight... and space and SATA connectors and power connectors, I always prefer my storage more compact. A 128GB SSD is fine but I'd gladly take a few 5TB HDDs to go with it.

Re:But the cost? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328969)

Is this going to be cheaper than SSD? The price point for solid state finally reached where platter drives were about ten years ago (a dollar or less a gig) and I installed one on my system just last week as my OS drive. Also, are these going to be significantly faster than the standard five platter density drives? Frankly, weight only matters in tablets, phones, and laptops. I'm not aware of any crushing weight problems in the steel server racks...

I think the idea is that they're going to be making 4-5TB drives with it, and those aren't as cheap as run of the mill 1-3TB HDDs that we're used to.

I'm guessing that they'll be selling to a crowd that values maximum storage size over price/GB.

Re:But the cost? (1)

BenJeremy (181303) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329099)

Is this going to be cheaper than SSD? The price point for solid state finally reached where platter drives were about ten years ago (a dollar or less a gig) and I installed one on my system just last week as my OS drive. Also, are these going to be significantly faster than the standard five platter density drives? Frankly, weight only matters in tablets, phones, and laptops. I'm not aware of any crushing weight problems in the steel server racks...

I think the idea is that they're going to be making 4-5TB drives with it, and those aren't as cheap as run of the mill 1-3TB HDDs that we're used to.

I'm guessing that they'll be selling to a crowd that values maximum storage size over price/GB.

Actually, it sounds like 6TB drives. initially, these will be enterprise drives, but I'm sure there will be consumer drives avialable. Platter drives still compete with SSDs in the consumer marketplace, and they do this for volume (which reduces costs). The only problem is that as SSD capacities rise (even if the $/GB is still much higher than platter drives) within the usual consumer "Benchmark" pricing (i.e. $200 or less), platter drives HAVE to increase capacity and maintain sub-$200 pricing.

The whole Thailand flood thing allowed platter drive vendors to breathe a bit after spending so much time at the low margin end fo the business, but it's gone on WAY TOO LONG. Now SSDs have started mainstreaming as boot drives on desktops and laptops. Platter drives are quickly being relegated to secondary storage status as slower data drives for consumers... Outside of enthusiasts, who needs much more than 500GB on a desktop or laptop? In another year, 500GB SSDs will be available for under $200 (that magic consumer price point), and only enthusiasts will be looking for bigger secondary drives to hold their games, music, movies and porn - and where will that leave platter vendors?

Re:But the cost? (1)

Rockoon (1252108) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329131)

Is this going to be cheaper than SSD? The price point for solid state finally reached where platter drives were about ten years ago

If you compare consumer SSD's to enterprise 15000 RPM HDD's then they are already at price parity, and by the middle of next year the enterprise SSD's will be at or better than parity with any 15000 RPM's.

Re:But the cost? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41329151)

The linked story claims a 50% lower price per GiB than traditional platter disks. So it will be far cheaper than SSD.

While certainly nice that factor isn't terribly important to many enterprise customers. What is important is storage density; how many TiBs can we cram into a rack. These devices can expand storage without expanding rack space, cooling capacity or power consumption — the really costly parts of data centers.

Frankly the SSD angle doesn't make sense. Anyone interested in these devices is looking for density (think streaming content delivery platforms like Netflix with stupid huge storage requirements.) SSD isn't used as primary storage for those systems.

They will not be lighter (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328497)

I'm calling BS on such a small amount of lifting gas reducing the drive's weight by 29%. They should fire the person who came up with that one.

Re:They will not be lighter (2)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328553)

The lighter weight is due to using thinner platters not the helium.

Re:They will not be lighter (1)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328583)

I don't think the article nor the summary states it's due to the gas.

Only one problem (5, Funny)

wcrowe (94389) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328523)

These disks are great except when you replay audio files the vocalists sound like munchkins.

Hey! (1)

FFOMelchior (979131) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328793)

Maybe some of us already like prog.

Re:Only one problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41329073)

That was damn funny.

Scarce(r) resource (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328529)

What about the impending Helium shortage?

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/med-tech/why-is-there-a-helium-shortage-10031229

Re:Scarce(r) resource (1)

XiaoMing (1574363) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328749)

What about the impending Helium shortage?

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/med-tech/why-is-there-a-helium-shortage-10031229

This is a much bigger issue/concern for MRIs that are cooled by liquid helium (remember, liquid takes up 1000x LESS space than gas, think of how much helium is needed to fill one of those).

The tiny amount of gaseous helium needed to create one of these hard-drives will probably cost much less than the amount of material saved (7-platter drive costing 50% less than a 4-platter one according to TFA).

Re:Scarce(r) resource (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328889)

Just do what the germans did, replace it with liquid hydrogen, and make sure you have enough no smoking signs around :)

Re:Scarce(r) resource (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328797)

if the US wasn't haemorrhaging helium for not good reason, it'd be a lot better.

Re:Scarce(r) resource (1)

angelbar (1823238) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329061)

You got the last apple of earth on your hand with no means to cultivate... What you do?

Re:Scarce(r) resource (5, Insightful)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329127)

You got the last apple of earth on your hand with no means to cultivate... What you do?

Reformat it and install Debian.

Done 40 years ago (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328533)

Helium was used as a lubricant in fixed head disk drives in the late 60's.
They had to keep a tank of it attached since it is very difficult to keep it from leaking out.
How, exactly, are they going to keep the Helium from leaking out?

Re:Done 40 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328605)

better airtight technology.

Re:Done 40 years ago (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328607)

By sealing them. Did you think they wouldn't think of that?

Re:Done 40 years ago (4, Insightful)

xlsior (524145) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328717)

Except that helium molecules are so small, they slowly leak out of pretty much any 'sealed' container?

Re:Done 40 years ago (4, Funny)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328819)

Perhaps they sealed the drives with more helium.

Re:Done 40 years ago (1)

baka_toroi (1194359) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328903)

Heliumception?

Re:Done 40 years ago (1)

angelbar (1823238) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329075)

People... need to borrow karma for this guy, please.

Re:Done 40 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41329031)

You're thinking of hydrogen

Re:Done 40 years ago (2)

AwesomeMcgee (2437070) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328673)

Fear: a terror level warning of paisley is on the side of each one permanently ensuring the helium will never risk leaving.

Re:Done 40 years ago (3, Informative)

wierd_w (1375923) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328735)

Good question. Helium atoms are so small that they can escape through tiny cracks between metal grain boundries in metals. Normal air does not. The only thing I can think is that they used some kind of penetrating sealant.

Re:Done 40 years ago (3, Insightful)

marcansoft (727665) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328873)

What would replace the helium atoms? If the case is rigid, and the pressure inside is equal to atmospheric pressure, and air can't diffuse back in since O2 and N2 molecules are larger, I expect that pressure alone will heep the helium from leaking significantly.

Re:Done 40 years ago (1)

FishTankX (1539069) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328799)

My best guess is that they'll have a low pressure sensor and a refill valve. A good seal should be good for several years, and topping back up on helium should be pretty trivial.

Helium is cheap. Atleast, in the quantities that would be used in hard disks. If each drive leaks a cubic inch per year, and you have 50,000 drives, you're probably looking at a 4000-6000$ recharge cost per year, just for the raw gas. Small price to pay for increased capacity and decreased volume per unit of capacity per disk.

Re:Done 40 years ago (3, Insightful)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329101)

Small price to pay for increased capacity and decreased volume per unit of capacity per disk.

Until it is all gone, or $10k for a recharge instead of $1.

There is a world wide helium shortage and a bunch of morons administrating the reserves. Average person just does not know, and why would they? We have been wasting it in balloons for most people's lives.

Barring a massive increase in technology, it is a completely nonrenewable resource. Unless you look at it in geological time frames, and even then, the planet only has so much.

By the time I retire MRI machines might cost several more times to operate just because of the helium costs alone....

Re:Done 40 years ago (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328869)

How, exactly, are they going to keep the Helium from leaking out?

Well, there was the whole thing about it being hermetically sealed...

My guess is that they have this figured out.

Re:Done 40 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41329093)

To leak out, wouldn't the Helium have to be replaced by something else leaking in? I can see Helium being a problem with an inflatable flexible bag sort of container which will of course shrink as the Helium escapes. For a rigid container though such as a hard drive, shouldn't this not be as much a concern? I suspect it's impossible for the Helium to escape leaving nothing but vacuum.

You'll know when they break too! (1)

ArcadeNut (85398) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328555)

You'll sound like Alvin and the Chipmunks!

Caviar "Light" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328565)

Change the pitch of the "click-of-death" so high it disappears ! Brilliant !

Helium shortage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328639)

Wasn't it pretty recently that a helium shortage was announced, and that world-wide helium amounts were going to start crashing? Why build a fancy, fancy, fancy new technology that relies on a gas that's supposed to go away relatively soon?

Re:Helium shortage (1)

Revotron (1115029) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328679)

Well, they can't ride the price-surge wave of the Thailand floods anymore, so they have to keep those prices up somehow.

Re:Helium shortage (1)

Richy_T (111409) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328949)

It's one of the most plentiful elements in the universe. If there is a market for it, it will be obtained somehow. The threatened shortage is what happens when government gets involved with things.

Re:Helium shortage (3, Insightful)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329023)

There shouldn't be. Its a by-product of natural gas production. And what with the way that is growing, the supply coming out of the ground should be increasing as well.

If there is a shortage, the price should go up. And the gas producers will happily invest in the recovery equipment needed.

Great! (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328663)

Yet another way to use up a nonrenewable resource [dailymail.co.uk] .

Not the first (5, Informative)

dsgrntlxmply (610492) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328705)

These drives are not the first. Circa 1969, Digital Development Corporation of San Diego sold a line of head-per-track disks that used a helium atmosphere. A typical unit took around 24 inches vertical height in a 19-inch rack. Given the difficulties of sealing anything against helium leakage, these drives required a small helium cylinder and pressure regulator to maintain a small positive pressure within the enclosure, and had a pop-off valve to vent excess pressure. The electronics consisted of about a dozen circuit cards built with discrete transistors. The capacities of these units were amusingly small by modern standards: the first one that I had direct experience with, held something like 128K bytes.

Yeah but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328711)

Can they make a drive that does not fail under moderate use in a year?

I'm so fucking tired of replacing WD drives. Such garbage.

So When The Helium Leaks Out, Drive Dies? (2)

Ron Bennett (14590) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328765)

Sure helium could improve performance and be beneficial for some uses, but anyone buying these need to ask what happens when the helium inevitably leaks out...

To me it looks another example of planned obsolescence at work. Though, perhaps, WD will take the razor blade approach and sell helium refill kits.

Not to worry, monitor indicator. (4, Insightful)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328853)

anyone buying these need to ask what happens when the helium inevitably leaks out...

No worries; when the balloon attached to the side is half-full you know it's time to replace the drive and then find a child to give the balloon to.

Or if you are not in a hurry take the drive in to any Party Center USA store for a free refill.

MP3s Sound Like the Chipmunks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328781)

My MP3s will sound like The Chipmunks and God knows what my porn will look like!

Do not want.

More platters = More problems (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328817)

More possible failure points.

Re:More platters = More problems (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328963)

15 platters on conventional disks = 3 motors, 3 actuators, 3 electronic boards, and 3 power supplies to fail.

14 platters on two He disks = 33% fewer of these, with more storage.

Grams are not a unit of weight (1)

coldsalmon (946941) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328919)

This drive's weight and its mass will be different due to the buoyancy of the helium in a sealed container. I wonder if the drives contain 690 grams of mass, or if their weight is the same as a non-buoyant 690-gram object (i.e. 6.77 newtons at sea level on Earth). The implication seems to be that the helium-filled drives contain more than 690 grams of mass, but weigh the same as a 690-gram object.

New Meaning (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328937)

Brings about a whole new meaning to keeping your data "in the cloud," doesn't it?


OK, so that didn't sound as funny as I thought it would...there's a joke in there somewhere, dammit.

zepplin drives? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#41328965)

oh, the humanity ...

Why not ... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#41328967)

.... hydrogen?

Cue the Hindenberg jokes(Oh teh humaniteez!). But then consider that hydrogen is used to cool large generators [wikipedia.org] . And you don't see these exploding randomly.

Re:Why not ... (0)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#41329085)

Pop Quiz Hot Shot... What Are You Gonna Do?

There is a virus in your data center that will set off the hydrogen filled HDD's if you don't pay me 3.7 Million dollars!

If you try to shut down the systems it will go off, if you try to start as mass backup it will go off it you run out of time it will go off.

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