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Yahoo Excludes BlackBerry From Employee Smartphone List

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the anything-but-that dept.

Android 192

Nerval's Lobster writes "Freshly minted Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer is promising the company's U.S. employees a new smartphone of their choice. There's just one catch: it can't be a BlackBerry. According to Business Insider, which posted significant portions of Mayer's memo, employees will have a choice of the Samsung Galaxy S3, HTC One X, HTC EVO 4G LTE, Nokia Lumia 920, or the upcoming iPhone 5. 'We'd like our employees to have devices similar to our users, so we can think and work as the majority of our users do,' she wrote, adding that Yahoo will shift away from BlackBerry as its corporate device of choice. Somewhere up in Waterloo, at least one Research In Motion executive could be screaming in frustration over this development. Not because Yahoo is a bellwether for corporate smartphone use; its U.S. employees shifting to an iOS, Windows Phone or Android device won't automatically drive other major companies will follow suit. But as a symbol of RIM's current issues, it's difficult to find a better one than a high-profile technology company dumping its collective BlackBerry stock in favor of pretty much any other platform."

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Nokia Lumia 920 (1, Troll)

RottenImp (2732245) | about 2 years ago | (#41362835)

I'm glad to see they chose Nokia Lumia 920 as a phone. It is very powerful, sleek and well-done smartphone with enterprise features from Microsoft. It's really much better business phone than iPhone or Android-based smart phones. On top of that Yahoo can use Visual Studio to develop their own apps - all with the maturity and familiarity of C# and Windows programming. Great choice!

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41362891)

You sound funny.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (1, Insightful)

Alarash (746254) | about 2 years ago | (#41362917)

I'm also kind of tired of seeing C# being frowned upon just because it's tied to Microsoft. It's a kick ass language.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (4, Interesting)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#41362977)

It's Java again.

Even the designer of C# has moved on, to Javascript of all places!

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (1)

RottenImp (2732245) | about 2 years ago | (#41363257)

C# is completely different than Java. Know what you speak of.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (4, Interesting)

RaceProUK (1137575) | about 2 years ago | (#41363331)

C# is completely different than Java. Know what you speak of.

C# developer here, and yes, C# shares a lot of similarities with Java, being as they are both C-family languages. However, I do agree that C# is sufficiently different to make it, on balance, a better and more flexible all-round language than Java.

*waits for anti-MS Java worshippers*

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (1)

John Napkintosh (140126) | about 2 years ago | (#41363509)

As a recent convert from C# to Java, it's hard to deny the very obvious influence Java had on C#. I see C# basically as a port of Java in most instances.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (1)

gorzek (647352) | about 2 years ago | (#41364631)

Indeed. I like both languages, and I think C# is better in some ways, but it's not like MS invented C# out of whole cloth. The whole concept of the .Net CLR was nicked from Java, and C# shares a great many language features and paradigms with Java.

Given the choice between the two, I'm not sure which I would pick. It would depend on what features I need, I suppose, and what platforms I need to support.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (0)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#41363597)

C# does have a few differences, but they're marginal at best.

Overall, the language is just Java Again On A Microsoft Platform.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (1)

thomasw_lrd (1203850) | about 2 years ago | (#41363603)

No one worships Java. It's owned by Oracle, and the the only tech company to get more hate than M$ is Oracle.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41364359)

No one worships Java. It's owned by Oracle, and the the only tech company to get more hate than M$ is Oracle.

That's not true. Oracle is #3 on my list, just below Apple.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (4, Interesting)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#41363531)

http://www.harding.edu/fmccown/java_csharp_comparison.html [harding.edu]

Weeee, look at how different it is.

It's so different.

It's clearly thinking different.

It's sooooooo different.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (3, Insightful)

SQLGuru (980662) | about 2 years ago | (#41363859)

When you focus on just those items, sure. But that table didn't include all of the features of both languages. Where's LINQ? Lamda expressions? etc.?

Run that same table to compare against any other language derived from C/C++.......there will be similar overlap. The point of that table looked like it was to get someone started on making the move from one language to the other.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (2)

GoogleShill (2732413) | about 2 years ago | (#41363683)

C# was designed to be a Java replacement and shared nearly identical syntax as well as utilizing the intermediate language VM and garbage collection. Although MS have added numerous language features over the years, it is absolutely not "completely different than Java."

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (5, Interesting)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 2 years ago | (#41363563)

You think that's bad, I'm a VB.Net developer. People rant endlessly about VB.Net. It's almost got the exact same feature set as C#, minus a few and plus a few features. For a long time, C# was missing simple things like optional parameters. Also, VB.Net has always had a much superior background compiler. A lot of what you hear about VB.Net is based on biases from the old VB, as well as complaints about syntax and verbosity. Neither of which really address it's merits.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363993)

As a C# guy, I find VB syntax to be a major inefficiency when I'm using it. That's not because VB is necessarily any less efficient, it's just that I'm thinking in C# and translating on the fly. So there are some valid personal reasons to dislike VB. I'm sure the exact opposite is true for you.

Then there's unsafe. That's the last thing VB still lacks that C# can do. It allows for all of the COM interop (ugh) to work. Without unsafe, there's no interop, or interop has to be coded directly in MSIL. Count your blessings on never having to work with unsafe code in a managed environment. If C is a gun that lets you shoot yourself in the foot, and C++ is a shotgun that will remove your leg with it, then C# with unsafe is a grenade with the pin pulled and you're wearing handcuffs.

On the other hand, VB has With and C# doesn't. But that's just a typing shortcut.

As for the background compiler, that hasn't been an issue, pretty much ever. Things that are compile-time checked will show up on a rebuild. Personally, I find VB's incessant bitching about errors caused by an incomplete line of code to be worse than C#'s lack of instant compilation checking.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (4, Funny)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 2 years ago | (#41363117)

If you could astropost when they'll actually ship, the rest of the world might care.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (5, Funny)

localman57 (1340533) | about 2 years ago | (#41363185)

I'm glad to see they chose Nokia Lumia 920 as a phone. It is very powerful, sleek and well-done smartphone with enterprise features from Microsoft. It's really much better business phone than iPhone or Android-based smart phones. On top of that Yahoo can use Visual Studio to develop their own apps - all with the maturity and familiarity of C# and Windows programming. Great choice!

Hum. You guys aren't up to the standard of the normal turfers from waggeneredstrom.com. They usually throw in some links:

I'm glad to see they chose Nokia Lumia 920 as a phone. It is very powerful, sleek and well-done smartphone [wikipedia.org] with enterprise features from Microsoft. It's really much better business phone than iPhone [wikipedia.org] or Android-based smart phones. On top of that Yahoo can use Visual Studio to develop their own apps [wikipedia.org] - all with the maturity and familiarity of C# and Windows programming [wikipedia.org] . Great choice!

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363405)

I love you

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (2)

RaceProUK (1137575) | about 2 years ago | (#41363341)

I like WinPhone/VS/C#, and I'm still calling shill.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (2)

SQLGuru (980662) | about 2 years ago | (#41363791)

Ditto. I have the HTC Arrive and still tell people that I love WP7 (of course, I'm mad at Sprint for their lack of support for WP7 --- I just hope it corrects with WP8) and I code in C# all day long. But that post was a tad "blech" to me as well.

But I was glad to see that WP8 made Yahoo's cut of "still relevant" phones.

Re:Nokia Lumia 920 (1)

Tridus (79566) | about 2 years ago | (#41364415)

It's remarkable how on every phone story there's a post made simultaneously with the article about how great the Lumia is.

Microsoft really needs to hire less obvious shills.

One failing company dropping another's technology (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41362915)

What's next, RIM employees stop using Yahoo for search and tell their employees to use Google or Bing?

Re:One failing company dropping another's technolo (5, Funny)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41363211)

What's next, RIM employees stop using Yahoo for search and tell their employees to use Google or Bing?

I think the vast majority of them are already using monster.com and dice.com, etc. Oh wait, do you mean general internet searching, not looking for a new job after the downsizing?

Re:One failing company dropping another's technolo (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363477)

No one uses Monster but some may use Dice--via Indeed.

Seriously, who uses these sites directly anymore? RSS feeds from Indeed FTW.

Re:One failing company dropping another's technolo (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | about 2 years ago | (#41363953)

Does *anyone* actually use Bing? I mean, other than on TV shows where they're paid to...

Re:One failing company dropping another's technolo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41364107)

No. Within a month, Mayer's replacement will probably reverse this decision. Don't worry though, as their replacement will probably reinstate it. Yahoo goes through more CEOs in five years than I went through toilet rolls during a particularly memorable trip to Tunisia.

Oh Yahoo... (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#41362935)

Oww, that has to hurt.

Yeah, we all knew that RIM was on the outs; but getting cut from the running for 'stodgy corporate issued device' by the somewhat-less-than-vibrant players over at yahoo? Ice burn, man, Ice Burn.

Re:Oh Yahoo... (5, Interesting)

rgbrenner (317308) | about 2 years ago | (#41363311)

That's one way of interpreting it.

So here's an ex-google exec saying Yahoo employees can use a bunch of android phones or a currently-unavailable iphone. Didn't a certain Nokia exec do something similar recently.. hmm

So Yahoo thinks it should discard RIM... When was the last time Yahoo got much of anything right? How do we know this isn't yet another miss-step? Aren't there some BB users that use Yahoo? Wouldn't it be better if Yahoo employees used ALL of the common smartphones?

Re:Oh Yahoo... (1)

somersault (912633) | about 2 years ago | (#41363423)

1% [bgr.com] is "common" now?

Admittedly I think they're higher than 1% here in the UK, but I've wanted them to die for about 8 years now. I'm happy to see them go. Steam is due out on Linux soon-ish, and MS look like they're going to pull a Vista with Windows 8. All in all, things in the world of technology seem to be heading in a good direction :)

Re:Oh Yahoo... (1)

rgbrenner (317308) | about 2 years ago | (#41363473)

% of mobile traffic != % of smartphone marketshare

Re:Oh Yahoo... (1)

sirambrose (919153) | about 2 years ago | (#41363649)

Buying an iphone 4S would be a waste of money because the 5 will be usable for at least one year longer than the 4S. I am sure that any employees that want an iphone will be glad to wait a week to get the better phone.

Re:Oh Yahoo... (1)

rgbrenner (317308) | about 2 years ago | (#41363853)

Right.. and I'm sure there are no Yahoo employees that already own a 4S.

Re:Oh Yahoo... (1)

John Napkintosh (140126) | about 2 years ago | (#41363551)

Yahoo is little more than AOL at this point. I see them as struggling to find a place among other better and more useful brands like Bing and Google. You'd think they would want to BOND with a brand becoming such as RIM who is also becoming less and less relevant by the hour.

Re:Oh Yahoo... (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 years ago | (#41364093)

With(unfortunately for their shareholders) one crucial difference.

Somehow, I don't know how they did it, AOL took a formerly-high-flying and now rotten from the inside company and somehow conned Time Warner to a merger of almost equals, with AOL on top. Damn. Now, of course, their business consists largely of confused old people who can't figure out how to cancel; but that was their moment.

Yahoo, by contrast, turned to a rather generous buyout bid and has been slipping fairly steadily in value since....

Why a Microsoft phone? (3, Insightful)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#41362963)

No one buys Microsoft phones.

They're in the same boat as RIM but they get a pass for some reason.

I can only assume Microsoft is paying them to stay somehow? Maybe free phones?

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363009)

Because RIM is on the decline and there is a fair amount of momentum behind MS. Even if the device doesn't make sales it's not likely to disappear from the market as soon as Blackberry.
 
But I know you're just being a hateful twat. Must suck to get your sense of self-worth from a device, eh?

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (5, Funny)

Minwee (522556) | about 2 years ago | (#41363073)

Because RIM is on the decline and there is a fair amount of momentum behind MS.

I think you misspelled the word "money". The first two letters were right, but then you went right off the tracks.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (3, Insightful)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 2 years ago | (#41363075)

The US military still insists on Blackberries over iPhone / Andoid. So just like with the US government's use of Iridium sat phones kept that company afloat, until the US military stops using Blackberries, the company will be "around".

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (2)

Anubis IV (1279820) | about 2 years ago | (#41363217)

They do? I could've sworn I heard about some field tests [geekwire.com] involving iPhone, Android, and Windows Phone 7, which later resulted in Android being selected [tuaw.com] . Granted, they cited a lack of secure encryption as a problem, but the nice thing about Android is that you can just put it in yourself. Plus, RIM's services all go through a central point of failure that has proven less-than-resilient in the last year or two.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (2)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41363269)

The US military still insists on Blackberries over iPhone / Andoid. So just like with the US government's use of Iridium sat phones kept that company afloat, until the US military stops using Blackberries, the company will be "around".

Yeah, I was admining a database running under BTOS on a unisys ruggedized "mini" in the early 90s in the US Army. That sure worked out well. Probably no one on /. has even heard of either the company or the OS. That's where Blackberries are inevitably headed. Grunt gets issued a "blackberry", asks WTF is this?

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | about 2 years ago | (#41364217)

Probably no one on /. has even heard of either the company or the OS.

You seem to be forgetting that a number of us /.ers are old farts of the deepest dye. I cut my programming teeth on the Burroughs B3700 [adspast.com] which by the 1990s had a lot in common with the Newcomen steam engine.

Incidentally, Burroughs later became a component of Unisys, along with Sperry/Univac, another heavy horse of which I have fond memories...

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363279)

android is now approved for in theater operation...
sorry for the anonymous post...

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (1)

ducomputergeek (595742) | about 2 years ago | (#41364095)

Actually, the DOD swooped in and bought the iridium network at the 11th hour right before the sats were to be given the command to thrust and burn up in the atmosphere. And they bought the entire network for pennies of what it cost to launch the birds in the first place (or what it would cost to launch their own similar network)

My understanding it was purchased primarily for non-secure military communications i.e. soldiers half a world away getting to call or video conference back home.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (0, Troll)

RottenImp (2732245) | about 2 years ago | (#41363013)

Yes, people buy Windows Phone 7 based phones. In fact they're always topping in reviews and happy customers.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (1)

Walterk (124748) | about 2 years ago | (#41363061)

Is that because those happy customers got their phones for free, courtesy of being Microsoft/Nokia employees?

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (2)

localman57 (1340533) | about 2 years ago | (#41363101)

Don't respond to RottenImp. He's an astroturfer. Look at his post history.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (1)

Tridus (79566) | about 2 years ago | (#41364479)

Windows Phone - #1 in astroturfing!

It's funny because the carriers don't seem to like Windows Phone very much. You think they know something about actual user satisfaction that the astroturfer boy here doesn't?

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (5, Insightful)

DogDude (805747) | about 2 years ago | (#41363045)

No one buys Microsoft phones.

Not true. This is posted from a Windows 7 Phone. They work just fine. I'm happy with mine. You don't know what you're talking about.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (2)

WiiVault (1039946) | about 2 years ago | (#41363575)

He should have said almost nobody, which is pretty true. But I'm quite happy with my LG Quantum first gen WP7.5 phone even if others aren't going WP in droves.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (5, Funny)

Microlith (54737) | about 2 years ago | (#41363585)

Hey look! You found him!

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (2)

Nimey (114278) | about 2 years ago | (#41363129)

They /are/ using Bing for searches these days, so that's probably something to do with it.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363157)

It's because people used to buy RIM phones but no longer do, and no one ever bought MS phone, and still don't.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363229)

Maybe they just don't want to continue the proprietary BES-Servers, every crapphone today can do ActiveSync or at least imap (and no, the Blackberry's can't, you need BIS for that).

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363371)

No one buys Microsoft phones.

There are some people out there that like Microsoft and will buy anything that Microsoft throws out there. You may have heard of some Apple fans like this.

There is actually a growing number of (Xbox 360) gamers maoving to WP7. This is because it is completely integrated with your Xbox Live account and its achievements and friends. I bought a WP7 for this purpose. I was going to use it as Wifi-only, but I like the interface so much that I moved the SIM card from my Android phone to WP7. I mainly just swap the SIM card back to my Android phone whenever I want to use it as a Wifi hot spot.

For the record, my corporate phone is an iPhone (we didn't get a choice). So, I carry around all three phones.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (1)

RaceProUK (1137575) | about 2 years ago | (#41363395)

No one buys Microsoft phones.

That's because MS doesn't make phones. Oh wait, you mean the WinPhones make by LG/HTC/Samsung/Nokia et al. They seem to be doing alright collectively.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363441)

RIM requires you to run the Blackberry Enterprise Server to get the full set of features. Microsoft phones use active sync, same as Android and iOS and does not require any special infrastructure.

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (1)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 2 years ago | (#41363573)

Interesting, that could be the difference. Thanks!

Re:Why a Microsoft phone? (2)

Plasmoid2000ad (1004859) | about 2 years ago | (#41363591)

Troll much? It's not exactly a best seller, but you can hardly claim no one buys them.

What does this mean for Yahoo? (4, Insightful)

NixieBunny (859050) | about 2 years ago | (#41362979)

This sounds like a ploy to retain employees by tempting them with shiny objects.

That's gotta hurt (1)

baalzebub (2505250) | about 2 years ago | (#41363047)

If RIM wasn't worried before (though I don't know how that'd be possible), they definitely should be now. If other companies follow Yahoo's footsteps, this may start a new trend, which would be the end of RIM (as in, it'd expedite the process of what's inevitable).

Interesting rationale (4, Interesting)

Rob the Bold (788862) | about 2 years ago | (#41363069)

CEO Marissa Mayer: "so we can think and work as the majority of our users do".

That makes sense on the surface, but it doesn't exactly sound like the attitude of a company that wants to be an innovator or technology leader. It might not be the attitude of a market leader, either. [google.com] At the risk of sounding like a fanboy of another big tech firm, "Think Same" may not be the motto to live by. But then I'm CEO of nothing.

Re:Interesting rationale (5, Funny)

vlm (69642) | about 2 years ago | (#41363169)

My WTF was different than yours.

CEO Marissa Mayer: "so we can think and work as the majority of our users do".

VLM questions "Yahoo still has users?" Who?

But then I'm CEO of nothing.

Patience young grasshopper. Yahoo will achieve nothingness soon enough. Then you can be its CEO.

I've occasionally wondered how much it would cost to start collecting companies as a hobby. For example, mint condition dotcom 1.0 corporations. How much would it cost me to buy flooz or drkoop.com or whatever it was called? I would imagine there's some ongoing accounting/tax costs. I do know people who collected paper stock certificates, for example Disney's paper stock certs used to be really cool and artistic, and I've always thought a collection of dotcom stock certs would be funny... but why collect a paper printout of a millionth of the dotcom when I could own the whole thing? My budget for this amusement would be on the scale of three digits, four is really pushing it. Is this a realistic collecting hobby for me? I'm not going to be one of those old people collecting a houseful of ceramic frogs... no not me... I'm gonna collect mint condition dotcom 1.0 companies. That sounds like fun.

Re:Interesting rationale (1)

LoudMusic (199347) | about 2 years ago | (#41363411)

Sure, but Yahoo doesn't make hardware or consumable software. They provide services on platforms created by other people which are used by their customers. You have to know your customers' experience before you can improve it.

what about spamcop (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363079)

once they are done with eliminating bb, could really spend some time on getting their smtp servers removed from spamcop.

Vajk

Too much privacy? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363083)

Your ELD is off. [dilbert.com]

No real keyboards? (4, Insightful)

JDG1980 (2438906) | about 2 years ago | (#41363141)

choice of the Samsung Galaxy S3, HTC One X, HTC EVO 4G LTE, Nokia Lumia 920, or the upcoming iPhone 5

None of these phones have real keyboards. To those of us with large fingers, that's a deal-breaker when selecting a phone; on-screen keyboards are simply unusable with a screen that small. As much as it sucks in other ways, the BlackBerry at least did offer a hardware keyboard. Yahoo should offer at least one Android phone with an actual keyboard (maybe the Samsung Epic 4G?)

Re:No real keyboards? (1)

mungtor (306258) | about 2 years ago | (#41363171)

Apparently you don't need it. The article ridiculously claims that focusing on physical keyboards and long battery life was a "failure" on RIMs part. Somehow they manage to overlook several multi-day network outages as a factor...

Re:No real keyboards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363349)

This happens on all phones and people are just picking on RIM. Get over it already, they will be back.

Nobody seems to ever mention that iGadgets didn't have copy and paste for two years.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IOS_version_history

RIM is surely hurting bad but they are by no means broken completely.

Re:No real keyboards? (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | about 2 years ago | (#41364361)

focusing on physical keyboards and long battery life was a "failure" on RIMs part

A couple of years ago I mistakenly bought a Sony/Ericsson Xperia X10 Mini Pro on the strength of its physical keyboard, but I found it such a struggle to use with my ageing eyesight that it was actually a relief when the machine died and I was able to justify replacing it with a Samsung device.

Re:No real keyboards? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363245)

Perhaps you don't realize, but the physical keys are roughly the same size as the on-screen ones.

If you go with a Note, they're like 40% larger.

Re:No real keyboards? (3, Informative)

JDG1980 (2438906) | about 2 years ago | (#41363511)

Perhaps you don't realize, but the physical keys are roughly the same size as the on-screen ones.

Being able to feel the keys (and press down on only the one you want) is a huge difference. Maybe when touch screens get haptic feedback, they'll catch up. But until then, on devices smaller than tablet size, a physical keyboard is the only good option for me.

Re:No real keyboards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363677)

*types on Android device* Yep, feels like haptic feedback to me.

Re:No real keyboards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363729)

They weren't listed but there *are* Android based devices with physical keyboards. It's probably better from a support standpoint to get one of those than it is to support another platform entirely. Also, it's a corporate phone and the goal is to familiarize yourself with the experience of your target market. If you have fat-finger issues with your phone you're much more likely to design UIs that mitigate fat-finger-ness as an issue. So if *ANYONE* should be forced to use the touch screen devices, it's people like you who have troubles with them. Your experience is invaluable.

Re:No real keyboards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363537)

None of these phones have real keyboards. To those of us with large fingers, that's a deal-breaker when selecting a phone...Yahoo should offer at least one Android phone with an actual keyboard.

Or a gym membership.

Re:No real keyboards? (1)

Cajun Hell (725246) | about 2 years ago | (#41363757)

None of these phones have real keyboards. .. on-screen keyboards are simply unusable with a screen that small.

That may be a reason for a tech company to give developers (particularly big-fingered ones) keyboardless smartphones.

"Here, have a difficult constraint. Figure out a way to make it work anyway."

Re:No real keyboards? (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 2 years ago | (#41363767)

choice of the Samsung Galaxy S3, HTC One X, HTC EVO 4G LTE, Nokia Lumia 920, or the upcoming iPhone 5

None of these phones have real keyboards. To those of us with large fingers, that's a deal-breaker when selecting a phone; on-screen keyboards are simply unusable with a screen that small. As much as it sucks in other ways, the BlackBerry at least did offer a hardware keyboard. Yahoo should offer at least one Android phone with an actual keyboard (maybe the Samsung Epic 4G?)

I believe those are the top-end flagship phones on each platform. Which until quite recently stopped coming with hardware keyboards and settled in on the slate formfactor for whatever reason.

Which is where I'm wondering where the innovation is - back when the Droid/Milestone was the kickass Android to get, it had a hardware keyboard. Can't they not come up with some innovative mechanicals and layout to produce a decent phone with a keyboard in the same formfactor? Hell, build in a battery like the iPhone!

Just like bigger screens - there's very few top end phones with screens smaller than 4". If you have smaller hands, it can be a pain to use these top end phones single-handedly (which can include the iPhone 5).

Re:No real keyboards? (2)

jittles (1613415) | about 2 years ago | (#41363891)

Are you serious? I have large fingers and I can't use those tiny excuse of plastic they call keys on blackberries. Whereas, I can use the keyboards on android and iOS devices just fine. Why? Because I can keep typing on the soft keyboards and they eventually correct my mistakes. Not so on the blackberry. Its easier for me to thread a needle than to use a blackberry keyboard. Ugh I have hated those things since the beginning, and it is one reason why I never had a blackberry for work. I refused to have one.

Re:No real keyboards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41364065)

I recently bought a Samsung Galaxy S3 with similar concerns. I hated my old original iPhone's keyboard, and I had an HTC Touch Pro 2 (WinMo 6.5 phone!) with the largest slide-out keyboard I've ever seen (no, that doesn't mean anything dirty).

The S3's keyboard is quite large, even in "portrait" mode. No complaints about that.

The battery life is a little lower than I'm used to, though. That TP2 sipped at a large battery for days before it needed a charge. The S3 can go about a day.

Re:No real keyboards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41364115)

I used to have the same issue. Try using swype.

Re:No real keyboards? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41364141)

Do you know if swype could fill that gap. I can't say i have the same issue but, i almost never type anything like a traditional keyboard anymore. it's more about aim than dexterity.

History repeats itself (4, Insightful)

concealment (2447304) | about 2 years ago | (#41363145)

Companies that both manufacture hardware and hand-roll their operating systems tend to collapse over time.

There are too many decisions which must be made centrally, and these involve too many conflicting "business objectives." In other words, the two branches (hardware and OS) can't figure out how to work together to nudge consumers toward spending more money, time and effort on the product.

Apple ducked this one by purchasing the core of its operating system from two sources, and allowing maintenance to be mostly driven by updates at least one of those OSes (BSD).

Blackberry has been frozen in motion (like Yahoo), unable to develop new software or hardware at the pace of the market. The result is that the world has moved on and, by parallax motion, RIM has moved backward.

Re:History repeats itself (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363651)

Apple ducked this one by purchasing the core of its operating system from two sources, and allowing maintenance to be mostly driven by updates at least one of those OSes (BSD).

Blackberry has been frozen in motion (like Yahoo), unable to develop new software or hardware at the pace of the market. The result is that the world has moved on and, by parallax motion, RIM has moved backward.

Wouldn't RIM's use of a QNX as it's operating system in BB10 effectively mirror Apple's strategy? Time will tell if they can survive, but on the surface it looks like a possibility.

Re:History repeats itself (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363795)

> and allowing maintenance to be mostly driven by updates at least one of those OSes (BSD).

Yes, everyone is super excited about iOS 6 because it contains the latest BSD updates! (and thanks for that "only on slashdot" comment)

Re:History repeats itself (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41364443)

You have no idea how OS X or iOS work if you think that updates to BSD drive anything.

Interesting (1)

kiriath (2670145) | about 2 years ago | (#41363177)

I can see why, I would say the same thing I believe. Blackberry is dying, there is no use going out and spending a dime on a Blackberry... Even when BB10 comes out, it will be too little too late. Really RIM will just be clawing at Microsoft's market share, those few people who don't want an Android or an iPhone will have Windows Phone and BB 10 to choose from. If RIM can stay together long enough to get it finished that is... Otherwise Microsoft will have all 4 of those non apple-android market shares to themselves...

Server side software (4, Interesting)

ERJ (600451) | about 2 years ago | (#41363227)

We run a small business and I can say that our IT group was quite happy when we moved away from blackberry devices. Not because of the phones themselves but instead because of the server side software. It is very likely things have changed since we stopped using their phones but I can tell you that we would be constantly losing device sync between the server side and the phones and would have to manually resync the connections. If that software is still in use I can see how companies the size of Yahoo would want to not have to support the additional infrastructure that is needed for the blackberry devices.

Wow... (5, Funny)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 2 years ago | (#41363233)

It's like being dumped by the dorkiest fat kid in school.

Lumia 920? (2)

Mr_Silver (213637) | about 2 years ago | (#41363295)

'We'd like our employees to have devices similar to our users, so we can think and work as the majority of our users do,' she wrote, adding that Yahoo will shift away from BlackBerry as its corporate device of choice.

As much as I hate to say it, I don't think that moving people from BlackBerry to Windows Phone will solve the problem she's describing.

Wait! Blackberry is still in business? (1)

macbeth66 (204889) | about 2 years ago | (#41363325)

Or are they talking about the old ones still lying about?

Damn, technology moves just too quickly for me to keep up with it.

Bad for the employment picture? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363359)

This has to result in fewer RIM jobs for everyone.

But not the Nexus (1)

Kupfernigk (1190345) | about 2 years ago | (#41363437)

It's a strange choice. Two HTCs, the Samsung that isn't as good in the USA as the equivalent South Korean version, a phone that may not be available for months and another one that the IT department won't have had time to check for compatibility and security. One small(ish) one and four big ones. It looks like a collection thrown together by someone in HR who had a quick read of gsmarena or bgr and then asked their usual supplier for their best prices.

Fortunately there isn't the slightest possibility that I would ever be recruited by Yahoo or, in the event that a stray high energy cosmic ray shower happened to hit their HR server in exactly the right way, that I would accept the resulting job offer. But this piece really does suggest that they don't have a sense of direction. A new shiny smartphone most of whose features you won't be allowed to use at work and which you won't use at home because you don't want them tracking you? The ability to annoy you 24/7 with irrelevant requests from managers?

RIM may nor may not be dying. It may or may not be doing a pre-second-Jobs-incarnation Apple. I certainly wouldn't buy a BB 7 phone now because we all know it has as much future as a flea in a liquidiser. But being left of the Yahoo list - it's a list that many people might want to be left off.

As another minor issue, I can't help feeling that some of RIM's bad press is because many user experiences are based on the locked down corporate market where all the good stuff is turned off, from the camera through the hotspot. How long will it be before the other manufacturer's products get locked down in the same way by IT, and the users perceive it as the phone's fault? Apple may be a "walled garden" now, but by the time some banks have finished with it, the iPhone 5 will be the fastest Nokia dumbphone on the market.

RIM Lost (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363445)

The Panasonic BU that I work for is also change from the Blackberry to an Android phone. Which one is still a rumor.

ActiveSync (1)

TheNinjaroach (878876) | about 2 years ago | (#41363517)

BES stinks. BIS stinks. The whole Blackberry "dumbphone" concept stinks (the devices just don't work without RIM servers, billed to end users as an extra cost in your phone bill).

Blackberry's failure to adopt ActiveSync - which became nearly ubiquitous among smartphones several years ago - is a big part of their downfall.

Blackberry users have been paying more for less for far too long.

Good (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363837)

Good news. As someone whose IT department supports BlackBerries, this trend can't spread fast enough. No offense to RIM but blackberries should have died out many years ago - and not that I like apple or droid so much, but they should have killed the BB off for corporate use. BlackBerries are terrible phones with inconsistent UIs, no slide out keyboards, changing usb cords, and are overly secure, nor does anyone who has one know how to use it.

Conspiracy against blackberry? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41363847)

Seems like a conspiracy by the powers that be to push Blackberry out of business, in favor of the google/apple iOS's that track and data-mine it's users for commercial gain..

Hmm!

Blackberry is the new "little guy" that apple used to be, everyone who's "hip" and "free" should go blackberry! Everyone who wants to be a mental slave to advertisers and the corporate machine should go android/iphone!

*ducks behind a wall*

Uh, Yahoo as a major technical bellwether? (2)

swschrad (312009) | about 2 years ago | (#41364089)

that's so 90s.

As far as RIM (1)

nighthawk243 (2557486) | about 2 years ago | (#41364371)

RIM is so behind in the smartphone business it isn't funny. Anyways, another issue for having BlackBerry devices is that you have to have a BES server to do what you need. Android and iOS require no such server; you can just sync them directly with Exchange.

Yahoo wont be here much longer anyway.. (1)

m_number4 (902127) | about 2 years ago | (#41364521)

Better that RIM don't get to shoulder all that bad debt.
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