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Seaweed is Good for You and Can Be Tasty, Too (Video)

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the how-is-it-with-sauerkraut? dept.

Biotech 109

When you think of garage-based tech start-ups, hardware makers like Apple or data-manipulators like Google probably spring to mind before biotech, and way before farming. Lewis Weil, though, has for the last several years been perfecting the art of growing seaweed in central Texas, and his Austin Sea Veggies have garnered interest from gourmets and restaurants across the U.S. In large part, that's because seaweed is so useful for industrial purposes, it's getting harder to find eating seaweed these days. Lewis says there's nothing stopping anyone with an interest in aquaculture in emulating his success as an inland ocean farmer, but has some cautions, too -- when small things go wrong, or a record heatwave overcomes humans' puny air conditioning systems, your seaweed harvest can fail just like any other crop. Update: 09/19 16:40 GMT by T : Now with transcript! If video's too slow and linear, click below to read what Lewis had to say.

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109 comments

TIMMEEEEYYYY!! (0)

ClicklyMan (2734081) | about a year and a half ago | (#41386985)

What does timothy do this time? Oh, he tries seawood. Ok then.

Re:TIMMEEEEYYYY!! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41388127)

Seaweed is good for you, have a link to Apple.

Weed, too (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387013)

Weed can also be tasty, e.g. in cookies. Yummy!

Re:Weed, too (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387031)

Have you ever tried weed.... at sea?

Re:Weed, too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41390463)

might be good for sea sickness, it could at least take your mind off puking

Re:Weed, too (-1, Flamebait)

ClicklyMan (2734081) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387077)

But weed is dangerous as it can very easily launch paranoid schizophrenia.

Re:Weed, too (2)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387675)

I know you're joking, but pot does NOT cause schitzophrenia; it's a cart-and-horse correlation thing. Undiagnosed schitzophrenics are self-medicating; the schitzophrenia comes first. Pot doesn't make you crazy, but crazy people are more likely to smoke pot (it is illegal, after all).

Re:Weed, too (1)

ClicklyMan (2734081) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387997)

It's not illegal everywhere. Yet it causes schizophrenia where it's legal too.

Re:Weed, too (3, Insightful)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388239)

Precipitates schizophrenia is not the same as causes schizophrenia. For something to be precipitated it has to exist in the first place. The research shows that it MAY precipitate early onset schizophrenia. So if you're over 30 and have never had a schizo break smoking pot won't do anything (except make you stupid :) ).

Re:Weed, too (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388535)

That is funny because the paranoid schizophrenics I've known have always been saner when on pot.

It's when they aren't smoking that I've had to worry about them.

Re:Weed, too (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41388939)

Only if the individual smoking it has a very, very weak mind. Keep them away from LSD and psilocybin at all costs. They'll go fucking nuts.

I ingested 7 grams of dry psilocybin mushrooms once. The most I've ever taken, and it was my limit. I'll never do it again. It's the thrill of holding your mind together... Not losing yourself in your own introspective delusions. 6 hours of pure terror. Why did I do it? Well you don't go into it looking forward to the terror. It just happens. When you come down and your thoughts are normal again, you'll have a new appreciation to be alive.

Re:Weed, too (1)

ZeroMS (2725031) | about a year and a half ago | (#41394893)

I ingested 7 grams of dry psilocybin mushrooms once. .

You sir, are a beast. I tip my hat to you.

I read that as: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387019)

"Garbage-based startups"

Love eating seaweed (4, Interesting)

kraln (1477093) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387033)

I make a point to grab a box of "Laver", which is roasted seaweed in salt and oil, every time I go to the local Asian grocer. It's delicious, and way better than corn chips, while still taking care of my need for crunch.

Re:Love eating seaweed (5, Interesting)

vlm (69642) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387209)

I make a point to grab a box of "Laver", which is roasted seaweed in salt and oil, every time I go to the local Asian grocer. It's delicious, and way better than corn chips, while still taking care of my need for crunch.

This makes the point that aquaculture "seaweed" is Big Business in Asia, so your best strategy to learn how to grow it is to start by learning to read Japanese and/or Korean and import some of their books / visit their websites.

Despite the article vibe, what they're doing is conceptually a heck of a lot more like farmers starting to grow Ginko plants in Wisconsin, than its like the HP guys inventing their first oscillator in their garage.

Another rather important point is there is no "seaweed plant". There are a zillion plants grown in seawater that are then processed as much as plants grown in dirt. So much as some "dirt plants" get turned into caesar salad, others into egg rolls, and others into chocolate chip cookies, "seaweed" can be a heck of a lot more than sushi roll wrappers and fried chips.

A final weird situation is you'll hear or read people who don't know anything claim that most freshwater algae is toxic in comparison to seaweed. Not so. My freshwater tropical fish tank is hardly a toxic waste dump. Yes I would not eat the algae from the industrial waste dump of a river that passes thru my home town, but that is because anything touching that water is tainted... I wouldn't eat a fish from that river, that does not mean all fish are toxic. For a example of a toxic seaweed try some "red tide". Simply plucking green things out of the ocean and eating them is probably not a recipe for success, anymore than eating random dirt plants is a good idea. "Here, try some green organic vegan fair trade hippy approved recyclable biodegradable freshly brewed hemlock tea"

Re:Love eating seaweed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387881)

"Here, try some green organic vegan fair trade hippy approved recyclable biodegradable freshly brewed hemlock tea"

I only offer that if the condom breaks...

Re:Love eating seaweed (1)

Andy Dodd (701) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387993)

"Simply plucking green things out of the ocean and eating them is probably not a recipe for success, anymore than eating random dirt plants is a good idea."

What, you mean poison ivy isn't tasty?

Re:Love eating seaweed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41391331)

well, i was courious and here is a seaweed handbook from fuji:
http://www.fao.org/docrep/field/003/AC287E/AC287E00.htm#TOC

Re:Love eating seaweed (2)

bemymonkey (1244086) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387211)

Not sure if this is the same thing, but those paper-thin layers of seaweed in the flat plastic bags with spices are pretty tasty too... any idea what they're called?

Re:Love eating seaweed (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388899)

Oh god. Once I start on those I can't stop until I'm sick or there are no more to be found in the house.

Re:Love eating seaweed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41388979)

Nori I believe.

Re:Love eating seaweed (1)

bemymonkey (1244086) | about a year and a half ago | (#41389137)

Oh thanks, I thought Nori was reserved for the stuff you use to wrap Sushi (i.e. unseasoned) :)

Re:Love eating seaweed (1)

asavage (548758) | about a year and a half ago | (#41391419)

Or Gim in Korean. You want to buy the stuff toasted in sesame oil, not the unflavored version used for kimbap/sushi rolls. You can even buy Gim at Costco in Vancouver sometimes.

Re:Love eating seaweed (1)

JanneM (7445) | about a year and a half ago | (#41393483)

You mean nori? It's actually an algae that's been dried flat, not a seaweed as most people would understand it.

Re:Love eating seaweed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387397)

Folks, my four year old loves this stuff. Honestly, he looks at me last night with a mouthful of seaweed chips and asked, "Dad, is seaweed really nutritious?!?" He truly believes it's junk food.

Re:Love eating seaweed (1)

JabberWokky (19442) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387441)

Actually, laver is algae, and it's popular in Welsh cooking (well, common; traditional foods are seldom "popular"). Seriously. It's common in traditional dishes around the Irish sea. It's related to nori and several other similar algae foods.

Re:Love eating seaweed (1)

nospam007 (722110) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388307)

"Actually, laver is algae.."

Like all seaweed.

Algae (/ældi/ or /æli/; singular alga /æl/, Latin for "seaweed")

Re:Love eating seaweed (1)

JabberWokky (19442) | about a year and a half ago | (#41393587)

Hunh. Growing up on an island, I was taught that seagrass and other such seaweeds were distinct from sargassum and other such algae categorized seaweed. I didn't know the term algae was not related to taxonomy. Still seems off...

Re:Love eating seaweed (2)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387597)

It's delicious

Yes it is. When I lived in Shanghai, I would buy packets of "haitai" in the corner shop and use it to reward my daughter for doing a good job on her homework. She loved the stuff.

The Japanese seaweed is too bland for my taste, except for the wasabi flavored seaweed. Lots of flavors are available in China, and all are good. But I think the Koreans make the best. I buy some every time I have a layover in Seoul. My daughter is in high school now, and when I return from an overseas trip, the first thing she asks is "Got any seaweed?"

 

Re:Love eating seaweed (1)

BeanThere (28381) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387701)

Hmm, on holiday in Malaysia once I tried seaweed snacks - delicious, I often wish I could find them locally. They sell them there just like you'd see Lays or Pringles on the shelf.

Re:Love eating seaweed (1)

parkinglot777 (2563877) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388819)

Seaweed itself does not taste that good and some are even bland. What most people eat are products that have been added flavour (seasoning). However, it has been known for a long time (at least in Asia) that seaweed is good and could be treated as a vegetable...

always been in health food stores (1)

peter303 (12292) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387067)

Often imported from Japan. Kind of salty like chips.

Re:always been in health food stores (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387191)

friend and salted I guess.. but the video is about a species you can eat fresh like salad.

lowermybills.com? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387115)

A fly by night operation that is invoking President Obama as a "spokesman" is the latest Slashdot advertiser? High class. Real high class.
 
So when is the Psychic Friends Network going to be paying the bills around here?

Re:lowermybills.com? (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388835)

What ads?

Since the majority of the people who come here use ad blockers perhaps they have figured that only people who have no clue about ad blockers are the ones they need to advertise to, therefor they will advertise really stupid stuff.

Re:lowermybills.com? (2)

Seumas (6865) | about a year and a half ago | (#41390235)

Right, while the rest of us who DO use ad-blockers participate in really intelligent discussions like making some fucking hippy ridiculously wealthy by eating fucking weeds of the sea, because it's trendy.

Wouldn't the slashdot version ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387145)

be C-weed?

OOOOooooook (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387157)

you know the world is getting tight on food reserves when.....lol
yum is spinach a better go?

Revenue (-1, Flamebait)

hawguy (1600213) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387169)

Wow, Dice is really turning the screws and trying to get Slashdot to earn money any way it can. How much did Austin Sea Veggies pay for this Slashvertisement? Is there a Slashvertisement rate card? I know a company that might be interested in purchasing one.

Re:Revenue (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387373)

That's how they pay the bills you insensitive clod!

Re:Revenue (1)

Jeng (926980) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388915)

If you have a company that wants a story submitted then submit the story for them, and if it is accepted ask to be paid.

Or let the company know that they can submit stories themselves.

Soilent green is... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387217)

...seaweed!

Stereotypical Garnishes (5, Insightful)

dorpus (636554) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387247)

- Japanese think everything tastes better with seaweed on it.
- Chinese think everything tastes better with green onions on it.
- Indians think everything tastes better with white onions on it.
- Koreans think everything tastes better with garlic and red chilis on it.
- Malaysians think everything tastes better with coconut flakes on it.
- Vietnamese think everything tastes better with spearmint on it.
- Hawaiians think everything tastes better with pineapple on it.
- Thais think everything tastes better with crushed peanuts on it.
- Iranians think everything tastes better with apricots on it.
- Turks think everything tastes better with sumac on it.
- Texans think everything tastes better with jalapenos on it.
- Californians think everything tastes better with avocados on it.
- Wisconsinites think everything tastes better with cheese on it.
- New Englanders think everything tastes better with cream cheese on it.
- English think everything tastes better with malt vinegar on it.
- Canadians think everything tastes better with white vinegar on it.
- Italians think everything tastes better with olive oil and balsamic vinegar on it.
- Russians think everything tastes better with red beets on it.
- Mexicans think everything tastes better with mole on it.
- Calvinists think everything tastes better with nothing on it.
- Southern Baptists think everything tastes better with bbq sauce on it.
- Catholics think everything tastes better with sour cream on it.
- Egyptians think everything tastes better on top of bread.
- Ethiopians think everything tastes better on top of injera.
- Hungarians think everything tastes better with ajvar on it.
- Costa Ricans think everything tastes better with Linzano on it.
- Cameroonians think everything tastes better with Maggie sauce on it.
- Bulgarians think everything tastes better with sunflower oil on it.
- Peruvians think everything tastes better with chili paste on it.

Re:Stereotypical Garnishes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387893)

- Dutch think everything tastes better with mayonaise on it.

Re:Stereotypical Garnishes (2)

HungWeiLo (250320) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388297)

Some updates needed:

Vietnamese - fish sauce.
Thais - more pungent fish sauce.
Hawaiians - Spam.

Filipinos also love Maggi sauce.

Re:Stereotypical Garnishes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41388387)

American's think everything tastes better with salt on it.

Re:Stereotypical Garnishes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41389203)

- Japanese think everything tastes better with seaweed on it.
- Chinese think everything tastes better with green onions on it. ....

http://forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?p=9781165

Re:Stereotypical Garnishes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41389939)

Ajvar is not even Hungarian, but Serbian! Hungarians definitely don't think everything tastes better with ajvar - most don't even know it.
Now, had you said "Hungarians think everything tastes better with onions" or "paprika", sure I'd be with you all the way. But ajvar? Nope.

Re:Stereotypical Garnishes (1)

dorpus (636554) | about a year and a half ago | (#41390039)

I originally had Hungarians with paprika. The last bottle of ajvar I bought was "made in Hungary".

Re:Stereotypical Garnishes (1)

thesandtiger (819476) | about a year and a half ago | (#41390285)

Garlic, onions and horseradish make virtually everything better.

Lemon or lime juice makes most of the things the above won't improve better.

Anything left after that will probably be improved by cayanne pepper or ground coffee, and if not, nothing can be done for the dish.

Then again, I have an incredibly weird sense of taste, since I can't abide most sweet things and would rather have something incredibly savory or salty for a dessert.

On the topic - seaweed is an awesome addition to many dishes. I'm starting to do a lot of vegetarian type cooking, and have been incorporating a LOT of seaweed, quinoa (instead of rice) and red+green kale into dishes lately. The seaweed adds a little bit of depth to the flavor that the other things don't have, as well as having a nice effect on the texture of the dish.

ethnic foil pouch (1)

epine (68316) | about a year and a half ago | (#41390899)

I'd guess Canadian Mennonites are the big consumers of white vinegar (for pickling--and they have the bowel disease to prove it), with homesick Brits as the big consumers of cider vinegar. Otherwise, outside of fish and chip shops, you rarely see the stuff around.

Among older English Canadians, you'd be closer to the mark with inferior/unidentifiable bubbly orange melted cheese (curds are the superior Quebecois surrogate), or for pancakes and pastries, maple syrup.

For pasta, we make an exception to the bubble orange cheese and shake Kraft brand pre-grated Parmesan out of a green plastic cylinder. You could make a similar food stuff by fabricating a solid soft-plastic cylinder, then using a mixture of table salt and MSG as grit, boring out the center until it's off-white and fluffy.

Just in the past two months cooking at home I've done Mexican, Italian, French, Moroccan, Greek, Persian, northern Indian, Chinese and Thai--not counting a leg of chicken with roast vegetables (who owns that?)

Among younger Canadians, you'd be a lot closer to the truth listing our favorite condiment as "ethnic foil pouch".

Wikipedia lists 25 different ethnic groups each accounting for at least 1% of the Canadian population. The Japanese article lacks a comparable table, because there isn't much need. A different source lists Japanese 98.5%, Koreans 0.5%, Chinese 0.4%, other 0.6% (although there has lately been a large influx of foreigners by Japanese norms). In any of the three big Canadian cities (and several smaller ones), you could without too much effort go two full months without duplicating the ethnicity of your lunch or dinner (supposing you don't count India, China, and Africa each as a single country). And if one night you're stuck for inspiration, skip a meal and tick off North Korean.

I don't eat a lot of seaweed myself, as I'm not fully equipped.

Gut bacteria in Japanese people borrowed sushi-digesting genes from ocean bacteria [discovermagazine.com]

Re:ethnic foil pouch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41392451)

You could make a similar food stuff by fabricating a solid soft-plastic cylinder, then using a mixture of table salt and MSG as grit, boring out the center until it's off-white and fluffy.

Hmm.. I don't know how you got your hands on the secret production process of Geska Glarus Swiss "cheese" powder [wikipedia.org], but you forgot to mention the Alp Herbs.

Now if you excuse me, I remember we have a pot of it in the fridge for the past 5 years (that stuff stays good for decades).

Re:Stereotypical Garnishes (1)

xaxa (988988) | about a year and a half ago | (#41391687)

- English think everything tastes better with malt vinegar on it.

Speaking as an Englishman, that's really only chips (and possibly battered fish). I propose instead:
- English think everything tastes better with nothing added to it.
(Herbs and spices? What're they?)

Re:Stereotypical Garnishes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41393705)

Two words: HP Sauce

Works for pies, buttes, chips, steak, etc.

Probably wouldn't put it on a Christmas pudding tho...

Dulse (2)

na1led (1030470) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387275)

Grown here in Maine, and tastes great. I make a habit to purchase a bag every month. Seaweed is very nutritious, so may call it a super food.

Re:Dulse (1)

JustOK (667959) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387633)

New Brunswick dulse is better

Re:Dulse (1)

na1led (1030470) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388271)

It's probably the same stuff, since New Brunswick borders Maine.

Aquaculture in Central Texas (2)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387345)

Limited water supply is a problem in central Texas with restrictions and rationing becoming more frequent. Fortunately this seaweed farm is small. There have been other water intensive operations that have been shutdown, like a catfish farm outside of San Antonio that wastefully used tens of millions of gallons each year from the aquifer. It was only shutdown because they were discharging water into the rivers without a permit. The Rice farmers on the coast have been getting large releases every year from the lakes though the Colorado river, but not this year due to drought.

Some places are not suitable for water intensive uses.

Re:Aquaculture in Central Texas (4, Interesting)

Whorhay (1319089) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387639)

I can see how a catfish farm wouldn't necessarily be using water efficiently, simply because those ponds are great for evaporation. And you said they were draining them and just dumping the water? That is pretty wasteful.

I have been reading up on aquaponics as a means of both gardening and raising fish. Basically you have a tank where you raise fish, they turn their food into fertilizer and deposit it in the water. The water is then pumped through a series of filters and grow beds where bacteria and plants breakdown and filter out the fishes waste. The cleaned water is then drained back into the fish tank to start the process over. It is apparently a very efficient use of water so far as farming goes because the only water leaving the system is actually in plant matter, which will be eaten or composted, and some evaporation. I wouldn't be suprised if you could grow seaweed in a similiar way and actually conserve water in comparison to more traditional farming methods.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquaponics [wikipedia.org]

Re:Aquaculture in Central Texas (1)

ISoldat53 (977164) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388437)

On the plus side, if it escapes the farm it probably won't reproduce in the fresh water.

Re:Aquaculture in Central Texas (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41388503)

I noticed that the intro was careful to mention that Austin hasn't had a sea in "thousands' of years, thereby appeasing the religious fundamentalist in Texas.

Re:Aquaculture in Central Texas (1)

Andy Dodd (701) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388987)

I believe proper aquaculture is designed to be as closed-loop as possible.

This is news? (1)

bmo (77928) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387349)

Gathering seaweed has been common here since, hell, since the Narragansetts, Wampanoags, and Pequots discovered they could eat it. The right to access the shoreline in the Rhode Island Constitution calls out the gathering of seaweed.

You can even make desserts with it. In fact, it's in many ice creams. That "carrageenan"? It's irish moss, chucked in a blender cooked in a double boiler and turned into a gel.

Block Island Blancmange: http://www.quahog.org/factsfolklore/index.php?id=154 [quahog.org]

Irish Moss can even be stir fried.

That's just one plant. There are others. Sugar kelp. Yup.

https://eatingwiththeecosystem.org/Sugar_Kelp.html [eatingwith...system.org]

--
BMO

Re:This is news? (1)

slim (1652) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388083)

Gathering seaweed has been common here since, hell, since ...

The news is that someone's successfully farming seaweed inland. The headline is poor.

That said, with the quality of transport today, it seems much saner to just ship sea-grown seaweed from the coast. There's a lot of lobster restaurants in Las Vegas. They don't raise the lobsters in Nevada.

Fukushima-contaminated seaweed (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41387355)

How much of the world's seaweed has been and will be contaminated by the Fukushima disaster?

The authorities who handled the Fukushima disaster pumped a lot of radioactive waste water directly in to the ocean. Seaweed is an excellent absorber of iodine, and huge amounts of radioactive iodine were dumped from Fukushima.

So how much of the world's edible seaweed is at risk of radioactive contamination from Fukushima? Much of the world's edible seaweed supply comes from the Asia-Pacific region, does it not? And therefore it is especially vulnerable to contamination from Fukushima.

Re:Fukushima-contaminated seaweed (1)

NoisySplatter (847631) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388703)

Just thinking this through with respect to the volume of seawater compared to the size of any possible release i would say it isnt much of a worry.

Re:Fukushima-contaminated seaweed (1)

Solandri (704621) | about a year and a half ago | (#41390397)

1) The major Iodine isotope from fission of Uranium-235 is Iodine-131. It has a half-life of 8 days. Of all the I-131 which was dumped into the ocean by Fukushima, 0.00000000000000000024% of it remains today.

2) Unless you live in certain areas with high natural background radiation (like Colorado), your largest annual dose of radiation comes from Potassium-40 [wikipedia.org]. It's a naturally occurring isotope of Potassium. About 0.01% of all Potassium is K-40. Our nerves need Potassium to function so you cannot reduce your Potassium intake to avoid it. Foods high in K-40 include potatoes, grapes/raisins, lima beans, spinach, tomatoes, oranges, bananas, and chocolate. Enjoy the rest of your paranoid life.

Re:Fukushima-contaminated seaweed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41392633)

That's what I wondered as well..

You probably don't have to worry about the Iodine, since it has a short half-life it's mostly harmless by now.

The next two most important waste products are, IIRC, Cesium and Strontium (Strontium-90 isotope). These both have half-lives of approx 30 years, so in a century or five they won't pose a problem anymore, either (if you think a century or five is a long time, don't build nuclear power stations!).

In the meantime, whether they are a problem depends on two independent factors:
  • 1. Are they bio-accumulated in seaweed and/or fish?
  • and

  • 2. Are they bio-accumulated in us after we consume that seaweed and/or fish?

I don't think Cesium and Strontium are *normally* used as building blocks, however they are analogs of important group-1 and group-2 elements, Potassium and Calcium, respectively. What this means is that Cesium probably is absorbed quickly and also pissed out quite quickly, and Strontium probably is absorbed quickly and then stays inside you for the rest of your life, if you're still growing up (gets put into your bones). Nicely irradiating your bone marrow in the meantime :-(

We still have a packet of nori from before Fukushima, btw.

Yeah, but... (1)

Smivs (1197859) | about a year and a half ago | (#41387921)

hasn't anybody noticed that the company is currently not selling any seaweed?!

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

ajlitt (19055) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388007)

FTMFWS:

"Austin Sea Veggies are back! You can get them every day at Wheatsville Coop in the refrigerated produce section.

For wholesale information please send us an email."

I've also seen them at the local farmer's market in the past.

Re:Yeah, but... (2)

timothy (36799) | about a year and a half ago | (#41389031)

Not all the footage shot made the final video, but Lewis said that though he started out at the farmer's market, the demand from restaurants become so great that basically he's outgrown it now. (Between realizing that the seaweed he was already growing was edible and standing in front of a banner at the farmer's market, he says was only about 2 weeks.)

But being at Wheatsville, that's close enough to a farmer's market, eh? ;)

Re:Yeah, but... (2)

ajlitt (19055) | about a year and a half ago | (#41390325)

A reply from Timothy and a front page mention (pokey9000) in one day, I'm honored!

Small scale, high tech agriculture is becoming a big thing in the area. There's a company not far from Austin that recently had a successful Kickstarter for a mostly automated modular greenhouse system (search for Horto Domi).

Re:Yeah, but... (1)

timothy (36799) | about a year and a half ago | (#41395577)

That sounds like a cool video subject -- thanks for the tip ;)

When I was at the organic farm where Lewis Weil is moving in his stuff, we talked about the conception I'd gotten from books about the nearish future (but mostly written in the early or mid '70s) that sometime soon we'd all be eating a lot of engineered algae ... it's a slow future to arrive, but it was great to eat some of this ogo as a sample.

Good source of iodine, but. (3, Interesting)

Theovon (109752) | about a year and a half ago | (#41388409)

The Japanese eat a heck of a lot of seaweed, which puts an unusually high amount of iodine in their diet, which has some health benefits. The problem for this farmed seaweed is that I can't find any indication that this grower is adding any form of iodine to the under-water soil, let alone a form that is easy to absorb.

I saw a video from one of these "prepper" people who pointed out that you don't need to take multivitamins as long as you eat a balanced diet of vegetables grown in virgin soil. We have to supplement because most farmland is depleated of trace nutrients, and the organics are only marginally better. So maybe his seaweed tastes good, but I doubt it's a good source of iodine.

Don't be fooled by imitations.

No, Dumbass (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41390881)

No,
You're dead wrong about farmland being "depleated" of trace nutrients. The balanced diet is the important part. In the western world, only those people with remarkably poor diets (vegan or McDonalds) and people with certian disease need vitamin supplements.

Re:Good source of iodine, but. (1)

nido (102070) | about a year and a half ago | (#41393159)

This is the most important comment in this story. If I had points I'd give you a +1. :)

Cultivating Edible Seaweed in Hawaii pdf (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41389087)

http://ag.arizona.edu/landandpeople/spring2004/article_10l&p.pdf

Anything aquaponics is all good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41389191)

Good to see more people getting in to aquaponics.

Those who get in early will benefit the most, of course.
If you have to space, look in to it, it could get you a little bit of money as a secondary job since they are mostly automatic if you do it right.

Womens Shows (2)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about a year and a half ago | (#41389641)

This reminds me of Oprah and her ilk with the near-weekly bits about how to eat healthy with organics, garden-fresh veggies, and exotic whatevers over nasty and dangerous store-bought, processed or fast foods.

Somehow, they always gloss over the part that it only works if you're indpendently wealthy and can easily afford both the time and monetary expenditures required. Hell, they can't even do it themselves, but have to rely on a guest with multiple assistants and a Deus Ex Machina uber kitchen that would cost more than an average US home.

For a male context, just think of Norm on New Yankee Workshop in his six-figure setup saying: "All you need is..."

Re:Womens Shows (2)

xaxa (988988) | about a year and a half ago | (#41391863)

There's a big difference between "store bought" and "processed"/"fast" foods.

I buy almost all my food at the nearest supermarket, but they have more kinds of fruits and vegetables than I can name, and it's hardly bad. It's not as nice as the luxury supermarket, or the health food / organic supermarket, which is reflected in the price, but it's fresh and healthy enough. However, about the most processed thing I buy is pre-cooked ham.

Admittedly, the supermarket doesn't have fresh seaweed (though they probably have dried seaweed, packed in a fancy box next to a "sushi kit" or whatever), but I don't think the lack of seaweed is what prevents the people stocking up on ready meals and chips from eating healthily.

(This is England, and previous discussions have shown that some basic stuff that I don't think of particularly "processed", like canned tomatoes or fresh bread, contain added sugar and salt in the US. Government and consumer pressure prevents that here.)

It's all in the preparation (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41390003)

I believe if you sautee it in butter, smother it with cheese and top it with bacon crumbles, seaweed can be part of a delightful treat!

Dulce and Dulse (1)

Ugmo (36922) | about a year and a half ago | (#41390047)

He mentions that an aquaculture farm is letting him use their greenhouses. The name contains "Dulce" which made me think of "Dulse" a seaweed that people in Ireland eat. It is not only the Japanese and Koreans (and aparently the Hawaiins) who eat seaweed. I would guess Dulse is a cold water seaweed and unsuitable for a greenhouse in Austin Texas

Re:Dulce and Dulse (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41390935)

Not just Ireland, but Canada too, especially Grand Manan. I wonder if Roland is still in business there. He used to be the guy.

FDA (1)

roman_mir (125474) | about a year and a half ago | (#41390713)

He should be careful advertising this way, he is going to get a nasty visit from some folks with FDA badges, and they will shut him down, they will require years of study of this that or other, they will want him to buy licenses and to pay for studies, they will screw him over big time. If anything he buys comes across state lines, it could be even worse. I wish him luck, he should expand and become the next Walmart of Seaweed.

I remember 25yrs ago. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41390763)

When I had an aquarium with seaweed in it. It grew like HECK and was tasty! So, he has reproduced what I did in my flat without really trying 25years ago? (BTW. The fish died but the seaweed was still edible and growing... I did not try the fish)

Soylent Green is People!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41393519)

Soylent Green is People!!!

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