×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

MS Office 2013 Pushing Home Users Toward Subscriptions

Soulskill posted about a year and a half ago | from the deposit-a-nickel-for-every-word-you-type dept.

Businesses 349

An anonymous reader writes "Ars reports that Microsoft has announced pricing plans for Office 2013 that include a subscription-based model for home users. There will be a $100/year Home version that can be shared by up to 5 users and a $150/year Small Business version. 'Subscription software of one form or another has proven popular in the enterprise (whether it be cloud services, like Office 365, or subscriptions to desktop software, such as Microsoft's Software Assurance scheme). But so far it's a rarity in the consumer space. Anti-virus software has tried to bully and cajole users into getting aboard the subscription train, but the large number of users with out-of-date anti-viral protection suggests users are resisting. ... As another incentive to subscribe, and one that might leave a bad taste in the mouth, the company says that subscribers will be given unspecified "updates" to add new features and capabilities over the life of their subscription. Perpetual licensees will only get bug fixes and security updates.'"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

349 comments

Guess I am learning Libre Office (4, Insightful)

jhoegl (638955) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381011)

I am not paying a leasing fee for software, thanks.

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381109)

Humorous. If you have to learn libre office you clearly haven't used a word processor before. Microsoft Office is not significantly different (at least older versions) than Libre Office. Unless you've only picked up word processing since 2007 or so and it was with MS Office then you've already got the skill set to use Libre Office. There are just a few slight differences for basic word processing tasks.

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (4, Informative)

jhoegl (638955) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381205)

I am actually talking about scripting and macroing in Libre.

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381243)

May I ask, what you do that requires scripting and macroing (or did you mean complex formulas for spreadsheet).

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (3, Insightful)

jhoegl (638955) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381291)

It could be complex formulas, or a form in Excel/Calc(Libre Ver)
It could also be an error checking, a sorting feature, um... what else
It could be maybe mass email lists, or some other functions like that.
Macros are pretty useful in Excel if you know what you are doing. I have seen some cool stuff.
Word... not so much.

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (4, Insightful)

Tough Love (215404) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381387)

Libreoffice spreadsheet macros are nearly identical to Excel now. Not to the point where you could expect some gigantic Excel model to just work, but I doubt you get that even between different versions of Microsoft's product. Writing macros from scratch... it just works. All the same functions are there with the exception of a few really bizarre ones. And Openoffice/Libreoffice has a much nicer implementation of cut and paste than Excel, it works more like cut and paste in a word processor as opposed to the wierdo funky scheme they came up with for Excel. That a big deal for me, I don't want to be thinking about cut and paste oddities when I'm thinking about crunching numbers.

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381347)

I'm sure it is just as easy in Libre, but I use macros all of the time when doing repetitious tasks. Monthly reports come to mind, I have a keyboard shortcuts for things like resizing photos, and highlighting and removing highlighting. I rarely have to touch the mouse now that I have it set up the way I like. This has cut a lot of time off of report prep.

I just prefer to skip using the mouse if I can, so even if the button is right there on the screen, I dont feel like moving the mouse there to push it.

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (5, Informative)

Baldrake (776287) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381157)

And fortunately you need go no further than TFM to find out that you don't have to. Subscription is just an option. You can still buy outright if you want.

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381837)

It's an option now. Several years down the road, who knows?

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (5, Insightful)

v1 (525388) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381445)

You're already leasing it. It's called licensing. The only difference is that you had a one-time payment before, and now they want you to pay continuously.

They say they're going to add new features, but I don't see how they can add $100 worth of new features every year. Heck, office 2004 still gets my jobs done. I don't see what features they could possibly have added over the last 8 years that would be worth $800.

The whole pricing thing for apps like this I think is going to do a bubble burst shortly anyway. Who's going to pay $100/yr to lease an app that a cloud app will do for you for $15/yr? I've used Google Docs recently, and while it's not a perfect replacement yet, it's sure a lot cheaper!

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381703)

If you are paying for income tax software, you are essentially leasing for an once a year use for it.

Re:Guess I am learning Libre Office (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about a year and a half ago | (#41382091)

Its pretty irritating if youre used to office, but the pricetag goes a long way to easing the pain. And actually its been a lot better in recent versions-- I often forget im using it.

Good news for Libre Office! (3, Informative)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381021)

Well then, I'll just leave this here:
Download Libre Office. $0, $0 a month. I think you can swing it. [libreoffice.org]

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381165)

Let me know when Libre Office doesn't horribly mangle my PPTX files.

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381185)

I does not mangle mine. So, I would say right now is the time.

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381313)

LibreOffice is good when you're doing simple text and pictures on a background.

Now try using it when you have animations, color changing, custom fonts, interactive features, and other things in your PPT files. It will make your presentation unusable.

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381447)

Having animations, color changing, custom fonts, interactive features, and other things will make your presentation unusable. What you write it in doesn't matter at that point.

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (5, Insightful)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year and a half ago | (#41382055)

That, ladies and gentlemen, is pretty much a textbook example of sour grapes [wikipedia.org].

Slashdotter #1: "My software can do everything your software can do."
Slashdotter #2: "Your software can't do x."
Slashdotter #1: "Yeah, but... but... doing x is stupid anyway, and only for losers!"

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (4, Interesting)

countach74 (2484150) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381209)

Here's the thing: LibreOffice is by far best when you use its native formats. Weird, huh?

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381287)

In the real world, we conduct our business in Office formats. Having LibreOffice do a halfass job of reading them is unacceptable.

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (1)

timeOday (582209) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381341)

In the real world, we conduct our business in Office formats. Having LibreOffice do a halfass job of reading them is unacceptable.

I have LibreOffice on my home computer for my kids who are in grade school and edit Word documents for their classes all the time. It works fine.

Would I rely on LibreOffice at work? Regrettably, no; the documents are far more complex. Even MS Office for OSX does not cut the mustard. But for home use, I find LibreOffice to be good.

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (1)

countach74 (2484150) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381429)

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the article is about "pushing home users toward subscriptions".

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381539)

In real work we use Libre Office to convert old WordPerfect and Microsoft Office files to a newer version. It handles old Microsoft Office files better than the recent versions of Microsoft Office.

( I work as digital archivist / documentalist )

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (4, Interesting)

smpoole7 (1467717) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381663)

> In the real world

... with a bad economy, with money tight, most businesses are looking for a way to trim a buck. Just because your particular firm isn't willing to spend the (minimal, in most cases) effort on a migration that will literally save your company tons of money, don't think that all of us think that way. We certainly don't.

Look: that argument was compelling up until just a few years ago. I'll grant you that, especially back in the old StarOffice days (gack, gag), then on to OpenOffice.org. But speaking for myself -- freely admitting that your mileage will vary -- I haven't had trouble opening anything in LibreOffice for a couple of years now. Including some fairly sweet PPT presentations.

Besides, Microsoft has tried to introduce the "subscription" model before. They'll probably back off of it after they get deluged with complaints. Again.

(Or -- this is my real fear -- they'll go after things like Libre and KOffice with the patent hammer.)

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381309)

If by best, you mean constantly having to receive e-mails from clients asking what the hell this file is you just sent them, then yeah it rocks!

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381359)

>Here's the thing: LibreOffice is by far best when you use its native formats. Weird, huh?

Here's the thing: Normal people who want documents from you don't use LibreOffice's native formats. Weird, huh?

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381489)

It also mangles a lot of my DOCX files... changes the formatting just enough to screw up anything that's not just text.

Re:Good news for Libre Office! (5, Funny)

gmanterry (1141623) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381511)

Let me know when Libre Office doesn't horribly mangle my PPTX files.

I believe that any MS file format that contains an 'X' in the extension is experimental and that is most likely why Libre Office has a problem. Use another file format and you probably won't have any problems.

mangling pptx for home use (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381831)

If you are doing PPTX at home for work, shouldn't work provide you with a copy of MS Office? Maybe I'm being silly, but I don't do powerpoint at home to impress my friends and family.

Perfect family gift (5, Funny)

Dan East (318230) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381033)

Dad: Merry Christmas kids!!!!
Kids: What did you get us?
Dad: We now have a 1 year family subscription for a web-based word processor!
Kids: YAAAAAAAY!!!!!!

Re:Perfect family gift (1)

game kid (805301) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381403)

What fools. My 1-year subscription came with a 3-month membership and in-game currency for an MMO!

See what happens when you don't clip the internet coupons in your toolbar? You miss out on great deals!

Libre Office (3, Insightful)

Sir_Kurt (92864) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381043)

OK, so why wouldn't any home user choose a free LibreOffice download over a $100/year msoffice subscription tax?

Kurt

Re:Libre Office (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381077)

Brought to you by the letters 'M' and '$'.

Re:Libre Office (4, Insightful)

dnaumov (453672) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381111)

Because users actually prefer MS Office and are willing to pay for using it?

Re:Libre Office (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381509)

If by users, you mean corporations (they're people too!).

Individuals prefer emails.

Re:Libre Office (1, Insightful)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381763)

Because users actually prefer MS Office and are willing to pay for using it?

Users don't necessarily prefer MS Office as much as they are locked into it.
Compatibility is a crapshoot and I think there may be active work on MS side to decrease it further.

Re:Libre Office (1)

xs650 (741277) | about a year and a half ago | (#41382093)

Because users actually prefer MS Office and are willing to pay for using it?

Microsoft is about to find out just how willing users are to pay for it every year.

An acquaintance said MS is incompetently evil while Apple is competently evil. If MS goes with this model, that will be further evidence that my acquaintance is correct about MS.

I prefer Libre Office but also have Office 2010 because $100 was a decent price to buy it for and on rare occasion it is useful. Lease it for $100/year? No fricking way

Re:Libre Office (4, Informative)

drooling-dog (189103) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381163)

Because it's not advertised on the Tee Vee, and because MS can afford all of the FUD and astroturfing it needs to keep people in a state of confusion. After all, it's "not ready for the desktop", just like Linux.

Re:Libre Office (2, Interesting)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381867)

Because it's not advertised on the Tee Vee, and because MS can afford all of the FUD and astroturfing it needs to keep people in a state of confusion.

Also, because you may or may not be able to open that PowerPoint.pptx with cute cat pictures. I know compatibility exists, but it is in no way guaranteed to always work

After all, it's "not ready for the desktop", just like Linux.

And here I will have to burn some of my carma once again
With all due respect, Linux is not nearly as ready for the desktop as people on slashdot seem to think. Now, I understand that there is a bunch of people who will come forward and explain how their grandma used Ubuntu (or such) for 10 years now.

But what I know is when the wireless card on the desktop did not work, the common googled solution appears to involve recompiling the kernel with right modules. That's where I begin to tune out. It's not the specific problem, it's the fact that kernel re-compilation should never be an acceptable part of the configuration/setup that is done by the average user.

Re:Libre Office (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381217)

Because most people have no idea that there is something called Libre Office, or that there are any alternatives to Microsoft Office at all.

Re:Libre Office (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381397)

People who use Office daily, for whom 27Â per day is reasonable.

Re:Libre Office (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381789)

People who use Office daily, for whom 27Â per day is reasonable.

People who use Office daily probably aren't home users (which the article is about). The small business cost is $150 per user per year, so a 100 person office will pay $15,000/yr. Regular business cost is even higher. Previously, a small business could purchase those 100 copies for around $20,000 and then use them for 5 years. That equates to $4,000/yr versus $15,000.

No wonder the republicans want tax cuts for the wealth, job creators -- they are going to have to use it to pay for new copies of Office.

Re:Libre Office (1)

Dan541 (1032000) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381781)

Not to mention $100 per year is fucking expensive compared to buying it outright.

Why is this a problem? (1)

tomhath (637240) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381053)

Don't like it? Buy a disk. Want an upgrade? Buy another disk. Or don't use MS Office. Your choice.

Re:Why is this a problem? (1)

drooling-dog (189103) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381133)

Did anyone here say it was a problem? Most of the responses so far are suggesting alternatives, like LibreOffice. Or is there some reason we shouldn't be discussing that?

Re:Why is this a problem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381173)

Its a forum. People are discussing it. A lot of people think its a stupid idea on Microsofts end. Your contributions are worthless to the conversation.

Poor value? (2)

DigitAl56K (805623) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381527)

I doesn't seem very good value to me.

I just bought a home license for office from Costco for ~$120 with instant $20 rebate. It allows up to three licensed installations and it doesn't expire. Like many people, I don't upgrade instantly each time a new version of Office rolls around, so you can easily amortize that cost over say.. 3-4 years. So for my 3 licenses (only two of which I'm even using), I paid about $33/yr, or $16.50 per active license/yr and don't have to worry that the software will expire.

If I bought this subscription, I would be paying $100 every year, getting more licenses - even though I can't use more, so I'd be paying about $50 per active license per year - and I better keep paying it if I want to keep editing my files.

Value seems poor, even if I used more licenses, and even if I hadn't got the $20 rebate. Seems at first glance like a 2.5x markup in my case, in fact.

who is dumb enough to pay it? (1)

alen (225700) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381057)

no one in their right mind will pay $100 a year to use MS Word and Outlook at home

Re:who is dumb enough to pay it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381131)

Mathematically it could prove cheaper for users that stay up to date with ms office. So for those users no one in their "right mind" wouldn't.

anti-virus cheaper @ retail than subscribing (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381085)

This is a no brainer. Subscription would probably work better if there wasn't so much competition in the space. A customer gos into a retail establishment and sees anti-virus on sale constantly for 1 year at $30 or less after rebate and then ends up getting charged $40-60 when they go to subscribe thereafter. Why would anybody who remembered the cost of anti-virus subscribe? The reason they discount it at retail is because they have to compete with other anti-virus companies. What they know is that a large percentage of people won't remember what they paid and/or are too lazy/lack the time to run to the store and purchase another copy. The other reason people subscribe is they aren't technically savvy enough.

Turning the screws (1, Insightful)

Tough Love (215404) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381115)

You knew this was going to happen. Think you bought your software? Microsoft disagrees, and by the way, Microsoft doesn't think you should own your computer either. Anybody so weak kneed as to be afraid to act in their own interest and move to the free and open option gets no sympathy from me.

Re:Turning the screws (1)

Dan East (318230) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381573)

The problem is Microsoft no longer holds the majority OS market in personal computing devices. If they try and screw you over with their software on their platform, then people will use a platform with more affordable application pricing. Microsoft has to win 2 games at one time here - the OS and the applications. Frankly I don't see it happening, as they are screwing up in one or both arenas every time they turn around.

One thing a lot of people don't realize is that not only is the iOS app market HUGE, but the pricing is incredibly low. The bang for the buck, even with just free apps, is incredible. So for me, it's not just the size of Apple's App market that's impressive, but the amount of entertainment and utility that I can get for a very, very reasonable price.

Any platform that is going to attempt to compete against iOS (and tablets and high-powered cell phones are and will be a big part of the future of consumer computers), has to compete not only in the OS and hardware levels, and not just with number of applications available, but also the cost of those applications. Microsoft doesn't seem to get this. I'm somewhat surprised that the Kindle is doing as well as it is for the same reason (or perhaps a significant number of people are unlocking their kindles so they can access the Google Play market as well?). There isn't a lot of value there, as far as apps go. Developers have to jump through even more hoops to get into the Amazon market, and after the trouble, many developers do not bother with a free or freemium version of their app. It's just pay-only. The Nook app store is even worse in this regard (much fewer apps, and they are basically ALL pay only - last I checked, a free version of Angry Birds wasn't even available, only the full version to purchase).

Now maybe MS is already throwing up their hands in defeat, and ceding that in the future, the only people really buying MS office are those that NEED MS office - for backwards compatibility, or because their school / workplace requires it in some way, etc. This subscription model doesn't even work well as a "PC tax" that they can slip in with the OEMs to bundle a really stripped down version of Office. So if this is the case, perhaps MS is wise to milk those customers for all they're worth, and just forfeit the more casual market to free online services like Google Drive (aka Google Docs), etc.

Re:Turning the screws (1)

redmid17 (1217076) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381765)

I don't see tablets and cell phones as a very viable market for document creation and editing. Tablets and cell phones are for consumption and it's going to take a hell of an engineering feat to make it more practical otherwise. There are already free readers out there for iOS and Android, so no one is going to pay for it.

Re:Turning the screws (1)

knorthern knight (513660) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381933)

> Tablets and cell phones are for consumption and it's going to take
> a hell of an engineering feat to make it more practical otherwise.

Add a bluetooth keyboard+mouse to a tablet, and you've re-invented the notebook.

Support for Access databases on Linux. (1, Insightful)

bejiitas_wrath (825021) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381143)

Libreoffice can open the *.docx format just fine; I just wish there was a way to work on Access databases in Libreoffice as you can in Access. That is my only gripe.

Re:Support for Access databases on Linux. (1)

jhoegl (638955) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381221)

Access works through SQL queries. Couldnt be that tough.

Re:Support for Access databases on Linux. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381225)

To this day, Access has no alternatives, no competitors. Closest thing is FileMaker on Mac, and that's a far cry from Access, and incompatible too.

I really wonder why none of the free software makers have ever taken on the challenge of doing an Access clone.

Re:Support for Access databases on Linux. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381327)

They're out there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gambas
http://www.glom.org/wiki/index.php?title=Glom
http://www.python-camelot.com/

They just suck. Not that access is good, but it has a giant user base and history.

Re:Support for Access databases on Linux. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381493)

Kexi is also an option

Re:Support for Access databases on Linux. (4, Interesting)

PRMan (959735) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381381)

Open Office Base is an alternative to Access. I even used it at work to open an Access 2007 file (we didn't have Access with our version of Office) and it opened it well enough for me to read it into a spreadsheet.

Re:Support for Access databases on Linux. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381471)

http://kexi-project.org/

Re:Support for Access databases on Linux. (1)

TheRecklessWanderer (929556) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381979)

There's no need for access at home. just like most people don't need SQL Server at home either. Any type of database stuff that does need to be done, there is most likely already free canned or inexpensive canned software. most anything that is needed for home is a spreadsheet, not a database.

Re:Support for Access databases on Linux. (1)

Aryden (1872756) | about a year and a half ago | (#41382075)

Or FileMaker on PC they are identical and work incredibly well compared to Access.

Unspecified Updates? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381261)

Is this a reference to bug and security fixes? I moved away from Microsoft when I realized I wasn't buying new features, I was buying installation convenience to make a product I had already licensed more secure & less broken.

Microsoft delivers junk. Why would people pay for the possibility of some unknown future benefit? Anyone remember Vista Ultimate Extras?

Seriously folks, move on....

Who the Hell is steering this ship? (4, Insightful)

hilldog (656513) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381303)

First an interface that no body likes ...say hello to blocky windows 8 than a screw you charge for Office. Bill come back! The captain is steering into the reefs! Awww...screw it just go open source, spend half an hour learning the in's and out's and be free!

Re:Who the Hell is steering this ship? (1)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381893)

First an interface that no body likes ...say hello to blocky windows 8 than a screw you charge for Office. Bill come back! The captain is steering into the reefs! Awww...screw it just go open source, spend half an hour learning the in's and out's and be free!

This is working for MS just fine. Vista was a failure similar to what Windows 8 is (apparently) shaping up to be, and no lasting damage was done. Most users and all corporations just skipped it. MS may be coordinating good/bad releases with corporate re-licensing cycle on purpose, for all we know

Most of those actions would be destructive for a non-monopoly but work reasonably well for MS.

no thanks... (5, Insightful)

jaymz666 (34050) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381315)

Word 2003 still works just fine...

Most home users barely use many of the features of these tools to begin with, they won't see the value of paying $100 a year for this. That's a lot of money to many people.

Re:no thanks... (1)

FrankSchwab (675585) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381361)

Actually, Word 2000 still works just fine. And is far more straightforward and less annoying than the 2010 version I use at work... /frank

Re:no thanks... (0)

Cosgrach (1737088) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381395)

I have to agree. The old version of M$ Orifice that we use in our office still works fine, and is joyfully free of the FUCKING RIBBON. It ain't broke, it has all the features that we need. Why buy an inferior re-hash of something that you already have?

Re:no thanks... (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381833)

Word 2003 still works just fine...

Most home users barely use many of the features of these tools to begin with, they won't see the value of paying $100 a year for this. That's a lot of money to many people.

Of course Microsoft could just change the licensing agreement on your existing copy (like Google and Facebook have recently done with their services) and you then have the choice to upgrade to the new subscription or stop using the product.

Re:no thanks... (1)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381915)

Word 2003 still works just fine...

Until you start receiving those docx files, you mean?

Re:no thanks... (4, Informative)

jaymz666 (34050) | about a year and a half ago | (#41382021)

To open Microsoft Office Word 2007 .docx or .docm files with Microsoft Office Word 2003, Word 2002, or Word 2000, you need to install the Microsoft Office Compatibility Pack for Word, Excel, and PowerPoint 2007 File Formats and any necessary Office updates. By using the Compatibility Pack for the 2007 Office system, you can open, edit some items, and save Office Word 2007 documents in previous versions of Word.

This has been an effort a long time coming (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381365)

Microsoft has been trying to go the subscription route for its software ever since Bill Gates was the CEO and remarked about how jealous he was at the AOL subscriber model.

Two words (3, Informative)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381383)

Google Drive.

Seriously if you've not checked out googles iteration of google docs (and their attempt to compete in 'the cloud') you should. 5 gigs free space on the cloud, plus built in web based office suite, all free.

Though from what I understand it costs more than the old google docs subscription models did. If you decide 5 gigs of space isn't enough for you. But it would seem they have added value to it with the rather convenient google drive program

Re:Two words (1)

hodet (620484) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381757)

I can say the same about Skydrive. I have Office 2010 home edition for the Windows laptop and use skydrive as well. The in browser version of office doesn't give everything that the desktop client gives but is a pretty worthy option in a pinch. Is plenty for most users. Also comes with 25GB of space (although 7 GB or something now). Just personal preference for me as Google docs just feels klunky to me. Again personal preference only. I have Libre Office on my Linux laptop and it seems ok too.

Recurrent cost? (1)

davidc (91400) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381391)

I don't THINK so!

Subscription software may be popular in the enterprise, but I can't see it flying in the home.

Subscription model will last one year (1)

jd659 (2730387) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381399)

There's a huge difference between a word processor and an anti-virus software. Many home users often run an outdated anti-virus and, while this may not give them an effective protection, they don't really see the negative side. Yes, an anti-virus may nag that it's outdated, but there's no additional negative implication. Even if the anti-virus gets completely disabled, users will be able to use computers just fine. This non-criticality allows making purchasing decisions whenever users feel like.

The word processing or e-mail access is a critical function of the general purpose computer. Imagine if your computer requires a $100 payment the night a presentation is due or the e-mail client doesn't allow downloading some critical attachments unless you pay.

The first year the users may buy the subscription, but they will switch to some alternative in the first renew cycle.

Why would anyone do this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381411)

Why would any home users purchase a $100/year license when they can purchase a full edition that installs locally for around $120. The local version can be used virtually for ever (or as long as the format remains relevant) and they don't have to worry about network down time, slow connection speed or MS pulling the plug on the service.

Wow, for only $100/yr I can get free UPDATES? (5, Insightful)

Jenny Z (1028212) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381433)

It is kind of funny how the marketing departments of big software companies think we actually look forward to 'updates' which annoy us and waste our time. Now I actually breath a sigh of relief when my BlueRay player gets past the moment where it may insist I have to spend 5 minutes 'updating' before I can watch my movie. I can't imagine wanting to pay $100 in return for being hassled with updates I don't care about. Apparently, they haven't figured out that people very well might pay $100 to never be bothered with them.

Vista Ultimate Extras (0)

dugn (890551) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381451)

I think we've heard that we'll be "given unspecified "updates" to add new features and capabilities" before.

Oh boy! (1)

ra1n85 (2708917) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381465)

Sign me up! This deal sounds just as good as the one the kid from the Geeksquad gave me on my new fatherboard.

Microsoft Office Pushing users to Open Source (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381519)

Respect to the big MS

Office web apps are still free (1)

PNutts (199112) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381533)

I would have to need the stuff not in the free apps pretty badly to pay a subscription. As in, "do I really need to do this?"

"Convenience" (2)

Redmancometh (2676319) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381559)

I'm tired of companies calling things convenient that aren't convenient, and using it as an excuse to screw us. Or "Simplifying" things and making things both more expensive, and harder to customize. I think for the first time the IT industry isn't getting better in any way shape or form it's getting worse!

Abiword, Openoffice, Libreoffice (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381571)

We definately have options to say the least, I haven't had word installed on any of my PC's for almost 10 years. Do I use word, yes but very rarely and thats due to it being the only word processor available at school or on family members computer.

Personal preference is Abiword for word processing it very lightweight but the spelling/grammer checker is lacking in comparison to openoffice but it more than makes up for that in raw simplicity and ease of use, so I use it to write in before transfering over to one of the other programs to do a final check on spelling/grammer.

Openoffice I prefer this over Libreoffice mainly because I have been using it since I ditched MS Office and I'm used to it.

Libreoffice tried it a little while ago but not the biggest fan of it, but I also had a lot of problems with it just plain working.

MS Office, I don't use it but I will admit in terms of functionality and spelling/grammer checker it is hands down the winner. But it costs money and after they changed the interface years ago I don't know where anything anymore.

Two words: (3, Interesting)

OldSport (2677879) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381587)

Fuck that.

I will use my current version of Office until it is absolutely and completely obsolete, and I will switch to something else before I buy into this "pay indefinitely for something" BS. Try increasing sales the old-fashioned way, by actually offering new and innovative products, instead of using this rent-a-program crap to leech off your customers.

Should be $50/year (1)

AmazinglySmooth (1668735) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381623)

I think the price is about 2x what they are currently charging... maybe 3x. They have 2003, 2007, 2010, and 2013. If I bought each one, then I'd be putting out about $100 every 3 years. I guess you get more users.

This just in... (3, Interesting)

roc97007 (608802) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381649)

Office 2000 still works. It'll even open docx files with this [microsoft.com].

I'm happy to use the more recent versions of Office, but it has to be on someone else's dime. (Like, my place of employment.) I bought 2000, it works, and they're gonna havta pry it from my cold dead hands (at least until I switch to something open source).

Why would a home user waste valuable income on a new version of Office? Are ribbons all that important for that letter to Aunt Edna?

Poor Reporting - Read TFA! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381671)

I know this is Slashdot, but could the editors have done a better job cherry-picking the article for the negative, riot-causing bits?

Standard (perpetual) licenses still exist, as a one-time purchase, so nothing is going away. The article doesn't say what the cost will be, but $130 for a home purchase (single user) isn't a bad deal. So you can get that, OR you can pay $100/year and get five machines covered.

The new pricing for businesses (especially small businesses) is great. Considering that if you pay the yearly fee you also get Exchange hosting and cloud sharing space.

Let's not also forget that Windows 8 RT (the tablet version) will come with Microsoft Office for free.

And if you don't like it, don't use it. But since when did we start complaining about choice?

Bright Business Future (2)

islisis (589694) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381677)

Expect to be followed up with a "Free to Type" and "Pay to Save" model shortly.

so... (4, Insightful)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381795)

Sadly I think this will actually work out for microsoft. This is the same sort of thing happened with MMOs. The thing is, you do something like this and drive away 2/3rds of your customers... so what if the remaining 1/3 is paying 10x the price for the same product. And what's going to happen here is people will get windows for "free" with their computer. They'll put all their files and such on it and then after 6 months or so... bam... can't access any of their important documents and the only way to get them back is pay microsoft $100.

Google Docs (3, Informative)

Teckla (630646) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381895)

Predictably, there are already lots of mentions of Libre Office.

I'm almost embarrassed to admit that Google Docs (free) meets my meager needs. You can even download copies of your documents, in several different formats, to store locally.

Highly recommended unless you have advanced needs.

Unspecified Updates (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381907)

Why would anyone pay in advance for unspecified updates from a company that has offered similar promises before but delivered poorly in the past? Windows Vista Ultimate Extras, anyone?

I moved away from MS after I decided the only incremental value of each new version was that it more conveniently packaged bug and security fixes for products I had already licensed.

Does anyone think this company will change its behavior in the near future?

BTW, any ideas why my relevant postings keep disappearing?

Thank you Microsoft! (3, Funny)

FlynnMP3 (33498) | about a year and a half ago | (#41381935)

Dear Microsoft,

Thank you for the generous time and money donation to "The Documentation Foundation"; home of LibreOffice. The extra incentive of more users having more time to devote to providing feedback to make LibreOffice better and more focused is certainly appreciated. However, in the future, perhaps consider a straight up money donation as this will be better for your business. After all, more competition is better for the consumer and if it weren't for the consumer, neither of us would be here.

For the future developers coming into the fold, there are plenty of User Interface improvements that are perfect for getting your feet wet with the project. We welcome you aboard!

Best Wishes,

LibreOffice Development Team

Remember Vista Ultimate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41381963)

the company says that subscribers will be given unspecified "updates" to add new features and capabilities over the life of their subscription.

Remind me how many extras were added to Vista Ultimate?

Poor poor Linux users (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41382063)

Poor poor Linux users. They don't get any of the subscription fee love. They get the full Libre Office package, with new versions updated every year, but they are forced to download the package for free (if they want it), complete with security patches, upgrades and all. They don't get the opportunity to pay on a monthly or weekly basis. They are forced to use the software at no change in perpetuity. Darn! Oh, and no one will kick their door down for giving copies to their friends, relatives, co-workers, the kid down the street, or (re)-posting it on the internet. Darn, Darn, Darn!

You guys aren't thinking about the big picture... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#41382083)

MS Office dominates any type of office-related application. At the end of the day, it's what the kids learn in school, and it's what lives at 90%+ of businesses in the field. Compared to their current atrocious costing on a "pay-to-own" piece of software that changes every 3 years, these prices are not terrible.

$100/year for 5 people utilizing a suite of Office that they will always have the latest software access to is not terrible for a family. A small business plan is what they've been lacking for years, and has kept companies like mine from being able to earn any kind of reasonable points on reselling something like software/hardware to my clients that they will buy no matter what.

I'm forced into being an M$ punter by profession, but that doesn't mean we don't come up with alternative solutions where viable (i.e. Linux for server OS, Apache for Web, etc). However, at the end of the day it's what the customer wants, and when 90% of the idiots they interact with are stuck in this solution, this only provides a helping hand to those of us that have struggled for so many years in their ridiculous "Parter Program".

They have made some great strides in the last couple years on providing services I can sell my clients, earn points on (albeit not many), and reduce the liability that I need to incur for small-medium size enterprises I support.

Cry as you will about subscription-based pricing, but it works. It will continue to do so.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...