Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

First Word On Results From GRAIL, NASA's Moon Gravity Mission

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 years ago | from the cheese-less-ages-than-previously-believed dept.

Moon 40

An anonymous reader writes "Nature has advance word on the first science results from GRAIL, NASA's twin probes launched a year ago which are mapping the gravity of the Moon from lunar orbit. This is coming out in advance of any official publication or NASA release, so the data isn't available, but the story trails what the PI Maria Zuber told a Harvard CFA colloquium last week are some of the team's key scientific findings: including that the Moon's crust is substantially thinner than once thought; and some of the more speculative impact basins haven't been confirmed."

cancel ×

40 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

thin crust (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372387)

Hmm, so the inside of the moon is softer?

Re:thin crust (4, Funny)

Eraesr (1629799) | about 2 years ago | (#41372447)

What more proof do you need that it's made of cheese, eh?

Re:thin crust (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372495)

The cheese?

Re:thin crust (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372497)

Moon mouse would be an irrefutable proof.

Radical opinion here. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372645)

the Moon's crust is substantially thinner than once thought;

The Moon is really cheese cake - cheese doesn't have a crust but cheese cake does.

If it were fried cheese with a jalapeno center - a Moon Popper - the orbit would be completely different.

Re:Radical opinion here. (4, Funny)

somersault (912633) | about 2 years ago | (#41372759)

The "crusts" on cheese are more commonly known as skins.

Cheese cake doesn't have a crust, it has a base.. and we haven't seen any moon bases yet.

I have to say that I'm sorely disappointed in the lack of moon poppers. Poppers are the moondog's nuts.

I beg to differ .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372813)

Cheese cake doesn't have a crust, it has a base..

According to Wiki, "crust" and "base" are interchangeable.

Now, we'll see if I started the first pastry flame war EVAR on Slashdot.

Re:I beg to differ .... (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | about 2 years ago | (#41375933)

The salient point being that it is underneath, not on top.

Hm, that's not very flame-y... Don't want to disappoint...

Ah! Cheesecake flambe! It might have a thin seared crust on top!

Re:Radical opinion here. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372907)

RIND. Cheese Rind.

WTF is a Cheese Skin? Maybe Edam and Babybel have Cheese Skins, other cheeses have rinds.

Re:Radical opinion here. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372919)

The "crusts" on cheese are more commonly known as skins.

It's not called a "crust" or a "skin", it's called the rind.

Cheese cake doesn't have a crust, it has a base.

Base is a generic term, cheesecake has a bottom crust.

Re:Radical opinion here. (4, Informative)

arth1 (260657) | about 2 years ago | (#41373129)

It's not called a "crust" or a "skin", it's called the rind.

Cheeses can have both rinds and crusts. The rind is on the outside, and is intended to be there. Crusts, on the other hand, develop mostly unintentionally, and often on the inside too after a cheese has been cut. An outside crust can be treated, e.g. with brine, to create a rind.

As for skins, yes, some have those too. Jarlsberg, for example, has a sprayed on rubbery skin between the cheese and the protective wax. It is NOT a rind, and not meant for consumption (and neither is the protective wax, although I've seen dolts that eat it).

In addition to these, some moist cheeses like Cabecou and Gamalost develop fur [blogspot.com] instead. It's a fungal layer which can be quite tasty. Sometimes it's compressed into the cheese again to make part of the rind, like in a Brie.

Re:Radical opinion here. (1)

Joce640k (829181) | about 2 years ago | (#41373265)

So how come a pizza is a "pie"?

a different AC posting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372765)

yeah, you got the joke and successfully dumbed it down for everyone. Congratulations!

Re:thin crust (1)

flappinbooger (574405) | about 2 years ago | (#41372807)

What more proof do you need that it's made of cheese, eh?

Everyone knows the moon is hollow:

https://www.google.com/search?q=hollow+moon+theory [google.com]

Duh... ;-p

Re:thin crust (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | about 2 years ago | (#41375967)

I'm so disappointed the top link isn't to the Superfriends episode where a space monster hatches out of the moon. :(

Re:thin crust (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 2 years ago | (#41373687)

Not cheese.... Chewy Nougat.

Re:thin crust^Hrind (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372595)

The term you should be using from now on is "rind".

First post... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372389)

...on the advanced word on the first science results from GRAIL!

In the news - wonderful example of cooperation (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372403)

Who'd have thought it; A Coptic Christian gets together with 100 Jewish financiers to make a film about Islam. doesn't that give you a warm fuzzy feeling?

Re:In the news - wonderful example of cooperation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41376395)

Well they certainly proved their point. They basically said "Islam is violent" with their crappy film, and surprise surprise, a bunch of Muslims get extremely violent when they hear about it. It is very interesting that so many Muslims have come out to counter-protest and condemn the violent ones, however, but it still shows they have a severe violence problem in their cultures. Here in the West, when nutty Christians get violent, it's only one or two of them (like the OK City bombers, or an occasional abortionist murderer), but in Islamic cultures, it's hundreds or thousands of them at a time.

Thin Crust?! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372441)

Aha! I knew it! "Thin Crust" -- The moon's not made of cheese it's a Pizza!

Re:Thin Crust?! (1)

eriqk (1902450) | about 2 years ago | (#41408869)

It was foretold.
"When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie..."

Data is plural. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372509)

> the data isn't available

Should be "the data aren't available"

Re:Data is plural. (2)

osu-neko (2604) | about 2 years ago | (#41372555)

Non-oblig. comic ref. [sheldoncomics.com]

That said, I think "data" counts as a "non-count" noun in its typical modern usage. Like "information", or "water", or "peanut butter", it may be composed of many individual bits, but it's talked about as a blob, not as a large number of individual bits.

Re:Data is plural. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372743)

So it's plural-possessive?

Re:Data is plural. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372771)

From http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/is-data-singular-or-plural.aspx

So if data is correct as both a count noun and as a mass noun, which should you use? It comes down to style and personal preference. Many academic and scientific fields, as well as many publishers and newspapers, still insist on the plural count noun use of data, as in The data are compelling, but it is more commonly used as a singular mass noun, as in The data is compelling.

And this is science.

Map this place from orbit. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372525)

It's the only way to make sure.

Re:Map this place from orbit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372559)

However good the gravitational map is, we can't be sure that there is no localized magnetic anomaly.

Re:Map this place from orbit. (1)

hattig (47930) | about 2 years ago | (#41372597)

A magnetic anomaly, buried in a crater on the far side of the moon?

Re:Map this place from orbit. (1)

FTWinston (1332785) | about 2 years ago | (#41372615)

Nearside. The clue's in its name [wikipedia.org] .

hello (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41372611)

hello

initial data (2)

GLowder (622780) | about 2 years ago | (#41372721)

Initial data seems to indicate the presence of a monolith buried underneath the surface of the moon. Scientists baffled at the implications.

Crosses fingers (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about 2 years ago | (#41372847)

and hopes for an anomoly at Tycho.

So (-1, Offtopic)

rossdee (243626) | about 2 years ago | (#41373255)

NASA found the Holy GRAIL on the moon? That might be one way to get more funding from the(R)ight wing nutjobs that want to close NASA down

Why is this news? Just a waste of money (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41373727)

Why do these things even make the /. headlines? These items from NASA are just high-zoot boondoggles that get nothing done except waste taxpayer dollars. Wake up folks, we are in a recession since 2008, and there are more important things to spend on than billion-dollar space probes. The sci-fi stuff is great for the movies, but until the economy actually gets going, things need to be spent first for basic things like reducing the national debt.

This stuff the private sector is better at anyway. For every $50 printed and spent on this, a private company could do it with $1.

Uh oh they found Dahak (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41373739)

I volunteer to be captain. That's Captain Coward to you bub.

The real excitement (3)

Peter Simpson (112887) | about 2 years ago | (#41374499)

Will come when they do a survery of the moon's *magnetic* field.

I like Groovy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41376859)

But I'm not a big fan of Grails. I'd rather just use Spring directly.

What a disappointment (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#41383251)

Slashdot is not what it should be anymore. The real slashdot should have discussions about the consequences of a thin crust. For example, is it having impact on the age of the moon?

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>