Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

What Windows Phone 8 Needs To Do To Succeed

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the run-on-an-iphone dept.

Windows 246

As Microsoft prepares for the launch of Windows Phone 8 devices, its most important push into the smartphone industry to date, speculation is rampant about whether or not consumers will continue to ignore Windows-based phones. There are many obvious ways Microsoft could misstep and lose its chance to participate in another generation of phones, but what would it take for Windows Phone 8 to succeed? To start, they can take advantage of manufacturers who are worried about being pursued over patent claims. They could also work to establish the permanence of Windows Phone 8, after the upgrade inflexibility involved with Windows Phone 7 and Windows Mobile 6.5. Finally, they could take a page out of Amazon's book and make WP8 devices more about services.

cancel ×

246 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Windows Phone 8 (-1, Troll)

DevAX (2730431) | about 2 years ago | (#41337465)

I think Microsoft mostly needs two things for Windows Phone 8 to succeed.

1.) Great hardware partner. Nokia here, along with HTC and other little players.
2.) Great developer tools. We got Visual Studio covered here, along with things like Microsoft's XNA for games and easy, yet powerful languages like C#.

The idea here is that Microsoft really has all it covered. Nokia has a very stable history of making good phones. Their hardware really is rock solid. Nokia is the perfect partner Microsoft needs, and they have them. Motorola Mobility for Google doesn't even come close to what Microsoft-Nokia partnership is. I seriously think that Google tried to get Nokia on-board but they had already decided on Microsoft.

What comes to development tools.. well, you can't really go wrong with Visual Studio. It's an industry standard, really widely used IDE. Pretty much everyone agrees that it's rock solid product from Microsoft. Even if you hate Microsoft, you can but agree on this one. And the availability of things like XNA, C#, great documentation and the fact that Visual Studio Express is free really helps. Microsoft really is the developer friendly company. Much more so than Google or Apple.

I'd say these two things are well covered.

Then there's the matter of UI. Again, Microsoft has done remarkable job with the design. While I agree that Metro UI doesn't work too well on computers, it really is great on mobile phones and tablets. Everyone who has tested one of the Microsoft Windows Phone 7 phones can agree. The UI and system are good.

The last part Microsoft has in front of it really comes down to marketing. Nokia never really was that well known company in North America and that's why other companies like Apple and HTC have gained a following there. Nokia largely ignored NA market while they concentrated on Europe and Asia. Let's not forget that Nokia is still the worlds biggest phone manufacturer and controls almost half of the markets when dumb phones are included. Even without, Nokia has a much better base in Europe.

What Microsoft and Nokia need are phone companies that will push the products to consumers. That's all there is to it. They have a wonderful product in their hands but are missing the marketing required for it. I think it mostly comes down to so much different market than what it is in Asia or Europe. They just lack the experience.

Microsoft, or Nokia for that matter, could introduce one leading phone. The "one" phone that everyone would choose. But I think it's much better when Nokia produces many different phones and everyone can choose the one they like the best. Let's not forget that Microsoft does have hardware requirements so there is no problem with fragmentation like Android has. Apple, of course, has little next to none fragmentation problems, even with the different resolutions. Nokia and Microsoft are almost at the same boat.

All in all, both Microsoft and Nokia have wonderful product. They just need to market it to people.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337539)

They had Nokia and Visual Studio last year. Here we are in 2012 and it hasn't been enough.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (0, Flamebait)

recoiledsnake (879048) | about 2 years ago | (#41338379)

Surely it's no Apple or Samsung, 7 million phones in two quarters isn't great but nothing too shabby.

http://www.engadget.com/2012/09/05/nokia-7-million-lumias-sold-to-date-in-54-countries/ [engadget.com]

They were held back by the hardware, single cores and display resolution earlier with the WP7 phones, now the hardware is much more competitive, the camera tech is like no other around, and they're pretty much at or near the top in the specs war.

http://www.wpcentral.com/sites/wpcentral.com/files/postimages/4213/iPhone%20versus%20MONA4.png [wpcentral.com]

Not to mention things like working with gloves on, which no capacitative touch screen around seems to be able to do.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=0lAi1fVfXl8#t=227s [youtube.com]

PS: I have nothing to do with first post troll/shill or whatever that is on Slashdot. I have been reading Slashdot since 10 years and posting since atleast 5. In many stories, it appears to be a troll and not shill making the comments(with nicknames like Waggenered Strom and Auntie Wag/Uncle Wag ) for they know 20 comments will follow discussing the troll itself.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (5, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 2 years ago | (#41337547)

It's a bit player in a competitive market. Microsoft has not leveraged Windows Phone 8 to better integrate with Windows business technologies (I'm talking Active Directory and Group Policies), and since both iOS and Android support ActiveSync for Exchange connectivity, it's not as if Microsoft is going to improve on that.

So I'd say the odds are stacked against Microsoft. It's about three years too late to the party, and not leveraging its phone OS with other Microsoft products means there is absolutely no reason for a business customer like myself to give a damn about it.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

mlts (1038732) | about 2 years ago | (#41338035)

MS has one advantage they can use with this device, and that is that they control both the horizontal and the vertical in the enterprise. In typical /. form:

1: Create an ActiveSync successor protocol. One that is heavily patented, perhaps undocumented.
2: Sell the AS successor as a lot more secure than just TLS/SSL to get it firmly rooted in the enterprise. Show how it is more secure than BIS/BES as well.
3: Leverage the new AS successor in next revs of the OS making AS depreciated, or even yank it out together such as what was done with hierarchial storage management or IEE1394 networking.
4: Allow either only themselves, or them and Apple access to the protocol.
5: ?????
6: Profit. Nobody else would be able to use that protocol by law, so only devices either running a MS operating system, or devices authorized to use that protocol would be allowed to run.

The result of this is the ability to completely lock competition out of the enterprise. In the past, it might be considered monopolistic practices, but these are different times, and a serious case would never happen. The end result likely would be MS and Apple being the only players in the enterprise if this is done.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 2 years ago | (#41338223)

Then everyone would just figure out how to grab the data off the OMA/OWA site like guys figured out to do for Yahoo and Hotmail back in the day. ActiveSync makes things easier, but it isn't the only way to grab data. Besides, I'm sure if it came to that, someone would just build a middleware solution. The day when Microsoft could use its market dominance to bully everyone else is done.

And besides, you can't patent protocols or APIs, so I'm reasonably certain that trying to leverage Exchange in that way would certainly bring Microsoft back in the cross hairs of European regulators, and by the time the war was done, Redmond would be forced to open it all up anyways, and suffer substantial fines in the process.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338325)

While a plan that I'm sure would work, there is one hitch. EU would start bringing on the antitrust lawsuits. What you describe is even more locked down and bullish than bundling IE with Windows.

That may not stop MS from trying it since they'll probably have it on the market for a few month to a year before legal measures start falling on their profit margins.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337633)

Hey everyone, a Microsoft/Nokia marketing department employee! :D

Come on, you need to understand your audience before advertising. Nobody will take this seriously. Whoever paid for you to write this *absolutely* wasted their money, because it'll be buried by others who see right through it.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (5, Insightful)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | about 2 years ago | (#41337711)

No you're missing the point. It's a long writeup ostensibly about how MS is positioned for success - but if you read a little closer, it's actually pitching Visual Studio to the slashdot crowd (like so many similar posts have in recent months). By presenting commentary related to VS as fact in the context of opinion related to the phone product, they're trying to send a subtle message that it's already proven beyond question that VS is a good product. By focusing on the debate around the phone - evidenced by your inclusion of "Nokia" in the list of culprits - you let that slip right by ;)

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 2 years ago | (#41337769)

Can I write Android and iOS apps in VS?

Re:Windows Phone 8 (-1, Troll)

DevAX (2730431) | about 2 years ago | (#41337807)

Can I write Android and iOS apps in VS?

Yes, yes you can. You can also write PHP, Python and wide array of other languages. VS is really powerful IDE.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1, Insightful)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 2 years ago | (#41338017)

You can also write PHP, Python and wide array of other languages. VS is really powerful IDE.

That's sort of weird how your first long post is basically error-free in terms of grammar, but now you're dropping your articles. That would be *a* wide array, and *a* "really powerful IDE". It's almost like the first post was written by one or more native English speakers, but now in a short comment your English isn't so good.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338425)

Visual Studio has an Objective C compiler, a C and C++ compiler that supports the clang Blocks extension, and a darwin compatible linker?

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338405)

You can if you pay Novell and use mono. (i.e write your apps in C#)

There might be a way using Intel's stuff as well. (For Android at least anyway).
Probably have to deal with the arm builds with ant though.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (0)

tooyoung (853621) | about 2 years ago | (#41337917)

I love how they included the comment about Metro not being a great UI for a desktop. Well designed for winning over the slashdot crowd. Remember, you won't look like a shill if you insert a few harmless disparaging remarks about the company you are representing.

I also love the fragmentation comment which is obviously pandering to the Apple crowd in an attempt for some up mods.

While this comment is lowly moderated now, those of you who came to this story early will have noticed that it started with a very high score.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (5, Insightful)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | about 2 years ago | (#41337637)

Hello copy-paste shill and welcome! I happened to observe that you posted at the instant the story went live, and had nothing but good things to say about MS. You also called out in particular MS's awesome Visual Studio product - a common thread among these kinds of posts over the last few months. Perhaps not coincidentally, Slashdot is a site that's seen as catering to developer types.

On other sites, I assume you have a similarly tailored copy-paste message ready to go.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about 2 years ago | (#41337691)

If it is "copy-paste", I haven't found the original source. You are right that it is too well written to have been done so quickly, but I'm not sure how the trick is being done.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (5, Interesting)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | about 2 years ago | (#41337737)

I'm assuming he's got a library of such commentary pre-written and ready to go, possibly provided by his employers. Most likely a subscription account as well (but posting with indicator turned off), so that he can get FP on these types of stories.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about 2 years ago | (#41337765)

It is a lot of work using a different account each time. Not unbelievable, but certainly not easy.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338025)

(but posting with indicator turned off\

What does "indicator turned off" mean?

Re:Windows Phone 8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338571)

If you are involved in the original submission, you could set up a script that would constantly check the front page until it posted something similar -- maybe a key phrase with a couple confirming keywords -- and then automatically post as soon as that story became available.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (5, Interesting)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about 2 years ago | (#41337643)

First post to this story. First post ever for this account.

Quite amazing if you ask me...

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

nomel (244635) | about 2 years ago | (#41337753)

Here here good Sir! You're not suggesting that he had some sort of privileged access to the thread before anyone else!? That would require an inside man, and we all know that the Slashdot editing staff would never allow such a thing! Surely you jest!

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

MyLongNickName (822545) | about 2 years ago | (#41337847)

Your theory has crossed my mind as well. Even a subscription account would requre a lot to pull this off as well as he/she/it has.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337689)

Get SAMSUNG in there to develop some Class-A hardware...

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1, Insightful)

X.25 (255792) | about 2 years ago | (#41337713)

I think Microsoft mostly needs two things for Windows Phone 8 to succeed.

1.) Great hardware partner. Nokia here, along with HTC and other little players.
2.) Great developer tools. We got Visual Studio covered here, along with things like Microsoft's XNA for games and easy, yet powerful languages like C#.

The idea here is that Microsoft really has all it covered. Nokia has a very stable history of making good phones. Their hardware really is rock solid. Nokia is the perfect partner Microsoft needs, and they have them. Motorola Mobility for Google doesn't even come close to what Microsoft-Nokia partnership is. I seriously think that Google tried to get Nokia on-board but they had already decided on Microsoft.

What comes to development tools.. well, you can't really go wrong with Visual Studio. It's an industry standard, really widely used IDE. Pretty much everyone agrees that it's rock solid product from Microsoft. Even if you hate Microsoft, you can but agree on this one. And the availability of things like XNA, C#, great documentation and the fact that Visual Studio Express is free really helps. Microsoft really is the developer friendly company. Much more so than Google or Apple.

I'd say these two things are well covered.

Then there's the matter of UI. Again, Microsoft has done remarkable job with the design. While I agree that Metro UI doesn't work too well on computers, it really is great on mobile phones and tablets. Everyone who has tested one of the Microsoft Windows Phone 7 phones can agree. The UI and system are good.

The last part Microsoft has in front of it really comes down to marketing. Nokia never really was that well known company in North America and that's why other companies like Apple and HTC have gained a following there. Nokia largely ignored NA market while they concentrated on Europe and Asia. Let's not forget that Nokia is still the worlds biggest phone manufacturer and controls almost half of the markets when dumb phones are included. Even without, Nokia has a much better base in Europe.

What Microsoft and Nokia need are phone companies that will push the products to consumers. That's all there is to it. They have a wonderful product in their hands but are missing the marketing required for it. I think it mostly comes down to so much different market than what it is in Asia or Europe. They just lack the experience.

Microsoft, or Nokia for that matter, could introduce one leading phone. The "one" phone that everyone would choose. But I think it's much better when Nokia produces many different phones and everyone can choose the one they like the best. Let's not forget that Microsoft does have hardware requirements so there is no problem with fragmentation like Android has. Apple, of course, has little next to none fragmentation problems, even with the different resolutions. Nokia and Microsoft are almost at the same boat.

All in all, both Microsoft and Nokia have wonderful product. They just need to market it to people.

Hahaha.

You didn't have this speech prepared by any chance, eh?

Pathetic. Both the 'news' and the first 'commercial'.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

Mike Buddha (10734) | about 2 years ago | (#41337979)

If he worked for MS, he'd have realized that XNA is in the process of being deprecated.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337771)

Nice try, Microsoft Marketing Department.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338335)

Microsoft-Nokia must be quite, quite desperate to pitch Windows 8 phones on Slashdot.

Ironically, I may purchase the Lumia 920. Not because I care much for the 'turd ecosystem' or am impressed by the hardware specs, but rather, I am confident that it will go into the bargain bin soon and I don't mind getting a cheap smartphone. I don't care for apps. Really, I don't. I can get by with zero apps downloaded from the app store. Microsoft/developers will be very sad if all smartphone users are like me.

I'm like the guy who doesn't spend much (if at all) on his credit card and pays his credit card bills on time, much to the bank's chagrin.

Also, the Lumia 920 may be the last Windows flagship phone from Nokia. Once Nokia's share price dips below a certain threshold, Stephen Elop will be fired and Nokia will proceed with 'Plan B' (possibly Android). It'll be great to own a relic of tech history.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337787)

Developers are irrelevant, consumer perception is everything. And people hate windows on computers, windows has viruses, windows crashes every now and then etc...
So why in god's name would they want windows on their phone ? They'll go either iphone (it just works), or android.

I think it's too late for Nokia to make this work (4, Insightful)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | about 2 years ago | (#41337797)

In my opinion Nokia was the perfect partner for this but they no longer are the perfect partner. Nokia got burned badly by the Win 7 phones and they bet the company on this partnership. I am afraid that in the first world too many people will view the Win 8 phone as another potential compatibility nightmare (for those that know about the previous Nokia Win 7 phones) or they'll see them as "not an iPhone or an Android and therefore a loser platform that won't survive". Nokia just reminds me of too many IT companies that can't admit that the market changed and they weren't prepared and can't play catchup any more. They've got the garbage section of the mobile phone industry covered. If you want low featured "I just want a phone that's a phone" type devices, then they are your company, especially if you live in a less developed country where you either can't afford or can't get an Android or iPhone. But I think that it's too late for them to get taken seriously in developed parts of AustralAsia, Europe and North America that basically want tiny computers that masquerade as phones.

Re:I think it's too late for Nokia to make this wo (1, Informative)

marcosdumay (620877) | about 2 years ago | (#41338559)

Soon enough all of the people in those less developped parts of the wrold will be using smartphones too. And everything indicates they'll be running Android.

Nokia is done.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337853)

I think Microsoft mostly needs two things for Windows Phone 8 to succeed.

1.) Great hardware partner. Nokia here, along with HTC and other little players.

2.) Great developer tools. We got Visual Studio covered here, along with things like Microsoft's XNA for games and easy, yet powerful languages like C#.

Funny I thought the real requirement was:

3.) Users who buy things

Without #3, all great dev tools do is make the experience of wasting money developing something nobody will buy more enjoyable.

Given that they've ALREADY messed up #3 by poking all the Nokia 800/900 early-adopters in the eye with a non-compatible major release SIX MONTHS into a likely two-year contract, I'd say they're pretty boned...

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337877)

Nokia has a very stable history of making good phones. Their hardware really is rock solid.

Nokia just closed the factory in Salo which was the base of their entire quality. Nokia is now another Foxcon OEM just like Apple but without the buying power.

Microsoft really is the developer friendly company. Much more so than Google or Apple.

The Microsoft which just more or less invalidated the work done on putting out WP7 apps? The Microsoft which is slowly depreciating C# which was previously their main devlopment language? The Microsoft which has a shared source license which basically means "what's mine is mine and what's yours is mine". This Microsoft?

Development is a bit of a lottery in many cases. Most products begin and fail; some products make a little; a few products become the next Google or Oracle. This means that the maximum upside is huge. This is an important part of the reward in IT. Look at partners that have gone with a Microsoft: Netscape; Borland; Sendo. People who could have made it really huge but, because they based their success on Windows ended up with nothing.

Microsoft loves developers in the same way that eagles love mice. Of course they want them to breed. If they didn't what would the chicks eat?

Then there's the Windows UI. It's very interesting that you say:

Everyone who has tested one of the Microsoft Windows Phone 7 phones

And certainly don't say "owned" or even "used". We know that WP has been a design disaster. Where all the competent companies used grid arrangements allowing multiple apps per screen line, Windows came up with the "original" idea of having everything in a long list meaning that the app you want is always half an hour's scrolling away. Imagine the idea that all your social networks are integrated into one hub with little control making it almost impossible to partition data safely between them. Think about a system where a third of the bottom of the screen is dedicated to Bing with no possible user control to change it.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

erp_consultant (2614861) | about 2 years ago | (#41337891)

I agree with much of what you say but we have seen technically superior products fail in the marketplace before (ex. Beta vs. VHS). What MS really needs to do, in my view, is find a way to woo developers to the platform. Just having great tools like VS is not going to do it. They're going to have to convince developers that it's a viable platform that they can make money on. Otherwise, why bother? Without Apps the phone is worthless no matter how good the hardware.

From the consumer side, MS has to convince iPhone and Android users that WP8 has something that the others don't. That's going to be tough. I think they only way they can do it is on price. Price the phones and the apps less than the other guys. MS will take a loss in the short term but might be able to make it up on the back end. They'll have to pull a page from their XBox playbook.

I guess the real question is...is there room for a 3th major player in the mobile OS space? Ok, 4th if you include RIM. Personally I think no. WP8 has a lot of promise and it's probably going to be really good but did MS wait too long?

You are wrong. (1)

goruka (1721094) | about 2 years ago | (#41337913)

1.) Great hardware partner. Nokia here, along with HTC and other little players.

Nokia is selling its assets and would have been long gone if not for the MS Cash infusion. It's more like a zombie partner at this point.

2.) Great developer tools. We got Visual Studio covered here, along with things like Microsoft's XNA for games and easy, yet powerful languages like C#.

Everybody is making games and apps for mobile (iOS and Android) using Java/ObjC/C++. None of such are what you mention and OpenGL isn't available either. So why would developers making apps for more profitable platforms rewrite their entire codebases for an irrelevant player? They are waaay too late to the game impose developers their own languages, APIs and tools.

Re:You are wrong. (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 2 years ago | (#41338519)

the ms cash infusion isn't that big of a deal really. they still have lots of assets.

HOWEVER.. the ms outhousing of os development provided them with a public friendly excuse to get rid of their huge, vast developer army - which was too big for their own good and which was really the problem in the first place.

now, what windows phone 8 needs? well, for starters, it would be nice to have the fucking SDK out. it's late, very late.

of course it would be nice if any of the new phones could match nokias symbian flagship 808 in utlity(stuff like fm transmitters, filesystem access, real multitasking combined with good battery life..).

what they need for mobile game ports is opengl though. to get gta etc... and a believable promise that windows phone 9 doesn't fuck up compatibility.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1, Informative)

hobarrera (2008506) | about 2 years ago | (#41337921)

The developer tools cost a fortune (MS windows + MS visual studio), certainly more than what I make in a few weeks. Meanwhile, most of the other mobile OS's dev tools cost $0. Except iOS, of course.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338523)

The iOS dev tools are free.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (1)

Mike Buddha (10734) | about 2 years ago | (#41337957)

XNA is dead in the water. Microsoft has said as much. For gaming support on WIndows 8/WIndows Phone 8, you're stuck with C++/Direct3D. :(

Re:Windows Phone 8 (2)

DannyO152 (544940) | about 2 years ago | (#41338009)

That's all nice, but VS and Nokia were joined a year ago and Lumia/WP7 did not set the US on fire. So let's think about this. I figure it's sales channel/carrier issues which are resolvable through one of the two taking up the spending a few notches. Unfortunately, Nokia can't afford a low margin top-end smartphone and they already have it priced under competitors' offerings. (800/900. As we know, the pricing on the 820/920 is not announced.) How much of its licensing revenue does Microsoft want to spend per phone? Both Nokia and Microsoft are doing this to grow profits and there's the dilemma. Share has to get huge fast in order to provide the volume they seek. But the more share they buy, the more volume they require in order to move the needle.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (4, Insightful)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about 2 years ago | (#41338143)

No. You're FUCKED without compatibility.

You want a walled garden? That's iOS and Apple. They win. Look what MS did to Apple in the 90s. That's who and where you are now, bottom bunk in a Turkish prison.

You want the ability to do anything you want? That's Android. I can transfer any of the files I... rented... to my HTC, watch em when I want, listen to the music I like, and it works with any computer on the planet as long as it's got either a USB port or Bluetooth. Would a Windows 7/8 phone be able to sync with my dad's four-year-old phone and drag off the photos? No. I can link my freakin' WATCH to my Android.

MS wants a proprietary system, specialized software, and total lockdown. I can't transfer files via Bluetooth, or USB, or anything else. Just your software, your walls, your garden. Sure, it's pretty, but I can throw that skin onto my Android.

I've used VS before. Nothing like being unable to run a program you've written because it's unsigned. True, I could be admin all the time but you never can be on a phone, since they're usually feature-locked by the Telco.

What's the advantage to getting a Windows phone?

There isn't one.

Re:Windows Phone 8 (0)

ultrasawblade (2105922) | about 2 years ago | (#41338585)

I think Microsoft mostly needs two things for Windows Phone 8 to succeed.

1.) Get rid of the Microsoft brand on phones
  2.) Do things Apple doesn't do

The idea here is that Microsoft really has all it copied. Nokia had a very stable history of making good phones. Their feature phones really were rock solid. Nokia is the perfect partner Microsoft bought, and they have them by the balls. Motorola Mobility for Google doesn't even come close to what Microsoft-Nokia partnership is (failure bailing out failure). I seriously think that Elop tried to get Google on-board but they had already decided on Microsoft.

What comes to development tools.. well, you can't really go wrong with Visual Studio. It's an industry standard, really widely used IDE mostly used to develop cheap Visual Basic apps. Pretty much everyone agrees that VB6 was a rock solid product from Microsoft. Even if you hate Microsoft, you can but agree on this one (until it messes up some .DLL's and applications start trying to start a non-existent debugger randomly). And the availability of things like XNA, C#, great documentation and the fact that Visual Studio Express is free really helps. Microsoft really is the monopoly friendly company. Much more so than companies not Google or Apple.

I'd say these two things are well covered.

Then there's the matter of UI. Again, Microsoft has done remarkable Microsoft Bob with the design. While I agree that Metro UI doesn't work too well on computers, it really is great on mobile phones and tablets. Everyone who has tested one of the Microsoft Windows Phone 7 phones can agree. They would only use this phone if it was given to them for free.

The last part Microsoft has in front of it really comes down to casing on a monoply. Nokia never was that well known company in North America until 2005 or so when it decided to ignore the US smartphone market and that's why other companies like Apple and HTC have gained a following there. Nokia largely ignored NA market while they concentrated on Europe and Asia which made sense because their wireless markets aren't crippled by the sorry as oligopoly that exists in America. Let's not forget that Nokia is still the worlds biggest phone manufacturer and controls almost half of the markets when dumb phones are included (and this is relevant because Windows Phone 8 will work on dumb phones). Even without, Nokia has a much better base in Europe.

What Microsoft and Nokia need are phone companies that will push the products to consumers because Microsoft can't operate any other way except for the OEM to be the last mile bitch for the customer. That's all there is to it. They have a wonderful copy of a product in their hands but are missing the marketing required for it. I think it mostly comes down to so much different market than what it is in Asia or Europe. They just lack the experience.

Microsoft, or Nokia for that matter, could introduce one leading phone. The "one" phone that everyone would choose. But I think it's much better when Nokia produces many different phones and everyone can choose the one they like the best. Because having 20 different phones that run the same OS and look and operate the same really makes sense for Microsoft. Let's not forget that Microsoft does have hardware requirements so there is no problem with fragmentation like Android has except when we decide to add a feature that requires new hardware to make that "one" phone. Apple, of course, has little next to none fragmentation problems, even with the different resolutions. Nokia and Microsoft are almost at the same boat because we paid for it.

All in all, both Microsoft and Nokia have wonderful product. We just need to force people to buy it.

Be Apple (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337491)

/thread

linux arm (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337529)

by replaceing win 8 to linux arm

Patent safety? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337559)

> To start, they can take advantage of manufacturers who are worried about being pursued over patent claims.

What!? How does Windows Phone 8 protect someone from a patent lawsuit? With patent trolls running around suing people for using hyperlinks, this is an absolutely ridiculous statement.

Re:Patent safety? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338069)

No, that part of it is a solid statement. Microsoft does indeed indemnify companies using their OS. Google does not. Of course, they aren't going indemnify you if you copy the industrial design (similar to the "rectangle with rounded corners" stuff). But they certainly do for the OS related things like how people have been suing over implementation of the rubber band box effect, the slide to unlock, the recognition and highlighting of phone numbers, etc. So this is not bunk. It is one of the few things in the first post that wasn't bunk.

Users (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337577)

Which it ain't gonna get unless the devices are far cheaper than gutter level Androids.

If Microsoft Windows Phone 8 is going to succeed (2, Insightful)

BuypolarBear (2713397) | about 2 years ago | (#41337579)

It's going to need to drop the Microsoft and Windows branding.

Re:If Microsoft Windows Phone 8 is going to succee (2)

InlawBiker (1124825) | about 2 years ago | (#41337663)

Yeah, look how well that worked for Zune. They tried this already, why throw good money after bad? The only useful consumer brand they own is X-Box, and nobody over 24 is going to carry an "X-Phone."

They need to integrate it with Exchange, AD and Communicator. Then it'll be a useful device for corporate customers. That's their only hope, no end-user consumer wants one no matter how nice they make them.

Re:If Microsoft Windows Phone 8 is going to succee (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 2 years ago | (#41337825)

The only reason X-Box is a "successful" consumer brand is because Microsoft has dumped billions into buying market position. Microsoft hasn't even made back its investment into the X-Box. But unless Microsoft and Nokia are basically willing to sell at a substantial loss for a considerable length of time, they are intruding into a market already crowded by iOS and Android devices.

WP8 is like Kia (1)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#41337591)

why buy Kia when toyota and honda already offer what you want. except to save a few dollars on some option.

same here. iOS and Android have sold a billion devices. why switch to a platform with such tiny market share? what will you gain for it. what does it do better that iOS and android don't do already?

Re:WP8 is like Kia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337863)

why buy Kia when toyota and honda already offer what you want. except to save a few dollars on some option.

Good point, it's not like the new Optimas are great cars, priced $3,000 below Honda and Toyota, just as reliable, and styled better... nope. No sir.

If you're going to make a car analogy, one that actually holds up to the argument you're trying to make...

Re:WP8 is like Kia (1, Flamebait)

alen (225700) | about 2 years ago | (#41337961)

try to factor in resale value

you have to pay money to get rid of a 4 year Kia while my CR-V will be worth enough to put down a big down payment on my next car

Personality cult. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337597)

One of two things is needed:

1) A product that is _significantly_ better than other products (which will not happen, as they pretty much all do the same thing)
2) Some culturally respected cool or godly figure to tell them to buy it. (which again, MS can't accomplish, because they're just not perceived as cool)

Why Should we discuss this for Free (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337603)

Any kind of suggestions here will only help MS for free.

Let's just hope that the dump Apple consumer mass keep ignoring MS forever.

They need to answer: Why? (5, Insightful)

Dinghy (2233934) | about 2 years ago | (#41337609)

The question is simple, why should I buy a Windows phone? What does it give me that I cannot get from Android or Apple? After all, if there is no big reason to choose Windows phone, then I would lean towards one with a broader base of apps. Once they're able to get a compelling mainstream reason why to move to Windows phone, they need to market it. Right now they think having a unified experience between desktop and phone is that killer feature. We'll see if they're right.

Re:They need to answer: Why? (1)

Tridus (79566) | about 2 years ago | (#41337989)

Wish I had mod points, because this is it exactly. It's been their problem right from the start.

These narratives exist for successful phones. I know why I bought an iPhone. I know why I almost bought an Android phone instead. I know why my dad bought a Blackberry.

I look at a Windows phone and just wonder "why would I want that?" Microsoft has never answered that question in a satisfactory way.

Re:They need to answer: Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338399)

Wireless charging! PureView camera! And those sexy 'used-to-be-called-Metro' tiles!

P.S: Android phones and iPhones are merely beta test phones, and they're all smoked by Windows phones.

Re:They need to answer: Why? (0)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about 2 years ago | (#41338501)

Because you like the design and layout of the OS. And it's not bad. Say what you will about Metro on Windows 8, Metro on Windows Phone 7 is pretty usable and really nifty. I can't get into it myself but I can see what's very good about it.

Re:They need to answer: Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338595)

Change? A couple years ago I had an iphone (the 3g). I grew to hate it (it grew slower and less usable with every IOS release). I despise Apple and will never buy any of their products (the iphone was a work phone and at the time it was a choice between an iphone or blackberry... I should have taken the blackberry).

For me personally, I am growing tired of Android. I now have a Galaxy S2 Skyrocket which is a really nice phone. My wife has the original Galaxy S phone (which is coming up on the end of it's contract). I have a couple of HP Touchpads (from the fire sale) running CM9.

  My Skyrocket is running ICS. I find the UI to be fairly cumbersome.... IMO, the phone app on Android really sucks. Since the ICS update, they seem to have screwed up the phone book app (or somehow made it more annoying to use). Also, I don't know why they did it this way, but when I tap a a contact from the phonebook, I expect it to start dialing.... not take me to a screen that has an option to start dialing. Long presses should give me other options like edit / SMS etc. The default action on tap should be to start dialing (or at least provide the option to specify the default action).

Windows phone 8 looks interesting. The concept of live tiles looks like it could actually be useful.

I don't use a ton of apps on my phone, so I don't care about app availability too much. If I can get Maps / Navigation, Netflix, Shazam, Amazon, Ebay and Uverse (for managing my DVR), I'd be happy.

Plus, as a developer, if the cross compilation / porting of apps across desktop, tablet and phone are simple / easy, that would make it really compelling.

Targeted EMP (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337617)

... that affects only iOS devices?

Copy and Paste (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337629)

Copy and Paste

WP8 stands a chance as Apple, Android dither (0)

another random user (2645241) | about 2 years ago | (#41337635)

There's an article on the reg which might be of some interest: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/09/14/windows8_phone_ecosystems_analysis/ [theregister.co.uk] (Comment subject taken from that article)

Re:WP8 stands a chance as Apple, Android dither (0)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 2 years ago | (#41337733)

What do you mean "dither"? Apple just released a new phone, there's some new Android device coming out with the same frequency as cows take a shit. Both the iOS and Android app markets are mature. What is Microsoft going to do to attract the developers? Why would any app developer take a chance on Microsoft, particularly considering how notorious Microsoft has historically been for smacking developers down just as they get used to a specific toolset.

If I were to start developing apps right now, at this very moment in time, WP8 would not even be on the radar. Why would I invest the time and money into a new and untested platform by a company who has screwed over developers before?

Microsoft came too late to the party. If it had wanted to be a meaningful player in the game, it should have put the effort in three or four years ago.

Re:WP8 stands a chance as Apple, Android dither (1)

another random user (2645241) | about 2 years ago | (#41337791)

What do you mean "dither"?

I don't mean anything by it, it's the title of the article I was referencing.

Re:WP8 stands a chance as Apple, Android dither (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337973)

For some reason this is getting modded as troll. How is simply pointing out an article that is on a different site that may have some relation to the topic in hand being a troll?

Microsoft will Force the consumers to use it (1)

na1led (1030470) | about 2 years ago | (#41337645)

If you think of all the businesses that use Microsoft on their desktop, and servers. They could easily force only Microsoft phones to sync with their products. Imagine Exchange only working with Windows Mobile 8, or file sharing with your desktop. Sure, you might try and get around it with other products, but Microsoft will make it difficult.

Re:Microsoft will Force the consumers to use it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337819)

Uh yeah, that would go over real well with world governments.

Re:Microsoft will Force the consumers to use it (1)

hobarrera (2008506) | about 2 years ago | (#41337965)

I'm not sure they're in a position to try this. No huge-corp would upgrade it's Exchange servers if it meant that they need to replace all their mobile hardware (BBs, iPhones, Androids), and plenty of other services that connect to Exchange.
The result would be:
1) Some sort of third-party middleware.
2) A different upgrade path that doens't include windows.

Re:Microsoft will Force the consumers to use it (1)

na1led (1030470) | about 2 years ago | (#41338427)

The whole upgrade to Windows/Mobile 8 and even Server 2012 is to force people to use the products to gain full integration. It may not happen this year, but it will creep up on us.

Re:Microsoft will Force the consumers to use it (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 2 years ago | (#41338051)

Yes, they could kill ActiveSync, but in the process not only would they deeply anger everybody from medium sized businesses to large corporations, and most likely they would land themselves back in Antitrust Hell.

In my case, pulling a stunt like that would mean I would just keep my current Exchange server going, even if its only purpose was to serve the Androids and iPhones feeding off of it. Exchange 201x won't support syncing with my iPhone or my business partner's Android, well then, just won't upgrade to Exchange 201x.

Re:Microsoft will Force the consumers to use it (3, Insightful)

na1led (1030470) | about 2 years ago | (#41338331)

It's already started with some apps, like OneNote for example, you need Mobile 7 to sync with Exchange. Microsoft may not ditch all access to Exchange on Android/Apple, but they could limit it. Trust me, Microsoft is in the business of monopolizing the industry, that's been their goal all along.

Closest "bird farm" to Redmond?? (1)

RobertLTux (260313) | about 2 years ago | (#41338217)

If they even breath trying to lockout Non-Win8 phones then they will find a herd of "Hogs" on their front lawn.

Don't forget that The Pentagon has lots and lots of nDroids , iThings and Crackberries devices running around.

Re:Closest "bird farm" to Redmond?? (1)

na1led (1030470) | about 2 years ago | (#41338367)

It will happen very subtle. Surely and eventually, they will force everyone to use their products.

free it.(GPL/Apache/other) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337653)

and offer it for free.

If that was all they could do, they'd be doomed (1)

marcosdumay (620877) | about 2 years ago | (#41337655)

Not a very imaginative article... But then, I wouldn't want to create great ideas for spreading MS's domination either. Really, if that was all MS could do, they'd be doomed from the beggining.

By the way, what "high-profile startups" means?

An oxymoron (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337667)

That's like asking what death must do to live.

Before any of that... (1)

bobmajdakjr (2484288) | about 2 years ago | (#41337669)

Before any of that they needed to have made it a real OS that real developers could really develop on without having to #ifdef hell an application. By this I mean, for example, C# .NET with WPF. I should be able to take my WPF application, change the drop down build target to Windows 8 Phone, and it should be done. That is how simple it should be. Look at iOS and Android... developing for those platforms is the biggest pain my life. Microsoft is in a not-so-unique position to actually do shit for real, for once. But, of course, won't.

Re:Before any of that... (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 2 years ago | (#41338155)

I don't know about you, but I don't develop for platforms that are the easiest to code for, I develop for platforms that have sufficient market share for me to have a reasonable chance of making back the money and resources I invested into writing a product. So even if WP8 is some sort of developer's heaven, what difference does that make? I'd sooner spend 20% more time developing for a platform I have a reasonable chance of making money on than 20% less on a platform with virtually no customers.

Re:Before any of that... (1)

na1led (1030470) | about 2 years ago | (#41338543)

But there is more opportunity to migrate existing apps on other platforms to WP8. The first developer to provide the only App, will be the one to reap the profits.

What would it take for Windows Phone 8 to succeed? (5, Funny)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about 2 years ago | (#41337687)

It would take someone dropping a nuke on Cupertino. Outside of that, I don't really see it happening.

Re:What would it take for Windows Phone 8 to succe (4, Funny)

DMiax (915735) | about 2 years ago | (#41338257)

And Mountain View. And Seoul. And Waterloo. And Tokyo. And Redmond, just to be sure. Then Windows Phone 8 can really fly.

Most important? (2)

tooyoung (853621) | about 2 years ago | (#41337693)

As Microsoft prepares for the launch of Windows Phone 8 devices, its most important push into the smartphone industry to date

How is this Microsoft's most important push into the smartphone industry to date? Why is this more important than Windows 7? Because it is happening now?

Who Cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337705)

Microsoft has never been an innovator, and they won't be able to innovate here. It's an irrelevant platform, and if Microsoft hadn't had a de facto monopoly on the desktop which finances WP, they would be long gone by now. Typically Microsoft, they want to bully desktop users into using the ridiculous Metro interface. That won't work... but of course they don't get it. Nokia has a few more quarters in them until they bleed to death, and then that will be yet another "partner" that Microsoft has led down the garden path, raped behind the shed and then buried in a shallow grave.

Re:Who Cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337931)

Something tells me it's been so long since you've even used Windows, you actually have no idea what you're talking about.

Replace our laptops (3, Interesting)

dubbayu_d_40 (622643) | about 2 years ago | (#41337721)

Simple dock for peripherals and the deal is done. They would trounce the market.

Re:Replace our laptops (1)

na1led (1030470) | about 2 years ago | (#41337843)

Cellphones with built in projectors. Project your screen and keyboard, no need for laptop.

Switch to iOS 6 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337751)

Duh.

Most important? (1)

leandrod (17766) | about 2 years ago | (#41337849)

its most important push into the smartphone

Why? All the others were equally touted, the difference being the situation was never as dire as it is now for MS WinCE.

Buck the trend, and stop trying to be Google/Apple (5, Insightful)

0xdeadbeef (28836) | about 2 years ago | (#41337873)

The marriage of operating system with services on the internet is stupid, stupid, fucking stupid.

Let apps be free. Let the apps implement that third party integration. Nobody fucking cares about Bing or Zune, stop trying to shove it down people's throats.

What they should be doing is emphasizing how little it actually matters what search engine you use, or how little matters if you post to Twitter versus Facebook, or how little it matters if apps come from iTunes or Google Play or the Zune store.

All that really matters is usability and security, and you can do that without crippling the devices and locking them down tighter than Steve Jobs' mummified sphincter.

The UI spectacular, and Visual Studio is far and away better than Eclipse and Xcode. So stop giving developers reasons to hate Microsoft and the apps will come, and then the people will come. Developers developers developers.

for starters, don't dump previous customers (4, Insightful)

swschrad (312009) | about 2 years ago | (#41337889)

I'm serious. every iteration of WinPhone has abandoned its users to no upward compatibility and no further support. If I had been silly or strung out enough to have bought a Win7 phone, I wouldn't have a WinProduct ever again.

not that I'm in the market, because they are a year late and a trillion dollars short in the market. the only industry reaction in anything close to real time to the iPhone was Google, and that's why those two lines have killed the rest of the business. you add up all the alternatives... WinPhone, BBOS, Symbian, Palm, whatever the Chinese just started up... add 'em all up, and it's an asterisk, too small to measure.

I think it's very simple (1, Interesting)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | about 2 years ago | (#41337935)

The article touches on really non of what, as a user, I think Windows Phone 8 needs. The experience in Windows 7 is great, but they're still lacking on apps, carrier support, new hardware, and advertising. So this is my list:

1) Support new hardware on all major carriers. Verizon currently has backwater outdated Windows Phones. That cannot happen with Windows Phone 8.

2) App parity with other platforms. With Windows 8 compatibility, this will likely be the case for Windows Phone 8. All the major players will write apps for Windows 8, and will most likely make the investment to bring their app over to WP8. However, this is still yet to be seen. Micosoft can ensure this will happen by making the transition as easy as possible, possibly by preserving all logic code and allowing a dev to make changes just to the interface.

3) A variety of hardware. Nokia is a great hardware partner but they cannot be the only one. I don't like some of the decisions on the 920, like no micro SD. I need to be able to go to Samsung or HTC to find a phone that fits me perfectly.

4) Integration with Windows 8, Xbox, Skydrive, Skype, and the various media properties like Xbox Music and especially Xbox Live.

In terms of what the article suggests I have these comments:

1) Take Advantage of Google Android’s Current Issues - Yes, I believe Microsoft is already capitalizing on this by offering indemnity for parters. I don't know how Samsung's verdict will really affect the market, but Microsoft can't rely on Android getting worse or less appealing; they have to make WP more appealing.

2) Stop the Upgrading Uncertainty - With the WP8 foundation this is probably already fixed, but I don't think it's that big of an issue. Still the majority of Android customers are two versions behind on Gingerbread, and many WP users are happy with the additional support provided with WP7.8. Yes it sucks WP won't be upgraded to 8, but then again we've had more certainty with our upgrades to Android until this point, with the vast majority of devices old and new being on 7.5. If they can continue this trend onto 8, they should be good.

3) Push Cloud Apps and Services - This is a foregone conclusion. Microsoft account integrates across Windows 8, Xbox, and Windows Phone, and carries all settings, mail, contacts, etc. between phone and desktop, and carries media between all three. With Office, the cloud trend will continue. I think this doesn't necessarily make WP more competitive, but it makes the ecosystem at least as appealing as the others. Microsoft has at least the advantage of Xbox and Office over Google and Apple, who cannot really offer parity in those respects.

They could stop making phones the microsoft phoned (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41337953)

Microsoft is big on the desktop sector becus backwards compability.
I hateted the windows smart phones during windows mobile 5 6 etc becus they could not be upgraded newer apps would not work.
They are doing the same mistake all over.

If win95 could not run 3.11 apps or win 98 apps microsoft would have failed the desktop market.
If i buy a phone i want it to be usable for atleast 3 years and i simply dont trust microsoft to provide me with that.

Won't happen (1)

sootman (158191) | about 2 years ago | (#41338091)

> There are many obvious ways Microsoft could
> misstep and lose its chance to participate in
> another generation of phones...

Or, they could do everything right, and it still won't matter. Beating an entrenched winner is HARD. How many times does it have to be said? Being "as good as" IS NOT ENOUGH. You have to be SIGNIFICANTLY BETTER in SEVERAL WAYS that will appeal to MANY PEOPLE to make any headway at all.

And it doesn't help that MS has made MAJOR recent blunders, like "oops, no Windows Phone 7 phone will EVER be upgradeable past 7.x." Not a great start, guys.

It's hard being an uncool kid and watching the cool kids have all the fun, but MS should accept its fate and focus on being the best enterprise company possible that also happens to make a consumer OS and a game system. Instead, they're pissing EVERYONE off by borking their OS one release after the other and slowly giving up the future to Apple.

Ballmer, accept the fact that MS will be the next IBM. It ain't so bad. If you don't, you won't even get that far.

Microsoft already won (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338149)

Windows Phone 8 will only succeed if Microsoft does something like they did with OWA where it's just a checkbox(overexaggerating, yes) for system administrators to support. When RIM lost a patent lawsuit and had an injunction brought against them in the US a few years ago, the company I was working for at the time dumped Blackberry support and switch to Samsung Blackjacks for the simple reason that the Exchange servers already supported them via OWA. If Microsoft does something to make Windows Phone 8 highly desirable and extremely cheap for Corporations, they will flock to it and kick Apple/Android to the curb in no time. Blackberry is already on life support.

One thing to remember is that Microsoft is already making money off of every Android/iPhone/Blackberry thanks to it's patent licensing deals. Even if WP8 loses, Microsoft still wins in the end.

Stop calling it "windows" (5, Insightful)

roc97007 (608802) | about 2 years ago | (#41338297)

It's the fact that it's still Windows, and Microsoft is still working on the paradigm of a single code build to rule them all, that's a complete turn-off to me, and makes the chance of me ever owning such a device bordering on nonexistent.

It was trying to deal with a company issued Windows mobile 5 phone, and later a Windows mobile 6 phone, that taught me that Microsoft just doesn't get the differences between the touch and kvm paradigms. It appears that they're going to "solve" this by making everything (including kvm pcs) run a touch-friendly interface.

The thing is, Microsoft has yet to create a truly successful touch interface. (The original "surface" had some really cutting edge features but was never released.) "Windows 7 tablet edition" is unbelievably bad, being for the most part a re-branding of old accessibility resources. Windows 7 Phone never took off, despite some early moderately favorable reviews, perhaps due to it's association to other failed attempts (see paragraph one).

So now... honestly, why do I need Windows Phone 8? Compatibility with Exchange? A known solution on both iphone and android. Compatibility with Microsoft Office? My Android phone came with Quickoffice, and it appears to be working fine. I can mail myself a PPT, open it on the phone, and use the HDMI interface to display on a projector, no laptop necessary.

Tiles that update dynamically? Android has had that (widgets) for years.

That it's called Windows? That's actually a reason *not* to buy it.

So, like, what? The number of applications? Um, no. The maturity of the code base? It is to laugh. Let's see... Crush on Steve Ballmer... nope. Love the logo... nope, if anything, the new logo looks amateurish. Microsoft has done such a great job on my PC that I'll buy anything they produce? Let's see, examining feelings, um, that would be a no. I'm really reaching here, but I don't know what else might come into play. Oh wait, I know:

I work for Microsoft and they're giving me a Windows 8 phone and tablet for free? [webpronews.com] Well, that might work. At very least, it'll reduce inventory somewhat. Storage must be costly.

On the other hand, my company (which isn't Microsoft) issued me a Windows Mobile phone, and after a very frustrating three months I gave it back. (In all fairness, they also issued me an ipad, and after a week, seeing that I'd still need to carry a laptop, I gave back the ipad.) So a more correct wording might be "We're giving Microsoft employees a free Windows 8 phone and you better the hell be seen using it".

That, plus TV show prop departments heavily subsidize by Microsoft (cough-hawaii-50-cough) might be the only places you see the critters.

Don't wait for netcraft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338317)

2013 will be the year of Windows on the cell phone!

They could try having a product... (5, Insightful)

RocketScientist (15198) | about 2 years ago | (#41338447)

They could try having a product when they have a product announcement. You know, a thing to sell, or pre-order with a solid ship date. I saw the new Nokia phone announcement and was like "that sounds great, I need a new phone now anyway" and looked for a ship date. nothing. Looked for a price. nothing. Looks like a great phone.

Shipping is a feature. Announce when that feature's complete, not other features. Amazon had an announcement, they had products, they had pre-orders, they had hands-on demo production products for the press, they're burning through sales. Apple had an announcement, they have pre-orders, they had hands-on demo production products for the press, they're selling product and their online store is already on backorder.

Microsoft and Nokia had announcements. They have no product, no preorders, people didn't get any hands on time with what the actual shipping product will be, the phone demo movie was faked up to the point where if they hadn't backed off they'd be looking at criminal fraud indictments, the actual "products" they had for demos were showing powerpoint slides for all they were worth.

Tease launches only work for industry-new products. Apple pulled it off with the original iPhone and iPad because there weren't any competitive products in the space, so the market didn't have an option to go out and buy something that filled that need *right now*. Microsoft and Nokia are trying to do a tease launch, when I can go to the store and buy something very similar for a probably similar price and have it in my hand before Microsoft and Nokia will get around to announcing prices, much less ship dates.

Microsoft is so used to being the industry leader they've forgotten how to act when they're not. Little hint guys: Apple's iPhone business is bigger than Microsoft. Not that Apple is bigger, Apple's iPhone business. Just that one piece of their business. Not that Apple couldn't be taken down by an innovative competitor with an effective marketing strategy, but Microsoft is neither an innovative competitor nor do they market effectively.

So, again, Microsoft is too little and too late to the party, and will be utterly ignored.

here's what it has to do (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41338633)

NOT SUCK FTFY

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>